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opponents

opponents Sentence Examples

  • The two were well-matched opponents and their last game ended in stalemate.

  • He was one of the earliest political opponents of slavery, as distinguished from the radical Abolitionists, or the followers of William Lloyd Garrison, who eschewed politics and devoted themselves to a moral agitation.

  • She struggled out from under his body as the last of her opponents slashed at her.

  • His own messengers brought him vague news of unrest from the battlefront and news of there being new opponents at the battle.

  • He snatched her hand when none of his opponents remained standing and ran with her toward the crevice.

  • Fitch and others, of Freeman, of Wyatt and of Van Zandt - the last-named bringing him especially the goodwill of opponents of slavery.

  • Among his opponents was the Cynic Crescentius (Apol.

  • A third, in the absence of opponents, between two councils would simply solicit a special gratuity for his faithful services, well knowing that at that moment people would be too busy to refuse him.

  • On the first day of this convention the opponents to the constitution, among whom were most of the delegates from the western counties, were ready to reject it without debate, but yielded to a proposal for discussing it clause by clause.

  • He overran Buchan either once or twice, and after a serious illness defeated the earl of Buchan, one of his chief Scottish opponents, near Inverurie on the 22nd of May 1308.

  • According to the Talmud, he warned her " to fear neither the Pharisees nor their opponents but the hypocrites who do the deed of Zimri and claim the reward of Phinehas: " the warning indicates his justification of his policy in the matter of the crucifixions.

  • "Ready when you are," he called to his opponents.

  • Apt to minimize difficulties, to search for the common ground of unity in opponents, he turned aside, with a disdain which superficial critics often mistook for indifference, from the base, the violent and the common.

  • Confusion and rage blinded him, and he threw himself into the battle, not noticing the nicks and bruises his opponents inflicted upon him.

  • In 1920, after the disestablishment of the Welsh Church, of which measure he had been one of the most active opponents, he was created Archbishop of Wales, and was enthroned by the Archbishop of Canterbury at St.

  • He dispatched the last challenger and strode toward her, eyes roving for more opponents.

  • The strength of her opponents was increased by the defection of Chatelherault and his son Arran; and an even more serious danger was the treachery of her secretary Maitland, who betrayed her plans to the lords of the Congregation.

  • The three Jacobinical Directors thereupon intrigued to bring to Paris General Lazarre Hoche and his army destined for the invasion of Ireland for the purpose of coercing their opponents; but these, perceiving the danger, ordered Hoche to Paris, rebuked him for bringing his army nearer to the capital than was allowed by law, and dismissed him in disgrace.

  • Upon the failure of this attempt of his opponents, Desmoulins published a pamphlet, Jean Pierre Brissot demasque, which abounded in the most violent personalities.

  • By the end of March not only were Hebert and the leaders of the extreme party guillotined, but their opponents, Danton, Desmoulins and the best of the moderates, were arrested.

  • But the speech which most exasperated his political opponents was one which he delivered at Bradford in March 1914, just after the incident of the Curragh.

  • About the same time Martin Luther was in the full course of his protest against the papal supremacy and had already burnt the pope's bull at Worms. The two opponents were girding themselves for the struggle; and what the Church of Rome was losing by the defection of the Augustinian was being counterbalanced by the conversion of the founder of the Society of Jesus.

  • Returned to the Convention in September 1792 he developed moderate, even reactionary views, becoming one of the fiercest opponents of the Mountain, though he never wavered in his support of republican principles.

  • In 1327 the opponents of the Beghards laid hold of certain propositions contained in Eckhart's works, and he was summoned before the Inquisition at Cologne.

  • As an orator he was the leader of the opponents of the florid Asiatic school, who took the simplest Attic orators as their model and attacked even Cicero as wordy and artificial.

  • The Bohemian brethren, whose intellectual originator was Peter Chelcicky, but whose actual founders were Brother Gregory, a nephew of Archbishop Rokycan, and Michael, curate of Zamberk, to a certain extent continued the Taborite traditions, and in the 15th and 16th centuries included most of the strongest opponents of Rome in Bohemia.

  • Always notably courteous in his treatment of opponents, he showed no bitterness either towards J.

  • In two campaigns, distinguished by rapidity of movement, he met and defeated his opponents in six battles.

  • For this reason, probabilism found vigorous opponents in Bossuet and other eminent divines; and various of its excesses were condemned by the popes during the latter half of the 17th century.

  • His lyrism is vigorous, feeling, austere and almost entirely subjective and personal, while his pamphlets are distinguished by energy of conviction, strength of affirmation, and contempt for weaker and more ignorant opponents.

  • It also aroused a general feeling in the North, and when finally he was admitted to bail (in May 1867), Horace Greeley, Gerrit Smith, and others in that section who had been his political opponents, became his sureties.

  • At Edessa the result of the conflict between the Nestorians and their opponents was long doubtful.

  • Wagner foresaw the use that would be made of this discovery by the adherents of the new philosophy, and, in the usual language of its opponents at the time, strove to ward off the " misinterpretations " that they would put upon it.

  • After these adventures he returned to Scotland in March 1565, but withdrew once more before the superior strength of his opponents to France.

  • As regards the pressure of foreign competition, it was stated to be greatly in excess of the anticipations of the supporters, and of the apprehensions of the opponents of the repeal of the Corn Laws.

  • His immoralities, like his acts of persecution, were exaggerated by his opponents; but his private life was undoubtedly a scandal to religion, and has only the excuse that it was not worse than that of most of his order at the time.

  • Their opponents also had secured a friend at court and seem to have prevented any effective measure of redress.

  • Though he rejected the demand of the pope, who wished him to consent to the abolition of the compacts, he endeavoured to curry favour with the Roman see by punishing severely all the more advanced opponents of papacy in Bohemia.

  • In the Yale Divinity School his influence was powerful, and in 1833 one of his foremost opponents, Bennet Tyler (1783-1858), founded in East Windsor a Theological Institute to offset Taylor's teaching at Yale.

  • object of training the able-bodied citizens of Buenos Aires in military exercises and creating a volunteer army, ready for service if called upon, to withstand by force the pretensions of their opponents.

  • When the Democrats, however, declared such language incendiary he tried to explain it away, and by so doing offended his friends without appeasing his opponents.

  • The vigour and success with which he organized the national resources and upheld the national honour, asserted the British sovereignty of the seas, defended the oppressed, and caused his name to be feared and respected in foreign courts where that of Stuart was despised and neglected, command praise and admiration equally from contemporaries and from modern critics, from his friends and from his opponents.

  • by ecclesiastical authority, and during his whole life Siger was exposed to persecution both from the Church and from purely philosophic opponents.

  • It shows that the " sobriety " of the Antiochene scholars can be predicated only of their exegesis; their style of piety was as exaggerated in its devotion to the ideals of monasticism as was that of their monophysite opponents.

  • In this endeavour he met with vigorous opponents.

  • This army, it is true, was so inefficient that it was completely routed by the Swedish king with a most inferior force, but it was improved gradually until it learned to conquer its Swedish opponents.

  • The Federalists were charged by the Republicans with being aristocrats and monarchists, and it is certain that their leaders 1 Even the Democratic party has generally been liberal; although less so in theory (hardly less so in practice) than its opponents.

  • Now he stood forth to the world as an unscrupulous aggressor; moral force, previously marshalled on the side of France, now began to pass to the side of his opponents.

  • From his writings we derive the impression of an amiable personality, who is honestly at pains to arrive at an understanding with his opponents.

  • Epistemologically von Hartmann is a transcendental realist, who ably defends his views and acutely criticizes those of his opponents.

  • In Congress he was one of the ablest opponents of slavery, contending particularly against the Compromise Measures of 1850,1850, but he was never technically an Abolitionist and he disapproved of the Radicalism of Garrison and his followers.

  • Severus laid such stress on the human infirmities of Christ as proving that His body was like ours, created and corruptible (09ap-rov) that his opponents dubbed him and his followers Phthartolatrae - worshippers of the corruptible.2 The school of Themistius of Alexandria extended the argument to Christ's human soul, which they said was, like ours, limited in knowledge.

  • He was an Albanian, and his fellow countrymen in the Constantinople garrison at once made common cause with the opponents of the committee.

  • The severe actions of Diirrenstein (near Krems) ors the iith, and of Hollabriinn on the 26th of November, in which Napoleon's marshals learned the tenacity of their new opponents, and the surprise of the Vienna bridge (November 14) by the French, were the chief incidents of this period in the campaign.

  • Much had been done to create an efficient staff, but though the idea of the army corps command was now no new thing, the senior generals entrusted with these commands were far from having acquired the independence and initiative of their French opponents.

  • The light cavalry had been much improved and the heavy cavalry on the whole proved a fair match for their opponents.

  • Napoleon, however, failed to allow for the psychology of his opponents, who, utterly indifferent to the sacrifice of life, refused to be drawn into engagements to support an advance or to extricate a rearguard, and steadily withdrew from every position when the French gained touch with them.

  • The actual working of his mind towards that strategic and tactical ascendancy that rendered his presence on the battlefield, according to the testimony of his opponents, equal to a reinforcement of 40,000 men, was entirely undiscernible.

  • of their day, were immeasurably ahead of their times, and both also understood to the full the strategic art of binding and restraining the independent will power of their opponents, an art of which Marlborough and Frederick, Wellington, Lee and Moltke do not seem ever even to have grasped the fringe.

  • In pursuance of his conservative policy which aimed at maintaining Athens as a land power, he was one of the chief opponents of the naval policy of Themistocles.

  • From the scanty and ill-natured notices of his opponents (Anselm and Abelard), we gather that he refused to recognize the reality of anything but the individual; he treated " the universal substance," says Anselm, as no more than " flatum vocis," a verbal breathing or sound; and in a similar strain he denied any reality to the parts of which a whole, such as a house, is commonly said to be composed.

  • This difficulty was presently raised by Duns Scotus and the realistically-inclined opponents of the Thomist doctrine.

  • His opponents had confidently predicted that he would fail utterly in the House of Commons.

  • At home there were two opponents to be dealt with: the Huguenots and the feudal nobility.

  • 10 and 25 and March 6) which will remain the classic documents of the controversy, and reduced his opponents to silence, though not to surrender.

  • The most powerful missionary of Nestorianism during the 2nd half of the 5th century was Barsauma of Nisibis, whom his opponents called " the swimmer among the reeds," i.e.

  • He had considerable success at the time, but the ground he had won was soon reconquered by his opponents, except at Taghrith and the surrounding district.

  • The statesmanlike qualities displayed on this occasion were unavailing to avert the storm of indignation conjured up by Crispi's opponents in connexion with a charge of bigamy not susceptible of legal proof.

  • The Federals advanced in their turn, the Bavarians on the right, the 8th on the left, and the opponents met in the valley of the Tauber.

  • Direct opponents or repudiators of the authority of Hippocrates were rare, all generally appealing to his authority.

  • In Scotland, Brown so far won the sympathy of the students that riotous conflicts took place between his partisans and opponents.

  • Many names are quoted as partisans or opponents of the Brunonian system in Italy, but scarcely one of them has any other claim to be remembered.

  • of country, while their opponents had had time to concentrate their scattered forces.

  • So dexterously had the assembling of the reinforcements within Birdwood's position been effected, that the Turks had entirely failed to detect how the numbers of their, opponents in this area had during the last few nights been nearly doubled.

  • When Liman von Sanders (who had fixed his headquarters near Gallipoli) learned during the night of the 6th-7th that the Allies were landing in strong force about Suvla, and were also attacking Sari Bair from Anzac, and after he had satisfied himself that certain threats on the part of his opponents at other points might be regarded as mere feints, he ordered the two Turkish divisions under his immediate orders to proceed towards Suvla with all speed.

  • been rather superior in numbers to their opponents.

  • With the object apparently of ascertaining the strength of their opponents, the Ottoman forces on the afternoon of Jan.

  • Just before the last boats sheered off the masses of stores which it had been necessary to abandon were set on fire, and only from the glare set up by this conflagration were the Turks made aware that their opponents had evaded them yet again.

  • for self-protection, developed into a national movement which was to rule the whole of north-western India and to furnish to the British arms their stoutest and most worthy opponents.

  • He would ascribe them to the Kummukh (Commagenians), who seem to have succeeded the Khatti as the strongest opponents of Assyria in these parts.

  • Several subsequent risings of the ciompi, largely of an economic character, were put down, and the Guelph families gradually regained much of their lost power, of which they availed themselves to exile their opponents and revive the odious system of ammonizioni.

  • Pulpit warfare was waged between Savdnarola and his opponents, and the matter ended in his being forbidden to preach and in a proposed ordeal by fire, which, however, never came off.

  • The Piagnoni were out of power, and a signory of Arrabbiati having been elected in 1498, a mob of Savonarola's opponents attacked the convent of St Mark where he resided, and he himself was arrested and imprisoned.

  • Received at first in the ranks of the philosophes, he soon went over to their opponents, possibly more from contempt than from conviction, the immediate occasion for his change being a quarrel with d'Alembert in 1762.

  • Thenceforth he violently attacked whatever was considered modern and enlightened, and while he delighted society with his numerous sensational pamphlets, he aroused the fear and hatred of his opponents by his stinging wit.

  • The philosophers from whom Croce learned most are Vico, the author of the Scienza nuova, and Hegel, but the thought of all other thinkers flows in his writings, in conformity with its historical character, and for this reason may, for instance, be found in it traces of some of Hegel's most active opponents, such as Herbart.

  • Dirck Coornhert argued, in private conferences and public disputations, that it was wrong to punish heretics, and his great opponents were, as a rule, the ministers, who maintained that there was no room for more than one religion in a state.

  • As his explanations were not considered satisfactory, the council deposed him from his priestly office and excommunicated him; but in 449, at a council held in Ephesus convened by Dioscurus of Alexandria and overawed by the presence of a large number of Egyptian monks, not only was Eutyches reinstated in his office, but Eusebius, Domnus and Flavian, his chief opponents, were deposed, and the Alexandrine dcctrine of the "one nature" received the sanction of the church.

  • Five years later the Persians, who had been called in by the opponents of Christianity, succeeded in taking over the rule and in appointing governors over Yemen.

  • In the following year, according to Procopius, Justinian perceived the value of the Ghassanids as an outpost of the Roman empire, and as opponents of the Persian dependants of Hira, and recognized Harith as king of the Arabs and patrician of the Roman empire.

  • Six years later he was associated with his father in the wardenship of the eastern march of Scotland,, and his zeal in border warfare won the name of Hotspur for him from his opponents.

  • The Ethiopians found their most vigorous opponents in the Saite princes Tefnachthus and his son Bocchoris "the Wise" of the XXIVth Dynasty.

  • Nevertheless, his opponents made such effective use of the popular prejudice against third terms that the scheme was defeated, and Garfield was named in his stead.

  • (1734-1825), is still the standard work for that period; but its value is somewhat diminished by the author's bitterness against his opponents and the fact that he does not give chapter and verse for his statements, many of which are based on his recollection of documents seen, but not available at the time of writing.

  • The latter had fought fully as hard as their opponents, and Napoleon realized that they were no longer the professional soldiers of former campaigns.

  • In defending his proposals Mr Disraeli gave full scope to his most characteristic gifts; he pelted his opponents right and left with sarcasms, taunts and epigrams. Gladstone delivered an unpremeditated reply, which has ever since been celebrated.

  • Returning to France he fell a victim to his opponents in the massacre of St Bartholomew (15 72).

  • - (ED.) Meanwhile in Phrygia and its neighbourhood - especially in Galatia, and also in Thrace - a controversy was raging between the adherents and the opponents of the new prophecy.

  • For nearly five years (202-207) the Carthaginian Montanists strove to remain within the Church, which was as dear to them as it was to their opponents.

  • But also we are drawn by the faults of our heretical opponents to do things unlawful, to scale heights inaccessible, to speak out what is unspeakable, to presume where we ought not.

  • He engaged in the Pelagian controversy with more than even his usual bitterness (Dialogi contra pelagianos); and it is said that the violence of his invective so provoked his opponents that an armed mob attacked the monastery, and that Jerome was forced to flee and to remain in concealment for nearly two years.

  • It was his peculiar virtue that he could quote his opponents without warping their meaning.

  • His authority was undisputed; and after Leo had cleared himself by an oath of certain charges made against him, Charles restored the pope and banished his leading opponents.

  • Mazarin, in spite of all disadvantages, triumphed alike over his domestic and his foreign opponents.

  • Tirpitz advances two contentions; first, that he would have sent the navy into decisive action at an earlier stage of the war; secondly, that he would have made an earlier and more ruthless use of the German U-boats; but his opponents traverse both these claims, and in particular assert that as Secretary of State he had neglected the construction of submarines, so that Germany entered the war with a comparatively small supply of these vessels.

  • The attempts to implicate him in corrupt transactions were not successful; but his political opponents endeavoured to make capital in subsequent campaigns, out of the "Cipher Dispatches."

  • On this account Clinton has generally been regarded as the originator of the "spoils system" in New York; but he was really opposed to the wholesale proscription of opponents that became such a feature of American politics in later years.

  • Opponents of a second war with Great Britain had revived the Federalist organization, and Federalists from eleven states met in New York and agreed to support Clinton, not on account of his war views, which were not in accord with their own, but as a protest against the policy of Madison.

  • His successful opponents, however, overreached themselves when in 1824 they removed him from the office of canal commissioner.

  • On the 11th of February 1873, however, Amedeo, abandoned by his partisans and attacked more fiercely than ever by his opponents, signed his abdication.

  • Similarly the Tory opponents of the Bill were nicknamed "Anti-Birminghams" or "Brummagems."

  • That they retained the laying on of hands in their spiritual baptism was an inconsistency which their orthodox opponents did not fail to note; the human hand, argued the latter, is, like the rest of the body, no less the work of the evil creator than water, oil, bread and wine, or than the wood, metal and stone out of which altars, images and churches are made.

  • On this head there is no difference, and idealism need have no difficulty in accepting all that its opponents here contend.

  • Few of his opponents, however, questioned his own full persuasion that the Compromise Measures were vitally necessary to pacify the nation.

  • By this lexicon Teller had put himself amongst the most advanced rationalists, and his opponents charged him with the design of overthrowing positive Christianity altogether.

  • The marquises being opponents of the house of Savoy, and taking part in the struggles between France and the empire, the city often suffered severely from the fortunes of war.

  • He had taken part in the double election of 1130, had been one of the most determined opponents of Anacletus II.

  • He deliberately chose the difficult route over the French Alps because he recognized that his opponents would neither expect him by this route nor be able to concert combined operations in time to thwart him.

  • The majority, indeed, even of determined opponents of personal rule in state and church favoured Presbyterianism, particularly before 1641, when Henry Burton's Protestation Protested brought before educated men generally the principles of Congregationalism, as distinct from Puritanism, by applying them to a matter of practical politics.

  • In 1864 he did not stand for re-election, owing to an affection of the eyes, but in 1866 he was one of the first to point out the way to a reconciliation between Bismarck and his former opponents.

  • Sir George Grey, entering colonial politics as a Radical leader, had appealed eloquently to the work-people as well as to the Radical "intellectuals," and though unable to retain office for very long he had compelled his opponents to pass manhood suffrage and a triennial parliaments act.

  • Grey was manoeuvred out of office, and Sir John Hall and Sir Harry Atkinson, able opponents, took the reins with a mission to reinstate the finances and restore confidence.

  • Gomarus then became the leader of the opponents of Arminius, who from that circumstance came to be known as Gomarists.

  • Among his political opponents he had some close personal friends.

  • He died in the summer of 1904, amid the consternation of supporters and the deep grief of opponents of his Zionistic aims.

  • The Liberal party was almost swept away, and Sir John, on his return to power, put his policy into effect with a thoroughness that commanded the admiration even of his opponents, who, after long resistance, adopted it on their accession to office in 1896.

  • He had a singular faculty for reading the minds and the motives of men, and to this insight he perhaps owed the power of adaptability (called by his opponents shiftiness) which characterized his whole career.

  • Celsus and Porphyry are the two early literary opponents of Christianity who have most claim to consideration, and it is worth noticing that, while they agree alike in high aims, in skilful address and in devoted toil, their religious standpoints are widely dissimilar.

  • 9); " ye shall die in your sins," He insists to His opponents (viii.

  • Other opponents were weakened by the audacious stroke of 1223, when the justiciar suddenly announced the resumption of all the castles, sheriffdoms and other grants which had been made since the king's accession.

  • Here his evangelistic fervour attracted multitudes to his preaching, including Roman Catholics, but at the same time excited the anger of his opponents; and the result of their opposition was that after a ministry of fifteen months he was commanded by the civil authorities (27th of September 1691) to leave Erfurt within forty-eight hours.

  • The social war (90-89 B.C.) had been brought to a close by the enfranchisement of Rome's Italian subjects; and the civil war which followed it led, after the departure of Sulla for the East, to the temporary triumph of the populares, led by Marius and Cinna, and the indiscriminate massacre of their political opponents, including both of Caesar's uncles.

  • His private life was not free from scandal, especially in his youth, but it is difficult to believe the worst of the tales which were circulated by his opponents, e.g.

  • The ordinary term "Jesuit" was given to the Society by its avowed opponents; it is first found in the writings of Calvin and in the registers of the Parlement of Paris as early as 1552.

  • Their hostility to the Huguenots forced on the revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685, and their war against their Jansenist opponents did not cease till the very walls of Port Royal were demolished in 1710, even to the very abbey church itself, and the bodies of the dead taken with every mark of insult from their graves and literally flung to the dogs to devour.

  • Of the actual writings of the Gnostics, which were extraordinarily numerous,' very little has survived; they were sacrificed to the destructive zeal of their ecclesiastical opponents.

  • All these efforts at reconciliation show how clearly the problem of evil was realized in these Gnostic and half-Gnostic sects, and how deeply they meditated on the subject; it was not altogether without reason that in the ranks of its opponents Gnosticism was judged to have arisen out of the question, 7r60ev TO KaK6P; This dualism had not its origin in Hellenic soil, neither is it related to that dualism which to a certain extent existed also in late Greek religion.

  • The British government, not feeling strong enough to blockade Brest and the Spanish ports, was compelled to regulate its movements by those of its opponents.

  • One of the most formidable of his opponents was Toktamish, who after having been a refugee at the court of Timur became ruler both of the eastern Kipchak and the Golden Horde, and quarrelled with Timur over the possession of Khwarizm.

  • A skilful party-leader, Laurier kept from the first not only the affection of his political friends but the respect of his opponents; while enforcing the orderly conduct of public business, he was careful as first minister to maintain the dignity of parliament.

  • He was elected German king at Frankfort on the 30th of January 1349 by four of the electors, who were partisans of the house of Wittelsbach and opponents of Charles of Luxemburg, afterwards the emperor Charles IV.

  • ZocearLKoL g XEyXoL: Sophistici Elenchi: On sophistic (roccaTLKOS) or eristic syllogism (EpLaTLKOS avXAoytapos), so called from the fallacies used by sophists in refutation (€AEy X os) of their opponents.

  • Bold, overbearing and unscrupulous, Sinan recoiled from no baseness to put a rival out of the way; while his insolence was not confined to foreign ambassadors, but was exercised towards his opponents in the sultan's presence.

  • In that case, a victorious party would not only be without great intellectual superiority to the rest of the people, but would even be inferior to its opponents in this regard, although its outlook in general social matters might be a much higher one.

  • In 1858 the LiberalConservative party, formed in 1854 by a coalition, attempted to bring him out as a candidate for the upper house, which was at this date elective, but though he had broken with the advanced reformers, he could not approve of the tactics of their opponents, and refused to stand.

  • Gratry was one of the principal opponents of the definition of the dogma of papal infallibility, but in this respect he submitted to the authority of the Vatican Council.

  • Kanaris was undoubtedly aided by the almost incredible sloth and folly of his opponents, but he chose his time well, and the service of the fireships was always considered peculiarly dangerous.

  • The restrained sentiments of the council in regard to Hoadly found expression in a war of pamphlets known as the Bangorian Controversy, which, partly from a want of clearness in the statements of Hoadly, partly from the disingenuousness of his opponents and the confusion resulting from exasperated feelings, developed into an intricate and bewildering maze of side discussions in which the main issues of the dispute were concealed almost beyond the possibility of discovery.

  • The most able of his opponents was William Law; others were Andrew Snape, provost of Eton, and Thomas Sherlock, dean of Chichester.

  • and by his opponents; and after some hesitation George William, influenced by Ernest Augustus, fought among the Imperialists, while John Frederick was ranged on the side of France.

  • 5) Wade and Davis published in the New York Tribune the famous "Wade-Davis Manifesto," a vituperative document impugning the President's honesty of purpose and attacking his leadership. As long as President Johnson promised severe treatment of the conquered South, Wade supported him, but when the President definitively adopted the more lenient policy of his predecessor, Wade became one of his most bitter and uncompromising opponents.

  • A form of duelling with the seeds is also known among the natives, in which the two opponents divide a bean, each eating one-half; that quantity has been known to kill both adversaries.

  • The island was nearly lost to Athens by two attempts of the oligarchic faction to effect a revolution; on each occasion the popular party ultimately won the day and took a most bloody revenge on its opponents (427 and 425).

  • Another Adiaphorist controversy between Pietists and their opponents, respecting the lawfulness of amusements, arose in 1681, when Anton Reiser (1628-1686) denounced the opera as antichristian.

  • From 1848 to 1851 Lamoriciere was one of the most conspicuous opponents of the policy of Louis Napoleon, and at the coup d'etat of the 2nd of December 1851 he was arrested and exiled.

  • It is a complicated task to determine the true character and the tenets of any ancient sect, considering that almost all the information that has reached us has come from the opponents.

  • Latimer, however, besides possessing sagacity, quick insight into character, and a ready and formidable wit which thoroughly disconcerted and confused his opponents, had naturally a distaste for mere theological discussion, and the truths he was in the habit of inculcating could scarcely be controverted, although, as he stated them, they were diametrically contradictory of prevailing errors both in The only reasons for assigning an earlier date are that he was commonly known as " old Hugh Latimer," and that Bernher, his Swiss servant, states incidentally that he was " above threescore and seven years " in the reign of Edward VI.

  • In December 1529 he preached his two " sermons on the cards," which awakened a turbulent controversy in the university, and his opponents, finding that they were unable to cope with the dexterity and keenness of his satire, would undoubtedly have succeeded in getting him silenced by force, had it not been reported to the king that Latimer " favoured his cause," that is, the cause of the divorce.

  • A commission appointed to inquire into the disturbances caused by his preaching in Bristol severely censured the conduct of his opponents; and, when the bishop prohibited him from preaching in his diocese, he obtained from Cranmer a special licence to preach throughout the province of Canterbury.

  • The king is a hero of the chivalric type common in contemporary romance; freedom is a "noble thing" to be sought and won at all costs; the opponents of such freedom are shown in the dark colours which history and poetic propriety require; but there is none of the complacency of the merely provincial habit of mind.

  • The party which had carried this constitution through attacked its opponents by withdrawing the charter of the college of Philadelphia (now the university of Pennsylvania) because its trustees were anti-Constitutionalists and creating in its place a university of the State of Pennsyl vania.

  • Ignominiously defeated by Montfort at Lewes (1264) he fell into the position of a cipher, equally despised by his opponents and supporters.

  • His works are chiefly reports of his disputations, such as that which appears in the Scisme Unmask't (Paris, 1658), in which the definition of a schism is discussed with two Romanist opponents.

  • They partake of the nature of a pastoral manifesto, which does not trouble to draw any fine distinctions between the principles or motives of its opponents.

  • Henry once declined an offer of the Empire, made by the opponents of Frederick Barbarossa; and he steadily supported the young Philip Augustus against the intrigues of French feudatories.

  • The first three-andtwenty years of Sigismund's reign is the record of an almost constant struggle between Zamoyski and the king, in which the two opponents were so evenly matched that they did little more than counterpoise each other.

  • 30 heritage without a civil war, but he was speedily victorious and made his position secure by treating his opponents with great clemency.

  • Stevens was an extreme partisan in politics; and his opponents and critics have always charged him with being vindictive and revengeful toward the South.

  • Between 1848 and 185 2 the "Barnburners" and the "Hunkers," their opponents, became partially reunited, the former returning to the Democratic ranks, and thus greatly weakening the Free Soilers.

  • One of the immediate results of this triumph of his policy was the increase of Oldenbarneveldt's influence and authority in the government of the Republic. But though Maurice and his other opponents had reluctantly yielded to the advocate's skilful diplomacy and persuasive arguments, a soreness remained between the statesman and the stadholder which was destined never to be healed.

  • They were henceforth known as " Remonstrants"; their opponents were styled "Contra- Contra- Remonstrants."

  • Every effort was made by the English to prevent the Dutch from joining the league, and in this they were assisted by the stadholder, but at last the States-General, though only by the bare majority of four provinces against three, determined to throw in their lot with the opponents of England.

  • In 1306 it managed to repel the Norwegians, but in 1362, and again in 1368, it was captured by the opponents of Valdemar Atterdag.

  • Robertson and Adam Smith), and warmly recognized the worth of his opponents (e.g.

  • If Sanballat the Horonite was really a native of the Moabite Horonaim, he finds an appropriate place by the side of Tobiah the Ammonite and Gashmu the Arabian among the strenuous opponents of Nehemiah.

  • About the year 1180 Lambert gathered some of these women, who had been ironically styled "Beguines" by his opponents, into a semi-conventual community, which he established in a quarter of the city belonging to him around his church of St Christopher.

  • Athenagoras is a powerful and clear writer, who strives to comprehend his opponents' views and is acquainted with the classical writers.

  • In politics the revulsion from his particuar conclusions did not prevent the more clear-sighted of his opponents from recognizing the force of his supreme demonstration of the practical irresponsibility of the sovereign power, wherever seated, in the state; and, when in a later age the foundations of a positive theory of legislation were laid in England, the school of Bentham - James Mill, Grote, Molesworth - brought again into general notice the writings of the great publicist of the 17th century, who, however he might, by the force of temperament, himself prefer the rule of one, based his whole political system upon a rational regard to the common weal.

  • It is possible that the relations between the sexes - in this prototype of Rabelais's Abbey of Theleme - were not entirely what is termed Platonic. But there is on the other hand scarcely a doubt that the tales of licentiousness circulated by opponents are groundless.

  • Lincoln before the state convention at Bloomington of "all opponents of anti-Nebraska legislation" (the first Republican state convention in Illinois) made on the 29th of May a notable address known as the "Lost Speech."

  • Either the opponents of slavery will arrest the further spread of it, and place it where the public mind shall rest in the belief that it is in course of ultimate extinction; or its advocates willipush it forward, till it shall become alike lawful in all the states, old as well as new - North as well as South."

  • Lincoln was elected by a popular vote of 1,866,452 to 1,375,157 for Douglas, 847,953 for Breckinridge and 590,631 for Bell - as the combined vote of his opponents was so much greater than his own he was often called "the minority president"; the electoral vote was: Lincoln, 180; John C. Breckinridge, 72; John Bell, 39; Stephen A.

  • relied upon the princes and the opponents of a united and the Germany; or, to make another division, Henrys anti- strength lay in the duchies of Franconia and Bavaria, kings.

  • Meanwhile in Germany Henrys opponents had chosen Herrnann, count of Luxemburg, king in succession to Rudolph of Swabia.

  • The Romanists saw the significance of this movement and, fortunately for them, were able to profit by the dissensions which were breaking out in the ranks of their opponents, especially the doctrinal differences between the followers of Luther and those of Zwingli.

  • Masters of the situation, Maurice and his associates met their opponents at Passau in May 1552 and arranged terms of peace, although the emperor did not assent to them until July.

  • Thus ended the first stage of the Thirty Years War, although some desultory fighting continued between the League and Danish its opponents.

  • As the leaders in these meetings were men like Virchow and Bluntschli, who had been lifelong opponents of Catholicism in every form, the result was disastrous to the Liberal party among the Catholics, for a Liberal Catholic would appear as the ally of the bitterest enemies of the Church; whatever possibility of success the Old Catholic movement might have had was destroyed by the fact that it was supported by those who avowedly wished to destroy the influence of Catholicism.

  • As a whole, however, the party remained firm in opposition to any action which would strengthen the hands of their opponents.

  • Originally the opponents of the landed interest and the nobility, they were the party of th educated middle class, of the learned, of the officials and finance They never succeeded in winning the support of the workinl men.

  • In the day of their power they showed themselves as intolerant as their opponents bad been.

  • A general election was imminent, and no party dared to go to the country as the opponents of the fleet.

  • Under Mowat's successors the barnacles which always attach to a party long in power became unpleasantly conspicuous, and in January 1905 the conscience of Ontario sent the conservatives into power, more from disgust at their opponents than from any enthusiasm for themselves.

  • In meeting all the extraordinary demands resulting from the Civil War he displayed great energy and resourcefulness, and was active in thwarting the schemes of the secessionists in the neighbouring state of Kentucky, and of the Knights of the Golden Circle, the Order of American Knights, and the Sons of Liberty (secret societies of Southern sympathizers and other opponents of the war) in Indiana.

  • They preach exactly like could read and write has been much debated him, they have to bring the very same charges against their opponents, who on their part behave exactly as the unbelieving inhabitants of Mecca.

  • In fact, the Koran boldly challenged its opponents to produce ten suras, or even a single one, like those of the sacred book, and they never did so.

  • Now when we consider that at that time there were many Moslems who had heard the Koran from the mouth of the Prophet, that other measures of the imbecile Othman met with the most vehement resistance on the part of the bigoted champions of the faith, that these were still further incited against him by some of his ambitious old comrades until at last they murdered him, and finally that in the civil wars after his death the several parties were glad of any pretext for branding their opponents as infidels; - when we consider all this, we must regard it as a strong testimony in favour of Othman's Koran that no party found fault with his conduct in this matter, or repudiated the text formed by Zaid, who was one of the most devoted adherents of Othman and his family, and that even among the Shiites criticism of the caliph's action is only met with as a rare exception.

  • But what were the distinctions and sophisms of the theologians for, if they could not remove such contradictions, and convict their opponents of heresy?

  • Within the last year and a half the Egyptians had lost something like 9000 men, while it was estimated that 40,000 of their opponents had perished.

  • The Pharisees were occupied with the piecemeal realization of the dreams of their supposed opponents, which gain a vague glory from their being far off.

  • The "Nicholas" was a royal ship, and Suffolk's murder was probably instigated by his political opponents.

  • and his type thrown into the bay by a number of the supporters of his opponents.

  • The quarrel of father and son was political only, though it is probable that the Beauforts had discussed the abdication of Henry IV., and their opponents certainly endeavoured to defame the prince.

  • later planned to kidnap many of his foreign opponents.

  • The preachers became, what the nobles had been, the opponents of authority; the Stuarts were to break them and be broken on them till 1688.

  • Charles heaped honours on his opponents (Argyll was the one marquis of his name), and hastened to England.

  • Meanwhile the Cavalier party invented a system of heavily fining men who had been their opponents in the troubles.

  • He was saved by the exertions of Lauderdale, and Tarbat suggested, while Middleton adopted, a scheme for ostracizing, and making incapable of office, twelve of their opponents, including Lauderdale.

  • And so the margin of difference between the Buddhists and their opponents gradually faded almost entirely away.

  • His first resignation in 1864 was refused; but the despotic acts by which he sought to establish a dictatorship only embittered his opponents, and in September 1865 he retired from office.

  • In his own diocese no victim of the persecution is known to have suffered till after his death; and, much as he was already maligned by opponents, there are strong evidences that his natural disposition was humane and generous.

  • He had found that all his opponents had pursued one line of argument: the power to issue an Indulgence is simply one case of the universal papal jurisdiction; Indulgences are what the pope proclaims them to be, and to attack them is to attack the power of the pope; the pope represents the Roman church, which is actually the universal church, and to oppose the pope is to defy the whole church of Christ; whoever attacks such a long-established system as that of Indulgences is a heretic. Such was the argument.

  • Among the dialecticians, Socrates had used inductive arguments to obtain definitions as data of deductive arguments against his opponents, and Plato had insisted on the processes of ascending to and descending from an unconditional principle by the power of giving and receiving argument.

  • It provoked the distinction of what was true secundum fidem and what was true secundum rationem among even sincere champions of orthodoxy, and their opponents accepted with a smile so admirable a mask for that thinking for themselves to which the revival of hope of progress had spurred them.

  • After his death, the contests between his followers and their opponents grew so hitter that the dispute was referred to the papal see.

  • Hammond was held in high esteem even by his opponents.

  • Stevenson's various occasional sallies in verse and prose - his Fables for Grown Gentlemen (1761-1770), his Crazy Tales (1762), and his numerous skits at the political opponents of Wilkes, among whose "macaronies" he numbered himself - were collected after his death, and it is impossible to read them without being struck with their close family resemblance in spirit and turn of thought to Sterne's work, inferior as they are in literary genius.

  • For it was largely due to an identification of dioceses and municipal territories that the nobles of the surrounding country took up their headquarters in the cities, either voluntarily or because forced to do so by the citizens, who made it their policy thus to turn possible opponents into partisans and defenders.

  • The assertions of Otto von Pack that a league had been formed against the elector and his friends induced John to ally himself again with Philip of Hesse in March 1528, but he restrained Philip from making an immediate attack upon their opponents.

  • He rendered great services to the Protestant cause in its infancy, but as a Lutheran resolutely refused to come to any understanding with other opponents of the older faith.

  • Even the disciples of Jesus could not grasp the simplicity and profundity of his message; still less could his opponents.

  • The opponents of the dogma complained at the very outset that he was wavering, half converted by his hosts, the members of the German College at Rome, and further influenced by his own misgivings.

  • His dislike to rationalism in religion also made him one of the numerous opponents of Benjamin Hoadly's Plain Account of the Nature and End of the Sacrament.

  • Even in Berington's time, however, there was a certain tendency to increase; and the great number of conversions that followed the Relief Act of 1791 was a stock argument of opponents of the act of 1829.

  • The haunting fear of conspiracy was skilfully used by them to direct Nero's suspicions against possible opponents.

  • These innovators found, however, small support, and were defeated by opponents who used the same logical weapons with authority to back them.

  • He was again hampered by his political opponents at home, and at *the end of 1446 was recalled, on the pretext that his term of office had expired.

  • His opponents endeavoured to waylay him, but he came to London with an armed retinue and forced himself into the king's presence.

  • Accordingly, when the DemocraticRepublican party came to be formed, about 1793, it was not to be expected that its leaders would long submit with patience to the continual interposition of Washington's name and influence between themselves and their opponents; but they maintained a calm exterior.

  • In 1816 Calhoun delivered in favour of a protective tariff a speech that was ever held up by his opponents as evidence of his inconsistency in the tariff controversy.

  • Opponents of this accidentalism maintain that what seems to be the result of chance is in reality due to a cause or causes which, owing to the lack of imagination, knowledge or scientific instruments, we are unable to detect.

  • Whether he came to the throne before or after the fall of Samaria (722721 B.C.) is disputed,' nor is it clear what share Judah took in the Assyrian conflicts down to 701.2 Shortly before this date the whole of western Asia was in a ferment; Sargon had died and Sennacherib had come to the throne (in 705); vassal kings plotted to recover their independence and Assyrian puppets were removed by their opponents.

  • But though Philip appeared for a time to give way, he had made up his mind to visit the opponents of his policy with ruthless punishment.

  • He led an expedition following Sherman into the Carolinas and fought two successful actions with Bragg at Kinston, N.C. He was governor of Ohio in 1866-1867, and as such advocated the colonization of the freedmen in a restricted area, and sympathized with President Johnson's programme of Reconstruction and worked for a compromise between Johnson and his opponents, although he finally deserted Johnson.

  • The phrase was not Blaine's, but his opponents made use of it to misrepresent his attitude toward the Roman Catholics, large numbers of whom are supposed, in consequence, to have withdrawn their support.

  • From the first he ranged himself among the opponents of John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster; he was a firm upholder of the rights of the English Church, and was always eager to root out Lollardry.

  • The Caps struck at once at the weak point of their opponents by ordering a budget report to be made; and it was speedily found that the whole financial system of the Hats had been based upon reckless improvidence and c prof the wilful misrepresentation, and that the only fruit of their long rule was an enormous addition to the national debt and a depreciation of the note circulation to onethird of its face value.

  • But when the Hats became the armourbearers of France in the north, a protector strong enough to counteract French influence became the cardinal exigency of their opponents, the younger Caps, who now flung themselves into the arms of Russia, overlooking the fact that even a pacific union with Russia was more to be feared than a martial alliance with France.

  • The non-noble Cap majority now proceeded to attack the senate, the last stronghold of the Hats, and, on the 25th of April, succeeded in ousting their opponents.

  • Six months later the cabinet was reorganized, and two most bitter opponents to the recent election of President Balmaceda were accorded portfolios.

  • Not long afterwards, however, some judaizing opponents of the apostle (note the contemptuous anonymity of the TcvES in i.

  • But the gravity of the situation renders it unlikely that he would delay for any length of time in writing to counteract the intrigues of his opponents; to judge from allusions like those in i.

  • The 1 Even Huxley, the most ardent of all opponents of fishery legislation, while denying that oyster-beds had been permanently annihilated by dredging, practically admitted that a bed may be reduced to such a condition that the oyster will only be able to recover its former state by a long struggle with its enemies and competition - in fact that it must re-establish itself much in the same way as they have acquired possession of new grounds in Jutland, a process which, according to his own statement, occupied thirty years (Lecture at the Royal Institution, May 11th, 1883, printed with additions in the English Illustrated Magazine, i.

  • But, for these successes, the empire had to thank the internecine strife of its Greek opponents, rather than its own strength.

  • At the head of 16,000 men, he thoroughly routed his opponents, and, having cleared the way before him, marched straight upon Tabriz, which at once surrendered.

  • The Ottoman army which met him is said to have numbered some 52,000; but victory was on the side of their opponents.

  • Tile rebellion of the asafu d-daula, maternal uncle of the shah, was punished by exile, while his son, after giving trouble to his opponents, and once gaining a victory over them, took shelter with the Turcomans.

  • 18 1909), while at the courts of his opponents he was hated but respected.

  • His opponents, moreover, have preserved some expressions of his, with extracts from his principal work; so that our knowledge of Marcion's views is in part derived from the best sources.

  • Here his great oratorical gifts gave him a high place as one of the ablest and most eloquent opponents of the administration.

  • Most of the men on their side who had come to the front in the war, such as General Louis Botha in the Transvaal, had been opponents of the Kruger regime; they now decided to continue the struggle, largely because they trusted that the Cape Dutch, and their sympathizers in Great Britain, would be able to obtain for them a re-grant of independence.

  • Butler seems willing to rest satisfied with his opponents' admission that the being of God is proved by reason, but it would be hard to discover how, upon his own conception of the nature and limits of reason, such a proof could ever be given.

  • Here, again, Butler joins issue with his opponents.

  • His opponents argued, " if all events are foreordained, divination is superfluous "; he replied that both divination and our behaviour under the warnings which it affords are included in the chain of causation.

  • Backed by these forces, as well as by the king and the army, Franco effected some useful reforms. But his opponents included not only the Republicans, the professional politicians and those officials who feared inquiry, but also the magistracy, the district and municipal councils, and the large body of citizens who still believed in parliamentary government.

  • These exploits dismayed his opponents and kindled the enthusiasm of his friends.

  • Trendelenburg's philosophizing is conditioned throughout by his loving study of Plato and Aristotle, whom he regards not as opponents but as building jointly on the broad basis of idealism.

  • The lines of Chatham's policy were abandoned in other cases besides the imposition of the import duty; his opponents were taken into confidence; and friends, such as Amherst and Shelburne, were dismissed from their posts.

  • Turkey's opponents, on the contrary, had in recent years not only rearmed themselves and secured their financial and political position, but also made those minute and careful preparations of detail which when the time comes translate themselves into smooth concentration, and regular, consistent operations.

  • Army of interposing between Ivanov and Bulgaria led to a regrouping of the Serbian forces for the benefit of this army, which, pursuing its advantage, drove back its opponents towards the line of mountains in the upper Bregalnitsa bend (Obozna-1340-Grlena).

  • Of the eleven first named, ten appear to have been born within twenty-five years of one another; and it is noteworthy that by far the greater part of the literary activity of the deists, as well as of their voluminous opponents, falls within the same half century.

  • In none of them is any theory on the subject specially prominent, except that in their denial of miracles, of supernatural revelation, and a special redemptive interposition of God in history, they seem to have thought of providence much as the mass of their opponents did.

  • They themselves gave way to another presupposition equally fatal to true historical research, though in great measure common to them and their opponents.

  • Podébrad was none the less opposed, almost from the first, by the Romanists, who even concluded an alliance against him with their extreme opponents, Kolda of Lampach and the other remaining Taborites.

  • Both parties agreed to respect the religious views of their opponents and to abstain from all violence, and the Compacts were again confirmed.

  • Being a much better soldier than any of his opponents he gained victories at Sepulveda and Fuente de la Culebra, but his only trustworthy supporters were his Aragonese, who were not numerous enough to keep down Castile and Leon.

  • Because of his fame as a frontier hero, of the circumstance that a part of his home at North Bend, Ohio, had formerly been a log cabin, and of the story that cider, not wine, was served on his table, Harrison was derisively called by his opponents the " log cabin and hard cider " candidate; the term was eagerly accepted by the Whigs, in whose processions miniature log cabins were carried and at whose meetings hard cider was served, and the campaign itself has become known in history as the "log cabin and hard cider campaign."

  • As he characterized his opponents in general as the "pestilent herd of libertine scribblers with which the island is overrun," it is no matter of surprise that the book made him many bitter enemies.

  • Warburton's manner of dealing with opponents was both insolent and rancorous, but it did him no disservice.

  • But he was always a man of peace, and while commonly counted one of the opponents of Athanasius, he did not take a place of leadership among them as his position and standing would have justified him in doing, and Athanasius never spoke of him with bitterness as he did of other prominent men in the party.

  • After the Yorkist failure at Ludlow in 1459, it was Margaret's vindictiveness that embittered the struggle by, a wholesale proscription of her opponents in the parliament at Coventry.

  • ANDERS JOHAN, COUNT VON HOPKEN (1712-1789), Swedish statesman, was the son of Daniel Niklas Hopken, one of Arvid Horn's most determined opponents and a founder of the Hat party.

  • He had assistance from two clerics of widely differing opinions - from Edmund Grindal, who was later, as archbishop of Canterbury, to maintain his Puritan convictions in opposition to Elizabeth; and from John Aylmer, afterwards one of the bitterest opponents of the Puritan party.

  • Christian suppressed his political opponents under the pretence of defending an ecclesiastical system which in his heart he despised.

  • In 1255 an interview between the English and Scottish kings at Kelso resulted in the deposition of Menteith and his party in favour of their opponents.

  • But in June 1859 Palmerston returned to power, and it was on this occasion that he proposed to Cobden, one of his most constant opponents, to take office, and on the refusal of that gentleman Milner Gibson was appointed to the board of trade, although he had been the prime mover of the defeat of the government on the Conspiracy Bill.

  • A proposal to send the British fleet into the Baltic was overruled, and the result was that Denmark was left to her own resources against her formidable opponents.

  • In private life his gaiety, his buoyancy, his high breeding, made even his political opponents forget their differences; and even the warmest altercations on public affairs were merged in his large hospitality and cordial social relations.

  • In spite of his near relationship to the Protector's family, he was one of the most violent opponents of the assumption by Cromwell of the royal title, and after the Protector's death, instead of supporting the interests and government of his nephew Richard Cromwell, he was, with Fleetwood, the chief instigator and organizer of the hostility of the army towards his administration, and forced him by threats and menaces to dissolve his parliament in April 1659.

  • In the civil war which resulted, Henry was able to break up the league of his opponents in 1032.

  • After 1864 Hall bore more than his fair share of the odium and condemnation which weighed so heavily upon the national Liberal party, making no attempt to repudiate responsibility and refraining altogether from attacking patently unscrupulous opponents.

  • The stouter-hearted Franciscans only yielded to violence persistently applied by the soldiers whom their opponents quartered upon them.

  • He was elected deputy by the department of the Seine in 1871, and was one of the most obstinate opponents of the terms of peace between France and Germany.

  • His position was strengthened by the birth of a son (2nd of November 1470, during his exile), and by the wealth which he acquired through the confiscation of the estates of his opponents.

  • So far he and his opponents are agreed.

  • Yet his conception of this faculty as functioning only in and through motive and character, inclination and desire, certainly carries us a long way beyond the abstraction in which his opponents stuck, that of a bare faculty without any assignable content.

  • It was afterwards acknowledged that the Oudh proclamation, interpreted as Canning meant it should be, was a wise piece of statesmanship. After the fall of Lucknow Canning insisted that Sir Colin Campbell should take immediate action against the rebels in Oudh and Rohilkhand, and a number of petty and harassing operations were carried out by detached columns; but Campbell moved too slowly to bring his guerrilla opponents to book, and the rebellion was really brought to a conclusion by Sir Hugh Rose's brilliant campaign in Central India.

  • To the decree of impeachment published by the congress he replied by a notice of dissolution and a declaration of war; but he soon found that the real power was with his opponents, who effected his arrest, and condemned him first to two years' imprisonment, but afterwards by commutation to two years' exile.

  • The Bondsmen were more lavish than their opponents in their promises to the natives and even invited a Kaffir journalist (who declined) to stand for a seat in the Assembly.

  • In 1816 he became recorder of Troy, but as he sided with the Anti-Clinton faction of the Democratic-Republican Party, known as the " Bucktails," he was removed from office in 1818 by his political opponents.

  • In a speech in the Senate defending Van Buren against an attack by Henry Clay, Marcy made the unfortunate remark that " to the victors belong the spoils of the enemy," and thereby became widely known as a champion of the proscription of political opponents.

  • He was secretary of war under President Polk from 1845 to 1849, and as such discharged with ability the especially onerous duties incident to the conduct of the Mexican War; he became involved, however, in controversies with Generals Scott and Taylor, who accused him, it seems very unjustly, of seeking to embarrass their operations in the field because they were political opponents of the administration.

  • While perhaps too cautious to be the ideal leader of a young and vigorous community, his grasp of detail, indefatigable industry, and unbending integrity won him the respect even of his political opponents.

  • In 379 his party surprised and killed their chief political opponents, and roused the people against the Spartan garrison, which surrendered to an army gathered by Pelopidas.

  • On the 2nd of February 1576, after several vain attempts, he escaped from the court, joined the combined forces of Protestants and of opponents of the king, and obtained by the treaty of Beaulieu (1576) the government of Guienne.

  • Some of his opponents denied the truth of his experiments, refusing to believe in the existence of the spectrum.

  • It appears that Newton made the mistake of supposing that all prisms would give a spectrum of exactly the same length; the objections of his opponents led him to measure carefully the lengths of spectra formed by prisms of different angles and of different refractive indices; and it seems strange that he was not led thereby to the discovery of the different dispersive powers of different refractive substances.

  • Secondly, whereas it has been argued 'above that " Opinion " is necessarily included in the system, Zeller, supposing Parmenides to deny the Nonent even as a matter of opinion, regards that part of the poem which has opinion for its subject as no more than a revised and improved statement of the views of opponents, introduced in order that the reader, having before him the false doctrine as well as the true one, may be led the more certainly to embrace the latter.

  • Hamilton (Discussions, p. 541), one of his most resolute opponents, described Cousin as "A profound and original thinker, a lucid and eloquent writer, a scholar equally at home in ancient and in modern learning, a philosopher superior to all prejudices of age or country, party or profession, and whose lofty eclecticism, seeking truth under every form of opinion, traces its unity even through the most hostile systems."

  • By 1808 the opponents of slavery, found chiefly among the Quaker settlers in the south-eastern counties, began to awake to the danger that confronted them, and in 1809 elected their candidate, xIv.

  • Their opponents were led by kings whose orders were punctually obeyed from Shrewsbury to Dover and from London to Exeter.

  • The tale of the dealings of his descendants with these two classes of opponents constitutes the greater part of English history for a full century.

  • The king knew how to yield, and even opponents like Winchelsea and the earls of Norfolk and Hereford respected him too much to drive him to an extremity.

  • his opponents, seized London, and two days later defeated and slew Warwick at the battle of Barnet (April 13,

  • The king by his unwise action threw power into the hands of his opponents.

  • (1685) put the views of the opponents of the Exclusion Bill to the test.

  • On the one hand, however, he alienated even reasonable opponents by offering no guarantees that equality so gained would not be converted into superiority by the aid of his own military force and of the assistance of the French king; whilst on the other hand he relied, even more strongly than his father had done, on the technical legality which exalted the prerogative in defiance of the spirit of the law.

  • Sometimes the dominant party in the House govern~ pressed with unscrupulous rancour upon its opponents.

  • But while the king now put forward a minister notoriously able and competent to the task, his opponents put forward a man whose only claim to office was the possession of large estates.

  • A wider intelligence might have held that, let France gain what territorial aggrandizement it might upon the continent of Europe, it was impossible to resist such changes until the opponents of France had so purified themselves as to obtain a hold upon the moral feelings of mankind.

  • The second reading of the government bill was carried in the House of Lords by a majority of only ten: it would not have been carried at all if the government had not secured a much larger number of proxies than their opponents could obtain.

  • Lord Ashley and the factory reformers contended, on the one hand, that ten hours were long enough for any person to work; their opponents maintained, on the contrary, that the adoption of the clause would injure the working-classes by lowering the rate of wages, and ruin the manufacturers by exposing them to foreign competition.

  • no experience of: high office; and it had no chance of commanding a majority of the House of Commons in the existing parliament: It owed its position to the divisions of its opponents.

  • But it owed its lasting character to the benevolence of its opponents rather than to the enthusiasm of its supporters.

  • The language of the public press and of Englishmen visiting Denmark confirmed theimpression which the words of the prime minister had produced; and there is unfortunately no doubt that Denmark was encouraged to resist her powerful opponents by the belief, which she was thus almost authorized in entertaining, that she could reckon in the hour of her danger on the active assistance of the United Kingdom.

  • For, while hitherto the debate had turn.ed on the technical points whether an affirmation could be substituted for an oath, or whether a person who had declared that an oath had no meaning for him could properly be sworn, the end at which Bradlaughs opponents were thenceforward aiming was the imposition of a new religious testthe belief in a Godon members of the House of Commons.

  • The new cabinet, which was formed to resist Home Rule, did not succeed in combining all the opponents to this measure.

  • His government, in these circumstances, while it failed to conciliate its opponents, excited no enthusiasm among its supporters.

  • He was one of the organizers in Michigan of the Republican party, and in 1857 succeeded Lewis Cass in the United States Senate, serving until 1875, and at once taking his stand with the most radical opponents of slavery extension.

  • Throughout the war he allied himself with the most radical of the Republican faction in opposition to President Lincoln's policy, and subsequently became one of the bitterest opponents of President Johnson's plan of reconstruction.

  • On the 28th of April 1796, when the Republicans, hostile to the Jay Treaty, were on the point of holding up the appropriation necessary for its execution, Ames, who had just arisen from a sick-bed, made what has been considered the greatest speech of his life; before the delivery of his speech his opponents had claimed a majority of six, but the appropriation was finally passed, in the committee of the whole, by the casting vote of the chairman.

  • The calf, if calf there be, is probably a symbol of the execrable heresy of Darazi, who is frequently styled the calf by his Orthodox opponents.

  • Disturbances again broke out in 1845, the native mukatajis refusing to obey the kaimakams. The Maronites flew to arms, but with the assistance of the Turks their opponents carried the day.

  • Flamininus was one of the first and most successful of the rising school of Roman statesmen, the opponents of the narrow patriotism of which Cato was the type, the disciples of Greek culture, and the advocates of a wide imperial policy.

  • But he was well aware of how much he owed to his opponents' errors,.

  • Accusations of this kind were foreseen by May, who says in his preface that if he gives more information about the Parliament men than their opponents it is that he was more conversant with them and their affairs.

  • Moreover, much of the apparent cogency of modern scientific determinist arguments has been derived from the unguarded admissions or timorous acquiescence of their opponents.

  • If, how ever, it be argued by libertarians that no explanation is possible of the manner in which the self or the will makes its decisions and inclines to this motive or to that, while they still assert the independent existence of the self or will, then they are undoubtedly open to the retort of their opponents that upon such a theory no rational explanation of conduct will be possible.

  • We must now consider the arguments by which determinists attack the position of their opponents and the evidence which they adduce to show that the freedom of the will is no necessary postulate for moral action.

  • The truth seems to be that throughout the history of the controversy the chief arguments for either side have been provided by the extreme and exaggerated statements to which their opponents have been driven in the presentation of their case.

  • 189), although in his later years, towards the end of the Trojan war, his old opponents took his side against the Greeks under their queen Penthesileia, who was slain by Achilles (Quint.

  • He came in the end to be regarded kindly even by opponents, and he was not afraid of taking a line displeasing to his liberal friends on the Jewish question (Die Judenfrage, 1843).

  • Similarly, their opponents refute their arguments by showing that they are based ultimately upon a recognition of certain distinctions which are moral distinctions (i.e.

  • We find that this antithesis, as exaggerated by some of the Gnostic sects of the and and 3rd centuries A.D., led, not merely to theoretical antinomianism, but even (if the charges of their orthodox opponents are not entirely to be discredited) to gross immorality of conduct.

  • The truth is that, while Locke agrees entirely with Hobbes as to the egoistic basis of rational conduct, and the interpretation of " good " and " evil" as " pleasure " and " pain," or that which is productive of pleasure and pain, he yet agrees entirely with Hobbes's opponents in holding ethical rules to be actually obligatory independently of political society, and capable of being scientifically constructed on principles intuitively known, - though he does not regard these principles as implanted in the mind at birth.

  • He became one of the most prominent republican opponents of the Radical party, distinguishing himself by his attacks on the short-lived Gambetta ministry.

  • Besides preaching every day in each alternate week, he taught theology three days in the week, attended weekly meetings of his consistory, read the Scriptures once a week in the congregation, carried on an extensive correspondence on a multiplicity of subjects, prepared commentaries on the books of Scripture, and was engaged repeatedly in controversy with the opponents of his opinions.

  • The practical distinction in modern society is necessarily one of degree, and both "individualism" and "socialism" are very vaguely used, and generally as terms of reproach by opponents.

  • Little is known of his life, and that only from his opponents.

  • Under Prince Ferdinand he pursued the same despotic methods of government which had characterized his administration during the regency; Major Panitza, who had organized a revolutionary conspiracy, was tried by court-martial and shot at Sofia in 1890; four of his political opponents were hanged at Sofia in the following year, and Karavelov was sentenced to five years' imprisonment.

  • His realm was, however, threatened by dangers from without, as large numbers of his opponents had taken refuge, not only in Iceland, then recently discovered, but also in the Orkneys, Shetlands, Hebrides and Faeroes, and in Scotland itself; and from these winter quarters sallied forth to harry Norway as well as the rest of northern Europe.

  • Yet no sooner was his triumph complete, than an attempt was made upon his life by a couple of young Greek naval officers (Tserepes and Kyriakos); and three months later, the Greek elections gave a crushing majority to his political opponents.

  • The comparison of the will unable to act between two equally balanced motives to an ass dying of hunger between two equal and equidistant bundles of hay is not found in his works, and may have been invented by his opponents to ridicule his determinism.

  • While his opponents had thus suddenly become warlike, Demosthenes had become pacific. He saw that Athens must have time to collect strength.

  • But he prosecuted his translation of Plato and prepared a new and greatly altered edition of his Christliche Glaube, anticipating the latter in two letters to his friend Dicke (in the Studien and Kritiken, 1829), in which he defended with a masterly hand his theological position generally and his book in particular against opponents on the right and the left.

  • After the death of St Patrick the bond between the numerous church families which his authority supplied was greatly relaxed; and the saint's most formidable opponents, the druids, probably regained much of their old power.

  • This question aroused a controversy which waxed hottest in England, and as the Irish monks stubbornly adhered to their traditions they were vehemently attacked by their opponents.

  • To meet such formidable opponents, Brian, now an old man unable to lead in person, mustered all the forces of Munster and Connaught, and was joined by Maelsechlainn in command of the forces of Meath.

  • east of Medina, and the courage of their opponents, made the conquest a very arduous one.

  • First (as Arnobius and Eusebius reminded their heathen opponents), the allegorical explanations are purely arbitrary, depend upon the fancy of their author, and are all equally plausible and equally unsupported by evidence.6 Secondly, there is no proof at all that, in the distant age when the myths were developed, men entertained the moral notions and physical philosophies which are supposed to be " wrapped up, " as Cicero says, " in impious fables."

  • Like most gods, they had struggles for pre-eminence with Titanic opponents, the Asuras, who partly answer to the Greek Titans and the Hawaiian foes of the divine race, or to the Scandinavian giants and the enemies who beset the savage creative beings.

  • The internal features of Genesis demand some formulated theory, more precise than the indefinite concessions of the 17th century, beyond which the opponents of modern literary criticism scarcely advance, and the Graf-Wellhausen theory, in spite of the numerous difficulties which it leaves untouched, is the only adequate starting-point for the study of the book.

  • A peace advantageous to him was made in 942, and on the deaths of his two opponents, Herbert of Vermandois and William of Normandy, all seemed to be going well for him; but his guardianship of Richard, son of the duke of Normandy, aroused fresh strife, and on the 13th of July ~45 he fell into an ambush and suffered a captivity similar to his fathers of twenty-two years before.

  • Owing to Mazarins exile and to the kings attainment of his majority (September 5, 1651) quiet was being restored, when the return of Mazarin, jealous of Anne of Austria, nearly brought about another reconciliation of all his opponents (January 1652).

  • His first act was to repudiate the Henoticon, a deed of union, originating, it is supposed, with Acacius, patriarch of Constantinople, and published by the emperor Zeno with the view of allaying the strife between the Monophysites and their opponents in the Eastern church.

  • In the cities of Languedoc and Opponents Provence, to which they had been driven by Spanish of A ver- roism.

  • Originally part of Zululand the district of Vryheid was ceded by Dinizulu to a party of Boers under Lucas Meyer, who aided him to crush his opponents, and was proclaimed an independent state under the title of the New Republic in 1884.

  • Caecilian's party, however, had not waited for them, knowing them to be in sympathy with their opponents.

  • The Donatists themselves repudiated the designation, which was applied to them by their opponents as a reproach.

  • Gail imagined that there was an organized conspiracy to belittle his learning and professional success, and there was a standing quarrel between him and his literary opponents.

  • An illustration is, with the general run of mankind, more powerful to convince than an argument; and the cogency of the visible plea for the Copernican theory offered by the miniature system, then first disclosed to view, was recognizable in the triumph of its advocates as well as in the increased acrimony of its opponents.

  • Besides the works already enumerated, it contained the Sermones de motu gravium composed at Pisa between 1589 and 1591; his letters to his friends, with many of their replies, as well as several of the essays of his scientific opponents; his laudatory comments on the Orlando Furioso, and depreciatory notes on the Gerusalemme Liberata, some stanzas and sonnets of no great merit, together with the sketch of a comedy; finally, a reprint of Viviani's Life, with valuable notes and corrections.

  • He had few personal friends, and rarely mingled in general society; though bitter to opponents, he was gentle to those who knew him, and his munificent charities gave him a warm place in the hearts of many to whom he was personally unknown.

  • The chief causes of his victory over his opponents were his great popularity and the superstitious reverence paid to the episcopal character at that period.

  • Jovellanos was compelled in August to retire on account of ill healththe result, it was rumouredof attempts on the part of his opponents to poison him.

  • The first won because the general trend of the world was in their favor, and because their opponents were blind, contumacious, and divided among themselves.

  • An orator of a business-like, straightforward type, cool and hard-hitting, his spare figure, incisive features and single eye-glass soon made him a favourite subject for the caricaturist; and in later life his aggressive personality, and the peculiarly irritating effect it had on his opponents, made his actions and speeches the object of more controversy than was the lot of any other politician of his time.

  • This subject had been handed over in 18 9 3 to a royal commission, and further discussed by a select committee in 1899 and a departmental committee in 1900, but both of these threw cold water on the schemes laid before them - a result which, galling enough to one who had made so much play with the question in the country, offered welcome material to his opponents for electioneering recrimination, as year by year went by between 1895 and 1900 and nothing resulted from all the confident talk on the subject in which Mr Chamberlain had indulged when out of office.

  • Never has a statesman's personality been more bitterly associated by his political opponents with the developments they deplored.

  • During the progress of the Boer War from 1899 to 1902, Mr Chamberlain, as the statesman who had represented the cabinet in the negotiations which led to it, remained the object of constant attacks from his Radical opponents - the "little Englanders" and "Pro-Boers," as he called them - and he was supported by the Imperialist and Unionist party with at least equal ardour.

  • No English statesman probably has ever been, at different times in his career, so able an advocate of absolutely contradictory policies, and his opponents were not slow to taunt him with quotations from his earlier speeches.

  • Nothing like this campaign had been known in the political world since Mr Gladstone's Midlothian days; and it produced a great public impression, stirring up both supporters and opponents.

  • Aristarchus of Samos, Martianus Capella (the precursor of Copernicus), Cicero, Favorinus, Sextus Empiricus, Juvenal, and in a later age Savonarola and Pico della Mirandola, and La Fontaine, a contemporary of the neutral La Bruyere, were all pronounced opponents of astrology.

  • When he went to Frankfort he was still under the influence of the extreme Prussian Conservatives, men like the Gerlachs, who regarded the maintenance of the principle of the form of bitter personal hostility; in 1863 the ministers refused any longer to attend the sittings, and Bismarck challenged Virchow, one of his strongest opponents, to a duel, which, however, did not take place.

  • Having secured the dominance of the crown in Prussia and of Prussia in Germany, he could afford to make a reconciliation with the parties which had been his chief opponents, and turn to them for help in building up a new Germany.

  • Reichstag were often very unsatisfactory, and at no time did he resort so freely to prosecutions in the law-courts in order to injure his opponents, so that the expression Bismarck-Beleidigung was invented.

  • His opponents have accused him of unscrupulousness and party spirit, but not one of them can deny that he reshaped Hungary and made her the leading partner of the dual monarchy.

  • But his appeal to the country at the beginning of 1905 was unsuccessful, and his opponents triumphed by a large majority.

  • As in the case of most heresies, we have only the partisan statements of opponents.

  • Ultimately Báthory got the better of his opponents, and executed all whom he got into his hands (1595).

  • ehKOVOKX60 - T173: EtKwV, image, and KAaecV, to break), the name applied particularly to the opponents in the 8th and 9th centuries of the use of images in Christian cult.

  • But this pontiff died soon after his election; and after a delay of eighteen months, during which Frederick marched against Rome on two occasions and devastated the lands of his opponents, one of his partisans, Sinibaldo Fiesco,was chosen pope, and took the name of Innocent IV.

  • In 1793 he put to confusion his opponents who had brought about a congressional investigation of his official accounts.

  • One intrigue into which he drifted in 1791, with a Mrs Reynolds, led to the blackmailing of Hamilton by her husband; and when this rascal, shortly afterwards, got into trouble for fraud, his relations with Hamilton were unscrupulously misrepresented for political purposes by some of Hamilton's opponents.

  • When it is added that Jefferson's assertions, alike as regards Hamilton's talk 3 and the intent and tendency of his political measures, were, to the extent of the underlying basic fact - but discounting Jefferson's somewhat intemperate interpretations - unquestionably true, 4 it cannot be accounted strange that Hamilton's Democratic opponents mistook his theoretic predilections for positive designs.

  • He im- prisoned his opponents on the council and tried to arrange for an attack on Dublin.

  • He now came forward as the professed champion and leader of the democracy, and, owing to the moderate abilities of his rivals and opponents, he was for some years undoubtedly the foremost man in Athens.

  • According to the Cartesians, this quantity was directly proportional to velocity; according to their opponents, it varied with the square of the velocity.

  • Gladiators lumbered toward one another, dragging their weighty hoses like giant pythons, heads down, intent on wreaking mayhem on their opponents while the combatant did the same to them.

  • Certain symbols pulled up certain features of the ships or angles of battle, similar to how picture-symbols in her video games on earth brought up different functions, allowing her to maneuver characters in the game or review the armament and skills of her opponents.

  • HiHiHis own messengers brought him vague news of unrest from the battlefront and news of there being new opponents at the battle.

  • Jenn didn't risk looking back, but the surge of power knocked her and her opponents to their knees.

  • Opponents to secular speakers sometimes tried to trick them into saying something that would be regarded as blasphemous.

  • I would try and pick which one to battle with depending on my opponents conker.

  • Labor's opponents will answer this conundrum with: " Let us take over.

  • decryre is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power?

  • decrydiff's fans have often decried higher division opponents who rest key players and their fans for not supporting these matches.

  • Jimmy Hill What makes this game so delightful is that when both teams get the ball they are attacking their opponents goal.

  • dogmatic stance to suit the sensibilities of his opponents?

  • It is not the physical injuries she inflicts that enrage her opponents, but the social.

  • foisting unpopular policies on the party which had been attacked by our opponents in the election.

  • It was a re-arranged league game brought about because our opponents had been on something of a cup run.

  • One opposition opponents of the bill has drawn parallels with Mugabe's land grabs in Zimbabwe.

  • Follow the best trajectories by using the guardrails, but watch out because your opponents are gunning for you.

  • hecklefashioned hustings meetings with the extra edge that comes from heckling opponents in the crowd.

  • Since his opponents were Arian heretics, he is claimed as a Catholic martyr.

  • hurtleman was moving with easy, deadly grace, sending his opponents hurtling through the air.

  • Large sections of the population simply idolized him, Even his opponents acknowledged this.

  • His rush was so impetuous, that he fairly overturned several of his opponents by dashing against them.

  • I am angular in the chart and all my world class opponents are ill or injured or otherwise indisposed and I win.

  • United's next opponents are labeled " woefully inept " by the BBC.

  • No political campaign is ever perfect but by comparison our opponents appeared inept, dull and out of touch with the public.

  • Historians argue that it was the political ineptitude of his opponents which allowed Stalin to gain power.

  • inequityin argument of the opponents of choice is that it is socially divisive and exacerbates existing inequities.

  • During application the opponents wrist is extended forward while pressure is applied against their triceps tendon insertion above the elbow.

  • intimidateactively contributes to the Redwatch site as part of its strategy of intimidating political opponents.

  • ire of mid-17th century opponents.

  • I consider we are making a real sacrifice when we decide to break a lance with these opponents.

  • It's a fantastic looker, but the 147 isn't quite as well put together as some if its key opponents.

  • Matthean community as standing in the same tradition as Paul's Galatian opponents.

  • Choose sitting on that chair, watching mind-boggling, bone-crunching fights, stuffing ****ing humble pie into your opponents mouth.

  • The most popular aspect of his ministry was its many healing miracles, which even his opponents never sought to deny.

  • Their opponents then have the upper hand as they still have their presuppositions see naturalism, logic and reality.

  • nonsense peddled by our opponents that Liberal Democrats campaign on different issues in different areas.

  • odium incurred by all opponents of the bill fastened especially on Wellington.

  • opponents of hunting who regard the pursuit of a wild animal for pleasure as cruel and barbaric will be delighted by the ban.

  • The AI seemed to work in only one map so far, but our computer-controlled opponents at least seemed competent.

  • opponents apparently distracted by their own malaise, they rarely threatened another.

  • In race after race Schumacher outwits opponents by overtaking them when they are stationary in the pits.

  • However we began the second half as we had ended the first - attempting to beat opponents on our own.

  • In the Commons, one of the most outspoken opponents to the Bill was the Recorder of Bristol, Sir Charles Wetherall.

  • But if the Methil men felt supremely confident about defeating their less illustrious opponents they quickly discovered the error of their ways.

  • You're almost there now: the penultimate chapter should detail a World XI, Club XI or toughest opponents XI.

  • opponents opposition was based on ownership and use of their mark JOY in relation to, primarily, perfumes (Class 3 ).

  • Likelihood of England match-up As possible semi-final opponents for England, Ghana are unlikely to get that far.

  • outclassed opponents with some amazing possession football.

  • outplayed gifted opponents and did much to reassure a cynical Leeds public.

  • outshine lot of effort for the ' hero ' to not be totally outshone by his opponents.

  • outsmart opponents.

  • outwits opponents by overtaking them when they are stationary in the pits.

  • overcall A bid that follows a bid made by the opponents.

  • But my opponents had put me on my honor not to warn any patriot.

  • peddled by opponents of wind power.

  • ponder who our next opponents would be.

  • preempting the opponents with your side's first bid.

  • You create creatures, spells or enchantments, and then pummel your opponents with them.

  • never give up against stronger opponents but never relent against weaker ones.

  • To begin with there are the great models of the knight and his opponents, Paul being particularly resplendent in his Templar outfit.

  • What do the opponents of David Irving and the other revisionists fear?

  • A player must not join the ruck or maul from the opponents ' side.

  • Nuneaton proceeded to take their opponents apart with another three goal salvo, this time in nine minutes.

  • We do not question the sincerity of our political opponents.

  • squirts derisive jets of water at opponents from its keyhole.

  • One of Jet Li's biggest opponents in Fearless is a character called Hercules O'Brien, played by former world strongman Nathan Jones.

  • torch can jump between pickup and police car and there is a giant acetylene flashlight to set your opponents on fire!

  • toughest opponents XI.

  • tumble over in the opponents penalty area?

  • If you can, quote someone who is considered unimpeachable, if not omniscient, by your opponents.

  • The recent upsurge in violence is a clear sign of panic of the part of our opponents.

  • vanquished opponents.

  • vociferous opponents of change today.

  • The British puppet regime, headed by Balewa, had waged war on its opponents in the South.

  • opponents ' weaknesses or have pioneered a fastest growing online.

  • writhecongregation in Norwich held him in reverence and love; but his Calvinist opponents pictured him writhing in hell.

  • wrong-foot opponents.

  • Unwise admirers and malicious opponents exaggerated the theological bearings of his system in this detail; and the efforts of the Jesuits succeeded in getting the works of Descartes, in November 1663, placed upon the index of prohibited books,- donec corrigantur.

  • The Cross party charged the Tennents with heresy and disorder; the Tennents charged their opponents with ungodliness and tyranny.

  • His policy was to establish a strong central government, and he became the head of a party known as Unitarians in contradistinction to their opponents, who were styled Federalists, their aim being to main taro to the utmost the local autonomy of the various provinces.

  • Here again it first appears as a term of reproach and contempt, applied by the opponents of the king.

  • It was soon adopted (as a title of honour) by the king's party, who in return applied Roundhead to their opponents, and at the Restoration the court party preserved the name, which survived till the rise of the term Tory (see Whig And Tor y).

  • It was on this occasion that the appellation of "the Beggars" (les Gueux) was first given to the opponents of King Philip's policy.

  • Few, except the open partisans of national bankruptcy, doubted its necessity; yet so strong was the current of feeling worked up for party purposes by opponents of the measure, that Sellas achievement in having by its means saved the financiai.situation of Italy deserves to rank among the most noteworthy performances of modern parliamentary statesmanship.

  • It had its opponents, however, for Herodotus showed that sea-basins existed cut off from the ocean, and it is still a matter of controversy how far the prePtolemaic geographers believed in a water-connexion between the Atlantic and Indian oceans.

  • Thus one reform led to another; but Peter was not dismayed by the magnitude of the task, and worked vigorously in all departments with a sublime disregard for the clamour of reactionary opponents and for the feelings and prejudices of his subjects in general.

  • He recognized, however, that in the event of a great European war the two nations would in all probability be found fighting on the same side, and that if they made no preparations for concerted military action they would be placed at a grave disadvantage in comparison with their opponents of the Triple Alliance, who were believed to have already worked out an elaborate plan of campaign.

  • In public life he was remarkable for his generosity to his political opponents, and for his sense of justice and honesty.

  • He gained from the struggle a more catholic view of human happiness, at delight in the poetry of nature and the affections as well as the poetry of heroic unselfishness, a disposition to study more sympathetically the point of view of opponents, a more courteous style of polemic, a hatred of sectarianism, an ambition,, no less noble and disinterested, but moderated to practical' possibilities.

  • Though occasionally irritable in speech, in his written polemics he was remarkable for courtesy to opponents and a capacity to understand their point of view.

  • Bonaparte further brushed aside a frankly democratic constitution proposed by Daunou, and intimidated his opponents in the joint commission by a threat that he would himself draft a constitution and propose it to the people in a mass vote.

  • But, confining ourselves to what is here our special business, it is to be remarked that perhaps the heaviest blow dealt at these strange doctrines was that delivered by Rennie, who, in an edition of Montagu's Ornithological Dictionary (pp. xxxiii.-1v.), published in 1831 and again issued in 1833, attacked the Quinary System, and especially its application to ornithology by Vigors and Swainson, in a way that might perhaps have demolished it, had not the author mingled with his undoubtedly sound reason much that is foreign to any question with which a naturalist, as such, ought to deal - though that herein he was only following the example of one of his opponents, who had constantly treated the subject in like manner, is to be allowed.

  • monster of iniquity; but, in spite of the harshness and occasional cruelty with which he treated his religious opponents, for which an excuse may be found in the obstinate fanaticism of the monks,.

  • members gradually united with other opponents of Jacksonian Democracy in forming the Whig party.

  • even below the level of his old opponents; and that this was not the consequence of temporary depression naturally resulting from the accumulated load of his misfortunes, is sufficiently shown by the downright puerility of the arguments by which he seeks to justify his own successes in the St Helena memoirs, which one may search in vain for any indication that Napoleon was himself aware of the magnitude of his own discovery.

  • His letters (162 in number), addressed to persons of rank, friends, and literary opponents, throw valuable light upon the condition of the sophistical rhetoric of the period and the character of the writer.

  • He soon came to be recognized as one of the foremost debaters on those economical and commercial questions which at that time so much occupied the attention of parliament; and the most prejudiced and bitter of his opponents were fain to acknowledge that they had to deal with a man whom the most practised and powerful orators of their party found it hard to cope with, and to whose eloquence, indeed, the great statesman in whom they put their trust was obliged ultimately to surrender.

  • The tariff reform movement in England started by Mr Chamberlain had the result of giving new boldness to the opponents of Manchesterism, and the whole subject once more became controversial (see Free Trade; Corn Laws; Protection; Tariff; Economics).

  • The House passed by an enormous majority a resolution (introduced on June 25) "that in order to give effect to the will of the people, as expressed by their representatives, it is necessary that the power of the other House to alter or reject bills passed by this House should be so restricted by law as to secure that within the limits of a single parliament the final decision of the Commons shall prevail"; but the prime minister's explanation that statutory provision should be made for two or three successive private conferences between the two Houses as to any bill in dispute at intervals of about six months, and that, only after that, the bill in question should be finally sent up by the Commons with the intimation that unless passed in that form it would become law over their heads, was obviously not what was wanted by enthusiastic opponents of the second chamber.

  • A few fragments and numerous quotations in his principal book form our only knowledge of the Kitab al-Tashwir (" Book of Refutation") a controversial work in four parts, in which Rabbi Jonah successfully repelled the attacks of the opponents of his first treatise.

  • The statements that he had been a slave and was never baptized appear to be malicious inventions of his theological opponents.

  • He travelled in Italy, complained of the malice of his opponents and of the ingratitude of the king, and determined "to retire from the world before it retires from me."

  • 33), are all closely interdependent and lead at once to His discussions with His Jerusalem opponents (xii.

  • and others who forwarded the movement, and speaks too harshly of some of its opponents.

  • Yet they rejected with scorn and derision the pacific overtures of their political opponents, the Potoccy, the Radziwillowie, and the Braniscy, Prince Michal openly declaring that of two tyrannies he preferred the tyranny of the Muscovite to the 2 Michal Kazimierz Radziwill alone was worth thirty millions.

  • He was sincerely religious; but his wellmeant efforts to unite the Lutheran and Reformed Churches, in celebration of the tercentenary of the Reformation (1817), revealed the limits of his paternal power; eleven years passed in vain attempts to devise common formulae; a stubborn Lutheran minority had to be coerced by military force, the confiscation of their churches and the imprisonment or exile of their pastors; not till 1834 was outward union secured on the basis of common worship but separate symbols, the opponents of the measure being forbidden to form communities of their own.

  • He was charged with aiming at a dictatorship, with permitting or even encouraging the imprisonment, torture and execution without trial of political opponents, with maladministration of the finances and with aggression against the neighbouring states.

  • The imperturbable courtesy of his style is in striking contrast to the violence of his opponents; and it must be remembered that, in spite of his unorthodoxy, he was not an atheist or even an agnostic. In his own words, "Ignorance is the foundation of atheism, and freethinking the cure of it" (Discourse of Freethinking, 105).

  • In his nephew's interests he accepted a compromise, disclaimed before parliament the truth of the malicious rumours against him, and was reconciled formally with his opponents.

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