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organ

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organ

organ Sentence Examples

  • The medics were talking about looking in his pockets for an organ donor card.

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  • I hate organ transplants.

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  • Considering the wide differences between the two groups in the size and external characters, and in the mode of life, including the mode of feeding, it is indeed surprising that in every important organ the two groups should show a fundamental morphological identity.

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  • For the support of the chorus the more powerful organ was necessary.

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  • Starting from the wellknown fact that the habitual use of a limb tends to develop the muscles of the limb, and to produce a greater and greater facility in using it, he made the general assumption that the effort of an animal to exert an organ in a given direction tends to develop the organ in that direction.

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  • On the 4th of June 1887 the official Vatican organ, the Osservatore Romano, published a letter written by Tosti to the pope conditionally retracting the views expressed in the pamphlet.

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  • When the organ was played for her in St. Bartholomew's, the whole building shook with the great pedal notes, but that does not altogether account for what she felt and enjoyed.

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  • The whole process is exactly analogous to the operation by which a violin string or organ pipe creates an air or sound wave.

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  • I stood in the middle of the church, where the vibrations from the great organ were strongest, and I felt the mighty waves of sound beat against me, as the great billows beat against a little ship at sea.

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  • Comparative anatomists have been learning to refrain from basing the diagnosis of a species, or the description of the condition of an organ, on the evidence of a single specimen.

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  • After the suspension of the Reflector in 1753, he edited in the New York Mercury the "Watch Tower" section (1754-1755), which became the recognized organ of the Presbyterian faction.

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  • The larger high-pitch organ will therefore be at a' 502.6.

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  • Strasburg was French territory in 1713, but Silbermann's organ is not quite a whole tone below.

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  • The Halberstadt organ, about which so much has been written, was, according to Praetorius (Syntagma musicum, Wolffenbi ttel, 1618), built in 1361, and repaired or rebuilt 1495.

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  • It is covered with numerous large papillae, and forms, like the trunk of the elephant, an admirable organ for the examination and prehension of food.

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  • basilica with a vaulted portico and a nave and two aisles begun in 1103, a mosaic pavement in the Cosmatesque style, a good ambo resting on columns and decorated with mosaics showing traces of Moorish influence, a Paschal candelabrum, and an organ gallery of similar style.

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  • In one passage he distinctly says the old organ high pitch had been a whole tone above his Cammerton, with which we shall find his tertia minore combines to make the required interval.

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  • In 1825 he bought and afterwards edited in Washington, D.C., The United States Telegraph, which soon became the principal organ of the Jackson men in opposition to the Adams administration.

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  • The vibration of the air as the organ notes swelled made her sway in answer.

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  • Schlick goes on to say the organ is to be suited to the choir and properly tuned for singing, that the singer may not be forced to sing too high or too low and the organist have to play chromatics, which is not handy for every one.

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  • What was remarkable in this organ was that it had one stop which was an equal minor third lower, a' 411.4'.

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  • My instinct tells me that my head is an organ for burrowing, as some creatures use their snout and fore paws, and with it I would mine and burrow my way through these hills.

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  • Ardently devoted to the service of humanity, he projected a scheme for a general concourse of all the savants in Europe, and started in London a paper, Journal du Lycee de Londres, which was to be the organ of their views.

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  • There are two orders, the Marsupialia and the Monotremata, which do not possess this organ; both these are found in Australia, to which region indeed they are not absolutely confined.

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  • Silbermann's great organ in Strasburg minster (1713-1716), the pitch of which, taken in 1880 and reduced to J9° Fahr.

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  • Ellis used this indication to have an organ pipe made which with one-sixteenth diameter and a wind-pressure of 34 in., at one-fourth Schlick's length, gave f' 301.6, from which he derived a just major third of a' 377, which would compare very well with an old Greek a'.

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  • The new hall (1876), the organ there, entirely his gift (1885), and the cricket ground (1889), remain as external monuments of the master's activity.

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  • In order to found a strong Conservative party he established a paper, the Vaterland, which was the organ of the Clerical and Federalist party.

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  • Smith, of Cambridge, in 1759, had the organ of Trinity College, built by Bernhardt Schmidt, lowered a whole tone, to reduce it to certain Roman pitch pipes made about 1720.

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  • The proprietors of Queen's Hall, London, did much for it when they undertook the alteration, at great expense, of their large concert organ, which had only just been erected.

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  • In 1837 he had founded the Zeitschrift fiir Philosophie as an organ of his views, more especially on the subject of the philosophy of religion, where he was in alliance with C. H.

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  • In this way the medusa sinks from an independent per sonality to an organ of the polyp-colony, becoming a so-called medusoid gonophore, or bearer of the reproductive organs, and losing gradually all organs necessary for an independent existence, namely those of sense, locomotion and nutrition.

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  • Huxley, therefore, considered a hydroid colony, for example, as a single individual, and each separate polyp or medusa budded from it as having the value of an organ and not of an individual.

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  • The Hampton Court organ of 1690 shows that Schmidt had further lowered his pitch a semitone, to a' 441 7.

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  • What is required, however, is something analogous to an organ pipe which produces a continuous sound.

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  • Further, two distinct types of otocyst can be recognized in the Hydro medusae; that of the Leptolinae, in which the entire organ is ectodermal, concrement-cells and all, and the organ is not a tentaculocyst; and that of the Trachylinae, in which the organ is a tentaculocyst, and the concrement-cells are endodermal, derived from the endoderm of the modified tentacle, while the rest of the organ is ectodermal.

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  • Bernhardt Schmidt, better known in England as Father Smith, was invited about 1660 to build the organ for the Chapel Royal, Whitehall; two years later he built the organ in Durham Cathedral a' 474.1, difference a whole tone, and practically agreeing with the Cammerton of Praetorius.

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  • Ellis quotes an organ at Lille, a' 374.2, but no other instance of the very low Schlick pitch is recorded, although trial of the French cathedral organs might perhaps result in the finding of examples.

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  • His determinations of pitch by a weighted wire are not trustworthy; Ellis thinks they are not safe within four or five vibrations per second, but gives a mean pitch for this organ, when altered, of a' 395.2.

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  • This is about a semitone below the Diapason Normal, and a just minor third lower than the St Jacobi organ in the same city (1688), measured by Herr Schmahl, a' 489.2.

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  • In the Orphic mysteries " the soul was regarded as a part of the divine, a particula aurae divinae, for which the body in its limited and perishable condition was no fit organ, but a grave or prison(ro a4 pa).

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  • The addition of the heart to the liver as an organ of the revelation of the divine will, reflects the stage which assigned to the heart the position once occupied by the liver.

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  • The slave, who struck a freeman or denied his master, lost an ear, the organ of hearing and symbol of obedience.

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  • The theory that the medusa is simply an organ, which has become detached and has acquired a certain degree of independence, like the well-known instance of the hectocotyle of the cuttle-fish.

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  • Accepting the law he distinguishes productive from permissive or transmissive function (p. 32), and, rejecting the view that brain produces thought, he recognizes that in our present condition brain transmits thought, thought needs brain for its organ of expression; but this does not exclude the possibility of a condition in which thought will be no longer so dependent on brain.

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  • So has the acrembolic pharynx of Chaetopods, if we consider the organ as terminating at that point where the jaws are placed and the oesophagus commences.

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  • Near this and less advanced into the branchial chamber is the single renal organ or nephridium r with its opening to the exterior r'.

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  • The heart c lying in the pericardium is seen in close proximity to the renal organ, and consists of a single auricle receiving blood from the gill, and of a single ventricle which pumps it through the body by an anterior and posterior aorta.

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  • This organ has, without reason, been supposed to represent the second ctenidium of the typical mollusc, which it cannot do on account of its position.

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  • Spengel showed that the parabranchia of Gastropods is the typical olfactory organ or osphradium in a highly developed condition.

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  • The minute structure of the epithelium which clothes it, as well as the origin of the nerve which is distributed to the parabranchia, proves it to be the same organ which is found universally in molluscs at the base of each gill-plume, and tests the indrawn current of water by the sense of ?,g smell.

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  • The nerve to this organ is given off from the superior (original right, see fig.

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  • dium or olfactory Yet in some Pectinibranchia (Paludina) organ).

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  • This organ is probably homologous with the byssogenous gland of Lamellibranchs.

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  • Cunningham that in Buccinum the egg-capsules are formed by this pedal gland and not by any accessory organ of the generative system.

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  • In the tribe of Pectinibranchia called Heteropoda the foot takes the form of a swimming organ.

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  • The odontophore also is remarkably developed, its lateral teeth being mobile, and it serves as an efficient organ for attacking the other pelagic forms on which the Heteropoda prey.

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  • q, Renal organ (nephridium).

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  • The Heteropoda are further remarkable for the high development of their cephalic eyes, and for the typical character of their osphradium (Spengel's olfactory organ).

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  • This is a groove, the edges of which are raised and ciliated, lying near the branchial plume in the genera which possess that organ, whilst in Firoloida, which has no branchial plume, the osphradium occupies a corresponding position.

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  • They have a well-developed proboscis which is used as a suctorial organ; some are abyssal, but the majority are either commensals or parasites of Echinoderms.

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  • In front, near the anterior attachment of the gill-plume, is the osphradium (olfactory organ) dis h covered by J.

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  • He was chief of the Socialist left, which then mustered sixty members, and edited until 1896 their organ in the press, La Petite Republique.

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  • As in all such introand e-versible organs, eversion of the Gastropod proboscis is effected by pressure communicated by the muscular body-wall to the liquid contents (blood) of the body-space, accompanied by the relaxation of the muscles which directly pull upon either the sides or the apex of the tubular organ.

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  • It contains a great organ dating from the 17th century.

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  • The special function of this organ has been a source of controversy during the past few years, and much uncertainty still exists as to its true nature.

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  • In the Florideae, Lichens and Laboulbenjaceae the, male cell is a non-motile spermatium, which is carried to the female organ.

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  • In some cases the region where the penetration of the male organ takes place is indicated on the oosphere by a hyaline receptive spot (Oedogonium, Vaucheria, &c.), or by a receptive papilla consisting of hyaline cytoplasm (Peronosporeae).

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  • The strongest direct evidence seems to be that the nuclear substances are the only parts of the cells which are always equivalent in quantity, and that in the higher plants and animals the male organ or spermatozoid is composed almost entirely of the nucleus, and that the male nucleus is carried into the female cell without a particle of cytoplasm.i Since, however, the nucleus of the female cell is always accompanied by a larger or smaller quantity of cytoplasm, and that in a large majority of the power plants and animals the male cell also contains cytoplasm, it cannot yet be definitely stated that the cytoplasm does not play some part in the process.

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  • The object of the phylogenetic study of any organ is to trace it back to its primitive form.

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  • Useful and suggestive as they often are, teratological facts played, at one time, too large a part in the framing of morphological theories; for it was thought that the monstrous form gave a clue to the essential nature of the organ assuming it.

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  • for regarding the monstrous form as necessarily primitive or ancestral, nor even as a stage in the ontogeny of the organ.

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  • However, it may still be useful in describing monstrosities, and perhaps also those cases in which an organ serves first one purpose and then another, as when a leafy shoot eventually becomes a thorn, or the base of a foliage-leaf becomes a bud-scale.

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  • But, in actual operation, these two processes are simultaneous; every member is developed as an organ for the performance of some special function.

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  • 12); highly specialized for flight, which, initiated and made possible mainly by the strong development of quill-feathers, has turned the wing into a unique organ.

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  • The latter is, in comparison with mammals, represented by its middle portion only, the vermis; in a sagittal section it shows an extremely well developed arbor vitae, produced by the transverse, repeated folding of the whole organ.

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  • The apex of the cochlea is turned towards, and almost reaches the anterior wall of the occipital condyle; at most it makes but half a twist or turn; it possesses both Reissner's membrane and the organ of Corti.

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  • The olfactory organ is poorly developed, and it is still a question whether birds possess much power of smell; many are certainly devoid of it.

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  • Jacobson's organ has been lost by the birds, apparently without a trace in the embryonic fowl, but T.

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  • The syrinx or lower larynx is the most interesting and absolutely avine modification, although absent as a voice-producing organ (probably due to retrogression) in most Ratitae, storks, turkey buzzards (Cathartes) and Steganopodes.

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  • The next chamber, the urodaeum, is small, and receives in its dorso-lateral wall the ureters and the genital ducts; above and below this chamber is closed by circular folds, the lower of which, towards the ventral side, passes into the coating of the copulatory organ when such is present.

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  • It lodges the copulatory organ, and on its dorsal wall lies the bursa Fabricii, an organ peculiar to birds.

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  • It occurs in two different forms. In the Ratitae, except Rhea, it consists mainly of a right and left united half (corpora fibrosa), with a deep longitudinal furrow on the dorsal side, and much resembles the same organ in crocodiles and tortoises.

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  • With copulatory organ.

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  • configuration of the palate, precoracoid, pelvis, intestinal convolutions, copulatory organ, &c. Loss of the keel is co-ordinated with the power of using the forelimbs for locomotion; although a " Ratite " character, it is not sufficient to turn a Notornis, Cnemiornis or Stringops, not even a Phororhacos into a member of the Ratitae.

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  • Meanwhile he had, in 1862, founded the Atheneium as the organ of Liberal Catholicism.

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  • He is an ardent royalist in politics, and was one of the group which in 1908 founded the royalist organ L' Action Francaise.

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  • Between them is situated, sometimes asymmetrically, the prominent intromittent organ.

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  • The root-feeding larvae of the cockchafer and allied members of the Scarabaeidae have a ridged area on the mandible, which is scraped by teeth on the maxillae, apparently forming a stridulating organ.

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  • 15f) the luminous region is at the hinder end, the organ emitting the light consisting, according to H.

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  • Dubois (1886), who considers that the luminosity is due to the influence of an enzyme in the cells of the organ upon a special substance in the blood.

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  • The Holy Synod (established in 1721) is the supreme organ of government of the Orthodox Church in Russia.

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  • It is this political rather than religious spirit which also underlies the repressive attitude of the government, and of the Orthodox Church as the organ of the government, towards the various dissident sects (Raskolniki, from raskol, schism), which for more than two centuries past have played an important part in the popular life of Russia, and, since the political developments of the end of the 19th and early years of the zoth century, have tended to do so more and more.

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  • On the whole, the best statistical source for this information is the annual computation published by the Archiv fiir Eisenbahnwesen, the official organ of the Prussian Ministry of Public Works; but the figure quoted above utilizes the Board of Trade returns for the United Kingdom and the report of the Interstate Commerce Commission for the United States.

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  • In 1839 Ward became the editor of the British Critic, the organ of the Tractarian party, and he excited suspicion among the adherents of the Tractarians themselves by his violent denunciations of the Church to which he still belonged.

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  • 1901) he once more became leader of the constitutional opposition, and in the autumn of the year founded a daily organ, Il Giornale d'Italia, the better to propagate moderate Liberal ideas.

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  • In many of those ants whose third abdominal segment forms a second " node," the basal dorsal region of the fourth segment is traversed by a large number of very fine transverse striations; over these the sharp hinder edge of the third segment can be scraped to and fro, and the result is a stridulating organ which gives rise to a note of very high pitch.

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  • These segments spring apparently from the top of the ovary - the real explanation, however, being that the end of the flower-stalk or "thalamus," as it grows, becomes dilated into a sort of cup or tube enclosing and indeed closely adhering to the ovary, so that the latter organ appears to be beneath the perianth instead of above it as in a lily, an appearance which has given origin to the term "inferior ovary."

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  • r, Olfactory organ.

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  • The whole organ, having, as is thought but not known, this double origin, is termed a nephromixium.

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  • Clitellum not present as a definite organ, as in Oligochaeta.

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  • They contrast with those of the Oligochaeta and Hirudinea by reason of their frequently close association with the gonads, the same organ sometimes serving the two functions of excretion and conveyance of the ova and spermatozoa out of the body.

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  • ap. Apical organ.

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  • It was characteristic of the closeness with which he watched current events, and of his zeal in the cause of "lucidity," that when the Reader, an organ of science and unpartisan opinion, fell into difficulties in 1865 Mill joined with some distinguished men of science and letters in an effort to keep it afloat.

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  • Close to this the small renal organ (i, mediad) and the larger renal organ (k, to the right and posteriorly) are seen, also the pericardium (1) and a coil of the intestine (int) embedded in the compact liver.

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  • It will be remembered that, according to Spengel, the osphradium of mollusca is definitely and intimately related to the gill-plume or ctenidium, being always placed near the base of that organ; further, Spengel has shown that the nerve-supply of this olfactory organ is always derived from the visceral loop. Accord ingly, the nerve-supply FIG.

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  • - A, Section in a plane vertical to the surface of the neck of Patella through a, the rudimentary ctenidium (Lankester's organ), and b, the olfactory epithelium (osphradium); c, the olfactory (osphradial) ganglion.

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  • Each renal organ is a sac lined with glandular epithelium (ciliated cell, with concretions) communicating with the exterior by its papilla, and by ce, Cerebral ganglia.

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  • time when the fact that the renal organ s,s', Nerves (right and of the Mollusca, as a rule, opens into the left) to the mantle.

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  • Large or external or right renal organ.

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  • Small or median renal organ.

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  • With regard to internal organization we may commence with the disposition of the renal organ (nephridium), the external opening of which has already been noted.

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  • The position of this opening and other features of the renal organ were determined by J.

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  • The kidney has similar relations in both species, and is identical with the organ spoken of by many authors as the triangular gland.

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  • To complete the account of the relations of the organ: the right anterior corner can be seen superficially in the wall of the mantlechamber above the gill.

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  • The osphradium (olfactory organ of Spengel).

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  • The typical character is retained by the heart, pericardium, and the communicating nephridium or renal organ in all Opisthobranchs.

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  • Spengel's observation of the osphradium and its nervesupply in these forms; the nerve to that organ, which is placed somewhat anteriorly - on the dorsal surface - being given off from the hinder part (visceral) of the right compound ganglion - the fellow to that marked A in fig.

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  • sp, Abdominal ganglion which represents also the supra-intestinal ganglion of Streptoneura and gives off the nerve to the osphradium (olfactory organ) o, and another to an unlettered socalled " genital " ganglion.

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  • e, Copulatory organ.

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  • Here we need only further draw attention to the osphradium, discovered by Lacaze-Duthiers, and shown by Spengel to agree in its innervation with that organ in all other Gastropoda.

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  • the nautiloid shell In Planorbis and in Auricula (Pulmonata, formed on the larva allied to Limnaeus) the olfactory organ is being cast, and a new on the left side and receives its nerve from shell of a different form the left visceral:ganglion.

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  • This paired organ consists of a string of cells which are perforated by a duct opening to the exterior and ending internally in a flame-cell.

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  • Lecaillon (1898) on various leaf beetles, tend to show that the organ " in the embryos of the lower Arthropoda corresponds with whole of the " mid-gut " arises from the proliferation of cells at the the region invaginated to form the serosa of the hexapod embryo.

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  • Two years later this was followed by a second contribution from him on the same subject, and of this only an extract appeared in the official organ of the Academy (ut supra, xvi.

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  • The probability of miracles depends on the conception we have of the free relation of God to nature, and of nature as the adequate organ for the fulfilment of God's purposes.

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  • - The organ most characteristic of a Nemertine is without doubt the proboscis.

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  • It adds a decisively aggressive character to an organ the original significance of which, as we have seen, was tactile.

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  • The proboscis, which is thus an eminently muscular organ, is composed of two or three, sometimes powerful, layers of muscles - one of longitudinal and one or two of circular fibres.

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  • No other intermediate stages have as yet been noticed between this arrangement and that of the Heteronemertini, in which a separate posterior brain-lobe receives a similar ciliated canal, and in which the oesophageal outgrowths have made their appearance and are coalesced with the nerve-tissue in the organ of the adult animal.

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  • As to the organ of touch, the great sensitiveness of the body has already been noticed, as well as the probable primary significance of the proboscis.

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  • The median dorsal vessel, however, remains distinct, but instead of continuing its course beneath the proboscidian sheath it is first enclosed by the ventral musculature of this organ, and still farther forwards it even bulges out longitudinally into the cavity of the sheath.

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  • In the female the ovary is a large unpaired organ from the anterior end of which arise two oviducts, and connected with the latter are a pair of large so-called copulatory pouches, which perhaps act as receptacula seminis.

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  • Under the editorship of a professor emeritus is published the Bibliotheca Sacra, a quarterly founded in 1843, and for many years the organ of the Andover Theological Seminary.

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  • From 1867 to 1893 Harris edited The Journal of Speculative Philosophy (22 vols.), which was the quarterly organ of the Philosophical Society founded in 1866.

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  • 1855), a prominent political leader, secretary of the interior in President Cleveland's cabinet in 1893-1896, and later governor of Georgia, was long the proprietor; and the Georgian (evening), founded in 1906 as a Prohibition organ.

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  • The 15th-century font, the pulpit (1570), the organ (1617), and the early Gothic Lady chapel containing a much venerated 13th-century image of the Virgin, which was annually carried in procession through the town, are all noticeable.

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  • A diagnosis covering all the Ratitae (struthio, rhea, casuarius, dromaeus, apteryx and the allied fossils dinornis and aepyornis) would be as follows - (i) terrestrial birds without keel to the sternum, absolutely flightless; (ii) quadrate bone with a single proximal articulating knob; (iii) coracoid and scapula fused together and forming an open angle; (iv) normally without a pygostyle; (v) with an incisura ischiadica; (vi) rhamphotheca compound; (vii) without apteria or bare spaces in the plumage; (viii) with a complete copulatory organ, moved by skeletal muscles.

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  • The Gazette is the official organ of the Kennel Club.

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  • Monthly organ, Teachers and Taught.

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  • Quarterly organ, Our Missions.

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  • The organ of the movement is One and All, published monthly.

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  • From this second conjunction emanated again the masculine potency Firmness (7) and the feminine potency Splendour (8), which constitute the divine legs of the archetypal man; and these sent forth Foundation (9), which is the genital organ and medium of union between them, thus yielding the third triad in the Sephiric decade.

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  • In that year he helped to found the Theologische Studien and Kritiken, the chief organ of the "mediation" theology (Vermittelungstheologie).

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  • The first, the Organ mountains, in Pinar del Rio, rises in a sandy, marshy region near Cape San Antonio.

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  • The Organ Mountains contain a hard blue limestone; and sandstones occur on the N.

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  • This district, including the finest land, is on the southern slope of the Organ Mountains between the Honda river and Mantua; bananas are cultivated with the tobacco.

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  • 1914, in his organ published at Geneva, " it is impossible, from the point of view of the international proletariat, to say which would be the lesser evil for Socialism, an Austro-German defeat or a Franco-Russo-English defeat.

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  • Strife then arose between the committee and the Liberal Union, a body which mainly represented the Christian electorate, and on the 5th of April Hassan Fehmi Effendi, who edited the Serbesti, the official organ of the union, was assassinated.

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  • He was one of those who made the Latin language into a great organ of literature.

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  • In his early manhood, while employed as an engineer, he became a convert to the theories of Saint Simon; these he ardently advocated in the Globe, the organ of the Saint Simonians, which he edited until his arrest in 1832 on a charge of outraging public morality by its publication.

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  • The proboscis is not the only organ of locomotion, being assisted by the succeeding segment of the body, the buccal segment or collar.

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  • On account of the presence and mode of origin (from the gut-wall) of this organ Bateson introduced the term hemichorda as a phyletic name for the class Enteropneusta.

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  • The chief differences are, that (a) the tongue-bar is the essential vm, organ of the gill-slit in Balanoglossus, and exceeds FIG.

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  • From serving primitively as the essential organ of the cleft the tongue-bar may have undergone reduction and modification, becoming a secondary bar in Amphioxus, subordinate to the primary bars in size, vascularity and development; finally, in the craniate vertebrates it would then have completed its involution, the suggestion having been made that the tongue-bars are represented by the thymusprimordia.

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  • Two pairs of muscles, apparently connected with the peduncle and its limited movements, have been minutely described by Hancock as having one of their extremities attached to this organ.

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  • The cathedral contains some fine stained glass, the largest organ in Germany (1856), and a number of interesting old paintings and carvings by Jorg Syrlin the elder, Jorg Syrlin the younger, Burkhard Engelberger, and other masters of the Swabian school.

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  • high, and contains a particularly fine organ.

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  • Zoologists are familiar with many instances (fishes, crustaceans) in which the protective walls of a water-breathing organ or gill-apparatus become converted into an air-breathing organ or lung, but there is no other case known of the conversion of gill processes themselves into air-breathing plates.

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  • In non-aquatic life such an unprotected organ cannot subserve respiration.

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  • Thus an organ newly discovered in Scorpio was found to have its counterpart in Limulus.

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  • Further, it is pointed out by Korschelt and Heider that the hinder portion of the gut frequently acts in Arthropoda as an organ of nitrogenous excretion in the absence of any special excretory tubules, and that the production of such caeca from its surface in separate lines of descent does not involve any elaborate or unlikely process of growth.

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  • Ancestral simplicity is more uniform, and does not co-exist with specialization and elaboration of a single organ.

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  • Intromittent organ of male beneath the genital operculum (=sternum of the 1st somite of opisthosoma).

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  • Intromittent organ of male in the apical segment of the 2nd prosomatic appendage.

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  • suctorial) organ, and no claws at the tip; their basal segments united in the middle line and furnished with sterno-coxal process.

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  • Intromittent organ of male lodged on the dorsal side of the 1st pair of prosomatic appendages.) Families - Hexisopodidae (Hexisopus).

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  • Intromittent organ of male beneath sternum of the 1st somite of the opisthosoma.

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  • Intromittent organ of male placed at the distal end of the appendage of the 5th pair.

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  • Intromittent organ of male lying within the genital orifice.

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  • ascophorous, producing asci; ascospore, the spore (or sporule) developed in the ascus; ascogonium, the organ producing it, &c.

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  • Its culminating point is in the Organ Mountains (Serra dos Orgaos), near Rio de Janeiro, which reaches an elevation of 7323 ft.

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  • Having worked first as a mason and then as a compositor, he joined P. Dubois in the foundation of Le Globe which became in 1831 the official organ of the Saint-Simonian community, of which he became a prominent member.

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  • In the past the Edinburgh Evening Courant, the chief organ of the Tory party, of which James Hannay was editor for a few years, had a high reputation.

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  • In 1833 he went to Paris, and started L'Univers religieux, which afterwards became Louis Veuillot's ultramontane organ.

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  • The Kaffirs have their own organ, Ipipa lo Hlunga (the paper of grievances), issued at Maritzburg, and the Asiatics, Indian Opinion, a weekly paper started in 1903 and printed in English, Gujarati, Hindi and Tamil.

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  • The journal was at first published in Czech and German, and the Czech edition survived to become the most important literary organ of Bohemia.

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  • UTeµaxos from UT6pa, a mouth), the bag-like digestive organ which in man is situated in the upper left part of the abdomen.

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  • During the spring of 1915 the official organ at Sarajevo published list after list of Bosnian-Serb families who were thus declared to have forfeited their citizenship: and many thousands of women and children were driven across the Montenegrin frontier, often with only the clothes in which they stood.

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  • According to that theory, every organ, every part, colour and peculiarity of an organism, must either be of benefit to that organism itself or have been so to its ancestors: no peculiarity of structure or general conformation, no habit or instinct in any organism, can be supposed to exist for the benefit or amusement of another organism, not even for the delectation of man himself.

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  • Homologous structures were such as, though greatly differing in appearance and detail from one another, and though performing widely different functions, yet were capable of being shown by adequate study of a series of intermediate forms to be derived from one and the same part or organ of the " plan-form " or " archetype."

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  • Contemporaneous with these were various schemes of classification which were based, not on a consideration of the entire structure of each animal, but on the variations of a single organ, or on the really non-significant fact of the structure of the egg.

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  • Thus the occurrence of blind animals in caves and in the deep sea was a fact which Darwin himself regarded as best explained by the atrophy of the organ of vision in successive generations through the absence of light and 1 Weismann, Vererbung, &c. (1886).

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  • It was first used in France, for the organ, in 1835; in England, for the pianoforte in 1846 and for the organ in 1854.

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  • 21 - the my will be that part of the orchestra which played the melody to be sung, virtually corresponding, mutatis mutandis, to what we now call the choir organ, and we need not complicate the compilation of the Psalter by postulating an altogether unnecessary " Director's Psalter."

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  • The "khen," or mouth organ, which is universal among them, is the sweetest-toned of eastern instruments.

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  • List of authentic works of Jean Goujon: Two marble columns supporting the organ of the church of St Maclou (Rouen) on right and left of porch on entering; left-hand gate of the church of St Maclou; bas-reliefs for decoration of screen of St Germain l'Auxerrois (now in Louvre); "Victory" over chimney-piece of Salle des Gardes at Ecouen; altar at Chantilly; illustrations for Jean Martin's translation of Vitruvius; bas-reliefs and sculptural decoration of Fontaine des Innocents; bas-reliefs adorning entrance of Hotel Carnavalet, also series of satyrs' heads on keystones of arcade of courtyard; fountain of Diana from Anet (now in Louvre); internal decoration of chapel at Anet; portico of Anet (now in courtyard of Ecole des Beaux Arts); bust of Diane de Poictiers (now at Versailles); Tribune of Caryatides in the Louvre; decoration of "Escalier Henri II.," Louvre; eeils de beeuf and decoration of Henri II.

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  • Disease we may define, accordingly, as any departure from the normal standard of structure or function of a tissue or organ.

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  • If, for instance, we find that instead of the natural number of Malpighian bodies in the kidney there are only half that number, then we are entitled to say that this defect represents disease of structure; and if we find that the organ is excreting a new substance, such as albumen, we can affirm logically that its function is abnormal.

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  • The difficulty, however, is more apparent than real, and in this sense, that if we start with a diseased organ as our subject of inquiry, we can quite properly, and without committing a solecism, treat of the functions of that organ in terms of its diseased state.

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  • Should the portion of tissue deprived of its circulation be contained in an internal organ, as is so often the case where the obstruction in the artery is due to embolism, it becomes converted into what is known as an " infarction."

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  • The effect of overwork upon an organ or tissue varies in accordance with (a) the particular organ or tissue concerned, (b) the amount of nourishment conveyed to it, and (c) the power of assimilation possessed by its cells.

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  • Mere enlargement of an organ does not imply that it is in a state of hypertrophy, for some of the largest organs met with in morbid anatomy are in a condition of extreme atrophy.

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  • Should there be much loss of tissue of an organ, the cells of the remaining part will enlarge and undergo an active proliferation (hyperplasia) so that it may be made up to the original amount.

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  • The particles in this case set up a form of fibrosis of the lung, which, either of itself or by rendering the organ liable to tubercular infection, is extremely fatal.

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  • Where a chronic inflammatory process has taken possession of an organ, or, let us say, has been located in periosteum or other fibrous part, there is a great tendency to the production of cicatricial fibrous tissue in mass.

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  • Its main principles were that it was useless to consider the causes of a disease, or even the organ affected by the disease, and that it was sufficient to know what was common to all diseases, viz.

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  • Treatment of disease was directed not to any special organ, nor to producing the crises and critical discharges of the Hippocratic school, but to correcting the morbid common condition or "community," relaxing the body if it was constricted, causing contraction if it was too lax, and in the "mixed state" acting according to the predominant condition.

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  • The Hippocratic and also Galenic rule, to let blood from, or near to, the diseased organ, was revived by Pierre Brissot (1470-1522), a professor in the university of Paris.

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  • In diabetes this organ seems to play a part which is not yet precisely determined; and one fell disease at least has been traced to a violent access of inflammation of this organ, caused perhaps by entry of foreign matters into its duct.

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  • The Argus, founded in 1813 by Jesse Buel (1778-1839) and edited from 1824 to 1854 by Edwin Croswell (1797-1871), was long the organ of the coterie of New York politicians known as the "Albany Regency," and was one of the most influential Democratic papers in the United States.

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  • The Evening Journal, founded in 1830 as an anti-Masonic organ, and for thirty-five years edited by Thurlow Weed, was equally influential as an organ of the Whig and later of the Republican party.

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  • After the revolution she edited in conjunction with Karl Liebknecht the Rote Fahne, the organ of the Spartacist or Communist advocates of violent revolutionary methods.

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  • With few exceptions they are composed (i) of a minute organ of fixation (the scolex), which marks the proximal attached end of the body; (2) of a narrow neck from which (3) a number of segments varying from three to several thousands are budded off distally.

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  • The body, or " strobila," consists of a usually minute organ of attachment (scolex or its representative) which is imbedded in the intestinal membrane, and of a series of segments that arise from the base of the scolex and increase in size distally.

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  • A peculiar modification of this type of scolex occurs in the Echinobothridae, in which the axial part of the organ (the rostellum) is elongated and provided with several rows of hooks, whilst the phyllidia have partially fused.

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  • But whilst in Trematoda a digestive sac is invariably present except in the sporocyst larval stage, the Cestodes possess no trace of this organ at any stage of their development.

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  • Those Cestodes which possess no very distinct organ of attachment (such, for example, as Gyrocotyle) have no distinct ganglionic thickening more pronounced at one end of the body than at the other; and as these are forms which have retained more primitive features than the rest, and show closer affinity to the Trematodes, it seems highly probable that the complicated nervous thickening found in the scolex, and often compared with the " brain " of other Platyelmia, is a structure sui generis developed within the limits of the sub-class.

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  • (From Lankester's Treatise on Zoology, part iv.) purposes inside the cyst, which is itself an organ comparable to an amnion.

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  • On the other hand, the gild merchant was certainly an official organ or department of the borough administration, and it exerted considerable influence upon the economic and corporative growth of the English municipalities.

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  • The sense-organs are highly developed; the wing-membranes are exceedingly sensitive; the nose-leaf is also an organ of perception, and the external ear is specially modified to receive soundwaves.

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  • Its chief and almost only organ, for kingdom and barony alike, was the curia - a court formed of the vassals.

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  • An embargo on trade with Flanders, voted in 1358 by a general assembly, resulted by 1360 in the full restoration of German privileges in Flanders, but reduced the counter at Bruges to an executive organ of a united town policy.

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  • From 1826 to 1837 he edited the Hartford Times, making it the official organ of the Jacksonian Democracy in southern New England.

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  • Their structure has undergone little degeneration in connexion with this habit, and may be compared organ for organ with that of the Planarians.

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  • Thus in the recently discovered arctic genus Prosorhynchus the muscular and glandular extremity is protrusible, but in the allied Gasterostomum this organ is represented by a sucker with fimbriated or tentacular margins.

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  • The large posterior organ of attachment is usually wheel-shaped and provided with hooks; but the ridges may become separated 'FIG.

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  • When young it is found in the intestine, but becomes mature in "Keber's organ" and the pericardium.

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  • The testis is a single compact organ.

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  • In addition to these suckers the sides of the anterior region may become infolded and give rise to an accessory adhesive organ (Holostomidae).

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  • - Zooecia prismatic or cylindrical, with terminal, typically circular orifice, not protected by any special organ.

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  • In some Gymnolaemata, polypides which develop an ovary possess a flask-shaped "intertentacular organ," situated between two of the tentacles, and affording a direct passage into the introvert for the eggs or even the spermatozoa developed in the same zooecium.

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  • It is terminated by a well-developed structure (fg) corresponding with the apical sense-organ of ordinary Trochospheres, and an excretory organ (nph) of the type familiar in these larvae occurs on the ventral side of the stomach.

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  • The principal differences are the complication of the ciliated band, the absence of the excretory organ, the great lateral compression of the body, the possession of a pair of shells protecting the sides, the presence of an organ known as the "pyriform organ," and the occurrence of a sucker in a position corresponding with the depression seen between (m) and (a) in fig.

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  • The alimentary canal, which may be represented by a vestigial structure, is accordingly not functional, and the larva does not become pelagic. A pyriform organ is present in most Gymnolaemata as well as the sucker by which fixation is effected.

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  • nph, Excretory organ.

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  • The whole apparatus is so exactly analogous in structure to the poison-gland and tooth of a venomous snake as to suggest a similar function, and there is now evidence that it employs this organ as an offensive weapon.

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  • In all tsetse-flies the proboscis in the living insect is entirely concealed by the palpi, which are grooved in their inner sides and form a closely fitting sheath for the piercing organ; the base of the proboscis is expanded beneath into a large onion-shaped bulb, which is filled with muscles.

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  • The tip of the proboscis is armed with a complicated series of chitinous teeth and rasps, by means of which the fly is enabled to pierce the skin of its victim; as usual in Diptera the organ is closed on the upper side by the labrum, or upper lip, and contains the hypopharynx or common outlet of the paired salivary glands, which are situated in the abdomen.

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  • On his advice Hugh Miller was appointed editor of the Witness, the powerful Free Church organ.

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  • He regarded this as the art of the eye, while sculpture was rather the art of the organ of touch.

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  • In the interior there is a fine organ and a quantity of statuary, and the vaults contain the remains of Philip the Bold, duke of Burgundy, and Anne of Burgundy, daughter of John the Fearless.

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  • Maxse, is alone in taking editorially a pronounced party line in politics as a Conservative organ.

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  • Ticknor, Everett and Bigelow were among the members, and were contributors to the organ of the club, the monthly Anthology and Boston Review (1803-1811), the forerunner of the North American Review.

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  • TheDial(1840-1844), Boston, the organ of the transcendentalists, was first edited by Margaret Fuller, and subsequently by R.

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  • The first, treating of agriculture and domestic economy, was the Journal economique (1751-1772); a Journal de commerce was founded in 1759; periodical biography may be first seen in the Necrologe des hommes celebres de France (1764-1782); the political economists established the Ephemerides du citoyen in 1765; the first Journal d'education was founded in 1768, and the Courrier de la mode in the same year; the theatre had its first organ in the Journal des theatres (1770); in the same year were produced a Journal de musique and the Encyclopedia militaire; the sister service was supplied with a Journal de marine in 1778.

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  • Of the same class was the Bibliotheque historique (1818-1820), another anti-royalist organ.

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  • The Revue contemporaine (1852), founded by the comte de Belval as a royalist organ, had joined to it in 1856 the Athenaeum francais.

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  • The Civilta cattolica (1850), fortnightly, is still the organ of the Jesuits.

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  • The Nuova antologia (1866) soon acquired a well-deserved reputation as a high-class review and magazine; its rival, the Rivista europea, being the special organ of the Florentine men of letters.

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  • The Archivio trentino (1882) was the organ of " Italia Irredenta."

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  • Bibliography: Rivista delle biblioteche e degli archivi (1888), published monthly at Rome and Florence, the official organ of librarians and archivists; Giornale della libreria della tipografia (1888), supplement to the Bibliografia italiana; Bollettino di bibliografia e storia delle scienze matematiche (1898); La Bibliofilia (1899), Florence, monthly; Raccolta Vinciana (1904).

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  • The Revue catholique, the organ of the professors of the university of Louvain, began in 1846 a controversy with the Journal historique et litteraire of Kersten (1834) upon the origin of human knowledge, which lasted for many years and excited great attention.

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  • Philosophy and ecclesiastical history: Revue neo-scholastique publiee par la societe philosophique de Louvain (1894); Revue d'histoire ecclesiastique (1900), the organ of the Catholic university of Louvain; Revue benedictine (1884); Analectes pour servir 'a l'histoire ecclesiastique de la Belgique, 2 e serie (1881-1904) and 3 e seri.e 1905); with an Annexe for Cartularies.

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  • Of those founded in the 19th century may be mentioned the Recensent (1803), and Nieuwe Recensent; the Nederlandsch Museum (1835); the Tijdstroom (1857); the Tijdspiegel, a literary journal of Protestant tendency; the Theologisch Tijdschrift (1867), the organ of the Leiden school of theology; and the Dietsche Warande, a Roman Catholic review devoted to the national antiquities.

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  • That poetry in its most elevated form aimed at being the organ of the new empire and of realizing the national ideals of life and character under its auspices; and in carrying out this aim it sought to recall the great memories of the past.

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  • It became also the organ of the pleasures and interests of private life, the chief motives of which were the love of nature and the passion of love.

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  • The Latin hexameter, which in Ennius and Lucretius was the organ of the more dignified and majestic emotions, became in his hands the most perfect measure in which the softer and more luxurious sentiment of nature has been expressed.

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  • Hallam's earliest literary work was undertaken in connexion with the great organ of the Whig party, the Edinburgh Review, where his review of Scott's Dryden attracted much notice.

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  • In the different families of the Hymenoptera, there are various modifications of the ovipositor, in accord with the habits of the insects and the purposes to which the organ is put.

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  • Linnaeus divided the Hymenoptera into two sections - the Terebrantia, whose females possess a cutting or piercing ovipositor, and the Aculeata, in which the female organ is modified into a sting.

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  • The " tongue," for example, is short and obtuse or emarginate in Colletes and Prosopis, while in all other bees it is pointed at the tip. But in Andrena and its allies it is comparatively short, while in the higher genera, such as A pis and Bombus, it is elongate and flexible, forming a most elaborate and perfect organ for taking liquid food.

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  • But the wings vary considerably in different families, and the most distinctive feature is the structure of the jaws, which form a beaklike organ with stylets adapted for piercing and sucking.

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  • b, c) with a deep groove on its anterior face; this organ is formed by the second pair of maxillae and corresponds therefore to the labium or " lower lip " of biting insects.

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  • This latter organ injects a secretion into the plant or After Marlatt, Bull.

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  • The church contains a richly carved pulpit, the work of Adam Straes van Weilborch about 1620, and there is besides some good carving and a fine organ (1721).

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  • When Francis died little had been done, in spite of the government's cruelty, to check Protestantism, while a potent organ of evangelical propaganda had been developing just beyond the confines of France in the town of Geneva.

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  • The extensible tongue, though practically serving the same end in both groups, is essentially different in its quasi-tubular structure, and there is also considerable difference between this organ in the Nectariniidae and the Meliphagidae.

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  • These poets aided also in developing that capacity which the Roman language subsequently displayed of being an organ of oratory, history and moral disquisition.

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  • He favoured the use of the organ and of prayers in the vernacular, and was instrumental in founding schools on modern lines.

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  • His newspaper purchases included the Deutsche Allgemeine Zeitung in Berlin, formerly the organ of Bismarck and then of all succeeding German Governments, the Miinchener Neueste Nachrichten and the Munchen-Augsburger Zeitung, the last-named being one of the oldest newspapers in Germany.

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  • The church organ was long considered the largest and finest in existence.

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  • From references which can be gathered from patristic writings it is abundantly evident that the belief in the mystical meaning of marks on the "organ of organs" was a part of the popular philosophy of their times.

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  • The pandean pipes continued in favour with the rustic populations of the West long after the organ evolved from it had eclipsed this humble prototype.

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  • The first newspaper of New York, the New York Gazette, was established in 1725 by William Bradford as a semiofficial organ of the administration.

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  • In 1733 a popular organ, the New York Weekly Journal, was established under John Peter Zenger (1697-1746), and in 1735 both the freedom of the press and a great advance toward the independence of the judiciary were the outcome of a famous libel suit against Zenger.

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  • Thus Philo had, in his life of Moses, allegorized the Pentateuchal narratives so as to represent him as mediator, saviour, intercessor of his people, the one great organ of revelation, and the soul's guide from the false lower world into the upper true one.

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  • SOUND, 1 subjectively the sense impression of the organ of 1 " Sound " is an interesting example of the numerous homonymous words in the English language.

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  • Experiments, referred to later, have been made to find the amplituae of swing of the air particles in organ pipes.

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  • A " stopped pipe " in an organ is a pipe of this type, and both the fundamental and the overtones may occur simultaneously when it is blown.

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  • An open " flue " organ pipe is of this type.

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  • 30) maintains the vibration in a way to be discussed later, and the opening 0 makes the lower end a loop. The modes of vibration in an open organ pipe may be exhibited by means of Koenig's manometric flames (Phil.

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  • Determinations of the pressure changes, or extent of excursion of the air, in sounding organ pipes have been made by A.

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  • Such bars are used in musical boxes and as free reeds in organ pipes.

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  • If two organ pipes in unison are mounted side by side on a windchest with their ends close together, and are blown for a very short time, they sound.

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  • Of the powerful literary executive which gathered about Counts Porro and Confalonieri, Pellico was the able secretary - the management of the Conciliatore, which appeared in 1818 as the organ of the association, resting largely upon him.

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  • They still had a Bank Note Reporter to print, and soon got the printing of a tri-weekly paper, the Constitutionalist, the organ of some lottery dealers.

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  • By many writers sovereignty is regarded as resident not in any one organ, but in the Gesammtperson of the community (Maitland, Political Theories of the Middle Ages, xliii.).

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  • A group of these columns, from their arrangement, have been fancifully named the "Giant's Organ."

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  • Under the Empire the ecumenical council had been looked upon as the highest representative organ of the Catholic Church; but the earlier centuries of the middle ages witnessed the convocation of no ecumenical councils.

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  • General councils were now once more called to mind; but these were no longer conceived as mere advisory councils to the pope, but as the highest representative organ of the universal Church, and as such ranking above the pope, and competent to demand obedience even from him.

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  • The Senate was intended to play the part of an organ of supervision, so as to act as a preventive of too hasty or too loosely drawn-up legislation.

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  • This Communist party established its own organ, the " Rude' Prdivo " (The Red Rights), in opposition to the " Pravo Lidu" (The Rights of the People), the organ of the Social Democratic party.

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  • The National Democrats (Liberals), whose organ was the " Narodni Listy," numbered twenty-nine.

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  • Thus the "imbecility" of reason becomes their warrant for the reception by another organ - i.e.

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  • The great organ in the music hall was dedicated at the third of the May festivals in 1878.

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  • England by the Hellenic Society, founded in 1879, with its organ the Journal of Hellenic Studies.

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  • Many species have a special glandular organ at the back of the head, which Sida crystalline uses for attaching itself to various objects.

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  • Considering the imprisonment of the ostracod body within the valves, it is more surprising that the Asteropidae and Cypridinidae should have a pair of compound and sometimes large eyes, in addition to the e median organ at the base of I the " frontal tentacle," than 6 that other members of the group should be limited to P that median organ of sight, or have no eyes at all.

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  • As might be expected, in thickened and highly embossed valves thin spaces occur over the visual organ.

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  • The frontal organ varies in form and apparently in function, and is sometimes absent.

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  • The mandibles are normally five-jointed, with remnants of an outer branch on the second joint, the biting edge varying from strong development to evanescence, the terminal joints or " palp " giving the organ a leg-like appearance and function, which disappears in suctorial genera such as Paracytherois.

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  • The furca is, as a rule, a powerful motor organ, and has its laminae edged with strong teeth (ungues) or setae or both.

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  • V.0, Vermiform organ.

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  • - First segment of hind-body footless, bearing the orifices of the genital organs (in the male unsymmetrically placed); last foot of the fore-body in the male a copulatory organ; neither, or only one, of the first pair of antennae in the male geniculating; cephalic limbs abundantly articulated and provided with many plumose setae; heart generally present.

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  • Here the males have one or the other of the first pair of antennae modified into a grasping organ for holding the female.

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  • - The first segment of the hind-body almost always with rudimentary pair of feet; orifices of the genital organs (symmetrically placed in both sexes) in the following segment; neither the last foot of the fore-body nor the rudimentary feet just mentioned acting as a copulatory organ in the male; both or neither of the first pair of antennae in the male geniculating; cephalic limbs less abundantly articulated and with fewer plumose setae or none, but with hooks and clasping setae.

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  • The posterior end of the organ is positive, the anterior negative, and the current, passes from the tail to the head.

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  • Space forbids any attempt to sketch here the special growth of criticism in other countries, such as France, where the brilliant genius of Renan was in part devoted to the Old Testament, or within the Roman Catholic Church, which possesses in Pere Lagrange, for example, a deservedly influential critical scholar, and in the Revue Biblique an organ which devotes much attention to the critical study of the Old Testament.

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  • It constituted itself the accredited organ of moderate Whig public opinion.

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  • But in any case the Greek language hardly offered another word for an organ of revelation so colourless as arp04, rns, while the condition of etymology among the ancients made it possible to interpret it as having a special reference to prediction (so Eusebius, Dem.

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  • they were, in however imperfect a way, an organ of national religious feeling, and could move forward with the movement of national life.

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  • 5), and by-and-by it comes to be clearly understood that the prophets are the appointed organ of Yahweh's communications with His people or His king.

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  • Origin from Primitive or Stem Forms. - As already observed, the same principles apply to groups of animals as to organs and groups of organs; an organ originates in a primitive and unspecialized stage, a group of animals originates in a primitive or stem form.

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  • It should be borne in mind, first, that wherever a new animal suddenly appears or a new character suddenly arises in a fossil horizon we must consider whether such appearance may be due to the non-discovery of transitional links with older forms, or to the sudden invasion of a new type or new organ which has gradually evolved elsewhere.

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  • From 1912 to 1914 she edited the Common Cause, the organ of the union.

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  • The apical end of the rotifer usually narrows suddenly beyond the curve of the gut and the cloacal aperture to form the foot of pseudopodium which ends in an organ of attachment, a pair of movable toes, each with the opening of a cement-gland (gl) at its tip. Thus for orientation we place the rotifer like the cuttle-fish, head downwards: the ciliated disk is basal or oral, proximal to the rest of the animal, the foot is apical, and the brain and cloacal aperture are anterodorsal.

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  • The current formed by the trochus is a gigantic vortex-ring, the down stroke of the cilia being directly outwards, brit the wave beats running round the organ in uniform succession in one direc tion.

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  • We may note that it was long since shown that the apical organ (at first assumed to be the brain) of these larvae was innervated from an anterior thickening of the circular nerve ring, corresponding with the brain of Rotifers; the nerve cells immediately below the pit are the ordinary bipolar From H.

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  • He edited at different times Les Droits de l'homme, Le Cri du peuple, Le Socialiste, but his best-known organ was the weekly Egalite.

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  • He wrote many articles, however, in the gazette Nepbardtja, an organ of the Magyar government, and served in the field as a national guard for eight or ten weeks.

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  • Bishop Strachan devoted the latter years of his long life entirely to his episcopal duties, and by introducing the diocesan synod he furnished the Episcopal Church in Canada with a more democratic organ of government.

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  • But this change was not permanent as the more liberal system prevails in the Ciceronian period The comitia tributa was in the later Republic the usual organ for laws passed by the whole people.

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  • In 1848 he left the Whig party and became one of the chief leaders of the Free Soil party, serving as presiding officer of that party's national convention in 1852, acting as chairman of the Free Soil national committee and editing from 1848 to 1851 the Boston Republican, which he made the chief Free Soil organ.

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  • There has been, in point of fact, no permanent shifting of weight or strength from any one organ of government to any other.

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  • Le Defricheur was an organ of extreme French sentiment, opposed to confederation, and also under ecclesiastical censure.

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  • Although the liver is a fairly solid organ, it is plastic, and moulds itself to even hollow neighbouring viscera rather than they to it.

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  • In fishes and amphibians the organ consists of right and left lobes, and a gall-bladder is present.

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  • It will be seen that the umbilical fissure (u) divides the organ into right and left halves, as in the lower vertebrates, but that the ventral part of each half is divided into a central and lateral lobe.

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  • The foot is commonly a simple cylindrical or ploughshare-shaped organ, used for boring in sand and mud, and more rarely presents a crawling disk similar to that of Gastropoda; in some forms it is aborted.

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  • The paired ctenidia are very greatly developed right and left of the elongated body, and form the most prominent organ of the group. Their function is chiefly not respiratory but nutritive, since it is by the currents produced by their ciliated surface that food-particles are brought to the feebly-developed mouth and buccal cavity.

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  • The chief points in which they vary are - (1) in the structure of the ctenidia or branchial plates; (2) in the presence of one or of two chief muscles, the fibres of which run across the animal's body from one valve of the shell to the other (adductors); (3) in the greater or less elaboration of the posterior portion of the mantle-skirt so as to form a pair of tubes, by one of which water is introduced into the sub-pallial chamber, whilst by the other it is expelled; (4) in the perfect or deficient symmetry of the two valves of the shell and the connected soft parts, as compared with one another; (5) in the development of the foot as a disk-like crawling organ (Arca, Nucula, Pectunculus, Trigonia, Lepton, Galeomma), as a simple plough-like or tongueshaped organ (Unionidae, &c.), as a re-curved saltatory organ (Cardium, &c.), as a long burrowing cylinder (Solenidae, &c.), or its partial (Mytilacea) or even complete abortion (Ostraeacea).

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  • A pair of genital apertures, connected by genital ducts with the paired gonads, are found right and left near the nephridial pores, except in a few cases where the genital duct joins that of the renal organ (Spondylus).

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  • x, Aperture of the left organ of Bojanus (nephridium) exposed by cutting the attachment of the inner lamella of the inner gillplate.

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  • The left inner gill-plate is also snipped to show the subjacent orifices of the left renal organ x, and of the genital gland (testis or ovary) y.

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  • The foot thus exposed in Anodonta is a simple muscular tongue-like organ.

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  • The blood makes its way by large veins to a venous sinus which lies in the middle line below the heart, having the paired renal organs (nephridia) placed between it and that organ.

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  • In Unionidae and several other forms the pericardial glands are extended into diverti cula of the pericardium which penetrate the mantle and constitute the organ of Heber.

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  • B, Organ of Bojanus.

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  • Finally, in the spirit of Plato's Phaedo and the dialogue Eudemus, the Protrepticus holds that the soul is bound to the sentient members of the body as prisoners in Etruria are bound face to face with corpses; whereas the later view of the De Anima is that the soul is the vital principle of the body and the body the necessary organ of the soul.

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  • Still a man is not the only organism; and every organism has a soul, whose immediate organ is the spirit (7rvEwµa), a body which - analogous to a body diviner than the four so-called elements, namely the aether, the element of the stars - gives to the organism its nonterrestrial vital heat, whether it be a plant or an animal.

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  • Now, though only one of the powers of the soul, intellect alone of these powers has no bodily organ; it alone is immortal: it alone is divine.

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  • Intelligence does not differ from sense by having no bodily organ, but the nervous system is the bodily organ of both.

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  • Near the ovary the tubes are closed, but nearer the Fal lopian tube they open into another tube which is nearly at right angles to them, and which runs toward the uterus, though in the human subject is generally lost before reaching that organ.

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  • Nearer the uterus than the ep08phoron a few scattered tubules are occasionally found which are looked upon as the homologue of the organ of Giraldbs in the male, and are known as the paroophoron.

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  • Organ of Giraldes.

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  • This at first is an important excretory organ, but during development becomes used for other purposes.

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  • A little above the globus major a few scattered tubules are found in children in front of the cord; these form the rudimentary structure known as the organ of Giraldes or paradidymis.

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  • The penis is the intromittent organ of generation, and is made up of three cylinders of erectile tissue, covered by skin and subcutaneous tissue without fat.

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  • The ovary is an organ which in shape and size somewhat resembles a large almond, though its appearance varies considerably in different individuals, and at different times of life.

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  • 3 In the Psalms the ideal aspect of the kingship, its religious importance as the expression and organ of Yahweh's sovereignty, is prominent.

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  • The foot is usually the pnly organ of locomotion.

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  • Most remarkable is its resemblance to the adult form of the Wheel animalcules, or Rotifera, which retain the prae-oral ciliated band as their chief organ of locomotion and prehension throughout life.

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  • As in the Rotifera, it serves the veliger larva as an organ of locomotion.

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  • The stomach varies in form from the simple oval bag of the squirrels to the complex ruminant like organ of the lemmings.

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  • It contains a fine organ by Silbermann and pictures by Raphael Mengs and other artists, the outside being adorned with 59 statues by Mattielli.

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  • The French, who naturally looked to German methods for inspiration, have come to apply them more particularly in the development of their cavalry and artillery, especially in that of the former, which has taken in the French army an ever higher place as its observing and thinking organ.

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  • This organ is generally single but sometimes paired and occasionally multiple.

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  • He holds indeed that, in accordance with the law of substance, consciousness must be evolved from unconsciousness with the development of sense organs and a central nervous organ.

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  • The close dependency of all mental operations on brain also tempts them to the conclusion that brain is not only an organ, but the whole organ of conscious mind.'

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  • Lastly, he thought that, while other operations have, intellect (vas) has not, a bodily organ; and hence he became responsible for the fancy that there is a break in bodily continuity between sense and will, while intellect is working out a purely immaterial operation of soul, resulting from the former and tending to the latter.

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  • In 1828 the erection of an organ in Brunswick Chapel, Leeds, led to a violent agitation and a small body of "Protestant Methodists" was formed.

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  • The department has its monthly organ and has its offices in Westminster.

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  • Besides making laws for the Christendom of the present and the future, these popes employed themselves in giving a more regular form to their principal administrative organ, the offices of the Curia.

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  • Thus the bill becomes a most delicate organ of sensation, and by its means the bird, while probing for food, is at once able to distinguish the nature of the objects it encounters, though these are wholly out of sight.

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  • in the formation of this organ or that of the apothecium it has the general structure characteristic of that division of fungi.

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  • This view was hotly contested by many workers and it was sought to explain the trichogyne - without much success - as a respiratory organ, or as a boring organ which made a way for the developing apothecium.

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  • 289), who admittedly had it from Waterton, and stated that it was "an admirable contrivance of nature to increase the delicacy of the organ of smell;" but R.

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  • - Grenie's organ pipe fitted with free-reed vibrator.

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  • - Organ pipe fitted with beatingreed.

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  • The labial commissure gives off a subradular commissure which also bears two ganglia, these being in close relation to a special sense-organ called the subradular organ, an epithelial projection with nerve-endings, lying in front of the radula and probably gustatory in function.

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  • The chief church is the Martini-kerk, with a high tower (43 2 ft.) dating from 1477, and an organ constructed by the famous scholar and musician Rudolph Agricolo, who was born near Groningen in 1443.

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  • Whether a spore results from the sexual union of two similar gametes (zygospore) or from the fertilization of an egg-cell by the protoplasm of a male organ (oospore); or is developed asexually as a motile (zoospore) or a quiescent body cut off from a hypha (conidium) or developed along its course (oidium or chlamydospore), or in its protoplasm (endospore), are matters of importance which have their uses in the classification and terminology of spores, though in many respects they are largely of academic interest.

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  • The contents of the antheridium are not set free, but that organ penetrates the oogonium by means of a narrow outgrowth, the fertilizing tube, and a male nucleus then passes over into the single oosphere, which at first multinucleate becomes uninucleate before fertilization.

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  • When the ascogonium (female organ) is present the ascogenous hyphae arise from it, with or without its previous fusion with an antheridium.

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  • Used in its widest sense this includes the Hysteriaceae, Phacidiaceae, Helvellaceae, &c. The group is characterized in general by the possession of an ascocarp which, though usually a completely closed structure during the earlier stages of development, at maturity opens out to form a bowl or saucer-shaped organ, thus completely exposing the layer of asci which forms the hymenium.

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  • The male organ (antheridium) consists of a few cells, the terminal one of which either abstricts from its end, or emits from its interior the non-motile spermatia, reminding us of those of the Florideae.

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  • The female organ is essentially a flask-shaped structure; the neck of the flask growing out as the trichogyne, and the belly composed of an axial carpogenic cell surrounded by investing cells, and with one cell (trichophoric) between it and the trichogyne.

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  • Some parasites attack many hosts and almost any tissue or organ (Botrytis cinerea), others are restricted to one family (Cystopus candidus) or genus (Phytophthora infestans) or even species (Pucciniastrum Padi), and it is customary to speak of rootparasites, leaf-parasites, &c., in expression of the fact that a given parasite occurs only on such organs - e.g.

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  • In Lutheran churches the organ is silent on this day, and altar, font and pulpit are draped in black, as indeed throughout Holy Week.

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  • The lower part of the altar is composed of Italian marble, with a representation of Christ's sufferings in the garden of Gethsemane; and the organ is considered the finest in Copenhagen.

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  • Added to the greater force of cardiac contraction is a permanent tonic contraction of the organ, so that its internal capacity is reduced.

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  • Besides these may be mentioned the church of St Pantaleon, a 13th-century structure, with a monument to Theophano, wife of the emperor Otto II.; St Cunibert, in the Byzantine-Moorish style, completed in 1248; St Maria im Capitol, the oldest church in Cologne, dedicated in 1049 by Pope Leo IX., noted for its crypt, organ and paintings; St Cecilia, St Ursula, containing the bones of that saint and, according to legend, of the 1 r,000 English virgins massacred near Cologne while on a pilgrimage to Rome; St Severin, the church of the Apostles, and that of St Andrew (1220 and 1414), which contains the remains of Albertus Magnus in a gilded shrine.

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  • It must be distinguished from the Kolnische Volkszeitung, which is the organ of the Clerical party in the Prussian Rhine provinces.

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  • Epicurus in this way explains vision by substituting for the apparent action of a body at a distance a direct contact of image and organ.

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  • In 1877 he became editor of the party organ at Dresden, and under the Socialist law was repeatedly condemned to various terms of imprisonment, and was also expelled from that city.

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  • All Samoan Islands measures passed by the Reichstag require the sanction of the majority of the Bundesrat, and Total in only become binding on being proclaimed on In Asia behalf of the empire by the chancellor, which Kiao-chow publication takes place through the Reichsgesetzhlatt (the official organ of the chancellor).

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  • As the central organ of this confederation (Bund) was established the federal diet (Bundestag), consisting of delegates of the several states.

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  • But, as Metternich had prophesied, this only provided an organ for giving voice to larger constitutional aspirations.

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  • m.o, Muscular pharyngeal organ.

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  • Apical organ.

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  • In some cases the branchial respiration a p pears to be insufficient, and the intestinal tract acts as an accessory breathing organ.

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  • The air-bladder may be so reduced as to lose its hydrostatic function and become subservient to a sensory organ, its outer exposed surface being connected with the skin by a meatus between the bands of muscle, and conveying the thermobarometrical impressions to the auditory nerves.

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  • From 1824 to 1826 Mill contributed to the Westminster Review, started as the organ of his party, a number of articles in which he attacked the Edinburgh and Quarterly Reviews and ecclesiastical establishments.

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  • A pit or depression, known as "the cerebral organ," opens into the brain just above the mouth; this usually divides into two limbs, which are deeply pigmented and have been called eyes.

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  • Thus among the tongue movements evoked by stigmatic stimulation of the cortex undeviated protrusion or retraction of the organ is not found.

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  • The organ seems also to receive many fibres from the parietal region of the cerebral hemisphere.

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  • From the organ there emerge fibres which cross to the opposite red nucleus, and directly or indirectly reach the thalamic region of the crossed hemisphere.

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  • The derangement gradually disappears, unless the damage to the organ be very wide.

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  • In albuminous Monocotyledons the cotyledon itself, probably in consequence of its terminal position, is commonly the agent by which the embryo is thrust out of the seed, and it may function solely as a feeder, its extremity developing as a sucker through which the endosperm is absorbed, or it may become the first green organ, the terminal sucker dropping off with the seed-coat when the endosperm is exhausted.

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  • The attachment organ of algae is thus more properly called a holdfast, and is found to be of very varied structure.

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  • An ardent opponent of slavery, he became a Free Soiler, was a delegate to the National Convention which nominated John P. Hale for the presidency in 1852, and subsequently served as chairman of the State Committee, having at the same time editorial control of the Charter Oak, the party organ.

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  • These images are created or produced not by an external stimulus, such as is necessary for a visual image (even the after-image is due to the continued excitement of the same organ), but by a mental act of reproduction.

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  • Molesworth at this time as an organ of philosophical radicalism.

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  • In the same year the king's " Courts of High Commission " were consolidated, and an organ was actually placed in the royal chapel at Holyrood.

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  • He insisted that the great powers of increase of all organisms led to a tremendous struggle for existence, and that variability extended to every part and organ of every organism; that the variability was large in amount in proportion to the size of the part affected, and occurred in a considerable proportion of the individuals of those large and dominant species which might be supposed to be breaking up into new species.

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  • Even the results of mutilation involve an intrinsic factor, for they range, according to the organ and organism affected, from complete regeneration to the most imperfect healing.

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  • It is now known that similar internal secretions, or hormones, pass into the blood from every organ and tissue, so reaching and affecting every part of the body.

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  • Change in the size of any part or organ, however it may have been produced, must bring with it many others changes, directly or indirectly.

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  • From 1828 to 1833 he was assistant secretary of the American Education Society (organized in Boston in 1815 to assist students for the ministry), and from 1828 to 1842 was editor of the society's organ, which after 1831 was called the American Quarterly Register.

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  • In 1880 he started his newspaper, La Justice, which became the principal organ of Parisian Radicalism; and from this time onwards throughout M.

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  • Internal dissensions in 1884 led to the foundation of the Socialist League, and in February 1885 a new organ, Commonweal, began to print Morris's splendid rallying-songs.

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  • In response Lord Minto was sent to Rome as " an authentic organ of the British Government," but the policy in question proved abortive.

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  • A curious duct with lateral branches termed the supra-intestinal organ lies above the intestine in the female.

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  • In Christ the human will has become the organ of the divine will.

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  • See the exposure in the Revue Biblique (the organ of the Dominican school of St Stephen at Jerusalem) for 1907.

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  • 2, 1) is a hollow organ enclosing an outgrowth of the body-cavity which is filled with fluid, and with its flexible under-surface capable of invagination or protrusion.

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  • Of the newspapers of Havana the most notable is the El Diario de la Marina (established in 1838; under its present name, 1844 morning and evening), which was almost from its foundation an official organ of the Spanish government, and generally the mouthpiece of the most intransigent peninsular opinion in all that concerned the politics of the island.

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  • Nicola (now suppressed), the buildings of which occupy an area of about 21 acres and contain the museum, a library, observatory, &c. The church, dating, like the rest of the buildings, from 16 931 735, is the largest in Sicily, and the organ, built in 1760 by Donato del Piano, with 72 stops and 2916 pipes, is very fine.

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  • Lewis (1784-1866), Amos Kendall and Duff Green, the last named being editor of the United States Telegraph, the organ of the administration.

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  • It was established in 1841 as a Democratic organ, and Walt Whitman was its editor for about a year during its early history.

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  • He became one of the first editors of the Jesuit organ, the Civiltd Cattolica; but then came under the influence of Gioberti, Rosmini and other advocates for reform.

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  • There is also a fine organ.

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  • The most important further step in the history of the towns, was the establishment of an organ of self-government, the town council (Rat, consilium, its members, Ratmeinner, consules, less.

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  • The industries include boat-building and timber yards, iron-foundries, copper and lead works, furniture, organ, tobacco and other factories, and the manufacture of gold and silver wares.

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  • Masses: Missa solennis for the inauguration of the cathedral at Gran; Ungarische Kronungs-messe; Missa choralis (with organ); Missa and Requiem for male voices (with organ); Psalms, 13, 137, 23 and 18; 12 Kirchen-Chor-Gesange (with organ).

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  • He was editor of the Western Christian Advocate, which he made a strong temperance and anti-slavery organ, from 1848 to 1852.

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  • - a, Atrium; al, alimentary canal; y blood-vessel; cv, cerebral vesicle; df, dorsal section of myocoel (= fin spaces); e, " eyespot"; end, endostyle; gl, club-shaped gland; lm, edge of left metapleur; m, lower edge of mouth; n, notochord; nt, pigmented nerve tube; ps, primary gill-slits, I, 9, and 14; rc, renal cells on atrial floor; rm, edge of right metapleur; so, sense organ opening into praeoral pit; ss, thickenings, the rudiments of the row of secondary gill-slits.

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  • The urine is nevertheless small in amount and contains albumen and blood owing to the local inflammation produced in the kidney by the passage of the poison through that organ.

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  • X Ocelli and post-antennal organ of right side.

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  • TipX terminal antennal segment with antennal organ.

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  • In many genera of springtails a curious post-antennal organ, consisting of sensory structures (often complex in form) surrounded by a firm ring, is to be noticed on the cuticle of the head between the eyes and the feelers.

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  • It may be of use as an organ of smell.

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  • The Revival of Learning must be regarded as a function of that vital energy, an organ of that mental evolution, which brought into existence the modern world, with its new conceptions of philosophy and religion, its reawakened arts and sciences, its firmer grasp on the realities of human nature and the world, its manifold inventions and discoveries, its altered political systems, its expansive and progressive forces.

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  • in diameter, standing erect, but pierced by a tubular passage from top to bottom; the Leaning Column nearly as large, undermined and tilting like the campanile of Pisa; the Organ, a cluster of stalactites in the chamber known as the Cathedral; besides a vast bed of di.- integrated carbonates left by the whirling flood in its retreat through the great space called the Elfin Ramble.

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  • The Organ.

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  • They differ in certain respects, as in the proportion of the limbs, in the bony development of the eyebrow ridges, and in the opposable great toe, which fits the foot to be a climbing and grasping organ.

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  • While resident in Italy for his health from 1845 to 1847, he occupied himself with researches on the electrical organ of the torpedo and on nervous organization generally; these he published in1853-1854(Neurologische Untersuchungen, Gottingen), and therewith his physiological period may be said to end.

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  • Portative Organ >>

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  • Local debt on the other hand can only be contracted under the sanction of the appropriate administrative organ of the state.

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  • The congregation elect the minister; in no other way can he enter on his functions; but once elected and admitted he is recognized as a free organ of the divine spirit, not subject in spiritual things to any earthly authority but that of his fellowministers; the word of God is the supreme authority, and the spoken word of God the vital element of every religious act.

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  • By introducing into his church a printed book of prayers and also an organ, Dr Lee stirred up vehement controversies in the church courts, which resulted in the recognition of the liberty of congregations to improve their worship. The Church Service Society, having for its object the study of ancient and modern liturgies, with a view to the preparation of forms of prayer for public worship, was founded in 1865; it has published eight editions of its " Book of Common Order," which, though at first regarded with suspicion, has been largely used by the clergy.

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  • The need of an organ for the dissemination of information, and the quickening of interest in the missionary and educational enterprises of the Triennial Convention, led Rice to establish the Latter Day Luminary (1816) and the Columbian Star, a weekly journal (1822).

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  • He had started in 1885 the Methodist Times, and rapidly made it a leading organ of Nonconformist opinion.

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  • organ.

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  • Each of the visceral ganglia is connected or combined with an olfactory ganglion underlying an area of specialized epithelium, which constitutes the olfactory organ, the osphradium.

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