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oporto

oporto

oporto Sentence Examples

  • Thus the distance between New York and Oporto, following the former (great circle sailing), amounts to 3000 m., while following the rhumb, as in Mercator sailing, it would amount to 3120 m.

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  • By this time, French armies, to a great extent controlled by Napoleon from a distance, had advanced - Soult from Galicia to capture Oporto and Lisbon (with General Lapisse from Salamanca moving on his left towards Abrantes) and Marshal Victor, still farther.

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  • Soult (over 20,000), leaving Ney in Galicia, had taken and sacked Oporto (March 29, 1809); but the Portuguese having closed upon his rear and occupied Vigo, he halted, detaching a force to Amarante to keep open the road to Braganza and asked for reinforcements.

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  • Soult Passage of expected the passage of the Douro to be attempted the Douro, near its mouth, with fishing craft; but Wellesley, by May 12,1809, a daring surprise, crossed (May 12) close above Oporto, and also by a ford higher up. After some fighting Oporto was taken, and Soult driven back.

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  • Pedro's famous army of 7500 men who landed at the Mindello and occupied Oporto.

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  • The stirring incidents in the political emancipation of Portugal inspired his muse, and he describes the bitterness of exile, the adventurous expedition to Terceira, the heroic defence of Oporto, and the final combats of liberty.

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  • See Dr Theophilo Braga, Historia do theatro portuguez; a baixa comedia e a opera (Oporto, 1871); F.

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  • In October 1848 Cibrario was made senator, and after the battle of Novara (March 1849), when Charles Albert abdicated and retired to a monastery near Oporto, Cibrario and Count Giacinto di Collegno were sent as representatives of the senate to express the sympathy of that body with the fallen king.

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  • He reached Oporto on the 28th of May, and after staying there for a month returned to Turin, which he reached just before the news of Charles Albert's death.

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  • That same night he departed alone and made his way to Oporto, where he retired into a monastery and died on the 28th of July 1849.

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  • Besides the general works on modern Italy, see the Marquis Costa de Beauregard's interesting volumes La Jeunesse du roi Charles Albert (Paris, 1899) and Novare et Oporto (1890), based on the king's letters and the journal of Sylvain Costa, his faithful equerry, though the author's views are those of an old-fashioned Savoyard who dislikes the idea of Italian unity; Ernesto Masi's Il Segreto del Re Carlo Alberto (Bologna, 1891) is a very illuminating essay; Domenico Perrero, Gli Ultim2 Reali di Savoia (Turin, 1889); L.

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  • The bridge is similar to that at Oporto, also designed by Seyrig.

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  • He drove the French out of Oporto by a singularly bold and fortunate attack, and then prepared to march against Madrid by the valley of the Tagus.

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  • of Morocco, Madrid, Lisbon and Oporto were added, and Spain was again invaded in 1119 and 1121, but the tide had turned, the French having assisted the Aragonese to recover Saragossa.

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  • the Revista Litteraria (Oporto, 1839), iii.

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  • Oporto, the seat of the outbreak, had no connexion by sea with any place known to be infected, and all attempts to trace introduction ended in speculation or assumption.

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  • the selection of Oporto and the escape of other places.

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  • Through him the suspicion was conveyed to the Medical Times and Gazette, in which the suggestion of plague at Oporto was made before any public mention of it in the town itself.

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  • distant, and one at Lisbon, in the person of the distinguished bacteriologist, Professor Camara .Pestana, who contracted the disease in making a post-mortem at Oporto, and died in Lisbon.

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  • Of the lower animals, mice, rats, guinea-pigs, rabbits, squirrels and monkeys are susceptible to the bacillus; horses, cattle, sheep, goats, pigs, dogs and cats are more or less resistant, but cats and dogs have been known to die of plague (Oporto, Daman, Cutch and Poona).

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  • In the Bombay hospitals it was about 70% among the former, and between 30 and 40% among the latter, which was much the same as in Oporto, Sydney and Cape Town.

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  • One such case occurred at Glasgow, and another at Oporto.

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  • The Oporto instance is still more conclusive.

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  • Two little girls had plague at Argoncilhe, a suburb some miles from Oporto, and were the only cases which occurred in that place.

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  • Their father was a riverside labourer, who lodged during the week in Oporto, but went home for Sunday.

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  • Similarly, at Oporto, personal connexion was traced in all the earlier cases; there was no mortality among rats, and no evidence to connect them with the outbreak (Jorge).

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  • Again, in Oporto there is an area which combines every possible sanitary defect - dense overcrowding, great poverty, no light, no air, no drainage, no scavenging, water brought in buckets.

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  • Wines Of Portugal In the north-east of Portugal, not far from the town of Oporto - from which it takes its name and whence it is exported - is produced the wine, unique in its full-bodied and generous character, known as port.

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  • above Oporto.

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  • The second racking takes place in March or April, and the wine is now placed in casks and sent to Oporto, where it is stored in large over-ground buildings termed lodges.

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  • In the period preceding the 'seventies of the last century practically the whole of the wine exported from Oporto came to Great Britain.

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  • The trade with the rest of the world, however, has gradually grown since then, the figures being as follows: Exports of Wine from Oporto.

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  • The growth of the export trade from Oporto with the rest of the world is principally due to the enormous increase in the quantity of wine sent to South America, chiefly Brazil, but only a small proportion of this (probably one-eighth) is port wine proper.

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  • These facts also account for the apparent anomaly that the exports from Oporto are much higher than the total production of wine in the Alto Douro.

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  • The main wine-growing district outside that of Oporto is in the neighbourhood of Lisbon.

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  • 1647), a Portuguese Jew of noble family, was born at Oporto towards the close of the 16th century.

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  • The harbours of Lisbon and Oporto are hardly inferior in beauty to those of Naples and Constantinople.

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  • The Mesozoic beds form an irregular triangle extending from Lisbon and Torres Novas on the south to Oporto on the north.

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  • Lisbon, Coimbra, Evora and Oporto have mean temperatures between 60° and 61.5° F., and the daily variation nowhere exceeds 23°.

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  • The chief towns of Portugal are Lisbon (pop. 1900, 356,009), the capital and principal seaport; Oporto (167,955), the capital of the northern provinces and, after Lisbon, the most important centre of trade; the seaports of Setubal (22,074), Ilhavo (12,617), Povoa de Varzim (12,623), Tavira (12,175), Faro (11,789),(11,789), Ovar (10,462), Olhao (10,009) Vianna do Castello (io,000), Aveiro (9975), Lagos (8291), Leixoes (7690) and Figueira da Foz (6221); and the inland cities or towns of Braga (24,202), Louie (22,478), Coimbra (18,144), Evora (16,020), Covilha (15,469), Elvas (13,981), Portalegre (11,820), Palmella (11,478), Torres Novas (10,746), Silves (9687), Lamego (9471), Guimaraes (9104), Beja (8885), Santarem (8628),(8628), Vizeu (8057), Estremoz (7920), Monchique (7345), Castello Branco (7288), Abrantes (7255), Torres Vedras (6900), Thomar (6888), Villa Real (6716), Chaves (6388), Guarda (6124), Cintra (5914), Braganza (5535), Mafra (4769), Leiria (4459), Batalha (3858), Almeida (2330), Alcobaga (2309), Bussaco (1661).

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  • The most important internal waterways are the lower Tagus and the Douro between Oporto and the Paiz do Vinho.

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  • The postal and telegraphic services are adequate; tel° p hone systems are installed in Lisbon, Oporto and other large towns; and the Eastern Telegraph Co.

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  • Lisbon and Oporto; conspicuous among these are the filigree ornaments which are bought by the peasant women as investments and by foreign visitors as curiosities.

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  • The province of Douro, another administrative division of less antiquity, comprised the present districts of Aveiro and Oporto, or part of Beira and EntreMinho-e-Douro.

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  • The six ancient provinces were subdivided on the 28th of June 1833 into districts, each named after its chief town, as follows: Entre-Minho-e-Douro into Vianna do Castello, Braga, Oporto; Traz-os-Montes, into Villa Real, Braganza; Beira, into Aveiro, Vizeu, Coimbra, Guarda, Castello Branco; Estremadura, into Leiria, Santarem, Lisbon; Alemtejo, into Portalegre, Evora, Beja; Algarve was renamed Faro.

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  • The three courts of appeal (tribunaes de relacao) sat at Lisbon, Oporto and Ponta Delgada (Azores), and there was a Supreme Court in Lisbon.

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  • There are fourteen dioceses, of which Oporto is the most important.

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  • In 1905 there were state lyceums in each district capital and in Guimardes, Lamego and Amarante; 5 municipal lyceums, at Celorico de Basto, Chaves, Ponte de Lima, Povoa de Varzim and Setubal; military and naval colleges; a secondary school for girls in Lisbon; numerous private secondary schools and ecclesiastical seminaries; industrial, commercial and technical schools; and pilot schools at Lisbon, Oporto, Faro and Ponta Delgada (Azores).

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  • Other important educational institutions are described under Lisbon and Oporto.

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  • Its name (Portucalia, Terra portucalensis) was derived from the little seaport of Portus Cale or Villa Nova de Gaia, now a suburb of Oporto, at the mouth of the Douro.

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  • But on the 15th of March 1147 Alphonso stormed the fortress of Santarem, and about the same time a band of crusaders on their way to Palestine landed at Oporto and volunteered for the impending siege of Lisbon.

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  • Finally he had quarrelled with Martinho Rodrigues, the unpopular bishop of Oporto, who was besieged for five months in his palace and then forced to seek redress in Rome (1209).

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  • This company met with strong opposition, culminating in a rising at Oporto (February 1757), which was savagely suppressed.

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  • The Spanish garrison in Oporto expelled the French governor and declared for the Braganzas, compelling Junot to march towards the north.

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  • He left Lisbon under the control of a regency, headed by the bishop of Oporto, who applied to Great Britain for help, promoted an insurrection against the French, and organized juntas (committees) of government in the larger towns.

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  • In March 1809 the second invasion of Portugal began; Soult crossed the Galician frontier and captured Oporto, while an auxiliary force under General Lapisse advanced from Salamanca.

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  • On the 12th of May he forced the passage of the Douro, subsequently retaking Oporto and pursuing Soult into Spain.

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  • In 1817 a military revolt (pronunciamento) in Lisbon was crushed by Beresford, and the leader, General Gomes Freire de Andrade, was executed; but on the 16th of August 1820, after Beresford had sailed to Brazil to secure the return of John VI., a second rising took place in Oporto.

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  • Joao Carlos de Saldanha de Oliveira e Daun, count The of Saldanha and commander of the army in Oporto.

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  • Pedro aboard the flagship. In July they reached Portugal and occupied Oporto, but the expected constitutionalist rising did not take place.

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  • Pedro in Oporto from July 1832 to July 1833, when the duke of Terceira and Captain Charles Napier, who had succeeded Sartorius, effected a daring and successful diversion which resulted in the capture of Lisbon (July 24, 1833).

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  • Oporto was field by a revolutionary junta, and Saldanha, who had become prime minister, persuaded the Quadruple Alliance to intervene.

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  • In June 1847 the Oporto junta surrendered, under promise of an amnesty, to a combined British and Spanish force, and the convention of Gramido (July 24, 1847) ended the war.

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  • Barros Gomes was then able to yield under protest; but disturbances at once broke out in Lisbon and Oporto, and the ministry resigned.

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  • The defeat of the Portuguese was the chief cause of a serious military rising in Oporto, which broke out on the 30th of January 1891.

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  • In 1902 the students at Coimbra and Oporto organized an agitation against the proposed conversion of the gold debt; and anti-clerical riots, followed by a strike, rendered necessary the proclamation of martial law in Aveiro.

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  • In January 1903 an insurrection of peasants armed with scythes took place at Fundao; the imposition of a new market tax provoked riots at Coimbra in March; a serious strike of weavers took place at Oporto in June.

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  • In November 1902, while King Carlos was in England, a military rising was organized in Oporto, but never took place.

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  • and Oporto were returned by large majorities.

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  • Periodicals containing valuable historical matter are the Archivo historico portuguez (Lisbon, 1903, &c.), the Boletim of the Lisbon Geographical Society (1873, &c.), and Portugalia (Oporto, 1898, &c.).

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  • Gomes Coelho, better known as Julio Diniz, records his experiences of English society in Oporto in A Familia ingleza, and for his romantic idealism he has been dubbed British; Portuguese critics have accused him of imitating Dickens.

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  • Circumstances were against him, however, and the count of Castelmelhor, fearing his influence at court, had him exiled first to Oporto and then to Coimbra; but in both these places he continued his work of preaching, and the reform of the Inquisition also occupied his attention.

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  • Carel, Vieira, sa vie et ses oeuvres (Paris, 1879); Luiz Cabral, Vieira, biog., caractere, eloquence (Paris, 1900); idem, Vieira pregador (2 vols., Oporto, 1901); Sotero dos Reis, Curso de litteratura Portugueza e Brazileira, iii.

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  • In 1809, after his defeat by Sir John Moore, he invadedPortugal and took Oporto, but, busying himself with the political settlement of his conquests in the French interests and, as he hoped, for his own ultimate benefit as a possible candidate for the throne, he neglected to advance upon Lisbon, and was eventually dislodged from Oporto by Sir Arthur Wellesley, making a painful and almost disastrous retreat over the mountains.

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  • Oporto >>

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  • HENRY OF PORTUGAL, surnamed the "Navigator" (1394-1460), duke of Viseu, governor of the Algarve, was born at Oporto on the 4th of March 1394.

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  • The Douro (485 m.) and the Ebro (466 m.) flow respectively south-west to the Atlantic at Oporto, and south-east to the Mediterranean at Cape Tortosa, from their sources in the great northern watershed.

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  • Leite do Vasconellos, Dialectos beirei (Oporto, I 884), and Sur le dialecte portugais de Macao (Lisbon, 1892).

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  • below Oporto at Sao Pao da Foz.

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  • On its way through Portugal the Douro traverses the Paiz do Vinho, one of the richest wine-producing territories in the world; large quantities of wine are conveyed to Oporto in sailing boats.

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  • Purchase a bottle or two of quality port from Oporto, or fine sherry from Jerez.

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  • Thus the distance between New York and Oporto, following the former (great circle sailing), amounts to 3000 m., while following the rhumb, as in Mercator sailing, it would amount to 3120 m.

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  • By this time, French armies, to a great extent controlled by Napoleon from a distance, had advanced - Soult from Galicia to capture Oporto and Lisbon (with General Lapisse from Salamanca moving on his left towards Abrantes) and Marshal Victor, still farther.

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  • Soult (over 20,000), leaving Ney in Galicia, had taken and sacked Oporto (March 29, 1809); but the Portuguese having closed upon his rear and occupied Vigo, he halted, detaching a force to Amarante to keep open the road to Braganza and asked for reinforcements.

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  • Soult Passage of expected the passage of the Douro to be attempted the Douro, near its mouth, with fishing craft; but Wellesley, by May 12,1809, a daring surprise, crossed (May 12) close above Oporto, and also by a ford higher up. After some fighting Oporto was taken, and Soult driven back.

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  • Pedro's famous army of 7500 men who landed at the Mindello and occupied Oporto.

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  • The stirring incidents in the political emancipation of Portugal inspired his muse, and he describes the bitterness of exile, the adventurous expedition to Terceira, the heroic defence of Oporto, and the final combats of liberty.

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  • See Dr Theophilo Braga, Historia do theatro portuguez; a baixa comedia e a opera (Oporto, 1871); F.

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  • In October 1848 Cibrario was made senator, and after the battle of Novara (March 1849), when Charles Albert abdicated and retired to a monastery near Oporto, Cibrario and Count Giacinto di Collegno were sent as representatives of the senate to express the sympathy of that body with the fallen king.

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  • He reached Oporto on the 28th of May, and after staying there for a month returned to Turin, which he reached just before the news of Charles Albert's death.

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  • That same night he departed alone and made his way to Oporto, where he retired into a monastery and died on the 28th of July 1849.

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  • Besides the general works on modern Italy, see the Marquis Costa de Beauregard's interesting volumes La Jeunesse du roi Charles Albert (Paris, 1899) and Novare et Oporto (1890), based on the king's letters and the journal of Sylvain Costa, his faithful equerry, though the author's views are those of an old-fashioned Savoyard who dislikes the idea of Italian unity; Ernesto Masi's Il Segreto del Re Carlo Alberto (Bologna, 1891) is a very illuminating essay; Domenico Perrero, Gli Ultim2 Reali di Savoia (Turin, 1889); L.

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  • The bridge is similar to that at Oporto, also designed by Seyrig.

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  • They are much used to adulterate those of Oporto, or, after undergoing the blending operation termed compage, are passed off as Bordeaux wines in France.

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  • He drove the French out of Oporto by a singularly bold and fortunate attack, and then prepared to march against Madrid by the valley of the Tagus.

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  • of Morocco, Madrid, Lisbon and Oporto were added, and Spain was again invaded in 1119 and 1121, but the tide had turned, the French having assisted the Aragonese to recover Saragossa.

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  • the Revista Litteraria (Oporto, 1839), iii.

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  • Oporto, the seat of the outbreak, had no connexion by sea with any place known to be infected, and all attempts to trace introduction ended in speculation or assumption.

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  • the selection of Oporto and the escape of other places.

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  • Through him the suspicion was conveyed to the Medical Times and Gazette, in which the suggestion of plague at Oporto was made before any public mention of it in the town itself.

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  • distant, and one at Lisbon, in the person of the distinguished bacteriologist, Professor Camara .Pestana, who contracted the disease in making a post-mortem at Oporto, and died in Lisbon.

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  • Of the lower animals, mice, rats, guinea-pigs, rabbits, squirrels and monkeys are susceptible to the bacillus; horses, cattle, sheep, goats, pigs, dogs and cats are more or less resistant, but cats and dogs have been known to die of plague (Oporto, Daman, Cutch and Poona).

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  • In the Bombay hospitals it was about 70% among the former, and between 30 and 40% among the latter, which was much the same as in Oporto, Sydney and Cape Town.

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  • Success was somewhat noisily claimed for an improved method tried in Oporto, but the evidence is of little or no value.

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  • One such case occurred at Glasgow, and another at Oporto.

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  • The Oporto instance is still more conclusive.

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  • Two little girls had plague at Argoncilhe, a suburb some miles from Oporto, and were the only cases which occurred in that place.

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  • Their father was a riverside labourer, who lodged during the week in Oporto, but went home for Sunday.

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  • Similarly, at Oporto, personal connexion was traced in all the earlier cases; there was no mortality among rats, and no evidence to connect them with the outbreak (Jorge).

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  • Again, in Oporto there is an area which combines every possible sanitary defect - dense overcrowding, great poverty, no light, no air, no drainage, no scavenging, water brought in buckets.

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  • Wines Of Portugal In the north-east of Portugal, not far from the town of Oporto - from which it takes its name and whence it is exported - is produced the wine, unique in its full-bodied and generous character, known as port.

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  • above Oporto.

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  • The second racking takes place in March or April, and the wine is now placed in casks and sent to Oporto, where it is stored in large over-ground buildings termed lodges.

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  • In the period preceding the 'seventies of the last century practically the whole of the wine exported from Oporto came to Great Britain.

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  • The trade with the rest of the world, however, has gradually grown since then, the figures being as follows: Exports of Wine from Oporto.

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  • The growth of the export trade from Oporto with the rest of the world is principally due to the enormous increase in the quantity of wine sent to South America, chiefly Brazil, but only a small proportion of this (probably one-eighth) is port wine proper.

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  • These facts also account for the apparent anomaly that the exports from Oporto are much higher than the total production of wine in the Alto Douro.

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  • The main wine-growing district outside that of Oporto is in the neighbourhood of Lisbon.

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  • 1647), a Portuguese Jew of noble family, was born at Oporto towards the close of the 16th century.

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  • The harbours of Lisbon and Oporto are hardly inferior in beauty to those of Naples and Constantinople.

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  • The Mesozoic beds form an irregular triangle extending from Lisbon and Torres Novas on the south to Oporto on the north.

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  • Lisbon, Coimbra, Evora and Oporto have mean temperatures between 60° and 61.5° F., and the daily variation nowhere exceeds 23°.

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  • The chief towns of Portugal are Lisbon (pop. 1900, 356,009), the capital and principal seaport; Oporto (167,955), the capital of the northern provinces and, after Lisbon, the most important centre of trade; the seaports of Setubal (22,074), Ilhavo (12,617), Povoa de Varzim (12,623), Tavira (12,175), Faro (11,789),(11,789), Ovar (10,462), Olhao (10,009) Vianna do Castello (io,000), Aveiro (9975), Lagos (8291), Leixoes (7690) and Figueira da Foz (6221); and the inland cities or towns of Braga (24,202), Louie (22,478), Coimbra (18,144), Evora (16,020), Covilha (15,469), Elvas (13,981), Portalegre (11,820), Palmella (11,478), Torres Novas (10,746), Silves (9687), Lamego (9471), Guimaraes (9104), Beja (8885), Santarem (8628),(8628), Vizeu (8057), Estremoz (7920), Monchique (7345), Castello Branco (7288), Abrantes (7255), Torres Vedras (6900), Thomar (6888), Villa Real (6716), Chaves (6388), Guarda (6124), Cintra (5914), Braganza (5535), Mafra (4769), Leiria (4459), Batalha (3858), Almeida (2330), Alcobaga (2309), Bussaco (1661).

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  • The most important internal waterways are the lower Tagus and the Douro between Oporto and the Paiz do Vinho.

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  • The postal and telegraphic services are adequate; tel° p hone systems are installed in Lisbon, Oporto and other large towns; and the Eastern Telegraph Co.

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  • Every district has its vineyards, the finest of which are in the Paiz do Vinho (see Oporto and Wine).

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  • Lisbon and Oporto; conspicuous among these are the filigree ornaments which are bought by the peasant women as investments and by foreign visitors as curiosities.

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  • The metric system of weights and measures has been officially adopted, but many older standards are used, such as the libra (1.012 lb avoirdupois), alqueire (0.36 imperial bushel), moio (2.78 imp. bushels), almude of Lisbon (3.7 imp. gallons) and almude of Oporto (5.6 imp. gallons).

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  • The province of Douro, another administrative division of less antiquity, comprised the present districts of Aveiro and Oporto, or part of Beira and EntreMinho-e-Douro.

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  • The six ancient provinces were subdivided on the 28th of June 1833 into districts, each named after its chief town, as follows: Entre-Minho-e-Douro into Vianna do Castello, Braga, Oporto; Traz-os-Montes, into Villa Real, Braganza; Beira, into Aveiro, Vizeu, Coimbra, Guarda, Castello Branco; Estremadura, into Leiria, Santarem, Lisbon; Alemtejo, into Portalegre, Evora, Beja; Algarve was renamed Faro.

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  • The three courts of appeal (tribunaes de relacao) sat at Lisbon, Oporto and Ponta Delgada (Azores), and there was a Supreme Court in Lisbon.

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  • There are fourteen dioceses, of which Oporto is the most important.

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  • In 1905 there were state lyceums in each district capital and in Guimardes, Lamego and Amarante; 5 municipal lyceums, at Celorico de Basto, Chaves, Ponte de Lima, Povoa de Varzim and Setubal; military and naval colleges; a secondary school for girls in Lisbon; numerous private secondary schools and ecclesiastical seminaries; industrial, commercial and technical schools; and pilot schools at Lisbon, Oporto, Faro and Ponta Delgada (Azores).

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  • Other important educational institutions are described under Lisbon and Oporto.

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  • Its name (Portucalia, Terra portucalensis) was derived from the little seaport of Portus Cale or Villa Nova de Gaia, now a suburb of Oporto, at the mouth of the Douro.

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  • But on the 15th of March 1147 Alphonso stormed the fortress of Santarem, and about the same time a band of crusaders on their way to Palestine landed at Oporto and volunteered for the impending siege of Lisbon.

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  • Finally he had quarrelled with Martinho Rodrigues, the unpopular bishop of Oporto, who was besieged for five months in his palace and then forced to seek redress in Rome (1209).

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  • This company met with strong opposition, culminating in a rising at Oporto (February 1757), which was savagely suppressed.

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  • The Spanish garrison in Oporto expelled the French governor and declared for the Braganzas, compelling Junot to march towards the north.

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  • He left Lisbon under the control of a regency, headed by the bishop of Oporto, who applied to Great Britain for help, promoted an insurrection against the French, and organized juntas (committees) of government in the larger towns.

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  • In March 1809 the second invasion of Portugal began; Soult crossed the Galician frontier and captured Oporto, while an auxiliary force under General Lapisse advanced from Salamanca.

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  • On the 12th of May he forced the passage of the Douro, subsequently retaking Oporto and pursuing Soult into Spain.

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  • In 1817 a military revolt (pronunciamento) in Lisbon was crushed by Beresford, and the leader, General Gomes Freire de Andrade, was executed; but on the 16th of August 1820, after Beresford had sailed to Brazil to secure the return of John VI., a second rising took place in Oporto.

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  • Joao Carlos de Saldanha de Oliveira e Daun, count The of Saldanha and commander of the army in Oporto.

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  • Pedro aboard the flagship. In July they reached Portugal and occupied Oporto, but the expected constitutionalist rising did not take place.

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  • Pedro in Oporto from July 1832 to July 1833, when the duke of Terceira and Captain Charles Napier, who had succeeded Sartorius, effected a daring and successful diversion which resulted in the capture of Lisbon (July 24, 1833).

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  • Oporto was field by a revolutionary junta, and Saldanha, who had become prime minister, persuaded the Quadruple Alliance to intervene.

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  • In June 1847 the Oporto junta surrendered, under promise of an amnesty, to a combined British and Spanish force, and the convention of Gramido (July 24, 1847) ended the war.

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  • Barros Gomes was then able to yield under protest; but disturbances at once broke out in Lisbon and Oporto, and the ministry resigned.

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  • The defeat of the Portuguese was the chief cause of a serious military rising in Oporto, which broke out on the 30th of January 1891.

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  • In 1902 the students at Coimbra and Oporto organized an agitation against the proposed conversion of the gold debt; and anti-clerical riots, followed by a strike, rendered necessary the proclamation of martial law in Aveiro.

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  • In January 1903 an insurrection of peasants armed with scythes took place at Fundao; the imposition of a new market tax provoked riots at Coimbra in March; a serious strike of weavers took place at Oporto in June.

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  • In November 1902, while King Carlos was in England, a military rising was organized in Oporto, but never took place.

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  • and Oporto were returned by large majorities.

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  • Periodicals containing valuable historical matter are the Archivo historico portuguez (Lisbon, 1903, &c.), the Boletim of the Lisbon Geographical Society (1873, &c.), and Portugalia (Oporto, 1898, &c.).

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  • Gomes Coelho, better known as Julio Diniz, records his experiences of English society in Oporto in A Familia ingleza, and for his romantic idealism he has been dubbed British; Portuguese critics have accused him of imitating Dickens.

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  • Circumstances were against him, however, and the count of Castelmelhor, fearing his influence at court, had him exiled first to Oporto and then to Coimbra; but in both these places he continued his work of preaching, and the reform of the Inquisition also occupied his attention.

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  • Carel, Vieira, sa vie et ses oeuvres (Paris, 1879); Luiz Cabral, Vieira, biog., caractere, eloquence (Paris, 1900); idem, Vieira pregador (2 vols., Oporto, 1901); Sotero dos Reis, Curso de litteratura Portugueza e Brazileira, iii.

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  • In 1809, after his defeat by Sir John Moore, he invadedPortugal and took Oporto, but, busying himself with the political settlement of his conquests in the French interests and, as he hoped, for his own ultimate benefit as a possible candidate for the throne, he neglected to advance upon Lisbon, and was eventually dislodged from Oporto by Sir Arthur Wellesley, making a painful and almost disastrous retreat over the mountains.

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  • Behaim relates that in 734 - a date which is probably a misprint for 714 - and after the Moors had conquered Spain and Portugal, the island of Antilia or "Septe Cidade" was colonized by Christian refugees under the archbishop of Oporto and six bishops.

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  • HENRY OF PORTUGAL, surnamed the "Navigator" (1394-1460), duke of Viseu, governor of the Algarve, was born at Oporto on the 4th of March 1394.

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  • portuguezas (Lisbon, 1892); Alves, Dom Henrique o Infante (Oporto, 1894); Archivo dos Acores (Ponta Delgada, 1878-1894); Gomes Eannes de Azurara, Chronica do descobrimento e conquista de Guine, ed.

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  • The Douro (485 m.) and the Ebro (466 m.) flow respectively south-west to the Atlantic at Oporto, and south-east to the Mediterranean at Cape Tortosa, from their sources in the great northern watershed.

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  • Coelho, Theoria da conjugacao em latim e portuguez (Lisbon, 1871), and Questoes da lingua portugueza (Oporto, 1874).

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  • Leite do Vasconellos, Dialectos beirei (Oporto, I 884), and Sur le dialecte portugais de Macao (Lisbon, 1892).

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  • below Oporto at Sao Pao da Foz.

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  • On its way through Portugal the Douro traverses the Paiz do Vinho, one of the richest wine-producing territories in the world; large quantities of wine are conveyed to Oporto in sailing boats.

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  • Purchase a bottle or two of quality port from Oporto, or fine sherry from Jerez.

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  • Johnstoni, it came from Oporto in 1884-85.

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