Ontario sentence examples

ontario
  • Lakes Ontario and Erie never freeze completely over in winter.

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  • shore of Lake Ontario and in Dutchess and Ulster counties in the Hudson Valley.

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  • That year he got as far as Allumette Island in the Ottawa, but two years later, with a "Great War Party" of Indians, he crossed Lake Nipissing and the eastern ends of Lakes Huron and Ontario, and made a fierce but unsuccessful attack on an Onondaga fortified town a few miles south of Lake Oneida.

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  • part of Euclid Avenue, and Ontario St.

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  • LAKE ONTARIO, the smallest andymost easterly of the Great Lakes of North America.

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  • He took the command at Sackett's Harbor on Lake Ontario in October 1812.

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  • Till 1884 an equally fierce agitation was carried on against Ontario with regard to the eastern boundary of Manitoba.

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  • GEORGE MONRO GRANT (1835-1902), principal of Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, was born in Nova Scotia in 183 5.

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  • He served with Commodore Chauncey, and then was sent from Lake Ontario to Lake Erie, where he took up the chief command at the end of March 1813.

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  • in level between Lake Ontario and Lake Erie is overcome by the Welland canal, which leads southward from Port Dalhousie.

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  • Canada produces in Ontario and Quebec coarse Virginian type tobacco.

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  • Utica is served by the New York Central & Hudson River and several lines leased by it, including the Rome, Watertown & Ogdensburg; the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western; the New York, Ontario & Western; and the West Shore railways; by the Erie Canal, and by interurban electric railways.

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  • Contemporary magazines are the Canadian Magazine (1893), the Westminster, both produced at Toronto, La Nouvelle-France (Quebec), the Canada Monthly (London, Ontario), and the University Magazine, edited by Professor Macphail, of the McGill University.

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  • Rome is served by the New York Central & Hudson River, the Rome, Watertown & Ogdensburg (controlled by the New York Central), the New York, Ontario & Western, and the Utica & Mohawk Valley (electric) railways.

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  • It is served by the New York Central & Hudson River, the New York, Ontario & Western, the West Shore and the Oneida (electric) railways (the last connecting with Utica and Syracuse), and by the Erie Canal.

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  • Algonquin-Iroquois Canada, thanks to the Geological Survey and the Department of Education in Ontario, has revealed old Indian camps, mounds and earthworks along the northern drainage of Lakes Erie and Ontario, and pottery in a curved line from Montreal to Lake of the Woods.

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  • Roebling's suspension bridge built in 1851-1856) of the Grand Trunk railway, which has a terminus at Niagara Falls (Clifton), Ontario, and connects here with the New York Central & Hudson River and the Lehigh Valley railways.

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  • 108 D., Sailing Directions for Lake Ontario, Hydrographic Office, U.S. Navy (Washington, D.C., 1902); St Lawrence Pilot (7th ed.), Hydrographic Office, Admiralty (London, 1906).

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  • We know he was in the Cleveland and then Ontario.

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  • by the western boundary of Ontario.

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  • KENORA (formerly RAT Portage), a town and port of entry in Ontario, Canada, and the chief town of Rainy River district, situated at an altitude of 1087 ft.

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  • - France, Norway, Sweden, Ontario.

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  • The petroleum industry in Canada is mainly concentrated in the district of Petrolea, Ontario.

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  • apart, gave the site its Indian name, De-o-wain-sta, "place where canoes are carried from one stream to another," and its earliest English name, "The Great (or Oneida) Carrying-Place," and gave it strategic value as a key between the Mohawk Valley and Lake Ontario.

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  • The Swedish, Norwegian, Ontario and Michigan mines yield ores of this kind; and though none of them can be profitably worked as a source of phosphate, yet on reducing the ore it may be retained in the slags, and thus rendered available for agriculture.

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  • In Ontario apatite has been worked for a long time in deposits of similar nature.

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  • Its northern boundary is, for the most part, formed by Lake Ontario and the St Lawrence river, which separate it from the province of Ontario, Canada; but north of the Adirondacks the boundary line leaves the St Lawrence, extending in a due east direction to the lower end of Lake Champlain.

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  • From the crest of the dome of the Adirondacks proper the surface slopes in all directions to surrounding lowlands: to the St Lawrence valley on the N.; the ChamplainHudson lowland on the E.; the Mohawk valley on the S.; and Lake Ontario on the W.

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  • by a series of steps, having its lowest elevation on the Ontario plain which skirts the southern shore of Lake Ontario.

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  • Of these the most notable is the Niagara escarpment which extends eastward from Canada, past Lewiston and Lockport, - a downward step from the Erie to the Ontario plain, where the Niagara limestone outcrops, and its resistance to denudation accounts for the steeply rising face at the boundary between the two plains.

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  • There are thousands of lakes and ponds in the state, most of them very small and all, even including Lakes Erie and Ontario, the result of glacial action.

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  • The largest lake apart from Erie and Ontario is the beautiful Lake Champlain, which lies on the eastern boundary, partly in Vermont, and with the N.

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  • on Lake Ontario.

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  • Buffalo lies at the lower end of natural lake navigation, though by the building of a ship canal in Canada, lake steamers can proceed into Lake Ontario and thence to the St Lawrence.

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  • A large portion of the Indian corn, wheat and barley is produced on the Ontario plain.

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  • shore of Lake Ontario southward across the state.

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  • The New York fisheries of Lakes Erie and Ontario and the Niagara and St Lawrence rivers yielded products in 1903 valued at $187,198 and consisting largely of pikeperch, herring, catfish, bullheads and sturgeon, and in 1902 there were commercial fisheries in sixteen interior lakes and rivers which yielded muscallonge, smelt, bullheads, pickerel, pike-perch and several other varieties having a total value of $87,897.

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  • shore of Lake Ontario and are either red or grey; the red are used for building, the grey for street paving.

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  • The Western Inland Lock Navigation Company, chartered by the state in 1792, completed three canals within about four years and thereby permitted the continuous passage from Schenectady to Lake Ontario of boats of about 17 tons.

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  • The Oswego Canal, connecting the Erie with Lake Ontario, was begun in 1825 and completed in 1828.

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  • sections, the Delaware & Hudson, the Rutland, and the New York Ontario - & Western in the E., and the Long Island on Long Island.

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  • Other ports of entry are Buffalo and Dunkirk, on Lake Erie, Niagara Falls, on the Niagara river, Ogdensburg and Cape Vincent, on the St Lawrence river, Plattsburg, on Lake Champlain, Oswego, on Lake Ontario, Rochester, on the Genesee river, Albany and Syracuse in the interior, and Sag Harbor at the E.

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  • On the 25th of November 1783 the British forces finally evacuated New York City, but the British posts on Lakes Erie and Ontario were not evacuated until some years later.

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  • The family emigrated to Canada in 1820, settling first at Kingston, Ontario.

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  • The two great political issues of the time were the secularization of the clergy reserves in Ontario, and the abolition of seigniorial tenure in Quebec. Both of these reforms Macdonald long opposed, but when successive elections had proved that they were sup ported by public opinion, he brought about a coalition of Conservatives and moderate reformers for the purpose of carrying them.

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  • Macdonald, at the head of a representative delegation from Ontario and Quebec, met the public men of the maritime provinces in conference at Charlottetown in 1864, and the outline of confederation then agreed upon was filled out in detail at a conference held at Quebec soon afterwards.

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  • During the summer of 1876 he travelled through Ontario addressing the people on the subject of a commercial system looking to the protection of native industries.

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  • In North America the Carolina parakeet, Conurus carolinensis, at the beginning of the i 9th century used to range in summer as high as the shores of lakes Erie and Ontario - a latitude equal to the south of France; and even much later it reached, according to trustworthy information, the junction of the Ohio and the Mississippi, though now its limits have been so much curtailed that its occurrence in any but the Gulf States is doubtful.

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  • BROCKVILLE, a town and port of entry of Ontario, Canada, and capital of Leeds county, named after General Sir Isaac Brock, situtated 119 m.

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  • A branch line connects it with the Canadian Pacific. It has steamer communication with the St Lawrence and Lake Ontario ports, and is a summer resort.

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  • Scranton is served by the Erie, the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western, the Central of New Jersey, the New York, Ontario & Western, the Delaware & Hudson, and the Lackawanna & Wyoming Valley railways.

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  • The cuesta begins where its determining limcstone begins, in west-central New York; there it separates the lowlands that contain the basins of lakes Ontario and Erie; thence it curves to the north-west through the province of Ontario to the belt of islands that divide1 Georgian Bay from Lake Huron; then westward throtigh the land-arm between lakes Superior and Michigan, and south-westward into the narrow points that divide Green Bay from Lake Michigan, and at last westward to fade away again with the thinning out of the limestone; it is hardly traceable across the Mississippi river.

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  • The arrangement of the Great Lakes is thus seen to he closely synipathetic with the course of the lowlands worn on the two belts of weaker strata on either side of the Niagara cuesta; Ontario, Georgian Bay and Green Bay occupy depressions in the lowland on the inner side of the cuesta; Erie, Huron and Michigan lie in depressions in the lowland on the outer side.

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  • Niagara river, connecting lakes Erie and Ontario, with a fall of 326 ft.

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  • Canals on the Canadian side of these unnavigable stretches admit vessels of a considerable size to lakes Ontario and Erie.

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  • The most significant stage in this series of changes occurred when the glacio-marginal lake wateis were lowered so that the long cuesta of Niagara limestone was laid bare in western New York; the previously confluent waters were then divided into two lakes; the higher one, Erie, supplying the outfiowing Niagara river, which poured its waters down the escarpment of the cuesta to the lower lake, Ontario, whose outlet for a time ran down the Mohawk Valley to the Hudson: thus Niagara falls began.

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  • The Devonian system yields much oil and gas in western Pennsylvania, south-western New York, West Virginia and Ontario; and some of the Devonian beds in Tennessee yield phosphates of commercial value.

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  • BERLIN, a city and port of entry, Ontario, Canada, and capital of Waterloo county, 58 m.

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  • 42]; Ontario [Revised Stats.

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  • Of the nine provinces of Canada only two have no coast line on salt water, the western prairie provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan; but Manitoba and Ontario have a seaboard only on Hudson Bay and its southern extension James Bay respectively, and there is no probability that the shallow harbours of the latter bay will ever be of much importance for shipping, though Churchill Harbour on the west side of Hudson Bay may become an important grain port.

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  • What Ontario lacks in salt water navigation is, however, made up by the busy traffic of the Great Lakes.

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  • The best example of this is the familiar one of the St Lawrence, which may be said to begin as Nipigon river and to take the names St Mary's, St Clair, Detroit and Niagara, before finally flowing from Lake Ontario to the sea under its proper name.

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  • North of the divide between the St Lawrence system and Hudson Bay there are many large rivers converging on that inland sea, such as Whale river, Big river, East Main, Rupert and Nottaway rivers coming in from Ungava and northern Quebec; Moose and Albany rivers with important tributaries from northern Ontario; and Severn, Nelson and Churchill rivers from the south-west.

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  • All of these are rapid and shallow, affording navigation only for canoes; but the largest of them, Nelson river, drains the great Manitoban lakes, Winnipeg, Winnipegosis and Manitoba, which are frequented by steamers, and receive the waters of Lake-of-the-Woods, Lake Seul and many others emptying into Winnipeg river from Ontario; of Red river coming in from the United States to the south; and of the southern parts of the Rocky Mountains and the western prairie provinces drained by the great Saskatchewan river.

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  • It includes Labrador, Ungava and most of Quebec on the east, northern Ontario on the south; and the western boundary runs from Lake-of-the-Woods north-west to the Arctic Ocean near the mouth of Mackenzie river.

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  • In most parts the Laurentian hills are bare roches moutonnees scoured by the glaciers of the Ice Age, but a broad band of clay land extends across northern Quebec and Ontario just north of the divide.

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  • The waterfalls are utilized at a few points to work up into wood pulp the forests of spruce which cover much of Labrador, Quebec and Ontario.

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  • In Quebec the chief portion is south of the St Lawrence on the low plain extending from Montreal to the mountains of the " Eastern Townships," while in Ontario it extends from the Archean on the north to the St Lawrence and Lakes Ontario, Erie and Huron.

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  • Though petroleum and salt occur in the southwest peninsula of Ontario, metalliferous deposits are wanting, and the real wealth of this district lies in its soil and climate, which permit the growth of all the products of temperate regions.

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  • Summing up the economic features of the Cordilleran belt, it includes many of the best coal-mines and the most extensive deposits of gold, copper, lead and zinc of the Dominion, while in silver, nickel and iron Ontario takes the lead.

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  • One cannot even describe the climate of a single province, like Ontario or British Columbia, as a unit, as it varies so greatly in different parts.

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  • In Quebec and northern Ontario the rainfall is diminished, ranging from 20 to 40 in., while the snows of winter are deep and generally cover the ground from the beginning of December to the end of March.

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  • The winter storms often sweep a little to the north of southern Ontario, so that what falls as snow in the north is rain in the south, giving a much more variable winter, often with too little snow for sleighing.

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  • There is a much lighter snowfall in winter than in northern Ontario and Quebec, with somewhat lower temperatures.

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  • inland beyond the Coast Range the precipitation and general climate are, like those of Ontario, comparatively mild and with moderate snowfall towards the south, but with keen winters farther north.

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  • Leaving out the maritime provinces, southern Ontario, southern Alberta and the Pacific coast region on the one hand, and the Arctic north, particularly near Hudson Bay, on the other, Canada has snowy and severe winters, a very short spring with a sudden rise of temperature, short warm summers, and a delightful autumn with its " Indian summer."

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  • The general flora of the Maritime Provinces, Quebec and Eastern Ontario is much the same, except that in Nova Scotia a number of species are found common also to Newfoundland that are not apparent inland.

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  • From the city of Quebec westwards there is a constantly increasing ratio of southern forms, and when the mountain (so called) at Montreal is reached the representative Ontario flora begins.

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  • In Ontario the flora of the northern part is much the same as that of the Gulf of St Lawrence, but from Montreal along the Ottawa and St Lawrence valleys the flora takes a more southern aspect, and trees, shrubs and herbaceous plants not found in the eastern parts of the Dominion become common.

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  • Beyond the forest country of Ontario come the prairies of Manitoba and the North-West Territories.

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  • The flora of the forest belt of the North-West Territories differs little from that of northern Ontario.

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  • In certain parts of Ontario the wild turkey is occasionally found and the ordinary quail, but in British Columbia is found the California quail, and a larger bird much resembling it called the mountain partridge.

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  • 2 The areas assigned to Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and British Columbia are exclusive of the territorial seas, that to Quebec' is exclusive of the Gulf of St Lawrence (though including the islands lying within it), and that to Ontario is exclusive of the Canadian portion of the Great Lakes.

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  • In 1867 the Dominion was formed by the union of the provinces of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Quebec (Lower Canada) and Ontario (Upper Canada).

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  • West of the province of Ontario, then inaccurately defined, the provinces of Manitoba and British Columbia were the only organized divisions of the western territory, but in 1882 the provisional districts of Assiniboia, Athabasca, Alberta and Saskatchewan were formed, leaving the remainder of the north-west as unorganized territories, a certain portion of the north-east, called Keewatin, having previously been placed under the lieutenant-governor of Manitoba.

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  • m.; in Nova Scotia it is 22.3; New Brunswick, 11.8; Ontario, 9.9; Manitoba, 4.9; Quebec, 4.8; Saskatchewan, 1 oi; Alberta, o 72; British Columbia, o 4; the Dominion, 1 8.

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  • This is not an indication of the density in settled parts; as in Quebec, Ontario and the western provinces there are large unpopulated districts, the area of which enters into the calculation.

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  • The population is composed mainly of Englishor French-speaking people, but there are German settlements of some extent in Ontario, and of late years there has been a large immigration into the western provinces and territories from other parts of Europe, including Russians, Galicians, Polish and Russian Jews, and Scandinavians.

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  • English, Irish and Scots and their descendants form the bulk of the population of Ontario, French-Canadians of Quebec, Scots of Nova Scotia, the Irish of a large proportion of New Brunswick.

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  • The birth-rate is high, especially in Quebec, where families of twelve to twenty are not infrequent, but is decreasing in Ontario.

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  • Between 1891 and 1901 the number of farmers in Ontario, Quebec and the Maritime provinces decreased, and there seemed a prospect of the country being divided into a manufacturing east and an agricultural west, but latterly large tracts in northern Ontario and Quebec have proved suitable for cultivation and are being opened up.

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  • The Methodists are the strongest, and in Ontario form over 30% of the population.

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  • Those of Ontario, numbering about 20,000, are more civilized than those of the west, many of them being good farmers.

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  • As they progress towards a settled mode of life, they are given the franchise; this process is especially far advanced in Ontario.

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  • The cities, towns and municipalities resort to it to supply their local needs, and there is a tendency, especially pronounced in Ontario on account of the excellence of her municipal system, to devolve the burden of educational payments, and others more properly provincial, upon the municipal authorities on the plea of decentralization.

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  • Farm products are the most important export, and with the extension of this industry in the north-west provinces and in northern Ontario will probably continue to be so.

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  • The government of Ontario has constructed a line to open up the agricultural and mining districts of the north of the province, and is operating it by means of a commission.

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  • In Ontario a somewhat similar commission, appointed by the local government, exercises extensive powers of control over railways solely within the province, especially over the electric lines.

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  • Numerous smaller canals bring Ottawa into connexion with Lake Champlain and the Hudson river via Montreal; by this route the logs and sawn lumber of Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick find their destination.

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  • With this object in view, the Trent Valley system of canals has been built, connecting Lake Ontario with the Georgian Bay (an arm of Lake Huron) via Lake Simcoe.

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  • Nova Scotia, British Columbia and the Yukon are still the most productive, but the northern parts of Ontario are proving rich in the precious metals.

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  • Coal, chiefly bituminous, occurs in large quantities in Nova Scotia, British Columbia and in various parts of the north-west (lignite), though most of the anthracite is imported from the United States, as is the greater part of the bituminous coal used in Ontario.

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  • Sudbury, in Ontario, is the centre of the nickel production of the world, the mines being chiefly in American hands, and the product exported to the United States.

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  • A great development has also taken place in Ontario and the eastern provinces, through the use of spruce and other trees, long considered comparatively useless, in the manufacture of wood-pulp for paper-making.

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  • All crown lands controlled by the provinces must be paid for, save in certain districts of Ontario, where free grants are given, but the price charged is low.

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  • Of these the most extensive are the Rocky Mountains Park at Banff, Alberta, owned by the Dominion government, and the "Algonquin National Park," north-east of Lake Simcoe, the property of Ontario.

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  • The lakes of Ontario and Manitoba produce white fish, sturgeon and other fresh-water fish.

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  • The British North America Act imposes on the provincial legislatures the duty of legislating on educational matters, the privileges of the denominational and separate schools in Ontario and Quebec being specially safeguarded.

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  • The school systems of all the provinces are, in spite of certain imperfections, efficient and well-equipped, that of Ontario being especially celebrated.

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  • New Brunswick, Ontario and Manitoba support provincial universities at Fredericton, Toronto and Winnipeg.

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  • Up to the close of the 19th century, Ontario was the largest wheat-growing province in Canada.

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  • In 1900 the wheat acreage in Ontario was 1,487,633, producing 28,418,907 bushels, an average yield of 19.10 bushels per acre.

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  • Over three-quarters of this production was of fall or winter wheat, the average yield of which in Ontario over a series of years since 1883 had been about 20 bushels per acre.

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  • The loss from this cause is also less than formerly, because any grain unfit for export is now readily purchased for the feeding of animals in Ontario and other parts of eastern Canada.

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  • In 1907 the area under oats in Ontario was 2,932,509 acres and yielded 83,524,301 bushels, the area being almost as large as that of the acreage under hay and larger than the combined total of the other principal cereals grown in the province.

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  • The cultivation of sugar beets for the manufacture of sugar has been established in Ontario and in southern Alberta, where in 1906 an acreage under this crop of 3344 yielded 27,211 tons, an average of 8.13 tons per acre.

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  • Heavy Live draught horses are reared in Ontario, and to a less stock.

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  • In Ontario sheep breeding has reached a high degree of perfection, and other parts of the American continent draw their supplies of pure bred stock largely from this province.

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  • In 1908 there were 4355 of these factories, of which 1284 were in Ontario, 2806 in Quebec, and 265 in the remaining seven provinces of Canada.

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  • Those in Ontario are the largest in size.

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  • The chief fruit-growing districts have long been in southern and western Ontario and in Nova Scotia; but recently much attention has been devoted to fruit-growing in British Columbia, where large areas of suitable land are available for the cultivation of apples, pears and other fruits.

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  • Its cultivation promises to be successful in parts of Ontario, Quebec and British Columbia.

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  • The central experimental farm is situated at Ottawa, near the boundary line between Quebec and Ontario, where it serves as an aid to agriculture in these two important provinces.

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  • The Macdonald Institute at Guelph, Ontario, the buildings and equipment of which Sir William provided at a cost of $182,500, and the Macdonald College at Ste Anne de Bellevue, 20 m.

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  • He reached Lake Huron and Lake Ontario, but not the great lakes stretching still farther west.

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  • There are several important agricultural colleges for the practical education of young men in farming, foremost amongst them being the Ontario Agricultural College at Guelph.

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  • He knew how to control the ferocious Iroquois, who had cut off France from access to Lake Ontario; to check them he had built a fort where now stands the city of Kingston.

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  • The danger from the Iroquois on Lake Ontario had long cut her off from the most direct access to the West, and from the occupation of the Ohio valley leading to the Mississippi, but now free from this savage scourge she could go where she would.

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  • To Nova Scotia, to what are now New Brunswick (q.v.) and Ontario (q.v.) they fled in numbers not easily estimated, but probably reaching about 40,000.

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  • Until this time the present New Brunswick and Ontario had contained few European settlers; now they developed, largely under the influence of the loyalists of the Revolution.

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  • (For the history of Lower and Upper Canada, now Quebec and Ontario, the separate articles must be consulted.) Each province had special problems; the French in Lower Canada aimed at securing political power for their own race, while in Upper Canada there was no race problem, and the great struggle was for independence of official control and in all essential matters for government by the people.

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  • W.) When federation was accomplished in 1867 the Dominion of Canada comprised only the four provinces of Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia.

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  • The first session of parliament was opened on the 8th of November, but adjourned on the 21st of December till the 12th of March 1868, chiefly on account of the fact that members of the Dominion parliament were allowed, in Ontario and Quebec, to hold seats in the local legislatures, so that it was difficult for the different bodies to be in session simultaneously.

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  • While Sir John Macdonald's administration was supported in Nova Scotia, it was weakened in Ontario on account of the clemency shown to Riel, and in Quebec by the refusal to grant a general amnesty to all who had taken part in the rebellion.

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  • But while a section of Quebec was eager to secure the rebel's pardon, Ontario was equally bent on the execution of justice, so that in the final vote on the question in parliament the defection of French Conservatives was compensated for by the support of Ontario Liberals.

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  • it from provincial politics the premiers of Ontario, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia.

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  • To a still more ambitious line, the Grand Trunk Pacific, extending from the Atlantic to the Pacific, aiming at extensive steamship connexion on both oceans, and closely associated with the Grand Trunk system of Ontario and Quebec, the government of Canada gave liberal support as a national undertaking.

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  • The discovery of large deposits of nickel at Sudbury; of extremely rich gold mines on the head-waters of the Yukon, in a region previously considered well-nigh worthless for human habitation; of extensive areas of gold, copper and silver ores in the mountain regions of British Columbia; of immense coal deposits in the Crow's Nest Pass of the same province and on the prairies; of veins of silver and cobalt of extraordinary richness in northern Ontario - all deeply affected the industrial condition of the country and illustrated the vastness of its undeveloped resources.

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  • The highly organized school system of Ontario is directed by a minister of education, who is a member of the provincial cabinet.

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  • In Ontario as well as in Quebec separate schools are allowed to Roman Catholics.

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  • Al' Gill University at Montreal has been enlarged and splendidly endowed by the munificence of a few private individuals; Toronto University by the provincial legislature of Ontario; Queen's University at Kingston largely by the support of its own graduates and friends.

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  • It originally consisted of 72 members, 24 from Quebec, 24 from Ontario, and 24 from the maritime provinces, but this number has been from time to time slightly increased as new provinces have been added.

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  • He was associated with Blake in his sustained opposition to high tariff, and to the Conservative plan for the construction of the Canadian Pacific railway, and was a conspicuous figure in the long struggle between Sir John Macdonald and the leaders of the Liberal party to settle the territorial limits of the province of Ontario and the legislative rights of the provinces under the constitution.

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  • After the concession of responsible government, he devoted himself to bringing about a good understanding between the English and French-speaking inhabitants of Canada, and his memory is held as dear among the French Canadians as in his native province of Ontario.

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  • OWEN SOUND, a town and port of entry in Ontario, Canada, and capital of Grey county, situated 99 m.

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  • This paper, at first weekly, became in 1853 a daily, and through the ability and energy of Brown, came to possess an almost tyrannical influence over the political opinion of Ontario.

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  • He championed the complete laicization of the schools in Ontario, but unsuccessfully, the Roman Catholic church maintaining its right to separate schools.

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  • Largely owing to Brown's efforts, Federation was carried through the House; but on the 21st of December 1865 he resigned from the Coalition government, though continuing to support its Federation policy, and in 1867 he was defeated in South Ontario and never again sat in the House.

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  • Soon afterwards Brown refused the lieutenant-governorship of Ontario, and on two subsequent occasions the offer of knighthood, devoting himself to the Globe and to a model farm at Bow Park near Brantford.

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  • The Pocono plateau, nearly all of the central and south-east provinces and the north-east portion of the Alleghany plateau are drained by the Susquehanna and Delaware river-systems into the Chesapeake and Delaware Bays; the greater part of the Alleghany plateau is drained by the Allegheny and Monongahela rivers into the Ohio river; the extreme southern portion of the central province and the extreme western portion of the south-east province are drained by tributaries of the Potomac; the Erie plain is drained by short streams into Lake Erie; and a very small section of the Alleghany plateau, in the northern part of Potter county, is drained by the Genesee river into Lake Ontario.

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  • The principal railways are the lines operated by the Pennsylvania Railroad Company from New York to Washington through Philadelphia; from Philadelphia to Cincinnati, Cleveland, Chicago and St Louis through Harrisburg and Pittsburg; from Baltimore, Maryland, to Sodus Point on Lake Ontario (Northern Central) through Harrisburg and Williamsport; from Williamsport to Buffalo and to Erie, and from Pittsburg to Buffalo; the Philadelphia & Reading; the Lehigh Valley; the Erie; the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western; the Baltimore & Ohio; and the Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburg.

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  • The scene of operations naturally divided into three sections: - (I) the ocean; (2) the Canadian frontier, from Lake Huron, by Lakes Erie and Ontario, the course of the St Lawrence and Lake Champlain; (3) the coast of the United States.

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  • Kingston was held at the east end of Ontario.

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  • Sound reasoning would have led the Americans to direct their chief attacks on Kingston and Montreal, since success at those points would have isolated the British posts on Lakes Ontario, Erie and Huron.

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  • On Ontario the Americans pushed on their preparations at Sackett's Harbour under Isaac Chauncey; the English were similarly engaged at Kingston.

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  • On Lake Ontario Yeo formed a more mobile though less powerful force than Chauncey's, and therefore manoeuvred to avoid being brought to close action.

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  • By the close of the war Yeo had constructed a ship of 102 guns which gave him the superiority, and the British became masters of Lake Ontario.

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  • The Americans turned to the east of Ontario, intending to assail Montreal by the St Lawrence in combination with their forces at Lake Champlain.

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  • It is served by the Delaware & Hudson, and the New York, Ontario & Western railways, and by an interurban electric line.

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  • Berlin, Ontario >>

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  • It is served by the West Shore (which here crosses Rondout Creek on a high bridge), the New York Ontario & Western, the Ulster & Delaware, and the Wallkill Valley railways, by a ferry across the river to Rhinecliff, where connexion is made with the New York Central & Hudson River railroad, and by steamboat lines to New York, Albany and other river points.

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  • GEORGE WILLIAM ROSS (1841-), Canadian politician, was born near Nairn, Middlesex county, Ontario, on the 18th of September 1841, the son of James Ross and Ellen M'Kinnon, natives of Ross-shire, Scotland.

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  • From 1872-1883 he was a Liberal member of the Federal House; from 1883-99 minister of education in the legislature of the province of Ontario; and from 1899-1905 premier and treasurer of that province.

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  • Considerable interest attaches to the diamonds found in Wisconsin, Michigan and Ohio near the Great Lakes, for they are here found in the terminal moraines of the great glacial sheet which is supposed to have spread southwards from the region of Hudson Bay; several of the drift minerals of the diamantiferous region of Indiana have been identified as probably of Canadian origin; no diamonds have however yet been found in the intervening country of Ontario.

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  • WINDSOR, a city and port of entry of Essex (disambiguation)|Essex county, Ontario, Canada, on the left bank of the Detroit river, opposite the city of Detroit.

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  • ONTARIO, a province of Canada, having the province of Quebec to the E., the states of New York, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota to the S., Manitoba to the W., and the district of Keewatin with James Bay to the N.

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  • In most cases the actual boundary consists of rivers or lakes, the Ottawa to the north-east, the St Lawrence and its chain of lakes and rivers to the south as far as Pigeon river, which separates Ontario from Minnesota.

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  • From this a canoe route over small rivers and lakes leads to the Lake-of-the-Woods, which lies between Ontario, Minnesota and Manitoba; and English and Albany rivers with various lakes carry the boundary to James Bay.

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  • Ontario extends r000 m.

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  • The south-western part is naturally divided into two tracts by the Niagara escarpment, a line of cliffs capped by hard Silurian limestones, running from Queenston Heights near the falls of Niagara west to the head of Lake Ontario near Hamilton, and then northwest to the Bruce Peninsula on Georgian Bay.

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  • In the last petroleum, natural gas, salt and gypsum are obtained, but elsewhere in southern Ontario no economic minerals except building materials are obtained.

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  • The Niagara escarpment mentioned above, generally called "the mountain" in Ontario, is the cause of waterfalls on all the rivers which plunge over it, Niagara Falls being, of course, the most important; and in most cases these falls have eaten their way back into the tableland, forming deep gorges or canyons like that below Niagara itself, through which the water pours as violent rapids.

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  • Between the Palaeozoic area near Ottawa, and Georgian Bay to the north of the region just referred to, there is a southward projection of the Archaean protaxis consisting of granite and gneiss of the Laurentian, enclosing bands of crystalline limestone and schists, which are of interest as furnishing the only mines of "Old Ontario."

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  • While all the larger cities and most of the manufacturing and farming districts of the province belong to old Ontario, there is now in process of development a "New Ontario," stretching for hundreds of miles to the north and north-west of the region just described and covering a far larger area, chiefly made up of Laurentian and Huronian rocks of the Archaean protaxis.

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  • Gradually, however, areas of good soil were opened up, in the Rainy river valley, near Lake Temiscaming and elsewhere, and mines of various kinds were discovered, as the Canadian Pacific railway and its branches extended through the region, and at length the finding of very rich silver mines attracted world-wide attention to northern Ontario.

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  • Up to the present the most important mineral product of Ontario is nickel, which is mined only in the neighbourhood of Sudbury, where the ores occur in very large deposits, which in 1905 produced 95 0 3 tons, more than half of the world's supply of the metal.

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  • The total mineral output of Ontario, including building materials and cement, is larger than that of any other province of the dominion, and as more careful exploration is carried on in the northern parts, no doubt many more deposits of value will be discovered.

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  • It has been found that northern Ontario beyond the divide between the Great Lakes and Hudson Bay possesses many millions of acres of arable land, clay deposits in a post-glacial lake, like those in the southern part of the province, running from east to west from Lake Abitibbi to a point north of Lake Nipigon.

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  • All parts of Ontario are well provided with lakes and rivers, the most important chain being that of the St Lawrence and the Great Lakes with their tributaries, which drain the more populous southern districts, and, with the aid of canals, furnish communication by fairly large vessels between the lower St Lawrence and the Lake Superior.

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  • east and west, empties northwards by Niagara river into Lake Ontario, which is only 247 ft.

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  • Power from the falls is put to use in New York state and Ontario, a large amount being sent to Toronto 80 m.

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  • Welland canal, between Port Colborne on Lake Erie and Dalhousie on Lake Ontario, carries vessels of 14 ft.

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  • From Lake Ontario the St Lawrence emerges through the meshes of the Thousand Islands, where it crosses Archaean rocks, after which follow several rapids separated by quieter stretches before Montreal is reached at the head of ocean navigation.

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  • All the other rivers in southern Ontario are tributaries of the lakes or of the St Lawrence, the Ottawa, navigable in many parts, being the largest, and the Trent next in importance.

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  • In northern Ontario lakes are innumerable and often very picturesque, forming favourite summer resorts, such as Lake Temagami, the Muskoka Lakes and Lake-of-the-Woods.

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  • In Ontario the Albany, Moose, Missanabi and Abitibbi flow into Hudson Bay, but none of these rivers is navigable except for canoes.

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  • The climate of Ontario varies greatly, as might be expected from its wide range in latitude and the relationships of the Great Lakes to the southern peninsula of the province.

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  • The south-west peninsula of Ontario has its climate greatly modified by the lakes which almost enclose it.

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  • Ontario is thus pre-eminently an agricultural province, though the growth of manufactures has increased the importance of the towns and cities, and many of the farmers are seeking new homes in the provinces of Manitoba, Alberta and Saskatchewan.

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  • Three-quarters of the orchard lands of Canada are in Ontario, the chief crops being apples and peaches.

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  • Northern Ontario is still a valuable fur-bearing and hunting country, moose, caribou, fox, bear, otter, mink and skunk being found in large quantities.

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  • The geographical distribution of the great mineral wealth of Ontario has already been indicated (see Physical Geography, above).

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  • When in 1905 the rich silver area was found in northern Ontario, a rush was made to it, comparable to those to the Australian and Californian goldfields.

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  • from North Bay by the provincial railway (Temiscaming & North Ontario railway).

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  • The great agricultural development of the western provinces, in which manufactures are little advanced, has given a great impetus to the industries of the older provinces, especially Ontario.

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  • The first white man known to have set foot in what is now Ontario was Champlain.

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  • In 1613 he explored the Ottawa river as far as Allumette Island; in 1615, starting from Montreal, he reached the Georgian Bay by way of the Ottawa river, Lake Nipissing and French river, and then by way of Lakes Couchiching and Simcoe and the Trent river system of lakes and streams made his way to Lake Ontario, called by him Entouhoronon.

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  • On the frontiers of what is now Ontario the.

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  • Farther north, in what is now New Ontario, their English rivals, the Hudson's Bay Company, had more or less permanent posts, especially at Fort Albany and Moose Factory.

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  • Thereafter for almost twenty years, Ontario was traversed only by wandering bands of trappers, chiefly belonging to the Hudson's Bay Company; but in 1782 bands of American loyalists began to occupy the fertile country along the Bay of Quinte, and in the Niagara peninsula, the first settlement being made in 1782 at Kingston.

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  • Between1782-1784about 5000 loyalists entered Ontario, and were given liberal grants of land by the British government.

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  • The war gave some heroic traditions to the province, and in special cemented that loyalty to Great Britain for which Ontario has been conspicuous.

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  • In the discussions from which sprang the federation of 1867, Ontario was the one province strongly in favour of the union, which was only rendered possible by the coalition of her rival leaders, J.

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  • Since Federation Upper Canada has been known as the province of Ontario.

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  • Several questions in which Ontario and the Dominion came into conflict were carried to the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council, and in all of them Mowat was successful.

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  • east of Port Arthur, but in 1884 the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council unanimously decided in favour of Ontario; and in 1888 another decision gave her absolute control, of the crown lands of New Ontario.

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  • Under Mowat's successors the barnacles which always attach to a party long in power became unpleasantly conspicuous, and in January 1905 the conscience of Ontario sent the conservatives into power, more from disgust at their opponents than from any enthusiasm for themselves.

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  • Adam Shortt, Municipal Government in Ontario.

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  • Ernest Cruikshanks has published numerous excellent studies on the Ontario section of the War of 1812.

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  • Lord Durham's celebrated Report (1839, reprinted 1902) is less trustworthy on Ontario than on Quebec. R.

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  • Biggar, Sir Oliver Mowat (2 vols., 1905), is practically a history of Ontario from 1867 to 1896.

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  • The provincial government has issued an excellent Documentary History of Education in Ontario, by J.

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  • Kingsford, Early Bibliography of Ontario.

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  • Lake Ontario >>

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  • BELLEVILLE, a city and port of entry of Ontario, Canada, and capital of Hastings county, 106 m.

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  • Communication is maintained with Lake Ontario and St Lawrence ports by several lines of steamers.

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  • In New York it occurs in the Salina beds of the Onondaga series, of Silurian age; and Silurian salt is found also in parts of Michigan and in Ontario, Canada.

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  • It is served by the New York, Ontario & Western, and the West Shore railways (being a terminus of the latter), and by suburban electric lines, and is connected with New York City by steam ferries.

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  • After the massacre of Christian Indians at Gnadenhiitten in 1782 the Indians removed to Michigan and in 1791 to Fairfield, Ontario; in 1798 some of them returned to Tuscarawas county and settled Goshen, where Zeisberger is buried.

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  • i 1867 in Middlesex county, Ontario.

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  • He stood unsuccessfully as a Liberal for the Dominion Parliament at the general election of Iwo, but in 191 i was elected to the Ontario Legislative Assembly for N.

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  • From 1911-7 he was leader of the Liberal Opposition in the Ontario Legislature.

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  • 1917 he entered the Federal Unionist Government as president of the council and vice-chairman of the War Committee of the Cabinet, and was elected to the Dominion House of Commons for Durham county, Ontario, Dec. 1917.

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  • On the north and east the waters reach the St Lawrence by way of Lakes George and Champlain, and on the west they flow directly into that stream or reach it through Lake Ontario.

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  • Ontario >>

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  • Largely owing to Howe's statesmanship responsible government was finally conceded in 1848 by the imperial authorities, and was thus gained without the bloodshed and confusion which marked its acquisition in Ontario and Quebec. In 1850 he was appointed a delegate to England on behalf of the Intercolonial railway, for which he obtained a large imperial guarantee.

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  • ALBANY, a river of Canada, forming part of the boundary between the province of Ontario and the district of Keewatin.

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  • OSHAWA, a manufacturing town and port of entry of Ontario county, Ontario, Canada, on Lake Ontario and the Grand Trunk railway, 30 m.

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  • INGERSOLL, a town and port of entry of Oxford county, Ontario, Canada, 19 m.

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  • PORT HOPE, a town and port of entry of Durham (disambiguation)|Durham county, Ontario, Canada, on the north shore of Lake Ontario, 63 m.

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  • by lakes Superior, George, Huron, and Michigan, and by St Mary's River, which separates it from the Province of Ontario, Canada; S.

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  • by lakes Huron, St Clair and Erie, and the St Clair and Detroit Rivers, which separate it from Ontario; S.

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  • by the province of Ontario, Georgian Bay and North Channel being wholly within Canadian territory.

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  • 1; the New York, Ontario & Western (controlled by the New York, New Haven & Hartford), from Weehawken to Oswego; the West Shore (leased by the New York Central), from Weehawken to Buffalo; and the Central railway of New Jersey (controlled by the Philadelphia & Reading), with numerous short lines from Jersey City to the S.

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  • TORONTO, the capital of the province of Ontario, and the second largest city in the Dominion of Canada, situated on the northern shore of Lake Ontario, almost due north from the mouth of the Niagara river.

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  • by the province of Ontario, W.

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  • COBOURG, the capital of Northumberland county, Ontario, Canada, on Lake Ontario and the Grand Trunk railway; 70 m.

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  • It has a large, safe harbour, and steamboat communication with St Lawrence and Lake Ontario ports.

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  • JOHN SANDFIELD MACDONALD (1812-1872), Canadian statesman, was born at St Raphael, Glengarry county, Ontario, on the 12th of December 1812.

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  • In the debates on federation he opposed the measure, but on its passage was in 1867 entrusted by the Conservatives with the task of organizing the provincial government of Ontario.

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  • The New York, Ontario & Western and the West Shore railways pass through West Nyack, a small village about 2 m.

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  • His father was a builder, and young Mackenzie emigrated to Canada in 1842, and worked in Ontario as a stone-mason, setting up for himself later as a builder and contractor at Sarnia with his brother.

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  • He was elected for Lambton to the first Dominion house of commons in 1867, and soon became the leader of the liberal opposition; from 1871 to 1872 he also sat in the Ontario provincial assembly, and held the position of provincial treasurer.

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  • by the province of Ontario.

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  • above that of Lake Ontario, this great difference being absorbed by the rapids and falls in the Niagara river, which joins the two lakes.

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  • The Erie canal leading from Buffalo to the Hudson river at Troy, and connecting with Lake Ontario at Oswego, had a capacity for boats 98 ft.

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  • long, connecting Lake Ontario and Lake Erie, with locks 270 by 45 by 14 ft., leaves Lake Erie at Port Colborne, where the Canadian government have constructed an artificial harbour and elevators for transhipment of grain from upper lake freighters to lighters of canal capacity.

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  • SIR WILLIAM MULOCK (1843-), Canadian statesman and jurist, was born at Bond Head, Ontario, on the 19th of January 1843, the son of T.

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  • In 1905 he resigned office, and was appointed chief justice of the exchequer division of the High Court of the province of Ontario.

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  • It is served by the Erie and the New York, Ontario & Western railways.

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  • section of Lake Huron, separated from it by Manitoulin Island and the peninsula comprising the counties of Grey and Bruce, Ontario.

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  • The Trent valley canal connects Georgian Bay with the Bay of Quinte and Lake Ontario, and a canal system has long been projected to Montreal by way of the French and Ottawa rivers and Lake Nipissing.

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  • On the outbreak of the second war with Great Britain (1812) he was placed in command of the New York state frontier from Oswego to Lake St Francis (near Cornwall, Ontario) and repelled the British attacks on Ogdensburg (October 4, 1812) and Sackett's Harbor (May 29, 1813).

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  • Early in the summer of 1814 he undertook offensive operations, and his forces occupied Fort Erie, and, on the 5th of July, at Chippawa, Ontario, defeated the British under General Phineas Riall (c. 1769-1851).

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  • The defences had been strengthened, a fort was built at Cataraqui (now Kingston), Ontario, bearing the governor's name, and conditions of peace had been fairly maintained between the Iroquois on the one hand and the French and their allies, the Ottawas and the Hurons, on the other.

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  • BARRIE, the capital of Simcoe county, Ontario, Canada, 5 6 m.

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  • Veronica Speedwell, age nine, of Lynden, Ontario was identified several days after her body was discovered in a roadside ditch.

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  • adult population of Hamilton, Ontario.

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  • Is cheapest simplest layouts Ontario auto insurance rate health maintenance provide services to.

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  • broker in Ontario the cost on.

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  • In late March 2005, the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation hosted two one-day workshops for Ontario nurses on the topic of knowledge brokering.

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  • And a velvet cloak drags across south Ontario and falls here on the small brick farm house.

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  • The exhibition has been jointly curated by Richard William Hill, of Cree heritage and formerly a Curator at the Art Gallery of Ontario.

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  • emigrated from the Scottish border country about 1851 to Ontario, Canada.

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  • alleging failures in some of auto insurance ontario rate the isdn codec can before they can.

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  • From American goldfinches Carduelis tristis in Ontario, Canada.

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  • jurisdiction of the courts of The Province of Ontario.

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  • State auto insurance quote ontario legislature passed he flagged down your coverage should.

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  • Our Ontario residential gas market share was approximately 26% at year end.

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  • pegmatite group, N.W. Ontario, Canada.

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  • The Separation Lake area is host to the most important rare-element pegmatites in Ontario, Canada.

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  • Participants Random sample of the adult population of Hamilton, Ontario.

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  • These auto high insurance online Ontario quote risk advantages quot data especially the.

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  • Rochester, located on the southern shore of the Great Lake Ontario, is just 90 minutes east of Niagara Falls.

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  • Lew Pitcher Canadian by birth, and living in Brampton, Ontario, I am a career techie working at a major Canadian bank.

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  • According to James Red Sky, an Ojibwa Indian of Ontario, Canada. 'We saw a thunderbird a few summers ago.

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  • The Paleozoic Fossils of Ontario ** Ordovician and Silurian trilobites.

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  • well-taken care of consumption (Association of responsible consumption ), Cultural Association [canada] alberta hamilton maritimes Montreal Ontario PEOPLE.

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  • and there became a distinguished lawyer and chancellor of Ontario, was born on the 13th of October 1833 at Adelaide in Middlesex county, Ontario.

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  • On the defeat of John Sandfield Macdonald's government in 1871 Blake became prime minister of Ontario, but resigned this office the same year in consequence of the abolition of dual representation.

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  • GENEVA, a city of Ontario county, New York, U.S.A., at the N.

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  • (See Ontario.) In both these disputes the provincial leader was the Hon.

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  • In 1877 Grant was appointed principal of Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, which through his exertions and influence expanded from a small denominational college into a large and influential educational centre; and he attracted to it an exceptionally able body of professors whose influence in speculation and research was widely felt during the quarter of a century that he remained at its head.

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  • P. macrophylla or candicans, commonly known as the Ontario poplar, is remarkable for its very large heart-shaped leaves, sometimes 10 in.

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  • "ARTHUR MEIGHEN (1874-), Canadian statesman, was born June 16 1874 at Anderson, Perth co., Ontario.

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  • He prepared plans for the construction of a canal between the Hudson river and Lake Champlain before 1776, and, in 1792-1796, carried to a successful conclusion a more pretentious scheme for connecting the Hudson with Lake Ontario by way of the Mohawk, Oneida Lake and the Onondaga river.

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  • This affords the largest stretch of arable land in eastern Canada, including the southern parts of Ontario and Quebec with an area of some 38,000 sq.

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  • Manitoba is largely peopled from Ontario, together with a decreasing number of half-breeds-i.e.

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  • from Lake Superior to the Pacific. Then Manitoba was principally inhabited by English and French half-breeds (or Metis), descendants of Hudson's Bay Company's employes, or adventurous pioneers from Quebec, together with Scottish settlers, descendants of those brought out by Lord Selkirk (q.v.), some English army pensioners and others, and the van of the immigration that shortly followed from Ontario.

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  • But there was relentless war between the Hurons and the Iroquois occupying the southern shore of Lake Ontario, and when in 1649 the Iroquois ruined and almost completely destroyed the Hurons, the Jesuit missionaries also fell victims to the conquerors' rage.

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  • Newfoundland yields cupreous pyrites, worked at Pilley's Island, whilst the nickeliferous pyrites of Sudbury in Ontario is partly magnetic (see Pyrrhotite).

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  • At Guelph is the Ontario Agricultural College, founded and endowed by the provincial government, and greatly enlarged and improved by the generosity of Sir William Macdonald (b.

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  • In 1862, when the diocese of Ontario was formed, the bishop was elected in Canada, and consecrated under a royal mandate, letters patent being by this time entirely discredited.

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  • These auto high insurance online ontario quote risk advantages quot data especially the.

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  • In August, Tom Locke visited Guelph, Ontario and Wooster, Ohio to investigate verticillium wilt of potatoes.

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  • Revealed to either assistant vise president The Deposit Insurance Corporation of Ontario acord data standards contractor and the.

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  • Well-taken care of consumption (Association of responsible consumption), Cultural Association [canada] alberta hamilton maritimes Montreal Ontario PEOPLE.

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  • Some attractions that are nearby include the Corning Museum of Glass, the Lake Ontario Wine Trail, a Renaissance Festival, Watkins Glen International, and the Women's Rights National Historical Park in Seneca Falls.

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  • A wide variety of scooters can be had at Abibaba, located at 7855 Keele Street in Concord, Ontario, just outside of the city.

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  • Bank fraud and identity theft investigations in Ontario are taken very seriously.

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  • If you are living in Ontario and you find yourself the victim of fraud, you may wonder what options there are for bank fraud and identity theft investigations.

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  • This means that while you live in Ontario, the person who stole your identity may live in a different location entirely- this makes it hard for law enforcement to pursue the case.

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  • Such is the case with a discovered fraud operation in Ontario, Canada.

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  • Consider the instance of an assistant manager of a bank in Barrie, a city in Central Ontario.

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  • In 2009 someone hacked into the phone system of an Ontario law firm and made phone calls to Africa that cost over $200,000.

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  • As you can see, while Ontario bank fraud and identity theft investigations are sometimes successful, the penalties for such fraud are not necessarily always severe enough to act as a deterrent.

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  • North America but the majority are primarily in Pennsylvania, Ohio, North Carolina, and Ontario.

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  • Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine: This college is located in Toronto, Ontario, Canada and offers a four-year program to become a Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine.

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  • The Health First® network is based in Burlington, Ontario, Canada.

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  • The island is accessible by ferry from Alexandria Bay or from Rockport and Ivy Lea, Ontario Canada.

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  • Founded in 1978, the Soma School of Makeup Art is registered and approved by Ontario's Ministry of Education and Training.

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  • Snow sport enthusiasts who find themselves in Ontario for business or pleasure may want to check out the greater Toronto area ski and snowboard packages.

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  • Ontario ski areas are not as famous as those in other parts of Canada, such as Quebec, Banff and British Columbia.

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  • The ski club is a concept that is unique to Toronto, Ontario.

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  • Blue Mountain is Ontario's largest resort.

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  • It is located about two hours north of Toronto, near Collingwood, Ontario.

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  • Its 216 meter vertical drop is one of the highest in Ontario.

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  • Today, the stores have jumped the border from the United States and spread into Canada, including Toronto, Alberta, and Ontario.

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  • According to statistics provided by the Ontario Provincial Police, impaired driving is the leading criminal cause of death in all of Canada.

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  • On long weekends in the summer, Ontario Provincial Police deal with 10 fatal accidents on average.

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  • Born Eileen Edwards in 1965, in Windsor, Ontario, Canada, Shania Twain always wanted to be an entertainer.

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  • Justin Bieber was born in Ontario, Canada, in 1994.

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  • On June 16, 2007, Kristy Swanson was arrested for allegedly assaulting Eisler's ex-wife, Marcia O'Brien, in Ontario, Canada.

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  • He spent several years in Syracuse, New York, before his family moved to Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

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  • The family resides in Ontario, California.

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  • Toronto, Ontario: McClelland and Stewart, Inc., 1991.

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  • Toronto, Ontario, Canada: ECW Press, 1999.

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  • Poison Sumach (Rhus Vernix) - This is a shrub or, in its own country, a small tree with pinnate leaves, and growing in swamps in southern Ontario and the coast district of the eastern States.

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  • Three Days Grace was formed in Ontario, Canada in the early 1990s by guitarist and singer Adam Gontier, bassist Brad Walst, lead guitarist Barry Stock and drummer Neil Sanderson.

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  • East York, Ontario, Bravado Designs manufactures maternity and nursing bras in a variety of styles and designs.

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  • All of the clothing sold at Imogene's and WERCreations is made at their location in Woodstock, Ontario.

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  • To find out more, contact the Sunrise Canadian Headquarters at 484 Steeles Avenue West in Thornhill, Ontario L4J 1A2 or call 416-553-2103.

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  • The amusement park was located in Crystal Beach, Ontario, next to the town of Ridgeway.

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  • Thunder Road: Built in 1981 at Canada's Wonderland in Ontario, this powered coaster reaches 40 miles per hour, an unheard of speed for electric rides.

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  • Crystal Beach amusement park was located near Ridgeway, Ontario on the Canadian shore of Lake Erie, just a few miles west of Buffalo, New York and south of Niagara Falls.

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  • Fallsview is an indoor water park located in Niagara Falls, Ontario.

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  • According to Professor Nick-Dyer Witheford of the University of Western Ontario, in 2000, Canadians purchased one billion dollars worth of video games, only slightly behind the 1.2 billion dollar Canadian music industry.

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  • Major areas in Canada that have the strongest video game industry presence includes Montreal and Vancouver, as well as numerous developers throughout Ontario.

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  • There is also an additional tasting room in Ontario, California.

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  • The company that makes the BlackBerry is called Research in Motion (RIM) and it is based out of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.

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  • Research in Motion Limited, also known as RIM, was founded in 2004 by . It is a Canadian telecommunication and wireless device company based in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.

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  • Ontario St., Suite 550, Chicago, IL 60611.

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  • Dr. Kang Lee of the Department of Psychology at Queens University in Kingston, Ontario, Canada, observed young children telling so-called "white lies" to avoid disappointing the researcher.

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  • American Osteopathic Association. 142 East Ontario Street, Chicago, IL 60611.

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  • Ontario Street, Suite 550, Chicago, IL 60611.

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  • Canadian Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. 2221 Yonge St., Suite 601, Toronto, Ontario, M4S 2B4, Canada.

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  • Chromosome 22 Central. 237 Kent Avenue, Timmins, Ontario.

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  • When it comes to qualifying for unemployment insurance, Ontario workers are subject to different rules depending on where they live.

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  • To apply for unemployment insurance, Ontario residents are required to submit a Record of Employment (ROE).

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  • If you are in Ontario, find more information on unemployment insurance in Ontario specifically.

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  • Obtaining a mortgage refinance in Ontario Canada can be a good way to get funds for many of life's unexpected surprises.

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  • Due to the high price of homes in Ontario, many homeowners take advantage of the lower interest rates that are currently available.

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  • There are many lenders to choose from for your mortgage refinance in Ontario, Canada.

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  • It is also a good idea to look for a lender who is a member of the Independent Mortgage Brokers Association of Ontario.

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  • Furniture Bank, which is located in Toronto, Ontario, accepts drop-offs between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. on Monday through Friday and from 9:00 a.m. until noon on Saturday.

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  • A popular night club DJ in Ontario has even adopted the company's moniker as his own stage name: DJ Spence Diamonds.

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  • Another De Beers owned mine, this one is located in northern Ontario.

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  • Born in 1901 in Ontario, Canada, Manly P.

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  • An Ontario, Canada sighting is documented here.

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  • The company, which got its start in Ontario, Canada in the early 1900s, was originally a distributor of comfortable winter shoes.

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  • The series revolves around teens who attend Degrassi Community School in Toronto, Ontario.

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  • United States player and two-time World Cup winner Landon Donovan of Ontario, California has wrist tattoos of hummingbirds.

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  • Bordered by the United States and Canada, visitors can stay in the United States or head over the border for a taste of all that Ontario has to offer when visiting Niagara Falls.

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  • Ontario International Airport: The Ontario International Airport (ONT) is a good option for those looking for something near San Bernardino or Riverside.

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  • By the end of 2008, GM's production had dropped by 18.4%, and it had stopped shifts at its Pontiac and Flint, Michigan plants, as well as facilities in Oshawa, Ontario, and Janesville, Wisconsin.

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  • The 2012 Cadillac vehicle may begin production in the Ontario, Canada plant as early as December of 2011.

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  • If you're looking for gourmet cooking supplies in Ontario, you have several places to choose from.

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  • You don't need to travel far to find plenty of gourmet cooking supplies in Ontario.

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  • Their motto is, "All Ontario, All the Time," and they take pride in knowing the source of everything they carry.

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  • Stop into any of Ontario's shops for gourmet supplies and see what your kitchen can produce.

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  • A band originating from Ontario, Canada with a punky-pop musical style and whose song lyrics range from plain to fun to powerful.

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  • Formed in 1997 in Peterborough, Ontario, this Canadian group has released six albums and enjoyed growing success.

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  • Born March 14, 1994, in Stratford, Ontario, Canada, Justin Drew Bieber started performing publicly at age 12.

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  • One of the first moves to stardom that Justin Bieber went through was entering a singing competition in Ontario at the age of 12.

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  • Survive This is filmed in Huntsville, Ontario, Canada, which is Les Stroud's hometown.

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  • Les Stroud was born on October 20, 1961, in the small town of Mimico, Ontario, Canada, where he grew up and attended school.

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  • After graduating high school, he enrolled at Fanshawe College in London, Ontario, where he completed the Music Industry Arts program.

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  • While Stroud had always had an affinity for the great outdoors, a wilderness canoe trip through Ontario's Temagami region sparked a desire for something new.

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  • In 1990, Stroud began leading canoeists through the Northern Ontario wilderness as a guide for Black Feather Wilderness Adventures.

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  • After studying survival training with a number of experts, Stroud and his wife, photographer Sue Jamison, spent a year in Northern Ontario living as if they were settlers there from hundreds of years ago.

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  • After spending time in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories as an outdoor instructor, Les Stroud and his wife returned to Ontario where they set up home and business in Huntsville.

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  • The City of Guelph, Ontario is also one of the most vibrant economic and industrial hot spots in Canada, so it should come as no surprise that the business of web design in Guelph is also a booming industry.

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  • The following services are currently the top professional web design businesses in the city of Guelph, Ontario.

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  • ABITIBBI, a lake and river of Ontario, Canada.

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  • CARLETON PLACE, a town and port of entry of Lanark county, Ontario, Canada, 28 m.

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  • PETROLEA, a town and port of entry in Lambton county, Ontario, Canada, situated 42 m.

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  • ORILLIA, a town and port of entry of Simcoe county, Ontario, Canada, situated 84 m.

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  • SACKETT'S HARBOR, a village in Jefferson county, New York, U.S.A., at the eastern end of Lake Ontario, on the south shore of Black River Bay, about i m.

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  • Sackett's Harbor was the starting-point of a force of 700 men under a Pole named von Schultz, who in November 1838, during the uprising in Upper Canada (Ontario) attempted to invade Canada, was taken prisoner near Prescott, was tried at Kingston, being defended by Sir John Macdonald, and with nine of his followers was executed in Kingston in December.

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  • 1108; Ontario, Rev. Stats.

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  • Scotland, Devonshire, Spain, Hanover, Archangel, Vitebsk, Athabasca, Mackenzie, Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, Newfoundland, New York, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Kentucky.

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  • Shropshire, Wales, Bohemia, Sweden, Esthonia, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, Newfoundland, New York, Pennsylvania [?], Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, Minnesota, Tennessee, Kentucky, Georgia, Alabama, Oklahoma, New Mexico, New Caledonia.

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  • Monumental Park is divided into four sections (containing about 1 acre each) by Superior Avenue and Ontario Street.

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  • by the Canadian provinces of Manitoba and Ontario, being separated from the latter by the Lake of the Woods, Rainy River and Rainy Lake, and certain of their tributaries and outlets, and on the E.

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