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oratory

oratory

oratory Sentence Examples

  • The impulse given to oratory by Cato, Ser.

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  • His earnest, rugged, simple style of oratory made him extremely popular, and at once secured for him a wide reputation.

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  • Jonathan was a prince to behold, suave beyond description, and with silver-tongued oratory, he calmed the fears of an entire city.

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  • Nicolo is the so-called Oratory of Phalaris, a shrine of the 2nd century B.C., 274 ft.

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  • Athenian art and literature in the 4th century declined but slightly from their former standard; philosophy and oratory reached a standard which was never again equalled in antiquity and may still serve as a model.

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  • Among the earliest examples of pulpit oratory which have been preserved in English literature, the discourses of Wycliffe and his disciples may be passed by, to arrive at the English sermons of John Fisher (1469?-1535), which have a distinct literary value.

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  • He had expressed an opinion that the true art of memory was not to be gained by technical devices, but by a philosophical apprehension of things; and the cardinal de Berulle, the founder of the Congregation of the Oratory, was so struck by the tone of the remarks as to impress upon the speaker the duty of spending his life in the examination of truth.

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  • In Southgate is an ancient hermitage and oratory cut out of the solid rock, which dates from 1396.

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  • Although Rome wanted creative force to add a great series of tragic dramas to the literature of the world, yet the spirit of elevation and moral authority breathed into tragedy by Ennius passed into the ethical and didactic writings and the oratory of a later time.

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  • But the great literary product of this period was oratory, developed indeed with the aid of these rhetorical studies, but.

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  • The date of the original chapel is unknown, but it was probably an oratory which was an offshoot of Kirkstall Abbey.

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  • At Rome he joined the Oratory in 1557 under St Philip Neri and succeeded him as superior in 1593.

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  • Oratory where Philip II.

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  • In his Commentaries, by laying aside the ornaments of oratory, he created the most admirable style of prose narrative, the style which presents interesting events in their sequence of time and dependence on the will of the actor, rapidly and vividly, with scarcely any colouring of personal or moral feeling, any oratorical passion, any pictorial illustration.

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  • Congregation of the Oratory of St Philip Neri >>

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  • He gave amusing illustrations of the absurdity and poverty of the current pulpit oratory of his day, some of them being taken from the sermons of his own father.

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  • John Hales (1584-1656); Edmund Calamy (1600-1666); the Cambridge Platonist, Benjamin Whichcote (1609-1685); Richard Baxter (1615-1691); the puritan John Owen (1616-1683); the philosophical Ralph Cudworth (1617-1688); Archbishop Leighton (1611-1684) - each of these holds an eminent position in the records of pulpit eloquence, but all were outshone by the gorgeous oratory and art of Jeremy Taylor (1613-1667), who is the most illustrious writer of sermons whom the British race has produced.

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  • In oratory, as in every other intellectual province, the Greeks had a truer sense of the limits and conditions of their art.

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  • former was the leading representative of the Asiatic or florid style of oratory, and, like other members of the aristocracy, such as C.Memmius and L.

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  • At the Restoration, pulpit oratory in England became drier, less picturesque and more sententious.

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  • These preachers of the Restoration were controversialists, keen, moderate and unenthusiastic. These qualities were accentuated in the 18th century, when for a while religious oratory ceased to have any literary value.

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  • He took his seat in the Upper House, and his oratory, never effective in the Commons by reason of its want of force and excess of finish, at once became a power.

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  • Oratory at Rome assumed a new type from being cultivated as an art which endeavoured to produce persuasion not so much by intellectual conviction as by appeal to general human sympathies.

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  • In prose the old forms - oratory, history, the epistle, treatises or dialogues on ethical and literary questions - continue to be cultivated.

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  • HERMAGORAS, of Temnos, Greek rhetorician of the Rhodian school and teacher of oratory in Rome, flourished during the first half of the 1st century B.C. He obtained a great reputation among a certain section and founded a special school, the members of which called themselves Hermagorei.

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  • Vergniaud certainly was far superior to him in oratory, but Brissot was quick, eager, impetuous, and a man of wide knowledge.

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  • The delights of love are made to stand for the raptures of union with the divine, the tavern symbolizes an oratory, and intoxication is the bewilderment of sense before the surpassing vision.

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  • It was rather parliamentary oratory in which he excelled, and his true compeers are rather Burke and Fox than any French speakers.

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  • The Roman oratory of the law courts had to deal not with petty questions of disputed property, of fraud, or violence, but with great imperial questions, with matters affecting the well-being of large provinces and the honour and safety of the republic; and no man ever lived who, in these respects, was better fitted than Cicero to be the representative of the type of oratory demanded by the condition of the later republic. To his great artistic accomplishment, perfected by practice and elaborate study, to the power of his patriotic, his moral, and personal sympathies, and his passionate emotional nature, must be added his vivid imagination and the rich and copious stream of his language, in which he had no rival among Roman writers or speakers.

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  • The oratory of S.

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  • He founded the Congregation of the French Oratory in 1611 and introduced the Carmelite nuns into France, notwithstanding the opposition of the friars of that order, who were jealous of his ascendancy.

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  • Born at Marseilles in 1634, he early entered the French Oratory, and obtained great reputation as a preacher.

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  • of Beaver Falls; it has a preparatory and a collegiate department, departments of music, oratory and art, and a physical department, and in 1907-1908 had 13 instructors and 235 students.

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  • Even oratory was intended quite as much for readers as for the audiences to which it was immediately addressed; and some of the greatest speeches which have come down from that great age of orators were never delivered at all, but were published as manifestoes after the event with the view of influencing educated opinion, and as works of art with the view of giving pleasure to educated taste.

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  • As Cicero tones down his oratory in his moral treatises, so Horace tones down the fervour of his lyrical utterances in his Epistles, and thus produces a style combining the ease of the best epistolary style with the grace and concentration of poetry - the style, as it has been called, of "idealized common sense," that of the urbanus and cultivated man of the world who is also in his hours of inspiration a genuine poet.

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  • He steadily opposed whatever might encourage the admission of Catholics to the national universities, and so put his foot down on Newman's project to open a branch house of the Oratory at Oxford with himself as superior.

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  • And so great was the influence of the Jesuits, that the congregation of St Maur, the canons of Ste Genevieve, and the Oratory laid their official ban on the obnoxious doctrines.

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  • The cathedral church, dedicated to its founder St Colman, a disciple of St Finbar of Cork, is a plain cruciform building mainly of the 14th century, with an earlier oratory in the churchyard.

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  • Grant threw the whole weight of his great influence in favour of confederation, and his oratory played an important part in securing the success of the movement.

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  • These had their origin in the same impulse which ultimately found its full gratification in Roman history, Roman epic poetry, and that form of Roman oratory known as laudationes, and in some of the Odes of Horace.

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  • It shows how flexible an instrument Latin prose had become in his hand, when it could do justice at once to the ample and vehement volume of his oratory, to the calmer and more rhythmical movement of his philosophical meditation, and to the natural interchange of thought and feeling in the everyday intercourse of life.

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  • Hence the two great forms of prose literature which drew their nourishment from the struggles of political life, oratory and contemporary history, were arrested in their development.

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  • In 18J7 the pope, proprio motu, appointed him provost (or head of the chapter) of Westminster, and the same year he took up his residence in Bayswater as superior of a community known as the "Oblates of St Charles," an association of secular priests on the same lines as the institute of the Oratory, but with this difference, that they are by their constitution at the beck and call of the bishop in whose diocese they live.

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  • Spirito), erected by Theodoric for the Arian bishops, but entirely modified: the baptistery of this church (afterwards the oratory of S.

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  • Muswell Hill took name from a holy well, of high repute for curative powers, over which an oratory was erected early in the 12th century, attached to the priory of St John of Jerusalem in Clerkenwell.

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  • Faneuil Hall (the original hall of the name was given to the city by Peter Faneuil, a Huguenot merchant, in 1742) is associated, like the Old South, with the patriotic oratory of revolutionary days and is called " the cradle of American liberty."

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  • His father, Wilgils, an Angle or, as Alcuin styles him, a Saxon, of Northumbria, withdrew from the world and constructed for himself a little oratory dedicated to St Andrew.

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  • Martin Luther was the most ancient type of early Reformation preacher, and he was succeeded by the mystic Johann Arndt (1555-1621); the Catholic church produced in Vienna the eccentric and almost burlesque oratory of Abraham a Santa Clara (1642-1709).

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  • A fine belfry (12th, 13th and 15th centuries) commanding the town is built on the terrace, beneath which are hollowed in the rock the oratory and hermitage of St Emilion, and adjoining them an ancient monolithic church of considerable dimensions.

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  • This church crowns the Fontebranda hill above the famous fountain of that name immortalized by Dante, and in a steep lane below stands the house of St Catherine, now converted into a church and oratory, and maintained at the expense of the inhabitants of the Contrada dell' Oca.

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  • A still nearer approach to literature was probably made in oratory, as we learn from Cicero that the famous speech delivered by Appius Claudius Caecus against concluding peace with Pyrrhus (280 B.C.) was extant in his time.

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  • Through his industry and vigorous understanding he gave a great impulse to the creation of Roman oratory, history and systematic didactic writing.

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  • The influence of Panaetius and Polybius was more adapted to their maturity, when they led the state in war, statesmanship and oratory, and when the humaner teaching of Stoicism began to enlarge the sympathies of Roman jurists.

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  • The general results of the last fifty years of the first period (130 to 80) may be thus summed up. In poetry we have the satires of Lucilius, the tragedies of Accius and of a few successors among the Roman aristocracy, who thus exemplified the affinity of the Roman stage to Roman oratory; various annalistic poems intended to serve as continuations of the great poem of Ennius; minor poems of an epigrammatic and erotic character, unimportant anticipations of the Alexandrian tendency operative in the following period; works of criticism in trochaic tetrameters by Porcius Licinus and others, forming part of the critical and grammatical movement which almost from the first accompanied the creative movement in Latin literature, and which may be regarded as rude precursors of the didactic epistles that Horace devoted to literary criticism.

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  • Royal oratory.

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  • There are ruins of an oratory dedicated to St Helen on Cape Cornwall.

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  • I expect Hague would win each one, on account of his good oratory, but this is no substitute for policies.

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  • Delaware is the seat of the Ohio Wesleyan University (co-educational), founded by the Ohio Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church in 1841, and opened as a college in 1844; it includes a college of liberal arts (1844), an academic department (1841), a school of music (1877), a school of fine arts (1877), a school of oratory (1894), a business school (1895), and a college of medicine (the Cleveland College of Physicians and Surgeons, at Cleveland, Ohio; founded as the Charity Hospital Medical College in 1863, and the medical department of the university of Wooster until 1896, when, under its present name, it became a part of Ohio Wesleyan University).

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  • Shaftesbury was the first great party leader in the modern sense, and the founder of modern parliamentary oratory.

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  • He was educated at the seminary of Quebec, where he developed the gift of declamatory and persuasive oratory.

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  • None of his great orations has survived, a loss regretted by Pitt more than that of the missing books of Livy and Tacitus, and no art perishes more completely with its possessor than that of oratory.

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  • itself the immediate outcome of the imperial interests, Oratory.

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  • Thus the speeches of M.Tullius Cicero (106-43) belong to the domain of literature quite as much as to that of forensic or political oratory.

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  • master of style unrivalled even by Cicero, the literary interest of most of Cicero's speeches is stronger than that of the great mass of Greek oratory.

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  • We should think of him also as the creator and master of Latin style - and, moreover, not only as a great orator but as a just and appreciative critic of oratory.

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  • The new profession of the delator must have given a stimulus to oratory.

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  • The imperial patronage had made education and social distinctions a greater possibility for the preacher, and the decline of political eloquence furnished an opening for pulpit oratory.

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  • Des Moines is the seat of Des Moines College, a Baptist institution, co-educational, founded in 1865 (enrolment, 1907-1908, 21 4); of Drake University (co-educational; founded in 1881 by the Disciples of Christ; now non-sectarian), with colleges of liberal arts, law, medicine, dental surgery and of the Bible, a conservatory of music, and a normal school, in which are departments of oratory and commercial training, and having in 1907-1908 -1764 students, of whom 520 were in the summer school only; of the Highland Park College, founded in 1890; of Grand View College (Danish Lutheran), founded in 1895; and of the Capital City commercial college (founded 1884).

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  • The two often engaged in friendly rivalry to try whether the orator or the actor could express a thought or emotion with the greater effect, and Roscius wrote a treatise in which he compared acting and oratory.

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  • Liddon's great influence during his life was due to his personal fascination and the beauty of his pulpit oratory rather than to any high qualities of intellect.

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  • In oratory, James Otis, Fisher Ames, Josiah Quincy, junr., Webster, Choate, Everett, Sumner, Winthrop and Wendell Phillips; and, in addition, in statesmanship, Samuel Adams, John Adams and John Quincy Adams. In fiction, Hawthorne and Mrs Stowe.

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  • These poets aided also in developing that capacity which the Roman language subsequently displayed of being an organ of oratory, history and moral disquisition.

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  • He founded a religious community at Birmingham, called Wilfridians, which was ultimately merged in the oratory of St Philip Neri, with John Henry Newman as Superior.

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  • In 1849 a branch of the oratory - subsequently independent - was established in London, first in King William Street, and afterwards at Brompton, over which Faber presided till his death on the 26th of September 1863.

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  • Oratorum) is improbable; but Theramenes may have taught Isocrates in oratory.

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  • As a public speaker his style was incisive, forceful and often eloquent, although he made no effort to practise oratory as an art.

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  • Having received his education in classics from the fathers of the oratory of San Filippo Neri, he afterwards entered upon a noviciate at the Franciscan monastery at Lago, at the close of which he was received as a Minorite on the 1 rth of September 1722.

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  • In the 8th century an oratory was established there by St Aubert, bishop of Avranches, in obedience to the commands of an apparition of St Michael.

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  • In 966 Richard I., duke of Normandy, founded in place of the oratory a Benedictine monastery, which in the succeeding century received a considerable share of the spoils of the conquest of England.

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  • In person Lord Selborne was of about the average height: his manners when among strangers were somewhat reserved; his style, both in speaking and writing, was fluent, tending to diffuseness; his oratory was marked by uniform good sense and lucidity, both of arrangement and language; and if he never reached the highest level of oratorical excellence, he never descended to what was commonplace or irrelevant.

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  • Lucien soon conceived a dislike for a duty which opened up no vista for his powers of oratory and political intrigue, and repaired to Corsica.

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  • The book also contains contributions to the history of Attic oratory and Greek literature generally.

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  • The upshot of his oratory was the summoning of a rokosz, or national insurrection, to Sandomir, which was speedily joined by the majority of the szlachta all over the country, who openly proclaimed their intention of dethroning the king and chastising the senate, and sent Stadnicki to Transylvania to obtain the armed assistance of Stephen Bocskay.

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  • A florid Jesuitical style of oratory became very popular in the time of Sigismund III., not without rhetorical power, but frequently becoming tawdry.

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  • The primitive stone-roofed oratory is supposed to have been a hermit's cell.

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  • He here urges that the foundation of all true learning is a " sound and thorough knowledge of Latin," and draws up a course of reading, in which history is represented by Livy, Sallust, Curtius, and Caesar; oratory by Cicero; and poetry by Virgil.

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  • In impressive and persuasive oratory he sets before Israel, in a form adapted to the needs of the age in which he lived, the fundamental principles which Moses had taught.

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  • The strict application of the word to a sanctuary containing relics was extended to embrace any place of worship other than a church, and it was synonymous, therefore, with "oratory" (oratorium), especially one attached to a palace or to a private dwelling-house.

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  • 29 a New Testament, connected with the name of the Abbe de Barneville, a priest of the Oratory at Paris.

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  • His personal appearance was remarkable, and not imposing, for he was very short, with plain features, ungainly gestures and manners, very near-sighted, and of disagreeable voice; yet he became (after wisely giving up an attempt at the ornate style of oratory) a very effective speaker in a kind of conversational manner, and in the epigram of debate he had no superior among the statesmen of his time except Lord Beaconsfield.

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  • Physically incapable of rising to passionate heights of oratory, Cotta's successes were chiefly due to his searching investigation of facts; he kept strictly to the essentials of the case and avoided all irrelevant digressions.

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  • Cornell College includes a collegiate department, an academy, a conservatory of music, a school of art, a school of oratory and a summer school; in 1907-1908 it had 40 instructors and 755 students.

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  • At the age of eighteen he joined the Congregation of the Oratory and taught for a time in the colleges of his order at Pezenas, and Montbrison and at the Seminary of Vienne.

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  • Oratory.

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  • Among other apartments, for the designation of which we must refer to the ground-plan, was a domestic oratory or chapel, 462 ft.

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  • The Roman Catholic church of Our Lady of Victories lies close to Kensington Road, and in Brompton Road is the Oratory of St Philip Neri, a fine building with richly decorated interior, noted for the beauty of its musical services, as is:the Carmelite Church in Church Street.

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  • In Oratory, Which Most French Canadians Admire Beyond All Other Forms Of Verbal Art, Sir Wilfrid Laurier Has Greatly Surpassed L.

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  • TEXvf ` PTJropu o': Ars rhetorica: On the art of oratory.

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  • His blunt, direct style of oratory and his somewhat rough manners were characteristic. After the outbreak of the Civil War he was one of the most vigorous critics of the Lincoln administration, whose Ohio member, Salmon P. Chase, had long been a political rival.

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  • This building, erected in the 15th century amid the barren dunes bordering the east shore of the estuary near its mouth, in place of a more ancient oratory, was long buried beneath drifts of sand.

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  • During this period, from 1886-1892, moreover, he developed gifts of oratory which made him one of the most effective of public speakers.

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  • himself there had been formed in Rome, in the Oratory of the Divine Love, a body of excellent men of strictly Catholic sentiments.

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  • It was by members of this Oratory - especially St Gaetano di Tiene; Carafa (later Paul IV.), and the great bishop of Verona, Giberti - that the foundations of the Catholic reformation were laid.

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  • He had resolved to take holy orders, but his studious disposition led him to decline a stall in Notre Dame, and in 1660 he joined the congregation of the Oratory.

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  • Besides the religious congregations there are a number of " secular congregations," composed of secular priests living together under temporary vows and free to leave at will; the following deserve mention: Oblates of St Charles (founded by St Charles Borromeo, 1578); Oratorians (founded by St Philip Neri, c. 1570); the French Oratory (founded by Cardinal Berulle, 1613), a similar but distinct institution, which produced a number of scholars of the highest distinction - Thomassin, Morin, Marlebranche, Richard Simon, Juenin, Lebrun, Masillon, and others; Lazarists (founded by St Vincent de Paul, 1624); Sulpicians (founded by M.

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  • The parish church of St Nicholas, an antiquated cruciform structure with curious Elizabethan work in the north transept, and monuments of the Chichester family, was originally a chapel or oratory dependent on a Franciscan monastery.

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  • Nor was it oratory alone to which Lysias rendered service; his work had an important effect on all subsequent Greek prose, by showing how perfect elegance could be joined to plainness.

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  • It was one of the triumphs of Bright's oratory that it constantly produced these popular cries.

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  • The 3rd marquess of Salisbury said of him, and it sums up his character as a public man: "He was the greatest master of English oratory that this generation - I may say several generations - has seen..

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  • He studied oratory in Athens, and was regarded as the most eloquent man of his age.

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  • They are almost invariably fluent speakers; with many of them oratory seems to be a natural gift; it is also carefully cultivated.

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  • In 1723 he was presented to the rectory of Chelmondiston in Suffolk; but residence being insisted on, he resigned both his appointments, and on the 3rd of July 1726 opened what he called an "oratory" in Newport Market, which he licensed under the Toleration Act.

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  • Into his services he introduced many peculiar alterations: he drew up a "Primitive Liturgy," in which he substituted for the Nicene and Athanasian creeds two creeds taken from the Apostolical Constitutions; for his "Primitive Eucharist" he made use of unleavened bread and mixed wine; he distributed at the price of one shilling medals of admission to his oratory, with the device of a sun rising to the meridian, with the motto Ad summa, and the words Inveniam viam aut faciam below.

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  • Besides his Sunday sermons, he delivered Wednesday lectures on social and political subjects; and he also projected a scheme for connecting with the "oratory" a university on quite a utopian plan.

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  • Welstede, but in all probability by himself, was inserted by him in his Oratory Transactions.

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  • With his exegetical skill (he was inferior in pure dogma to Theodore of Mopsuestia) he united a wide sympathy and a marvellous power of oratory.

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  • From 1806 to 1809 Adams was professor of rhetoric and oratory at Harvard.

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  • As an advocate, too, he stood in the very highest rank; in mere oratory he was surpassed by Plunket, and in rhetorical gifts by Bushe, the only ' See the account of O'Connell's uncle, Count Daniel O'Connell (1745-1833), to whose property he fell heir, in Mrs O'Connell's Last Colonel of the Irish Brigade (1892), and O'Callaghan's Irish Brigade in the Service of France (1870).

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  • By this time O'Connell had attained a position of great eminence in the House of Commons: as a debater he stood in the very first rank, though he had entered St Stephen's after fifty; and his oratory, massive and strong in argument, although too often scurrilous and coarse, and marred by a bearing in which cringing flattery and rude bullying were strangely blended, made a powerful, if not a pleasing, impression.

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  • At first his thoughts turned towards the priesthood, and he spent some time at the London Oratory and at St Edmund's College, Ware; but being unable to surrender his belief in the validity of Anglican orders, he proceeded no further than minor orders in the Roman Church.

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  • As an advocate, however, he did not shine; a weakness of voice made continued speaking impossible, and he had neither the ability nor the temperament for oratory.

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  • The sophistical movement was then, primarily, an attempt to provide a general or liberal education which should supplement the customary instruction in reading, writing, gymnastic and music. But, as the sophists of the first period chose for their instruments grammar, style, literature and oratory, while those of the second and third developments were professed rhetoricians, sophistry exercised an important influence upon literature.

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  • As instruments of education Protagoras used grammar, style, poetry and oratory.

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  • That he should do so was only natural, since his position as a teacher of rhetoric was already secure when Protagoras made his first appearance in the character of a sophist; and, as Protagoras, Prodicus and the rest of the sophists of culture offered a comprehensive education, of which oratory formed only a part, whilst Gorgias made no pretence of teaching " civic excellence " (Plato, Meno, 95 C), and found a substitute for philosophy, not in literature generally, but in the professional study of rhetoric alone, it would have been convenient if the distinction between sophistry and rhetoric had been maintained.

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  • Thus the first and second definitions represent the founders of the sophistry of culture, Protagoras and Prodicus, from the respective points of view of the older Athenians, who disliked the new culture, and the younger Athenians, who admired it; the third and fourth definitions represent imitators to whom the note of itinerancy was not applicable; the fifth definition represents the earlier eristics, contemporaries of Socrates, whom it was necessary to distinguish from the teachers of forensic oratory; the sixth is framed to meet the anomalous case of Socrates, in whom many saw the typical sophist, though Plato conceives this view to be unfortunate; and the seventh and final definition, having in view eristical sophistry fully developed, distinguishes it from SfµoXoyuci, i.e.

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  • When Protagoras included in his course grammar, style, interpretation of the poets, and oratory, supplementing his own continuous expositions by disputations in which he and his pupils took part, he showed a not inadequate appreciation of the requisites of a literary education; and it may be conjectured that his comprehensive programme, which Prodicus and others extended, had something to do with the development of that versatility which was the most notable element in the Athenian character.

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  • There is less to be said for the teachers of rhetoric, politics and eristic, who, in limiting themselves each to a single subject - the rhetoricians proper or forensic rhetoricians to one branch of oratory, the politicians or political rhetoricians to another, and the eristics to disputation - ceased to be educators and became instructors.

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  • To literature and to oratory the sophists rendered good service.

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  • Whereas, when sophistry began, prose composition was hardly practised in central Greece, the sophists were still the leaders in literature and oratory when Plato wrote the Republic, and they had hardly lost their position when Demosthenes delivered the Philippics.

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  • Excellent as a statement of the aim and method of Isocrates, and tolerable as a statement of those of Gorgias, these phrases are inexact if applied to Protagoras, who, making " civic virtue " his aim, regarded statesmanship and administration as parts of " civic virtue ", and consequently assigned to oratory no more than a subordinate place in his programme, while to the eristics - whose existence is attested not only by Plato, but also by Isocrates and Aristotle - and to Socrates - whom Grote himself accounts a sophist - the description is plainly and palpably inappropriate.

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  • His oratory was so successful that he determined to become a missionary-preacher among the people, in order the better to combat the social and political evils of the day.

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  • He had previously affected the florid, or Asiatic, style of oratory then current in Rome.

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  • 9.23) that it " does not deal in hackneyed rules and embraces the whole theory of oratory as laid down by Isocrates and Aristotle."

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  • Brutus, sketching a portrait of the perfect and ideal orator, Cicero's last word on oratory.

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  • Livy's practice is exactly opposite to that of Cicero, since he has a marked preference for the S forms, "thereby exemplifying Cicero's saying that long syllables are more appropriate to history than to oratory.'

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  • Crassus does not seem to have possessed much military ability, but he was greatly distinguished for his knowledge of law and his accomplished oratory.

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  • He was educated first at the college of the Oratory in Marseilles, and afterwards at that of the Jesuits in the same city.

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  • It contains the original oratory of St Francis and the cell in which he died.

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  • A king therefore stands in almost as much need of oratory as of warlike skill and prowess.

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  • A generation later the French Oratory became the home of Malebranche and of Richard Simon, father of Biblical criticism.

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  • One mass of Greek and Roman erudition, including history and metaphysics, law and science, civic institutions and the art of war, mythology and magistracies, metrical systems and oratory, agriculture and astronomy, domestic manners and religious rites, grammar and philology, biography and numismatics, formed the miscellaneous subject-matter of this so-styled rhetoric. Notes taken at these lectures supplied young scholars with hints for further exploration; and a certain tradition of treating antique authors for the display of general learning, as well as for the elucidation of their texts, came into vogue, which has determined the method of scholarship for the last three centuries in Europe.

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  • We have one patron more added to those we already have in heaven"; and returning to his oratory Pole found peace in his sorrow.

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  • Bloomington is the seat of the Illinois Wesleyan University (Methodist Episcopal, coeducational, founded in 1850), which comprises a college of liberal arts, an academy, a college of law, a college of music and a school of oratory, and in 1907 had 1350 students.

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  • Bishop's Island, a bold isolated rock in the vicinity, has remains of an oratory and house ascribed to the recluse St Senan.

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  • He had more authority in the country than in the Chamber, where the violence of his oratory diminished its effect.

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  • On the 2 ist, a few moments after the estates had assembled, the king in full regalia appeared, and taking his seat on the throne, delivered that famous philippic, one of the masterpieces of Swedish oratory, in which he reproached the estates for their unpatriotic venality and licence in the past.

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  • The pulpit discharged some of the functions of the modern press, and men who combined the gifts of oratory and writing filled it and distinguished themselves, their order and their country.

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  • The early days of parliamentary rule produced Manoel Fernandes Thomas and Manoel oratory.

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  • He subsequently settled in Athens, and supported himself by the practice of oratory and by teaching rhetoric. He died at Larissa in Thessaly.

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  • There are other scattered remains of 13th-century architecture in the town, while, in the centre of the ancient city, close to the so-called oratory of Phalaris, is the Norman church of S.

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  • History for him is the mine from which to draw argument in oratory and example in education.

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  • In 1618 he joined the congregation of the Oratory, and in due course took priest's orders.

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  • The Histoire de la delivrance de l'eglise chretienne par l'emp. Constantin, et de la grandeur et souverainetetemporelle donnee d l'eglise romaine par les rois de France (1630) gave great offence at Rome, and a Declaration (1654), directed against faults in the administration of the Oratory, was strictly suppressed.

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  • Some of his speeches were published under the title, Forty Years of Oratory (2 vols., Indianapolis, Indiana, 1898), edited by his three sons and his daughter, Harriet C. Voorhees, and with a biographical sketch by T.

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  • When he began to teach again he found consolation, and in gratitude he consecrated the new oratory they built for him by the name of the Paraclete.

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  • His oratory cannot be estimated with absolute confidence.

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  • On the death of Mirabeau a few months later, Barnave paid a high tribute to his worth and public services, designating him the Shakespeare of oratory.

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  • He very rapidly acquired a large practice, and after taking silk in 1842 he gained a reputation for forensic oratory surpassing that of all his contemporaries, and rivalling that of his most famous predecessors of the 18th century.

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  • His oratory was rough and unpolished, but full of freshness and force and genuine feeling.

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  • He began at the bottom of the ladder, mixing with the Bohemian society that haunted the Temple, practising oratory in the free and easy debating societies of Covent Garden and the Strand, and writing for the booksellers.

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  • Having obtained the degree of doctor of letters in 1877 with a Latin thesis upon C. Asinius Pollion and a French one upon Giacomo Leopardi (whose works he subsequently translated into French), he made a study of parliamentary oratory during the French Revolution, and published two volumes upon Les Orateurs de la constituante (1882) and upon Les Orateurs de la legislative et de la convention (1885).

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  • His impetuous oratory, popular on the platform, was less adapted to the halls of legislation.

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  • He became a priest in the order of the Oratory, and professor of rhetoric at Beaune.

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  • There are the remains of his oratory and house and of seven rude churches or chapels, together with a round tower and a holy well still in repute.

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  • The death of her father roused her to serious reflection, and one day, as she entered the oratory, she was struck by the image of the wounded Christ, placed there for an approaching festival.

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  • But it is well to remember the charge made against the style of Demosthenes by a contemporary Greek orator, and the defence offered by the best Greek critic of oratory.

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  • As a preacher he produced a powerful effect, yet not at all by the force of his oratory but by his intellectual strength, his devotional spirit and the philosophical breadth and unity of his thought.

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  • When St Maelmaedoc in the first half of the 12th century thought of building a stone oratory at Bangor it was deemed a novelty by the people, who exclaimed, " we are Scotti not Galli."

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  • The oratory of the day was of a high order, and incursions into the wide field of pamphlet literature often repay the student.

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  • Sex had no effect in softening the prevalent style of oratory, but the government thought it better to take no notice.

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  • Perhaps it was his gift of oratory which suggested his appointment as bishop of the refractory men of Devon and Cornwall.

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  • Ruins of a very ancient oratory stand near it.

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  • He was educated by the fathers of the Oratory with a view to the priesthood and ordained in 1825.

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  • The Assembly followed; and henceforth king and Assembly were more or less under the influence of the whims and passions of a populace maddened by want and suspicion, by the fanatical or unscrupulous incitements of an unfettered press, and by the unrestrained oratory of obscure demagogues in the streets, the cafs and the political clubs.

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  • He was thoroughly unscrupulous, stopping at nothing to maintain the supremacy of the Mountain, and rendered it great service by his rapid work, by the telling phases of his oratory, and by his clear expositions of the problems of the day.

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  • In Minneapolis are the Minneapolis College of Physicians and Surgeons (1883), the medical school of Hamline University; Augsburg Seminary (Norwegian Lutheran, 1869), the United Church Seminary (1890), the Minnesota College (Swedish, 1905), the Minneapolis Normal School for Kindergartners, the Froebellian Kindergarten Normal School, Graham Hall and Stanley Hall, the Minneapolis School of Music, Oratory and Dramatic Art, and the Northwestern Conservatory of Music. Between Minneapolis and St Paul are the main buildings of Hamline University (Methodist Episcopal, co-educational, 1854).

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  • As a preacher he lacked all the graces of oratory, but compelled attention by his searching and practical earnestness.

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  • The college includes a collegiate department, an academy, a Bible school, a normal school, a summer school and correspondence courses, and schools of business, of music and of oratory, and in 1908-1909 had 331 students, 73 of whom were in the Academy.

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  • Accordingly he settled down, with some companions, at the hospital of San Girolamo della Carita, and while there tentatively began, in i 556, the institute with which his name is more especially connected, that of the Oratory.

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  • The scheme at first was no more than a series of evening meetings in a hall (the Oratory), at which there were prayers, hymns, readings from Scripture, from the fathers, and from the Martyrology, followed by a lecture, or by discussion of some religious question proposed for consideration.

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  • he accepted, while retaining the charge of San Girolamo, where the exercises of the Oratory were kept up. At this time the new society included amongst its members Caesar Baronius, the ecclesiastical historian, Francesco Maria Tarugi, afterwards archbishop of Avignon, and Paravicini, all three subsequently cardinals, and also Gallonius, author of a well-known work on the Sufferings of the Martyrs, Ancina, Bordoni, and other men of ability and distinction.

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  • The Florentines, however, built in 1574 a large oratory or mission-room for the society contiguous to San Giovanni, in order to save them the fatigue of the daily journey to and from San Girolamo, and to provide a more convenient place of assembly, and the headquarters were transferred thither.

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  • It was immediately after taking possession of their new quarters that Neri formally organized, under permission of a bull dated July 1 5, 1 575, a community of secular priests, entitled the Congregation of the Oratory.

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  • Neri continued in the government of the Oratory until his death, which took place on the 26th of May 1595 at Rome.

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  • The government, strikingly unlike the Jesuit autocracy, is of a republican form; and the superior, though first in honour, has to take his turn in discharging all the duties which come to each priest of the society in the order of his seniority, including that of waiting at table, which is not entrusted in the Oratory to lay brothers, according to the practice in most other communities.

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  • Each house can call its superior to account, can depose, and can restore him, without appeal to any external authority, although the bishop of the diocese in which any house of the Oratory is established is its ordinary and immediate superior, though without power to interfere with the rule.

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  • The Oratory chiefly spread in Italy and in France, where in 1760 there were 58 houses all under the government of a superior-general.

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  • Agnelli, Excellencies of the Oratory of St Philip Neri, trans.

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  • Before the house at Edgbaston was occupied he had established the London Oratory, with Father Faber as its superior, and there (in King William Street, Strand) he delivered a course of lectures on "The Present Position of Catholics in England," in the fifth of which he protested against the anti-Catholic utterances of Dr Achilli, an ex-Dominican friar, whom he accused in detail of numerous acts of immorality.

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  • In 1858 he projected a branch house of the Oratory at Oxford; but this was opposed by Manning and others, as likely to induce Catholics to send their sons to that university, and the scheme was abandoned.

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  • In 1859 he established, in connexion with the Birmingham Oratory, a school for the education of the sons of gentlemen on lines similar to those of the English public schools, an important work in which he never ceased to take the greatest interest.

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  • After an illness that excited apprehension he returned to England, and thenceforward resided at the Oratory until his death, r rth August 1890, making occasional visits to London, and chiefly to his old friend, R.

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  • His portrait by Ouless is at the Birmingham Oratory, and his portrait by Millais is in the possession of the duke of Norfolk, a replica being at the London Oratory.

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  • Edwards and Manek struggled to lay a bat on some wayward Oratory bowling but they did bring up a 50 opening partnership.

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  • Holy Sepulcher was not built as a parish church, but as a wayside chapel, or oratory.

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  • Much now appears very dated: Carducci's oratory, the passionate declamation on Italy's place in the world, the Roman past.

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  • epideictic oratory called " the formal lecture " .

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  • They could n't equivocate on the majesty of His oratory.

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  • It is the " hwyl, " without which Welsh oratory is considered imperfect.

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  • Capable of fierce invective, his oratory is impersonal; passionate and emotional himself, his speeches are temperate.

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  • lithe body movement Coriolanus did not quite convince in his oratory.

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  • oratory are many small oratories round the West Coast where chiefs and clansmen were wont to pray before and after voyaging.

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  • oratory of this sort.

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  • She shrugs her shoulders and tells Miss Thorne that she supposes Eleanor will have an oratory in the deanery before she has done.

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  • The German language is a lovely language for making mob oratory in.

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  • In May 1992 it was redecorated in honor of St Philip Neri, the saint who founded the oratory in sixteenth century Rome.

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  • He was ordained priest in the Spring of 1914 and in the Autumn of 1915 he joined the oratory.

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  • oratory called " the formal lecture " .

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  • oratory used to motivate British troops a century ago.

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  • During 1838 he toured the country raising the movement's profile with his brilliant oratory.

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  • Or maybe it's Cameron's lack of experience in his public oratory?

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  • It is the " hwyl, " without which welsh oratory is considered imperfect.

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  • oratory skills through the internet rather than in a face to face setting.

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  • oratory abilities and his pragmatic approach to political problems.

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  • oratory style attracted and influenced many people.

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  • Anderson entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1812 and swiftly achieved a strong reputation for pulpit oratory particularly on missionary platforms.

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  • relic preserved in the oratory of the Frankish kings under the name of " St.

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  • stage-managed conferences, Audrey always drew huge applause for her skillful oratory.

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  • tabernacle door in the secret oratory is related in the pamphlet above.

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  • wayside chapel, or oratory.

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  • After short stays at Avignon and Rome, Vincent found his way to Paris, where he became favourably known to Monsieur (afterwards Cardinal) de Berulle, who was then founding the congregation of the French Oratory.

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  • He approved the formation of the Oratory of Divine Love, a group of pious men at Rome which later became the Theatine Order, and he canonized Francesco di Paola.

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  • To meet the oratory of Burke and Sheridan and Fox, Hastings wrote an elaborate minute with which he wearied the ears of the House for two successive nights, and he subsidized a swarm of pamphleteers.

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  • He was throughout these debates celebrated for the "nervous and subtle oratory" which made him so formidable in after days.

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  • He makes an interesting addition to our conception of Shaftesbury's place in English politics, by insisting on his position as the first great party leader in the modern sense, and as the founder of modern parliamentary oratory.

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  • Though rejected by the Jesuits, who found peripatetic formulae a faithful weapon against the enemies of the church, Cartesianism was warmly adopted by the Oratory, which saw in Descartes something of St Augustine, by Port Royal, which discovered a connexion between the new system and Jansenism, and by some amongst the Benedictines and the order of Ste Genevieve.

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  • Yet in 1675 the university of Angers was empowered to repress all Cartesian teaching within its domain, and actually appointed a commission charged to look for such heresies in the theses and the students' note-books of the college of Anjou belonging to the Oratory.

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  • In the days of its greatest power Rhodes became famous as a centre of pictorial and plastic art; it gave rise to a school of eclectic oratory whose chief representative was Apollonius Molon, the teacher of Cicero; it was the birthplace of the Stoic philosopher Panaetius; the home of the poet Apollonius Rhodius and the historian Posidonius.

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  • Dionysius was also the author of several rhetorical treatises, in which he shows that he has thoroughly studied the best Attic models: The Art of Rhetoric (which is rather a collection of essays on the theory of rhetoric), incomplete, and certainly not all his work; The Arrangement of Words (IIEpi 6uv%o-Ews ovo,uarwv), treating of the combination of words according to the different styles of oratory; On Imitation (Ilepi Au170 Ews), on the best models in the different kinds of literature and the way in which they are to be imitated - a fragmentary work; Commentaries on the Attic Orators (IIEpi T(AV apXalwv prtrOpwv inro j j anopoi), which, however, only deal with Lysias, Isaeus, Isocrates and (by way of supplement) Dinarchus; On the admirable Style of Demosthenes (IIEpi Anyoa8 'ous b€t)orrlros); and On the Character of Thucydides (Hepi Tou Oovevbibov a detailed but on the whole an unfair estimate.

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  • ORATORY (Lat.

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  • His object was not to dazzle by a conformity with the artificial rules of oratory, but to move the soul of the listener by a direct appeal to his conscience.

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  • the advance of oratory and grammatical studies, H there must have been not only greater fluency of composition but the beginning of a richer and more ornate style.

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  • But to his services to Roman oratory we have to add his services not indeed of the lost literature in determining the spirit, form and style of the eras of more perfect accomplishment which followed is unmistakable.

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  • Oratory is no longer an independent voice appealing to sentiments of Roman dignity, but the weapon of the "informers" (delatores), wielded for their own advancement and the destruction of that class which, even in their degeneracy, retained most sympathy with the national traditions.

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  • Petetot, cure of Saint Roch, he reconstituted the Oratory of the Immaculate Conception, a society of priests mainly devoted to education.

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  • A visit to the English House of Lords excited boundless admiration for Lord Chatham, of whose style of oratory Grattan contributed an interesting description to Baratariana (see Flood, Henry).

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  • Fort Dodge is the seat of Tobin College (420 students in 1907-1908), a commercial and business school, with preparatory, normal and classical departments, and courses in oratory and music; among its other institutions are St Paul's school (Evangelical Lutheran), two Roman Catholic schools, Corpus Christi Academy and the Sacred Heart school, Our Lady of Lourdes convent and a Carnegie library.

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  • Native oratory abounds in figures, metaphors and parables; and a large number of folk-tales, songs and legends, together with the very numerous proverbs, give ample evidence of the mental ability and imaginative powers of the Malagasy.

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  • It fell in the crash of the Revolution, but was revived by Pere Petetot, cure of St Roch, in 1852, as the " Oratory of Jesus and the Immaculate Mary ";"; the Church of the Oratory near the Louvre belongs to the Reformed Church.

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  • The part kept by himself became the famous relic preserved in the oratory of the Frankish kings under the name of St.

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  • The story of the tabernacle door in the secret oratory is related in the pamphlet above.

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  • And believe me, at moments like this when it's late in the evening you do want to make the toasts short and sweet; this is no time for an oratory tome.It is your duty as the host to initiate the toast.

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  • So probably were the rhetorical works, especially the Theodectea; since both politics and oratory were the subjects which the father wanted the tutor to teach his son, and, when Alexander came to Phaselis, he is said by Plutarch (Alexander, 17) to have decorated the statue of Theodectes in honour of his association with the man through Aristotle and philosophy.

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  • It is the seat of Fort Worth University (coeducational), a Methodist Episcopal institution, which was established as the Texas Wesleyan College in 1881, received its present name in 1889, comprises an academy, a college of liberal arts and sciences, a conservatory of music, a law school, a medical school, a school of commerce, and a department of oratory and elocution, and in 1907 had 802 students; the Polytechnic College (coeducational; Methodist Episcopal, South), which was established in 1890, has preparatory, collegiate, normal, commercial, and fine arts departments and a summer school, and in 1906 had 12 instructors and (altogether) 696 students; the Texas masonic manual training school; a kindergarten training school; St Andrews school (Protestant Episcopal), and St Ignatius Academy (Roman Catholic).

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  • The 123rd Novel of Justinian, promulgated about the end of the 5th century, decreed "that if any man should erect an oratory, and desire to present a clerk thereto by himself or his heirs, if they furnish a competency for his livelihood, and nominate to the bishop such as are worthy, they may be ordained."

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  • Nevertheless his speech was a superb effort of oratory; for more than two hours he kept his audience spellbound by a flood of epigram, of sustained reasoning, of eloquent appeal.

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  • The slow progress of the war, the severe sacrifice of life in campaign and battle, the enormous accumulation of public debt, arbitrary arrests and suspension of habeas corpus, the rigour of the draft, and the proclamation of military emancipation furnished ample subjects of bitter and vindictive campaign oratory.

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  • part of the city is Albion College (Methodist Episcopal; co-educational), embracing a College of Liberal Arts, a preparatory department, a conservatory of music, a school of art, a school of oratory, a normal course, and a commercial department.

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  • Before the days of stage-managed conferences, Audrey always drew huge applause for her skillful oratory.

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