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ordainers

ordainers Sentence Examples

  • In 1311 the king was forced to agree to the election of the "ordainers," and the ordinances they drew up provided inter alia for the perpetual banishment of his favourite.

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  • figured among the Lords Ordainers; though, with more patriotism than some of his fellow-commissioners, he afterwards followed the king to Bannockburn.

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  • As one of the "lords ordainers" he was a recognized leader of the opposition to Edward II.

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  • and even of the restored archbishop, Winchelsea, who was anxious to uphold the privileges of his order, Langton, accused again by the barons in 1309, remained in prison after Edward's surrender to the "ordainers" in 1310.

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  • He was released in January 1312 and again became treasurer; but he was disliked by the "ordainers," who forbade him to discharge the duties of his office.

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  • Langton was one of the "ordainers" elected in 1310, and it was probably his connexion with this body that led to his losing the office of chancellor about this time.

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  • Instead of introducing any general scheme of reform they contented themselves with putting him under the tutelage of twenty-one lords The ordainers, a baronial committee like that which had LosJs been appointed by the Provisions of Oxford, fifty Oryears back.

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  • The second, and more fatal, was that this council of ordainers, when installed in office, showed energy in nothing save in persecuting the friends of Edward and Gaveston; it neglected the general welfare of the realm, and in particular made no effort whatever to end the Scottish war.

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  • In August 1318 he was removed from power by a league formed by Pembroke, Warenne, Arundel and others of the lords ordainers, who put a new council in power, and showed themselves somewhat less hostile to the kingthan Earl Thomas had been.

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  • that the lorcis ordainers had held over his father, and tional compelled him to assent to a long list of petitions reforms. which, if properly carried out, would have removed most of the practical grievances of the nation.

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  • In spite of the warnings given by the assault on Suffolk in 1450, by Jack Cades insurrection, and by the first armed demonstrations of Richard of York in 1450 and 1452, the king persisted in keeping his friends in office, and they had to be removed by the familiar and forcible methods that bad been applied in earlier ages by the lords ordainers or the lords appellant.

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  • With his associates he produced the banishment of the royal favourite, Piers Gaveston, in 1308; compelled Edward in 1310 to surrender his power to a committee of "ordainers," among whom he himself was numbered; and took up arms when Gaveston returned to England in January 1312.

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  • In 1311 the king was forced to agree to the election of the "ordainers," and the ordinances they drew up provided inter alia for the perpetual banishment of his favourite.

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    0
  • figured among the Lords Ordainers; though, with more patriotism than some of his fellow-commissioners, he afterwards followed the king to Bannockburn.

    0
    0
  • As one of the "lords ordainers" he was a recognized leader of the opposition to Edward II.

    0
    0
  • and even of the restored archbishop, Winchelsea, who was anxious to uphold the privileges of his order, Langton, accused again by the barons in 1309, remained in prison after Edward's surrender to the "ordainers" in 1310.

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    0
  • He was released in January 1312 and again became treasurer; but he was disliked by the "ordainers," who forbade him to discharge the duties of his office.

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    0
  • Langton was one of the "ordainers" elected in 1310, and it was probably his connexion with this body that led to his losing the office of chancellor about this time.

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    0
  • Instead of introducing any general scheme of reform they contented themselves with putting him under the tutelage of twenty-one lords The ordainers, a baronial committee like that which had LosJs been appointed by the Provisions of Oxford, fifty Oryears back.

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    0
  • The second, and more fatal, was that this council of ordainers, when installed in office, showed energy in nothing save in persecuting the friends of Edward and Gaveston; it neglected the general welfare of the realm, and in particular made no effort whatever to end the Scottish war.

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    0
  • In August 1318 he was removed from power by a league formed by Pembroke, Warenne, Arundel and others of the lords ordainers, who put a new council in power, and showed themselves somewhat less hostile to the kingthan Earl Thomas had been.

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    0
  • that the lorcis ordainers had held over his father, and tional compelled him to assent to a long list of petitions reforms. which, if properly carried out, would have removed most of the practical grievances of the nation.

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    0
  • In spite of the warnings given by the assault on Suffolk in 1450, by Jack Cades insurrection, and by the first armed demonstrations of Richard of York in 1450 and 1452, the king persisted in keeping his friends in office, and they had to be removed by the familiar and forcible methods that bad been applied in earlier ages by the lords ordainers or the lords appellant.

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  • With his associates he produced the banishment of the royal favourite, Piers Gaveston, in 1308; compelled Edward in 1310 to surrender his power to a committee of "ordainers," among whom he himself was numbered; and took up arms when Gaveston returned to England in January 1312.

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