On-the-whole sentence example

on-the-whole
  • The summer is hot, but on the whole the climate is very healthy.

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  • The climate is moist and sometimes oppressively hot, though pleasant on the whole.

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  • Between optimism and pessimism is the theory of "meliorism," according to which the world on the whole makes progress in goodness.

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  • Grote maintained that on the whole the allies had little ground for complaint; but in so doing he rather seems to leave out of account the Greek's dislike of external discipline.

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  • The value of foreign trade of the open ports has fluctuated considerably, but has shown a tendency to increase on the whole.

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  • They encountered many difficulties and some suffering in their early days, but on the whole they throve and prospered.

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  • It is the antithesis of "optimism," which denotes the view that on the whole there is a balance of good and pleasure, or at least that in the long run good will triumph.

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  • If Shipton let her know he knew all the dirt on Annie's past, that might throw a kibosh on the whole business.

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  • The time thus spent seems to have been on the whole happy, even allowing for warm discussions with the mathematicians and metaphysicians of France, and for harassing controversies in the Netherlands.

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  • The weather on the whole is remarkably dry.

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  • The surface on the whole is hilly and is partly occupied by offshoots of the Thuringian Forest; the highest summits are found in the eastern half, where the Kieferle reaches 2849 ft.

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  • The religious element, however, which predominated in Cromwell's foreign policy inclined him to peace, and in April of that year terms were arranged by which England on the whole was decidedly the gainer.

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  • The faithful talking with tongues were taken by bystanders for drunken men, but intoxicated men do not talk in languages of which they are normally ignorant.2 Paul on the whole discouraged glossolaly.

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  • By a bull of 1264 Urban made the festival, hitherto practically confined to the diocese of Liege, obligatory on the whole Church,' and a new office for the festival was written by Thomas Aquinas himself.

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  • Income from land has diminished on the whole.

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  • It is proportional, and is collected by deduction from salaries and pensions paid to servants of the state, where it is assessed on three-eighths of the income, and from interest on consolidated stock, where it is assessed on the whole amount; and by register in the cases of private individuals, who pay on three-fourths of their income, professional men, capitalists or manufacturers, who pay on one-half or nine-twentieths of their income.

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  • Minghettis finance, though less clearsighted and less resolute than that of Sella, was on the whole prudent and beneficial.

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  • He made various reforms which were badly wanted in army administration, but on the whole the experiment of a civilian War Lord was not a complete success, and in April 1909 Senator Casana retired and was succeeded by General Spingardi, an appointment which received general approval.

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  • This latter definition seems on the whole the more probable one, and it certainly would fit exactly the character of the writings to which the term relates.

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  • Human survival is taught, but not ultimate immortality; and, as against Epicureanism, Stoicism on the whole tends to deny free will.

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  • Empiricism is restated by Paley, who is Kant's younger contemporary as a man and also on the whole as a writer.

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  • Yet on the whole Aristotle leans to a teleological theory of evolution, which he interprets dualistually by means of certain metaphysical distinctions.

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  • Yet while, in its application to history, Hegel's theory of evolution has points of resemblance with those doctrines which seek to explain the worldprocess as one unbroken progress occurring in time, it constitutes on the whole a theory apart and sui generis.

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  • It is possible to suppose that this condition is derived from the astelic condition already referred to, but the evidence on the whole leads to the conclusion that it has ansen byan increase in the number of the bundles within the stele, the individuality of the bundle asserting itself after its escape from the original bundle-ring of the primitive cylinder.

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  • These are connected by the presence of peculiar types, Proteaceae, Restiaceae, Rutaceae, &c., mostly shrubby in habit and on the whole somewhat intolerant of a moist climate.

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  • It is interesting to observe that though deduced exclusively from the study of flowering plants, they are in substantial agreement with those now generally adopted by zoologists, and may therefore be presumed to be on the whole natural.

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  • The climate is cold in the eastern and central districts of Ain, but it is on the whole healthy, except in the Dombes.

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  • The pope treated Mantegna with less liberality than he had been used to at the Mantuan court; but on the whole their connexion, which ceased in 1490, was not unsatisfactory to either party.

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  • Very important for the study of Midrashic literature are the Yalgut (gleaning) Shim`oni, on the whole Bible, the Yalqut Mekhiri, on the Prophets, Psalms, Proverbs and Job, and the Midrash ha-gadhol, 2 all of which are of uncertain but late date and preserve earlier material.

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  • It is a minority, a minority strictly marked out by birth from other members of the commonwealth, a minority which seems further, though this point is less clearly marked, to have had on the whole the advantage in point of wealth.

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  • It will be seen from this statement that Peiper bases his conclusions on grounds far too narrow; and on the whole it is perhaps more probable that Boetius wrote none of the four Christian treatises, particularly as they are not ascribed to him by any of his contemporaries.

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  • In the article on Solon (ad fin.) it is shown that the Solonian reforms, though they made a great advance in some directions, failed on the whole.

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  • The standard of teaching in the universities is on the whole very high, and may be compared to that of the German universities.

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  • Indeed, towards paganism, at least, he is perhaps even more than tolerant, preferring on the whole to keep on good terms with pagan divinities.

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  • For half a century the struggle between the two races went on with varying success, but on the whole the Polish government proved stronger than its insubordinate subjects, and about 1638 it seemed to have attained its object.

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  • But isolated examples of high speeds do not give the traveller much information as to the train service at his disposal, for on the whole he is better off with a large number of trains all maintaining a good average of speed than with a service mostly consisting of poor trains, but leavened with one or two exceptionally fast ones.

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  • Sleep may overtake the patient in the midst of the sweating stage, and he awakes, not without some feeling of what he has passed through, but on the whole well, with the temperature fallen almost or altogether to the normal, or it may be even below the normal; the pulse moderate and full; the spleen again of its ordinary size; the urine that is passed after the paroxysm deposits a thick brick-red sediment of urates.

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  • Quotidian intermittent is on the whole more common than tertian in hot countries; elsewhere the tertian is the usual type, and quartan is only occasional.

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  • The medieval Jews on the whole lived, under the crescent, a fuller and freer life than was possible to them under the cross.

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  • It is truer to say that on the whole the Jews began at this period to abandon as hopeless the attempt to find a place for themselves in the general life of their country.

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  • Turkey has always on the whole tolerated the Jews, and much is hoped from the new regime.

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  • Its climate is less hot and arid, its natural productiveness much greater, and its population more settled and on the whole more advanced.

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  • With the rise of Mahommedanism occurred a sudden effervescence of the Arabs, who during some centuries threatened to impose not only their political authority but their civilization and new religion on the whole known world.

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  • Looking at eastern Europe and western Asia only, one must say that Asiatic influences have on the whole prevailed hitherto (though perhaps the tide is turning), for Islam is paramount in this region and European culture at a low ebb.

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  • Hitherto pacific counsels had on the whole prevailed; but Wolsey, who was nothing if not turbulent, turned the balance in favour of war, and his marvellous administrative energy first found full scope in the preparations for the English expedition to Biscay in 1512, and for the campaign in northern France in 1513.

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  • Man is able to derive a measure of enjoyment from life in spite of the nonexistence of the orthodox gods; yet this enjoyment is on the whole negative, the avoidance of pain.

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  • In Europe on the whole the so-called pessimistic attitude was commoner in the Teutonic north than in the Mediterranean basin.

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  • But on the whole the house of Sindhia remained faithful.

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  • The vegetation of the steppe is on the whole scanty.

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  • Another reform was the substitution for the corvee of a tax in money levied on the whole province, the construction of roads being handed over to contractors, by which means Turgot was able to leave his province with a good system of roads, while distributing more justly the expense of their construction.

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  • The Early English style is on the whole less well exemplified in the county, but Ashbourne church, with its central tower and lofty spire, contains beautiful details of this period, notably the lancet windows in the Cockayne chapel.

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  • The terms were on the whole unexpectedly favourable to Austria.

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  • He used his facilities carefully and judiciously; and the result is a work on the whole accurate and unprejudiced, and quite indispensable to the student either of the history of the early colonies, or of the institutions and customs of the aboriginal American peoples.

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  • But the vestigial jaws, numerous Malpighian tubes, and specialized wings of may-flies forbid us to consider the order as on the whole primitive.

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  • It does not seem to have been the author's original intention to publish any letterpress to this enormous work, but to let the plates tell their own story, though finally, with the assistance, as is now known, of William Macgillivray, a text, on the whole more than respectable, was produced in five large Ma egil- octavos under the title of Ornithological Biography, of liyr ay.

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  • For the rest there is only one considerable change, and that forms the greatest blot on the whole scheme.

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  • Venice was successful on the whole.

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  • This selection of one market for detailed examination does not rob our sketch of generality, as might at first be thought, since broadly the history of the development of one market is the history of the development of all, and on the whole the economic explanation of the evolution that has taken place may be universalized.

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  • Expressed both absolutely and as percentages of the price averaged from the 1st of October to the 31st of July, the range of movement, standard deviation, and mean weekly movement calculated between the times mentioned above (October 1st to July 31st), after diminishing significantly for some years after the later 'sixties, have risen appreciably on the whole of late years.

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  • In British Central Africa, the results on the whole have not been satisfactory.

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  • Yet the result of the Fourth Crusade was on the whole disastrous both for the papacy and for the crusading movement.

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  • Always in large part French, the Crusades had on the whole contributed to exalt the prestige of France, until it stood at the end of the r3th century the most considerable power in Europe.

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  • No school in England has on the whole produced so many eminent men as Westminster did under the regime of Busby.

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  • The years of the supremacy of Pericles (443-429) are on the whole the most glorious in Athenian history.

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  • In the autumn months malarial fever is prevalent in all thickly forested tracts and also in the rice country; but on the whole the province is considered to be healthy, and as the rains break fairly regularly in June and produce an immediate fall in the temperature, severe heat is only experienced for a period of from two to three months.

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  • Up to this time the rule of the Bhonsla rajas, rough warriors of peasant extraction, had been on the whole beneficent; but, soured by his defeat, Raghoji now set to work to recover some of his losses by a ruthless exploitation of the peasantry, and until the effective intervention of the British in 1818 the country was subjected to every kind of oppression.

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  • The soil consists, for the most part, either of clay intermixed with sand or of calcareous earth, and is on the whole fruitful.

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  • It was in the Roman state that military action - in Greece often purposeless and, except in the resistance to Persia, on the whole fruitless - worked out the social mission which formed its true justification.

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  • It is noteworthy, however, that although the manner in which the prey is stung (for example) is on the whole similar in the case of the members of any given species - that is to say, all the wasps of the species behave in very much the same manner - yet there are minor variations in detail.

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  • The arrangement set forth in and sanctioned by the decree of Muharrem on the whole worked admirably.

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  • The light cavalry had been much improved and the heavy cavalry on the whole proved a fair match for their opponents.

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  • The bazaars of Bagdad are extensive and well stocked, and while not so fine in construction as those of some other Eastern cities, they are more interesting in their contents and industries, because Bagdad has on the whole been less affected by foreign innovations.

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  • But this was a mere legal formality, and on the whole the marriage seems to have met the views of both parties, 'neither of whom had any affection for the other.

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  • The climate of the east coast is on the whole considerably more arctic than that of the west coast on corresponding latitudes; the land is much more completely snowcovered, and the snow-line goes considerably lower.

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  • The trade of Greenland has on the whole much decreased in modern times, and trading and missions cost the Danish state a comparatively large sum (about £i i,000 every year), although this is partly covered by the income from the royalty of the cryolite mines at Ivigtut.

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  • During the last half of the 19th century there was on the whole a slight increase of the native population.

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  • The population of the east coast seems on the whole to be decreasing in number, several hundreds chiefly living at Angmagssalik.

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  • The climate of Upper Austria, which varies according to the altitude, is on the whole moderate; it is somewhat severe in the north, but is mild in Salzkammergut.

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  • The soil is on the whole fertile, and the produce very varied.

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  • The streets are as a rule arcaded, and this characteristic has been preserved in modern additions, which have on the whole been made with considerable taste, as have also the numerous restorations of medieval buildings.

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  • The Reformation brought in radical changes, which were on the whole a return to the primitive type.

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  • Abelard's discussion of the problem (which it is right to say is on the whole incidental rather than systematic) is thus marked by an eclecticism which was perhaps the source at once of its strength and its weakness.

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  • In the fourth class may be grouped such of the latest Hungarian novelists as have tried, and on the whole succeeded, in clothing their ideas and characters in a style peculiar to themselves.

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  • In this connexion verse 10 is particularly appropriate as addressed to an Egyptian princess whose forefathers, though their rule had not on the whole been tyrannical, had been regarded by the Jews as heathen oppressors.

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  • It is then on the whole probable that the Paulicians who appear in Armenian records as early as 550, and were afterwards= called Thonraki, by the Greeks by the Armenian name Paulikiani, were the remains of a primitive adoptionist Christianity, widely dispersed in the east and already condemned under the name of Pauliani by the council of Nice in 325.

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  • The following years were marked by recurring attempts at revolution, but on the whole Venezuela during the period1830-1846was less disturbed than the neighbouring republic owing to the dominating influence of General Paez, who during the whole of that time exercised practically dictatorial power.

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  • Shortly after crossing the Bohemian-Saxon frontier, and whilst still struggling through the sandstone defiles, the stream assumes a north-westerly direction, which on the whole it preserves right away to the North Sea.

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  • The praise, though it has been at times exaggerated, is on the whole just, certainly in respect of variety of work and mastery of form.

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  • Among the drawbacks of this temper, which on the whole made for progress, was the rise of a school of excessive scepticism, which, forgetting the value of the accumulated stores of empiricism, despised those degrees of moral certainty that, in so complex a study and so tentative a practice as medicine, must be our portion for the present, and even for a long future, however great the triumphs of medicine may become.

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  • While in some cases these laws are unnecessarily stringent and tend to restrict the business of mining yet on the whole they have had the effect of reducing greatly the loss of life and injuries of miners where they have been well enforced.

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  • The resultant hydrostatic thrust across any diametral plane of the cylinder will be modified, but the only term in the loss of head which exerts a resultant thrust on the whole cylinder is 2mU sin Olga, and its thrust is 27rpmU absolute units in the direction Cy, to be counteracted by a support at the centre C; the liquid is streaming past r=a with velocity U reversed, and the cylinder is surrounded by a vortex.

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  • It will be noted that the first group has obtained higher dates than the second, and the second group higher dates on the whole than the third.

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  • We must, therefore, assume a number of independent sources put together by an editor or else that the book is on the whole the work of one author who made use of independent writings but failed to blend them into one harmonious whole.

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  • The former perhaps produce a little better char, but the latter, working almost automatically, require less labour and attention for an equal amount of work, and on the whole have proved very satisfactory.

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  • As an exegete he exercised a powerful, and on the whole a beneficial, influence on theological investigation.

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  • The Nilotic Nubians are on the whole a strong muscular people, essentially agricultural, more warlike and energetic than the Egyptians.

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  • The municipal finance has on the whole been sound, and notwithstanding the extra burdens assumed on the incorporation of the suburbs, the equilibrium of the communal budget was maintained up to the fall of the Liberal administration.

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  • Though a thorough and avowed partisan, he was within the party the counsellor of moderate rather than extreme measures, and thus gained on the whole a position of great influence.

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  • Still, having been an actor in many of the events recorded, he is on the whole accurate and trustworthy.

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  • Yet while presenting these unlovely traits, Herder's character was on the whole a worthy and attractive one.

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  • Stephen of Rome attempted to force the Roman practice on the whole church in 253.

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  • While Constantine at the beginning of his reign (313) declared complete religious liberty, and kept on the whole to this declaration, yet he confined his favours to the orthodox hierarchical church, and even by an edict of the year 326 formally asserted the exclusion from these of heretics and schismatics.

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  • The animal is ` brown,' of a shade from orange or tawny to quite blackish; the tail and feet are ordinarily the darkest, the head lightest, often quite whitish; the ears usually have a whitish rim, while on the throat there is usually a large tawny-yellowish or orange-brown patch, from the chin to the fore legs, sometimes entire, sometimes broken into a number of smaller, irregular blotches, sometimes wanting, sometimes prolonged on the whole under surface, when the animal is bicolor like a stoat in summer.

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  • If, starting from E, the same amount of heat h is restored at constant pressure, we should arrive at the point F on the adiabatic through B, since the substance has been transformed from B to F by a reversible path without loss or gain of heat on the whole.

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  • Roughly we may distinguish three main divisions of the calendar year, the festivals of Spring, of the Harvest and of Winter, preserving on the whole their peculiar characteristics.

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  • With the 14th century a new note, that of reformation, is struck; but on the whole there was a drop from the high level of the 13th.

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  • As king, he still retained something of the clerk in the habit of his dress; but he was at the same time a warrior so impetuous, as to be sometimes foolhardy, and his policy was on the whole anti-clerical.

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  • It is the only confession which has been imposed by authority of parliament on the whole of the United Kingdom.

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  • Hardy that the "double aspect of Trajan's rescript, which, while it theoretically condemned the Christians, practically gave them a certain security," explains "the different views which have since been taken of it; but by most of the church writers, and perhaps on the whole with justice, it has been regarded as favourable and as rather discouraging persecution than legalizing it" (Pliny's Correspondence with Trajan, 63, 210-217).

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  • Corps approaching, whilst the rain of shells into St Privat exceeded anything hitherto seen on any battlefield, decided to call on the whole of his force to attack.

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  • Despite the comparative failure of the Composite Corps the attack had on the whole been a brilliant success, seven Allied divisions having defeated nine enemy divisions ensconced in immensely powerful works, capturing from them 5,300 prisoners and ioo guns and effecting such a wide breach in the last German line of defence that its complete capture in a few days was assured.

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  • His interpretation is on the whole mystical.

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  • He espoused now one side, and now the other, but on the whole supported Rome, so that orators and historians could speak of him as "a most faithful ally of the Roman people."

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  • The Sure or Sauer, the most important stream in the duchy, rises at Vaux-les-Rosieres in Belgian Luxemburg, crosses the duchy, and forms the eastern boundary from the confluence of the Our till it joins the Moselle after a course of 50 m., during which it receives the Wiltz, Attert, Alzette, White and Black Ernz, &c. The soil of Luxemburg is generally good; the southern districts are on the whole the most fertile as well as the most populous.

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  • The verse portions, which are on the whole correct and classically constructed, are in imitation of Varro and are less tiresome.

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  • These poems are in a sense valuable as repertoires of antiquities; but their style is on the whole bad, and infinite patience is required to clear up their numerous and obscure allusions.

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  • It is superior on the whole to the Porphyrian scheme, which has grave defects.

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  • After a cannonade in which it suffered more severely than its entrenched enemy, the French centre furiously attacked the village of Allerheim; the fighting here was very heavy, and on the whole in favour of the Germans, although Mercy was killed.

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  • In other lands things did not on the whole go so well, and many causes at work during the later middle ages tended to bring about relaxation in the Benedictine houses; above all the vicious system of commendatory abbots, rife everywhere except in England.

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  • Though wanting in strength of will, Constantine possessed intelligence and many other good qualities, and his reign on the whole was not unsatisfactory.

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  • Spanish America was never so well governed as at the end of the 18th century, and was on the whole prosperous.

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  • The Indians are on the whole a tall people.

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  • This composite art reached its climax in Peru, the llama wool affording the finest staple on the whole hemisphere.

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  • Congregationalists, on the other hand, whether Independents or Baptists, remained on the whole Trinitarians, largely perhaps in virtue of their very polity, with its intimate relation between the piety of the people and that of the ministry.

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  • The 19th century was a period of considerable progress for the Congregational body, and on the whole the same may be said for the first seven years of the 10th century.

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  • The production is on the whole diminishing in Belgium (180,000 tons in 1907), but in France it is still large (375,000 tons in 1907).

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  • Fourteen millions of borrowed money, spent in ten years, were on the whole well laid out.

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  • The Weser on the whole is shallow, and navigation above Bremen is sometimes interrupted by drought.

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  • As sound arises in general from vibrating bodies, as it takes time to travel, and as the medium which carries it does not on the whole travel forward, but subsides into its original position when the sound has passed, we are forced to conclude that the disturbance is of the wave kind, We can at once gather some idea of the nature of sound waves in air by considering how they are produced by a bell.

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  • The term Pv/V added up for a complete wave vanishes, for P/V is constant and Zv=o, since on the whole the compression equals the extension.

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  • On the whole the air S within ABCD neither gains nor g D loses momentum, so that on the whole it receives as much through AB as it gives up to CD.

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  • Since no angular momentum goes out on the whole Z nwra 4 d0/dx -?- 2 pwra 4 Ud0/dt = o.

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  • Just as the Gathas (the ancient Zoroastrian hymns) omit Gaokerena, and the Hebrew prophets on the whole avoid mythological phrases, so this old Hebrew thinker prunes the primitive exuberance of the traditional myth.

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  • His theory, which corresponded on the whole to the state of things in France in the time of Louis XI., was a theory of despotism.

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  • This administrative " double track," as it was called, led, it is true, in many cases to lively emulation, but was on the whole highly extravagant.

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  • The system of regulation by central boards was severely .criticised for incompetence and even for corruption, and sometimes justly; but on the whole it was amply justified by the urgent necessities of the times and by its results.

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  • On his return he entered Rome with an ovation (a minor form of triumph), temples were built, statues erected in his honour, and a special priesthood instituted to attend to his worship. The people were ground down by new forms of taxation and every kind of extortion, but on the whole Rome was free from internal disturbances during his reign; some insignificant conspiracies were discovered and rendered abortive.

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  • The Apologists no doubt show us certain fresh factors entering into this development; but on the whole the Apostolic Fathers by themselves go a long way to explain the transition in question, so far as knowledge of this saeculum obscurum is within our reach at all.

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  • In the summer of 1770 he returned to Paris, resumed music-copying, and was on the whole happier than he had been since he had to leave Montlouis.

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  • Berthelot, who examined the skull, found no trace of injury by a bullet; and on the whole there is no reason to doubt the verdict of the original inquiry at Ermenonville.

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  • The soil is varied in character, but on the whole rich and under high cultivation.

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  • As a politician he on the whole failed, though he retained the confidence of the popular party almost to the last.

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  • But although the crests of its component ranges reach altitudes of 21,500 to 22,000 ft., they are not as a rule overtopped by individual peaks of commanding and towering elevation, as the Himalayas are, but run on the whole tolerably uniform and relatively at little greater altitude than the lofty valleys which separate them one from another.

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  • The climate is on the whole pleasant.

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  • In this rapid glance at some of the chief priesthoods of antiquity we have hitherto passed over the pure Semites, whose priesthoods call for closer examination because of the profound influence which one of them - that of the Jews - has exercised on Christianity, and so on the whole history of the modern world.

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  • The act of 1883 was passed in the main as a party measure by the Republicans, and on the whole served rather Revision of 1883.

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  • This version is on the whole a fai t hful reproduction of G 1.

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  • This analysis has on the whole been accepted by Harnack, Schi rer, Deane and Beer.

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  • In 1850 he published the Life of Calvin, a conscientious and on the whole impartial work, though the character of Calvin is somewhat harshly drawn, and his influence in the religious world generally is insufficiently appreciated.

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  • The results are open to criticism in details, but form on the whole a remarkable achievement in the conversion of unwritten and highly technical law into a body of written law sufficiently clear to be administered by officers to many of whom its ideas and language are foreign.

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  • In this respect both the Crown and the country were with them, so that their interference,if violent,was on the whole distinctly beneficial.

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  • The feeding of carnivores is on the whole the most easy; the chief pitfall being the extreme liability of all except the larger forms to fatal digestive disturbances from food that is not quite fresh.

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  • Mohler (q.v.) who afterwards became his friend, on being appealed to, pronounced on the whole in his favour.

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  • In February 1793 the Convention decreed a levy on the whole of France, and on the eve of the ballot the Vendee, rather than comply with this requisition, broke out in insurrection.

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  • But this they could not do; and since the version, owing to the limitations of the translators, departs widely from the sense of the original, Christian scholars were on the whole kept much farther from the original meaning than their Jewish contemporaries, who used the Hebrew text; and later, after Jewish grammatical and philological study had been stimulated by intercourse with the Arabs, the relative disadvantages under which Christian scholarship laboured increased.

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  • Other important works in which English and American scholars have co-operated are the Encyclopaedia Biblica (1899-1903) and Hastings' Bible Dictionary (1898-1904) - the latter less radical, but yet on the whole based on acceptance of the fundamental positions of Vatke, Graf, Wellhausen.

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  • It seems on the whole most probable that 2 Peter is not a genuine work, but that it came from the same factory of pseudonymous Petrine writings as the Apocalypse which bears the same name, though the one has, and the other has not, obtained a place within the Canon.

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  • Partly on account of its great extent, and partly because there is no wide opening to the Arctic regions, the normal wind circulation is on the whole less modified in the North Pacific than in the Atlantic, except in the west, where the south-west logy.

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  • The surface waters of the North Pacific are relatively fresh, the salinity being on the whole much lower than in the other great Salinity.

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  • Later accounts made it appear that this was an exaggeration, although the standard of morality was unquestionably low on the whole.

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  • These contributions to the literature of Shakespeare are full of curious matter, but on the whole display a great waste of erudition, in seeking to show that papers which had been proved forgeries might nevertheless have been genuine.

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  • But on the whole the false prophets deserve that name, not for their conscious impostures, but because they were content to handle religious formulas, which they had learned by rote, as if they were intuitive principles, the fruit of direct spiritual experience, to enforce a conventional morality, shutting their eyes to glaring national sins, after the manner of professional orthodoxy, and, in brief, to treat the religious status quo as if it could be accepted without question as fully embodying the unchanging principles of all religion.

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  • This of course is only the broadest possible statement of a position which undergoes many modifications in the hands of individual seers, but on the whole governs all prophecy from Amos to Jeremiah.

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  • He is pictured on monuments and seal cylinders with the lightning and the thunderbolt, and in the hymns the sombre aspects of the god on the whole predominate.

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  • Probably the 129 and 224 systems coexisted in the country; but on the whole it seems more likely that 129 or rather 258 grains was the Hebrew shekel before the Ptolemaic times -- especially as the 100 shekels to the mina is paralleled by the following Persian system (Hultsch) --

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  • This is not merely in the vague sense that on the whole good will be rewarded and evil punished, but that every single act must work out to the uttermost its inevitable consequences, and receive its retribution, however many ages the process may require.

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  • But after 1884 under the rule of Diaz, the Federal system continued in name, but it concealed in fact, with great benefit to the nation, a highly centralized administration, very intelligent, and on the whole both popular and successful - a modern form of rational despotism.

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  • The conduct of foreign relations was on the whole the most creditable part of his administration.

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  • Though the direct results of these unions were the restoration of prestige to the absolutist papacy and the bringing of Byzantine men of letters, like Bessarion, to the West, the outcome was on the whole disappointing.

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  • But the evidence is on the whole cumulative and convincing that there was a remarkable falling off in the birth-rate during the 19th century.

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  • It Is Therefore Infinitely More Commodious To Determine The Commencement Of The Year By A Fixed Rule Of Intercalation; And Of The Various Methods Which Might Be Employed, No One, Perhaps Is On The Whole More Easy Of Application, Or Better Adapted For The Purpose Of Computation, Than The Gregorian Now In Use.

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  • Whether this phase is that of the morning sun or of the springtime with which beneficent qualities are associated, or that of the noonday sun or of the summer solstice, bringing suffering and destruction in its wake, is still a matter of dispute, with the evidence on the whole in favour of the former proposition.

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  • The external form of the embryo meanwhile passes through highly characteristic changes, which are on the whole fairly constant ara (After Lankester, 17.) FIG.

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  • His first important appearance as a controversialist was against Edmund Calamy "the younger" in reference to conformity (1703-1707), and after this he came into conflict with Francis Atterbury, first on the interpretation of certain texts and then on the whole Anglican doctrine of non-resistance.

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  • They have, however, the only good ports on the whole coast, Bomba and Tobruk..

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  • There are, however, instances in which no such explanation will serve, and it is possible that our first and third evangelists may have used two documents which were not in all respects identical, but which corresponded very closely on the whole.

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  • Lastly, Fichte called this system realism, in so far as it posits the thing in itself as another thing; idealism, in so far as it posits it as a noumenon which is a product of its own thinking; and on the whole real idealism or ideal realism.

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  • He accepts on the whole the system of synthetic understanding which Kant superimposed on mere association.

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  • Ward on the whole follows this triple scheme, but modifies it by new arguments founded on later German phenomenalism.

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  • Yet on the whole the definition given above may be accepted as generally true for the present.

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  • In regard to physical features they present at the present time very many varieties both of stature and of pigmentation, though on the whole they are probably the tallest and fairest of European peoples.

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  • How Mesopotamia was affected by the passing of Persian armies on their way to suppress revolts in Syria or Egypt, or to conquer Greece, we do not know; on the whole it probably enjoyed unwonted peace.

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  • It was on the whole the personality, however, rather than the discoverer, that was greatest in Tyndall.

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  • He found the system to form the chief physiographical feature of southern Tibet, and stated it to be " on the whole the most massive range on the crust of the earth, its average height above the sealevel being greater than that of the Himalayas.

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  • Thiselton-Dyer classes the flora of Tibet on the whole as belonging to the Arctic-Alpine section of the great northern division, but containing a purely endemic element.

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    0
  • In the south and west the surface gradually slopes down in undulating terraces towards the Adriatic. The Quieto in the west and the Arsa in the east, neither navigable, are the principal streams. The climate of Istria, although it varies with the varieties of surface, is on the whole warm and dry.

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  • The partition of the continent among the various European nations has been on the whole favourable to mission work.

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  • Among the remaining divisions of Invertebrata special mention may be made of the air-breathing Arthropoda - on the whole the most important and interesting group. About one-third of the animals belonging thereto that occur in the higher regions are exclusively alpine (or alpine and northern); these characteristically alpine forms being furnished chiefly by the spiders, beetles and butterflies.

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  • The town is on the whole sumptuously built, with broad and regular streets.

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  • A form which is primitive on the whole may show a more advanced stage of evolution in some particular system of organs than another animal which is on the whole more highly developed and specialized.

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    0
  • The peace of Breda was signed (31st of July 1667) on terms on the whole favourable to the Dutch.

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    0
  • Agriculture in Poland is on the whole carried on according to more advanced methods than in Russia.

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    0
  • Although there are long stretches of marshy moorland along the coast, the soil is on the whole productive.

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  • In spite of the frequent pillage and destruction of monasteries by Northmen, Saracens, Arabs and other invaders; in spite of the existence of even widespread local abuses, St Benedict's institute went on progressing and consolidating; and on the whole it may be said that throughout the early middle ages the general run of Benedictine houses continued to perform with substantial fidelity the religious and social functions for which they were created.

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  • The Syriac (Peshitta) version is paraphrastic, but on the whole it follows the Hebrew text.

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  • He was tall and erect in figure, and lived on the whole a temperate life, though he used to say that he had been drunk about a hundred times.

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  • He pretended to have read little, and to be the original architect of his own system, and the claim was no doubt on the whole true.

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  • The progress in irrigation up to the end of the 19th century was spasmodic but on the whole steady.

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  • The influence exercised by his conversation, directly upon those with whom he lived, and indirectly on the whole literary world, was altogether without a parallel.

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  • It has no extensive sands, though on the whole very flat.

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  • Newspapers.While in England a few important newspapers I have an immense circulation, the newspapers of Germany are much more numerous, but on the whole command a more limited sale.

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    0
  • Having been recognized as king by the Saxons, the Thuringians and the nobles of Lorraine, the new king was able to turn his attention to the affairs of government, but on the whole his reign was an unfortunate one for Germany.

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  • Many mistakes were made in the administration, and cases of misconduct by individual officials formed the text for attacks on the whole system.

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  • They continued to look on the whole machinery of government, emperor and army, church and police, as their natural enemies, and remained completely under the bondage of the abstract theories of the Socialists, just as much as fifty years ago the German bourgeois were controlled by the Liberal theories.

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  • In the work of pressing on the national and international expansion of Germany the interests and views of the lesser constituent states of the Empire were apt to be overlooked or overridden; and in the southern states there was considerable resentment at the unitarian tendency of the north, which seemed to aim at imposing the Prussian model on the whole nation.

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  • That Polygordius, Protodrilus and Saccocirrus are on the whole primitive forms, and related to each other, there can be little doubt, but their place amongst the Annelida is difficult to determine.

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  • In the debates in the British parliament Fox urged that the whole territory should remain one province, and of this the governor-general, the 1st baron Dorchester, was on the whole in favour, but in 1791 Pitt introduced and carried the Constitutional Act, by which Upper and Lower Canada were separated.

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  • The first provincial government, formed on coalition lines by John Sandfield Macdonald, was thrifty and not unprogressive, but in 1871 was defeated by a reorganized liberal party, which held power from 1871 to 1905, and on the whole worthily.

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  • Wars and con conquests between Greeks and Greeks, especially on the q p y part of Syracuse, though not wanting, have been on the whole less constant than in old Greece.

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  • Towards the native races his policy varied according to momentary interests; but on the whole his reign tended to bring the Sicels more and more within the Greek pale.

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  • By virtue of the old relations between the popes and the Normans of Apulia, he held his kingdom in fief of the Holy See, a position which on the whole strengthened the royal power.

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  • Whereas Sparta had been least of all the allies interested in the war, and apart from the campaigns of Brasidas had on the whole taken little part in it, her allies benefited least by the terms of the Peace.

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  • The style, although marked by mannerisms, by occasional affectations and rhetorical devices, is on the whole direct and businesslike, nor is the Greek bad for the period in which he wrote.

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  • Rhymed prose was a favourite form of composition among the Arabs of that day, and Mahomet adopted it; but if it imparts a certain sprightliness to some passages, it proves on the whole a burdensome yoke.

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  • Besides commentaries on the whole Koran, or on special parts and topics, the Moslems possess a whole literature bearing on their sacred book.

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  • It is to be hoped that definite light may one day be forthcoming on the whole of this critical episode which had such a profound effect on the character and history of the Egyptian people.

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  • The arguments on the whole are in favour of 900.

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  • It must, however, be recognized that on the whole the work was well and efficiently done.

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  • There are some pleasing passages in Arnobius, but on the whole he is a tumid and a tedious author.

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  • The way in which the ulema are recruited and formed into a hierarchy with a vigorous esprit de corps throws an instructive light on the whole subject before us.

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  • Klebs has, however, recently canvassed the conclusions of both these investigators; and as the result of his own observations declares that algae, so far from being as polymorphic as they have been described, vary only within relatively narrow limits, and present on the whole as great fixity as the higher plants.

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  • He was indeed professionally and in the first place a painter; but throughout his career a great, and on the whole the most successful, part of his industry was devoted to drawing on the block for the woodcutter or engraving with his own hand on copper.

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  • In spite of such drawbacks, Carlyle in later years looked back upon the life at Craigenputtock as on the whole a comparatively healthy and even happy period, as it was certainly one of most strenuous and courageous endeavour.

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  • Though on the whole transverse, these depressions furnish another notable example of that independence of geological structure already referred to.

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  • The glens are more numerous there and on the whole deeper and narrower.

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  • The result on the whole has been the reverse.

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  • Early in the 19th century, when on the whole horses were much cheaper than they are at present, 700 and 800 guineas are prices recorded as having been occasionally paid for hunters of special repute.

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  • Every house possesses its staircase, its well, and cisterns for irrigation; and on the whole the Aryan Tajiks of this northern section of the Oxus valley seem to be well provided with most of the comforts, if not the luxuries, of life.

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  • Sir Thomas Maitland was not slow to exercise the control thus permitted him, though on the whole he did so for the benefit of the islands.

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  • In external politics peace was maintained on the whole after 1825.

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  • This was a direct attack on the whole Pharisaic position.

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  • The surface is for the most part undulating, but on the whole little above sea-level; the highest elevations are in the south-east, where Cretaceous hills (the oldest geological formation on the island) reach heights of upwards of 350 ft.

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  • Among the most characteristic birds may be mentioned eagles, vultures, owls, partridges, bee-eaters and hoopoes; singing birds are on the whole uncommon.

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  • They are on the whole carelessly made and maintained, and are liable to go badly and more or less permanently out of repair in heavy rain.

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  • The terms of peace, though on the whole moderate, were of a galling and humiliating nature, being ingeniously contrived to make the Christians ever conscious of their own inferiority.

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  • Thus we see that in our aquariums most of the axolotls remain in the branchiate condition, transformed individuals being on the whole very exceptional.

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  • On the other hand, although his sympathies were on the whole with the liberal movement in the university, he never took a lead in the matter.

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  • It is on the whole a route across open plains and hard, stony " dasht" - a route which would offer no great difficulties to that railway extension from Chaman which has so long been contemplated.

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  • But if we could look down on the whole from a balloon, we should find that India (apart from Burma, for which see the separate article) consists of three separate and well-defined tracts.

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  • Spanish rule on the whole was oppressive and tyrannical, and based solely on the idea that the dependencies must pay tribute to the dominant kingdom.

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  • It Is Readily Attainable At Any Time In A Modern Laboratory With Adequate Heating Arrangements, And Is Probably On The Whole The Most Suitable Temperature To Select.

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  • The style of Diphilus was simple and natural, and his language on the whole good Attic; he paid great attention to versification, and was supposed to have invented a peculiar kind of metre.

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  • The committee last quoted gave it as their opinion that "penal servitude as at present administered is on the whole satisfactory; it is effective as a punishment and free from serious abuses.

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  • The newest prisons are generally lighter, more roomy, better ventilated and on the whole more comfortable than even the best British prisons.

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  • The annual raids of Moslems and Greeks in the border districts of Asia Minor were attended with alternate successes, though on the whole the Greeks had the upper hand.

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  • We need devices, indeed, to determine priority or superior claim to be " better known absolutely or in the order of nature," but on the whole the problem is fairly faced.4 Of science Aristotle takes for his examples sometimes celestial physics, more often geometry or arithmetic, sometimes a concrete science, e.g.

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  • More probably it reflects the fact that Epicurus was, according to tradition through Nausiphanes, on the whole dominated by the influences that produced Pyrrhonism.

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  • Finally, it is on the whole in keeping with Mill's presuppositions to admit even in the case of the method of difference that in practice it is approximative and instructive, while the theoretical formula, to which it aims at approaching asymptotically as limit, if exact, is in some sense sterile.

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  • Among them it is on the whole impossible not to include the names of Hamilton and Mansel.

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  • Moreover, few of the writers who, whatsoever it was that they baptized with the name of logic, were at least earnestly engaged in an endeavour to solve the problem of knowledge within a circle of ideas which was on the whole Kantian, were under the dominance of a single inspiration.

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  • He is, perhaps, more able than Bradley has shown himself, to use material from alien sources and to penetrate to what is of value in the thought of writers from whom, whether on the whole or on particular issues, he disagrees.

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  • The native population is on the whole orderly and prosperous.

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  • Those cities, on the other hand, where the mercantile community remained in power, like Nuremberg and the seaboard towns, on the whole followed a more enlightened policy, although even they could not quite keep clear of the ever-growing.

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  • Not all these provinces suffered alike, but on the whole plague steadily strengthened its hold on India generally, and hardly relaxed it in any part.

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  • His style, modelled on that of Thucydides and unreservedly praised by Photius, is on the whole pure, though somewhat rhetorical and showing a fondness for Latinisms.

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  • This is an immediate consequence of the fundamental postulate, in either of the forms above stated, since the internal forces do on the whole no work.

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  • If the worship of Siva, despite the purport of his chief symbol, seems on the whole less liable to produce these undesirable effects than that of the rival deity, it is doubt- less due partly to the real nature of that emblem being little realized by the common people, and partly to the somewhat repellent character of the "great god," more favourable to evoking feelings of awe and terror than a spirit of fervid devotion.

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  • The emperor protested that only the Greeks were fit to hear him, and rewarded them when he left by the bestowal of immunity from the land tax on the whole province, and by the gift of the Roman franchise; he also planned and actually commenced the cutting of a canal through the Isthmus of Corinth.

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  • Whereas the white wines of the Graves are on the whole fairly dry and light in character, the white wines of Sauternes are full and sweet, with a very fine characteristic bouquet.

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  • The wines, moreover, of Algeria are on the whole of decidedly fair quality, possessing body and strength and also stability.

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  • Although the quantity produced is not so large as in Italy, the quality on the whole is decidedly superior to that of the latter country.

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  • Wines Of Italy Italy ranks second to France as regards the quantity of wine produced, but in respect to quality a comparison is scarcely possible, inasmuch as the Italian wines are on the whole of a poor character.

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  • The wines of northern Italy are on the whole of good colour, but somewhat harsh.

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    0
  • Finland was on the whole prosperous and progressive, and his statue in the great square in front of the cathedral and the senate house in Helsingfors testifies to the regard in which his memory is cherished by his Finnish subjects.

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  • It has been asserted that " the writings of recent Jewish critics have tended on the whole to confirm the Gospel picture of external Jewish life, and where there is discrepancy these critics tend to prove that the blame lies not with the New Testament originals, but with their interpreters."

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  • Though self-conscious and vain, Cotton Mather had on the whole a noble character.

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  • The export of coal greatly increased on the whole during the period 1890-1909.

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    0
  • The annual output of iron ore in the United Kingdom has on the whole decreased since 1882.

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    0
  • The average annual rainfall for Sweden is 19.72 in., locally increasing on the whole from north to south, and reaching a maximum towards the south-west, precipitation on this coast greatly exceeding that on the south-east.

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    0
  • The arrivals, however, have been on the whole discouragingly small, the total for the years 1901-1905 being only 14,000.

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    0
  • Her influence was on the whole a moderating and prudent force.

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    0
  • In the latest inscriptions the iguage is already much degraded; but on the whole it is almost antique as Zend, with which it has many points in common.

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    0
  • The criticisms on Mill contain much that is ingenious and much that is forcible, but on the whole they cannot be regarded as taking rank with Jevons's other work.

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  • But, admitting all that may be justly urged against the extreme attitude of some of the missionaries, no unprejudiced man will deny that their work on the whole has been a good one.

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    0
  • Here although frequently denounced as an Orangeman, his period of office was on the whole a successful one, and in 1823 he managed to pass the Irish Tithe Composition Bill.

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    0
  • The climate of British Baluchistan is dry and bracing - even exhilarating - but the extremes of temperature lead to the development of fever in very severe forms. On the whole it is favourable to European existence.

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  • That the remains exhibit variety and fertility, that there are in them numerous happy strokes of humour and satire, and many felicitous phrases and descriptions, is true, but the art is on the whole heavy, awkward and forced, and the style rudely archaic and untasteful.

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  • From the Mongolian plateau the ascent is on the whole gentle, but from the plains of Siberia it is much steeper, despite the fact that the range is masked by a broad belt of subsidiary ranges of an Alpine character, e.g.

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    0
  • The flora is on the whole poor, although the higher regions carry good forests of larch, pitch pine, cedar, birch and alder, with rhododendrons and species of Berberis and Ribes.

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  • Though subsequent researches have on the whole confirmed these results, it is still a matter of dispute whether these proteids are the true toxins or merely contain the toxic bodies precipitated along with them.

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  • Turkish Corps under the energetic Djavid.5 The battle of Monastir, which was finally launched on the whole front on the 18th, will long be studied for its tactical incidents, but as an ensemble it is sufficiently described by saying that the resistance of the half division of Morava II.

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  • Their surrender made a deep impression on the whole Greek world, which had learned to regard a Spartan surrender as inconceivable, and to Sparta their loss was so serious that the Athenians might have concluded the war on very favourable terms had they so wished.

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  • As Wenceslas had been an ally of Germany, his murder resulted in a war with that country, in which, as far as we can judge by the scanty records of the time, Boleslav, the brother and successor of Wenceslas, was on the whole successful.

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  • Though Vladislav was faithful to his promise of maintaining the Compacts, and did not attempt to prevent the Bohemians from receiving the communion in both kinds, yet his policy was on the whole a reactionary one, both as regards matters of state and the religious controversies.

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  • The results of the diet of 1575 were on the whole favourable to the estates, and they seem to have taken this view, for almost immediately afterwards they recognized Maximilian's eldest son Rudolph as his successor and consented to his being crowned king of Bohemia.

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  • The book ends with the obscurest passage of the whole, an elaborate eulogy of the "herb pantagruelion," which appears to be, if it is anything, hemp. Only two probable explanations of this have been offered, the one seeing in it an anticipation of Joseph de Maistre's glorification of the executioner, the other a eulogy of work, hemp being on the whole the most serviceable of vegetable products for that purpose.

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  • Here and there persons are glanced at, while the whole scenery of his birthplace and its neighbourhood is curiously worked in; but for the most part the satire is typical rather than individual, and it is on the whole a rather negative satire.

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  • Le Duchat was a very careful student, and on the whole a very efficient editor, being perhaps, of the group of students of old French at the beginning of the 18th century, which included La Monnoye and others, the most sober, critical and accomplished.

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  • Up to 1909 this was the only Assyrian palace which had ever been explored systematically, in its entirety, and fortunately it was found on the whole in an admirable state of preservation.

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  • He is on the whole for the nobles and against the commons; and, though the unfavourable colours in which he paints the leaders of the latter are possibly reflected from the authorities he followed, it is evident that he despised and disliked the multitude.

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  • Similarly, though the influence of rhetoric upon his language, as well as upon his general treatment, is clearly perceptible, he has not the perverted love of antithesis, paradox and laboured word-painting which offends us in Tacitus; and, in spite of the Venetian richness of his colouring, and the copious flow of his words, he is on the whole wonderfully natural and simple.

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  • Some modern writers have included in the same class the Burgundians, a nation which had apparently come from the basin of the Oder, but the evidence at our disposal on the whole hardly justifies the supposition that their language retained a close affinity with Gothic.

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  • The matter is well arranged, the style (modelled on that of Xenophon) simple, and on the whole free from the usual florid bombast of the Byzantine writers.

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  • After Vondel, he may on the whole be considered the most considerable author that Holland has produced.

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    0
  • Rain and fog are frequent, but the climate is on the whole healthy.

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    0
  • The sense-organs of the Scyphomedusae are on the whole of a very uniform type.

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    0
  • In1717-1726Zurich tried hard by means of heavy dues to crush the rival silk and cotton industries at Winterthur, which, however, on the whole very successfully maintained its ancient rights and liberties against the encroachments of Zurich.

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    0
  • The net return from public works in excess of expenditure in 1906 amounted to nearly 31% on the whole public debt, and the interest paid averages 3.6%.

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  • The contrast between the lower grounds of the Western and the Eastern Divisions is masked in many places by the general covering of the surface with glacial drift, which is usually a stiff clay composed on the whole of the detritus of the rocks upon which it rests, though containing fragments of rocks which have been transported from a considerable distance.

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  • The group of heights of South Wales, running on the whole from west to east, marks the outcrops of the Old Red Sandstone and Carboniferous strata which lie within a vast syncline of the Silurian rocks.

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  • It is on the whole a region with few streams, and a considerable portion of the ancient woodland still remains in Ashdown Forest.

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  • At the head of Lynn Canal, the only place on the whole extent of the south-eastern Alaskan coast where a clear-cut waterparting is exhibited between the sea-board and interior drainage, the summits of the highest peaks in the Coast Range are 8000 to 9000 ft.

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  • Many of the spurs or broken segments of ranges thus formed abut steeply upon the Black Sea, so that this littoral region is on the whole very rugged and not readily accessible, especially as the general elevations are considerable.

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  • The examination of his literary labours does not on the whole increase our appreciation of him.

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  • The relations between man and ape are most readily stated in comparison with the gorilla, as on the whole the most anthropomorphous ape.

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  • But his internal government was on the whole beneficial to the country.

    0
    0
  • Yet on the whole the country prospered.

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  • But there is no doubt that the cult of Aphrodite was on the whole as pure as that of any other divinities, and although a distinction may have existed in later times between the goddess of legal marriage and the goddess of free love, these titles do not express the idea.

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  • On the northern side, which sinks on the whole gently towards the Lahn, the greywacke formation attains a considerable development.

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  • His son, Dirk VII., had a stormy, but on the whole successful reign.

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  • In essential character there is no difference between excise and customs duties, except that excise duties are levied upon articles of home production, and customs upon articles imported from abroad, or brought into one part of a country or empire from another part; but excise duties on the whole are considered more likely to interfere with trade, in consequence of the necessity of supervising the production of the articles affected.

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  • In describing the principal taxes which are employed in 'the United Kingdom to provide for the national expenditure, observations have necessarily been made upon the incidence, probable or assumed, upon the taxpayer, and on the question how far they may fall equally on the whole community without any special incidence being traceable.

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  • Easily and delightfully written, and on the whole eminently sane and moderate, these volumes form a brilliant piece of narrative from a Liberal standpoint.

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  • A prolonged study of the text, which has brought to light a multitude of fresh passages the majority of which can be explained by retranslation into Hebrew, has convinced the present writer' that, whilst the evidence on the whole is in favour of an Aramaic original of vi.-xxxvi., it is just as conclusive on behalf of the Hebrew original of the greater part of the rest of the book.

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  • On his accession to office as president he found the country exhausted and disorganized, more especially in the department of finance, and the congress was on the whole hostile to him.

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  • The language and dialogue of Melite are on the whole simple and natural, and though the construction is not very artful (the fifth act being, as is not unusual in Corneille, superfluous and clumsy), it is still passable.

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  • By a secret treaty he had bound himself not to advance further in a constitutional direction than Austria should at any time approve; but, though on the whole he acted in accordance with Metternich's policy of preserving the status quo, and maintained with but slight change Murat's laws and administrative system, he took advantage of the situation to abolish the Sicilian constitution, in violation of his oath, and to proclaim the union of the two states into the kingdom of the Two Sicilies (December 12th, 1816).

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  • If any observations exist upon the drainage area itself they are commonly only from a single gauge, and this gauge, unless the area is very level, may give results widely different from the mean fall on the whole area.

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  • During the decade 1891-1901 the mill industry passed through a period of depression due to widespread plague and famine, but on the whole there has been a marked expansion of the trade as well as a great improvement in the class of goods produced.

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  • The establishment of an orderly administration, one outcome of which was a general fall of prices that made the unwonted regularity of the collection of taxes doubly unwelcome, naturally excited a certain amount of misgiving and resentment; but on the whole the population was prosperous and contented, and under Lord Elphinstone (1853-1860) the presidency passed through the crisis of the Mutiny without any general rising.

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  • But the peasantry gained on the whole more than they lost, and the trade of Bombay was not permanently injured.

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  • But on the whole the people submitted with characteristic docility to the sanitary regulations of the government.

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  • The present article deals mainly with the principles of the subject, for which a logical arrangement is on the whole the more convenient.

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  • Hsrolds governance of the realm seems to have been on the whole successful.

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  • Strong and regular governance had on the whole prevailed ever since Henry II.

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  • The realm was on the whole contented and even flourishing.

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  • The greater part of the House of Commons was on their side, and on the whole they may be regarded as the party of constitutional protest against maladministration.

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  • But on the whole there was no ruinous devastation of the land.

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  • The increasing estrangement between him and the nation made him averse from the natural remedy of a parliament, and he reverted to the absolute practices of the middle ages, in order that he might strain them far beyond the warrant of precedent to levy a tax under the name of ship-money, first on the port towns and then on the whole of England.

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  • Edgehill was a drawn battle (1642), and the campaign of 1643, though it was on the whole favorable to the king, gave no decisive results.

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  • But opinion on the whole has vindicated its wisdom, and it has survived all the attacks which have been made upon it.

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  • His stride is the stride of a giant, from the sentimental beauty of the picture of Marie Antoinette at Versailles, or the red horror of the tale of Debi Sing in Rungpore, to the learning, positiveness and cool judicial mastery of the Report on the Lords' Journals (1794), which Philip Francis, no mean judge, declared on the whole to be the "most eminent and extraordinary" of all his productions.

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  • The rigour of the fasts of the modern Greek Church is well known; and it can on the whole be traced back to that comparatively early date.

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