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  • "Alex tells me you have some nice horses on your ranch," Carmen said to Señor Medena.
  • I work for Uncle Bill on his ranch, and he pays me six dollars a month and my board.
  • She slid over, cuddling close to him, her head on his pillow.
  • A warm hand rested on her waist.
  • He rolled up the newspaper and hit her playfully on the backside as she walked away.
  • People on top of the earth are all meat.
  • The expression on Felipa's face reflected both humor and interest.
  • He was respectful of her concerns, but they didn't see eye-to-eye on any of it - except the fact that they both wanted another child.
  • A few impressions stand out vividly from the first years of my life; but "the shadows of the prison-house are on the rest."
  • On that subject she was adamant.
  • I'll get supper on the table.
  • Taking her in his arms, he held her close for a moment and then planted a kiss on her forehead.
  • When they finally got on the plane, she and Jonathan had a window seat - Jonathan in front of her.
  • I was born on June 27, 1880, in Tuscumbia, a little town of northern Alabama.
  • He had just entered, wearing an embroidered court uniform, knee breeches, and shoes, and had stars on his breast and a serene expression on his flat face.
  • Strolling down to the footbridge, she leaned on the railing.
  • Later, she lay in bed, tucked warmly under the covers as his boots clicked away from her on the hardwood floor - down the hall and into the den.
  • He slapped her on the backside playfully as she passed.
  • Nothing could be gained by dwelling on such thoughts.
  • He continued to avoid her gaze, focusing on Felipa instead.
  • He asked her to go back to Houston with him, enticing her with rides on the beach - and love all night.
  • It was impossible to know what was going on in Señor Medena's mind by observing his expression.
  • Jumping out of the buggy he put Dorothy's suit-case under the seat and her bird-cage on the floor in front.
  • Bad science fiction plots, speculating on futures which could not really happen, are the worst examples of this.
  • These are easy to spot: They rely on huge conceptual leaps without a framework to support them.
  • The family on my father's side is descended from Caspar Keller, a native of Switzerland, who settled in Maryland.
  • One day he would order his camp bed to be set up in the glass gallery, another day he remained on the couch or on the lounge chair in the drawing room and dozed there without undressing, while--instead of Mademoiselle Bourienne--a serf boy read to him.
  • At dinner that day, on Dessalles' mentioning that the French were said to have already entered Vitebsk, the old prince remembered his son's letter.
  • On moving to the drawing room he handed the letter to Princess Mary and, spreading out before him the plan of the new building and fixing his eyes upon it, told her to read the letter aloud.
  • Staring out the bay window at the old house, she abandoned her coffee cup on the window sill.
  • No, but I can't sit on the fence forever - and I do want another baby.
  • Katie picked up the plate, her focus on Carmen.
  • They circled the room twice before a hand reached up and tapped Alex on the shoulder.
  • On the other hand, the dream was in her head, not his.
  • He came up behind her and took the coffee cup from her hands, sitting it on the table.
  • For a few minutes they held on to each other, kissing as if they hadn't seen each other in a week.
  • There was shopping and packing to be done before they left on vacation.
  • One day they were sitting at the table working on coloring books when Alex came home early.
  • He plopped down in a chair, his intense gaze fixed on her.
  • His penetrating gaze prowled over her face and pounced on her eyes.
  • The unknown can be worse than reality, and she had no idea what to expect on the flight.
  • As it was, the kids might pick up on her fear and emulate.
  • On the other hand, Alex exuded confidence.
  • If you want something different, why don't you trade them in on something else?
  • Grabbing her hands, he pushed her back on the bed and held her down.
  • He pulled away from her, propping up on an elbow as he studied her face.
  • It was embarrassing to think she had let it go on this long without realizing he was troubled by it.
  • His eyes blinked and opened, slowly focusing on her face.
  • It's about time you spent some money on yourself.
  • She turned her head and kissed him on the cheek.
  • I just didn't see any point in spending money on new clothes when my old ones still had a lot of wear in them.
  • With everything going on, Carmen didn't have time to worry about flying, but when they were all sitting at the airport, she finally had time to stew over it.
  • Señor Medena eyed Carmen thoughtfully, but like Alex, there was no way of knowing what was on his mind.
  • Carmen tried to focus on Felipa, but her mind was full of questions.
  • Alex climbed into the car beside Carmen and placed his arm protectively on the back of the seat behind her neck.
  • Getting around in front, so that she could look inside, the girl saw a boy curled up on the seat, fast asleep.
  • He was not going very fast, but on his flanks specks of foam began to appear and at times he would tremble like a leaf.
  • Crash after crash echoed far above their heads, as the earth came together where it had split, and stones and chunks of clay rattled around them on every side.
  • Suddenly a man appeared through a hole in the roof next to the one they were on and stepped into plain view.
  • He reached the edge of the tall roof, stepped one foot out into the air, and walked into space as calmly as if he were on firm ground.
  • "Perhaps we can walk on the air ourselves," replied the girl.
  • I've tumbled through the air long enough to make me contented on this roof.
  • Eureka walks on the air all right.
  • "Come on, Jim!" called the boy.
  • "Nonsense!" said the little man, turning red--although just then a ray of violet sunlight was on his round face.
  • I belong to Bailum & Barney's Great Consolidated Shows--three rings in one tent and a menagerie on the side.
  • But now, good wanderers, your luncheon is on the table, so please sit down and eat as much as you like.
  • Even if we should come to unpleasant places on our way it is necessary, in order to reach the earth's surface, to keep moving on toward it.
  • They now bade farewell to the kind but unseen people of the cottage, and after the man had called their attention to a high, pyramid-shaped mountain on the opposite side of the Valley, and told them how to travel in order to reach it, they again started upon their journey.
  • On the river, however, the adventurers seemed to be perfectly safe.
  • The opening in the mountain was on the side opposite to the Valley of Voe, and our travellers looked out upon a strange scene.
  • Just above them, and almost on a level with their platform, were banks of rolling clouds which constantly shifted position and changed color.
  • Once I lived on top the earth, but for many years I have had my factory in this spot--half way up Pyramid Mountain.
  • Here, on a broad shelf, were several card-board boxes of various sizes, each tied with cotton cord.
  • They are invaluable to make flags flutter on a still day, when there is no wind.
  • On peering out all they could see was rolling banks of clouds, so thick that they obscured all else.
  • We've got 'em on the run now, sure enough.
  • The space underneath the roof, where they stood, permitted them to see on all sides of the tall building, and they looked with much curiosity at the city spread out beneath them.
  • On the roof? asked the girl.
  • "Do you see that big rock standing on the hillside yonder?" he continued, pointing with his finger.
  • The girl sat in the middle of the seat, with Zeb and the Wizard on each side of her.
  • Inside the archway were several doors, leading to different rooms built into the mountain, and Zeb and the Wizard lifted these wooden doors from their hinges and tossed them all on the flames.
  • Oh, she is sometimes gone for several weeks on her hunting trips, and if we were not tied we would crawl all over the mountain and fight with each other and get into a lot of mischief.
  • Will you kindly tell us which way your mother went to get on top the earth?
  • They now moved on again, creeping slowly up another steep incline.
  • "But we're ALMOST on earth again," cried Dorothy, "for there is the sun--the most BEAU'FUL sun that shines!" and she pointed eagerly at the crack in the distant roof.
  • "Almost on earth isn't being there," said the kitten, in a discontented tone.
  • "A sawhorse is a thing they saw boards on," remarked Jim, with a sniff.
  • "On my word," he exclaimed, "it's little Jellia Jamb--as pert and pretty as ever!"
  • I told them I was a Wizard, and showed them some easy tricks that amazed them; and when they saw the initials painted on the balloon they called me Oz.
  • I live on the fat of the land--don't I, Ozma?
  • Around Billina's neck was a string of beautiful pearls, and on her legs were bracelets of emeralds.
  • They obeyed at once, and next served a fine large turbot on a silver platter, with drawn gravy poured over it.
  • The servants were a little discouraged, but soon they brought in a great tray containing two dozen nicely roasted quail on toast.
  • Fetch it on, but don't cook it, as you value your life.
  • Then the servants heaped a lot of rugs upon the floor and the old horse slept on the softest bed he had ever known in his life.
  • "What brought you back?" was the next question, and Dorothy's eye rested on an antlered head hanging on the wall just over the fireplace, and caught its lips in the act of moving.
  • The chariot was drawn on this occasion by the Cowardly Lion and the Hungry Tiger, who were decorated with immense pink and blue bows.
  • Jim and the buggy followed, the old cab-horse being driven by Zeb while the Wizard stood up on the seat and bowed his bald head right and left in answer to the cheers of the people, who crowded thick about him.
  • But although the Munchkin was hardly tall enough to come to Zeb's shoulder he was so strong and clever that he laid the boy three times on his back with apparent ease.
  • Please go to my boudoir, Jellia, and get the white piglet I left on the dressing-table.
  • Jellia at once departed on the errand, and she was gone so long that they had almost forgotten her mission when the green robed maiden returned with a troubled face.
  • "There ought to be several animals on the jury," said Ozma, "because animals understand each other better than we people understand them.
  • When Ozma went away she closed the door and left her pet on the table.
  • Instead of keeping still, so I could eat him comfortably, he trembled so with fear that he fell off the table into a big vase that was standing on the floor.
  • Then they rode on, talking and laughing as before.
  • His shoes were covered with mud; he had torn his coat on the thorny tree.
  • Then he took from his pocket a sheet of paper on which some verses were written.
  • "Well, I know what that is," he said to himself; and he wrote the word _turnip_ on his slate.
  • Before the half hour was ended he had written a very neat composition on his slate.
  • Some people said that they were what Henry Longfellow wrote on his slate that day at school.
  • She boiled it, and boiled it, As long as she was able; Then Mrs. Finney took it, And put it on the table.
  • On the day that he was seven years old, his mother gave him a few pennies.
  • He drove these to the pastures on the hills and watched them day after day while they fed on the short green grass.
  • One dark night James Hogg was on the hilltop with a flock of seven hundred lambs.
  • It was a beautiful land lying on both sides of the wonderful river Nile.
  • These children are learning it just as the first people who lived on the earth learned it in the beginning.
  • The poet went on: May each morning bring thee some new joy.
  • The boy played on the grass near by.
  • Gilbert was soon on his feet again.
  • The four men followed them for some distance, and then lost them on the hillside.
  • They tracked the beast to the mouth of a cave, far up on the hills.
  • He got down on his hands and knees and crawled into the cave.
  • The smith went on with his work.
  • "Three nails in each shoe will hold them on," said the smith.
  • The horse was lamed on a rock.
  • His soldiers were intent on saving themselves.
  • If a man was obliged to go from one city to another, he often rode on horseback.
  • Jonathan Swift, often called Dean Swift, was famous as a writer on many subjects.
  • A boat was at the landing, ready to take him on board.
  • He stood on the doorstep and looked back into the house.
  • Near the top of a hill he saw a little shepherd boy who was lying on the ground while a flock of sheep and lambs were grazing around him.
  • As he came nearer he saw that the boy held a charred stick in his hand, with which he was drawing something on a flat rock.
  • The stranger bent over him and looked at the picture he had made on the rock.
  • Night came on before he had finished it.
  • In the morning, when he looked at the picture, he saw a fly on the man's nose.
  • One day King Solomon was sitting on his throne, and his great men were standing around him.
  • The king moved uneasily on his golden throne.
  • One day Benjamin's mother had to go to a neighbor's on some errand.
  • A fly lighted on the baby's cheek, and he brushed it away.
  • He had no pencil, but there was a piece of black charcoal on the hearth.
  • He put his hands on the lad's head and said:--
  • He was not strong enough to work on the farm like his brothers; but he loved books and study.
  • Daniel and his father would ride there on horseback.
  • One was Mr. Webster's horse; the other was an old gray nag with a lady's sidesaddle on its back.
  • He does me a favor by allowing you to ride on the animal, and I do him a favor by taking care of it.
  • But won't it look rather funny for me to ride to Exeter on a sidesaddle?
  • And so they set out on their journey to Exeter.
  • Mr. Webster rode in front, and Daniel, on the old gray nag, followed behind.
  • First, Tommy Jones whispered to Billy Brown and was at once called out to stand on the floor.
  • And so the fun went on until the clock showed that it lacked only ten minutes till school would be dismissed.
  • He stood on one leg and then on the other, and watched very closely; but nobody whispered.
  • The clock kept on ticking.
  • "Elihu Burritt, take your place on the floor," said the master sternly.
  • Then he began with the first word on the first page and read the first story aloud without making one mistake.
  • Who lives on the other side of the world?
  • And so William Jones went on reading and learning.
  • He slept on a hard bed.
  • He thinks that he makes a fine figure when he waits on you.
  • Some of the men rode on camels, some on horses.
  • "You are a brave lad to be joking with robbers" said the man; and he also hurried on to a more promising field.
  • On a mountain near their city, there was a narrow chasm or hole in the rocks.
  • So a party of soldiers led him up into the mountain and placed him on the edge of the yawning hole in the rocks.
  • The rocky walls surrounded him on every side.
  • On the last day, the great army which Coriolanus had led from Antium was drawn up in battle array.
  • He took his stand on the forward deck, while the robber sailors stood in a half circle before him, anxious to listen to his song.
  • Old story-tellers say that he alighted on the back of a large fish, called a dolphin, which had been charmed by his music and was swimming near the ship.
  • They were so tame that they sat on the shoulders of St. Francis and ate from his hand.
  • Some of these bundles contained the things they would need on the road; some contained clothing; and some contained goods which the master would sell in the city.
  • This answer pleased the rich man so well that he bought Aesop at once, and took him to his home on the island of Samos.
  • "Now which of you will hang this bell on the Cat's neck?" said the old gray Mouse.
  • There was not a breath of wind to stir the young leaves on the trees.
  • So, let us go on with the work that is before us.
  • When night came on he stopped at a pleasant roadside inn and asked for lodging.
  • In the morning a good breakfast was served, and then Mr. Randolph made ready to start on his journey.
  • He went far out of his way and lost much time, all on account of his surliness.
  • "I would rather live alone on a desert island than be a sailor on this ship," he said.
  • We shall put you ashore on the first island that we see.
  • Set me on shore and leave me there.
  • There were pigs and goats on the island, and plenty of fish could be caught from the shore.
  • For four years and four months he lived alone on the island.
  • When Daniel Defoe heard how Selkirk had lived alone on the island of Juan Fernandez, he said to himself: Here is something worth telling about.
  • He thought how grand it would be to sail and sail on the wide blue sea.
  • There are great storms on the sea.
  • Robinson Crusoe sailed first on one ship and then on another.
  • It was a small island, and there was no one living on it.
  • But there were birds in the woods and some wild goats on the hills.
  • At last a ship happened to pass that way and Robinson was taken on board.
  • One night the king sat up very late, writing letters and sending messages; and the little page was kept busy running on errands until past midnight.
  • The next morning the king wished to send him on another errand.
  • The king was about to waken him roughly, when he saw a piece of paper on the floor beside him.
  • The king went back to the room on tiptoe.
  • Then his eyes overflowed with tears, and he fell on his knees before the king.
  • Have mercy on me.
  • But it still held on to the grain of wheat.
  • On his arm he carried a small basket.
  • When the work was finished, the old fishing boat looked rather odd, with a paddle wheel on each side which dipped just a few inches into the water.
  • "Bob Fulton planned the whole thing," he said, "and I helped him make the paddles and put them on the boat."
  • He kept on, planning and thinking and working, until at last he succeeded in making a boat with paddle wheels that could be run by steam.
  • Then he set out on foot to walk to another city.
  • He put the bag of money on top of them and then leaped into the water.
  • The poor man could do nothing but dress himself and go sorrowing on his way.
  • Find all the old men that live on the mountains or in the flat country around, and command them to appear before me one week from to-day.
  • On the day appointed, forty gray- bearded, honest old men stood before the caliph.
  • But when they saw that his mind was set on going, they said no more.
  • He might be seen every day with a bag of charcoal on his back, carrying it to some of his customers.
  • Throw on some chips and make a blaze.
  • That on the children's bed is best.
  • Soon the little stranger was clad in the warm clothes; the dry soft blanket was wrapped around him; and he was laid on the children's bed.
  • He looked at the fire on the hearth.
  • "How did these clothes come on me?" cried the child.
  • Mine makes the servants wait on me and do as I tell them.
  • But our dear mother waits on us herself.
  • "Well," said the soldier, "about two hours ago I was on guard at the gate of the queen's park.
  • Do you mean that the one with his hat on will be the king?
  • The messengers went on until they came at last to the island of Rhodes.
  • But when they came into Lacedaemon, they heard his praises on every side.
  • They may have missed on specifics (such as each of us owning a personal jet pack and a flying car) but in general were dead-on.
  • We are already well on our way.
  • In the end, our fundamental challenge is to become better individuals, and technology offers little help on that front; it is up to each one of us to solve that for ourselves.
  • All corn used to be "corn on the cob" until canned corn came along.
  • But it is the biggest, best store ever, where you can buy anything from anywhere, based on reviews by other buyers, at a discount, and have it gift wrapped, engraved, altered, drop-shipped, and probably delivered by tomorrow.
  • She hires a contract programmer in Russia for $3000 to code it and advertises on Craig's List for a designer who will work for some stock.
  • She creates premium services on her site that cost just $9.95 a year that include a number of additional features and virtual goods.
  • A friend of hers who is a florist asks if she can advertise on the site.
  • She drops $300 on Google ads before realizing it might not be a great fit.
  • One friend suggests she advertise on dating sites.
  • In the past, success relied heavily on whether an entrepreneur could move an offline experience online better than someone else.
  • I spend less time waiting for Excel to do a recalculation of my formulas today than I did on my 386 in the 1990s, even though my spreadsheets are thousands of times more complex.
  • Now kids are making animated movies on handheld tablets.
  • On the Internet are far fewer passive observers.
  • In 2007, Google researchers estimated there were one hundred trillion words on the Internet.
  • Millions comment on movies, millions write reviews of products.
  • In 2010, people were uploading one hundred million photos on Facebook every single day.
  • Over a hundred million videos on YouTube.
  • We all desire to leave our stamp on the world.
  • Yes, there is art on YouTube.
  • So when doubters scoff—There's art on YouTube?—I say yes.
  • Now, of course, much of what is on YouTube is not art.
  • But the inventors of our age have put a billion transistors on an area the size of a postage stamp.
  • On top of the common-good projects supported with our tax dollars, almost all of us—certainly not just the wealthy—have causes we support.
  • Now a billion or more can achieve that dream, and I foresee a time not far off when everyone on the planet can.
  • Imagine a world where everyone on the planet has access to this expanded canvas of human expression that technology has created.
  • On the morning of June 28, 1914, Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, were shot dead in Sarajevo by nineteen-year-old assassin Gavrilo Princip.
  • When Loyka realized his mistake and slammed on the brakes, the archduke and his wife were sitting ducks.
  • If my reasoning stopped there, you would probably start fishing around for the receipt for this book and read up on your bookseller's return policy.
  • So he commissioned seven emissaries to go out to seven certain oracles around the world and on a predetermined day, let's say July 12, at a predetermined time, say 3:00 p.m.
  • In the ancient world, man wanted guidance from the gods on what he should do.
  • By "the end of ignorance," I mean a world where everyone everywhere will be able to go through life making wise decisions based on near-perfect information.
  • Not just that you went to a certain address but that the address was a movie theater and—based on where you sat and that you ordered tickets online—you saw Episode VII of Star Wars.
  • That said, if I had to pick one function I think the Internet will turn out to "be," it is this: The Internet will become a repository and a set of applications for storing the sum total of all life experiences of all people on earth.
  • It reflects well on us.
  • I know the list of nefarious uses of the Internet—but on balance, we are building it for good purposes.
  • The Internet is full of sites that offer good to humanity and yield no profit for the people working on them.
  • But as I watch how we are building and using the Internet, the one-on-one encounters impress me most.
  • In our modern age, people disagree not just in terms of values they apply to knowledge, but they disagree on actual pieces of knowledge.
  • These are all knowable things, and yet there is not universal agreement on them.
  • We will be completely insulated from the collecting and researching of data so that we can focus entirely on turning data into knowledge.
  • This technological shift will have profound effects on the course of human history.
  • This will turbocharge science, which will no longer rely exclusively on slow observations in real time.
  • Instead of science proceeding at the slow speed of time, the only limit on its progress will be processor speed—and those two speeds hardly can be compared.
  • You could ask it, "What is the number of presidents of the United States born on Friday who have older sisters, multiplied by the number of wars lost by Bolivia?" and it could instantly give you an answer.
  • When you look at a product on one of its web pages, Amazon suggests other products you might like as well.
  • On the same page, Amazon says "Frequently Bought Together" and then lists a few other products.
  • I daresay if you have purchased anything on Amazon, you have almost certainly, at some point, purchased an additional item Amazon suggested.
  • These features weren't on the site when it was first launched because the necessary data did not yet exist.
  • It took him most of his life to do this, and the value was engraved on his tombstone.
  • So now that the task of remembering past purchases and using that information to suggest future purchases is completely transitioned to machines, it operates on a whole different scale.
  • Every sale from the point the robot was turned on to when the sun finally burns out will be perfectly remembered.
  • The machine will figure this out as it collects more data and incorporates more variables, and then experiments on people to see which combinations of factors work the best.
  • As time passes, the suggestions will become astonishingly on-target—and no human will have programmed that.
  • They might balk at getting on an airline flight flown by a computer and prefer having a pilot on board to take over if he "feels in his gut" that something is wrong (even if that feeling is the airport burrito he had for lunch).
  • So when I knocked on the door of Jim's atelier and said, "Hey, I'm Byron Reese," he said, "Oh, Byron, come over here, I want you to meet this guy.
  • Then imagine if you shared your Digital Echo with a billion other people on the planet.
  • You could see which restaurants were rated the highest on Yelp, which ones certain reviewers liked, and so on.
  • And my system will come back with a single answer, something like, You should go to Tommaso's on Kearny Street.
  • How many people similar to you went to that college and are now on antidepressants?
  • Every time you buy a book from Amazon, its employees use your data—information about what you did on their site in the privacy of your own home—to try to sell other people more products.
  • In the world of the future, the collective experience of everyone on the planet is recorded.
  • The amount of data stored is so vast that even if we put a number on it, it would be beyond our comprehension.
  • Now we are certainly on the fuzzy edges, a place where words, often fuzzy in their meanings, begin to fail us.
  • Under what conditions can we claim victory in this war on disease?
  • So how about this instead: What if I can show you a future where everyone on the planet will live in good health as long as it is possible for their body to live?
  • His call for a "march of dimes" was a play on "The March of Time," a well-known newsreel series.
  • The name and idea caught on, and by mid-January the biggest names of the day were promoting it on their shows: Jack Benny, Bing Crosby, and Rudy Vallee, to name but a few.
  • On the research team of the eminent virologist Dr. Thomas Francis, who was working on a flu vaccine, was a young physician named Jonas Salk.
  • On the research team of the eminent virologist Dr. Thomas Francis, who was working on a flu vaccine, was a young physician named Jonas Salk.
  • With a grant from the National Foundation for Infant Paralysis, he went to work on a polio vaccine.
  • This goal is within our grasp—and with the vaccine presently priced at about thirty cents a child, shame on us for not ending polio once and for all.
  • Aside from two laboratory samples, one in the United States and one in Russia, it does not exist on the planet.
  • Jenner had frequently performed variolations on patients.
  • An illness with no serious effects on humans, cowpox caused lesions on cows' udders which then could spread to dairymaids' hands.
  • When Jenner did variolations on milkmaids who had had cowpox, they never came down with smallpox.
  • In 1796, he extracted fluid from the pox on the hand of a dairymaid named Sarah Nelmes—who had caught the condition from her cow Blossom—and injected the fluid into a cut in eight-year-old James Phipps's arm.
  • Although the technique of growing cowpox on cow hides would come, transporting it was difficult due to lack of refrigeration.
  • We can draw lessons and encouragement from the histories of polio and smallpox, on several counts.
  • Well, the diseases that human beings focus on are the ones considered most unbearable.
  • And as population rises, education rises, health rises, and wealth rises, more and more people will be working on these problems.
  • Expect solutions in the future to come from countries you couldn't find on a map today.
  • Read on to see how that momentum has built over time, and continues to build.
  • And then we come to Greece, the home of Hippocrates, the "Father of Modern Medicine," who left us not just the oath that bears his name but also a corpus of roughly sixty medical texts based on his teaching.
  • In 1543, Andreas Vesalius published On the Fabric of the Human Body, which corrected errors from antiquity and advanced the medical sciences.
  • In 1736, Claudius Aymand performed the first successful appendectomy on an eleven-year-old boy.
  • For instance: Imagine all people with skin cancer voluntarily shared their Digital Echo files on an anonymous basis.
  • We act on it.
  • Why do first basemen live longer than anyone else on the team?
  • But the choice will be ours and will be made based on facts.
  • It should know what the food on my fork weighs, run a chemical analysis of every bite I take, and log it in my Digital Echo file for my future reference.
  • A record of all human activity, with anonymity safeguards in place, will allow us all to become part of the solution by putting our minds to work on the problems of the world.
  • Then the scientific race of the century was on, with this goal: to figure out how DNA conveyed genetic information.
  • They are essentially instructions on how to make proteins, which are what build and regulate your body.
  • Due to genetic factors we will certainly learn about in the future, some drugs and treatments do not work on certain people.
  • Diseases are frequently diagnosed with broad terms based on a set of symptoms.
  • For instance, have you ever seen one of those people on TV who is turning one hundred and says he ate bacon every day of his life?
  • We will discuss the molecular machines called nanites—tiny, molecular-sized robots that will swim around in your body fighting disease, repairing damage, and alerting you to problems (and will likely dramatically increase the human lifespan).
  • Third, pretty much everything we know is published on the Internet and can be found in moments, if not seconds.
  • Cloud computing and software frameworks such as Hadoop give unimagined computing power to the scientist on the most modest budget.
  • Complex projects can be carried out on multiple continents through project management tools.
  • You can share your desktop and have whiteboard sessions on your computer.
  • The ability to instantly and, for a very low cost, reliably transfer money to anyone on the planet is a key ingredient in increasing the amount of trade that occurs online.
  • I am fascinated by credit cards and the fact that the entire free enterprise system relies on the honesty of almost all people.
  • Good information on a product can mitigate this problem.
  • Often, a buying decision hinges on a piece of arcane information about a product that is difficult to locate.
  • With the rapid flow of information about businesses and their products, along with the ease of "checking up" on a vendor, good businesses will get more business and push out the bad ones.
  • This makes business a meritocracy and encourages business owners to focus on quality, service, and reputation since these are so easy for customers to check.
  • The pay per click (PPC) business is a way to advertise online to people who did a specific search in a search engine like Google or who are viewing content on a certain topic.
  • In 1958, an American economist named Leonard Read wrote an essay called "I, Pencil," written from the pencil's point of view, about how no one on the planet knows how to make a pencil.
  • But if each of ten people specialized on just one-tenth of the task, they could together make 48,000, an increase in per-person productivity from one pin a day to 4,800 pins per day.
  • I won't base my reasoning for how the Internet and technology will end poverty on this idea alone.
  • Vastly more energy than we need pours down on this planet in the form of sunlight.
  • We know how to power a clock with this energy but haven't yet cracked the code on doing it at scale.
  • That amount, if melted, would form a cube fifty-five feet on each side.
  • We compute the maximum amount of food the world can produce by beginning with total acres of land considered arable, but that is based on assumptions about the future of technology and agriculture.
  • First, let's consider the macroeconomic impact of this change—the effect it will have on the net economic status of the planet.
  • My purpose is to explain the net effect of free trade, technological advance, and outsourcing on the overall economic system of the planet.
  • But in spite of the relative economic displacement they all cause, free trade, outsourcing, and technological displacement all have a positive net effect on the economics of the planet.
  • Externalities are the external effects an action has on society.
  • To some extent, we have this in the form of high taxes on cigarettes, which are seen to have negative externalities, and a home interest deduction on income taxes, as home ownership is viewed as having positive social good.
  • The company should insure its workers because if uninsured workers end up in the ER, the burden falls on society, not the company.
  • The country requires a minimum wage because workers paid below the poverty line have an added cost on society.
  • We have established that outsourcing, free trade, and technological advance all have the same effect on the system: They lower prices and increase net wealth.
  • If you take something worth a dollar, spend an hour working on it, and your employer sells it for three dollars, no way in the world can you ever make more than two dollars an hour.
  • Who do you think makes more money: the person who hauls bricks on his back or the person who operates the forklift that moves the bricks?
  • If every job that could be done by a machine was done by a machine tomorrow, the standard of living of virtually everyone on the planet would rise.
  • Depending on function, robots can come in all shapes and sizes, and I see no compelling reason to make them like humans.
  • Let me offer my reasoning on this.
  • I'm not about to waste my best material on a machine!
  • No human can solder a billion transistors on a computer processor, so your computer needed a robot in order to be built.
  • But wait (as they say on late-night TV commercials), there's more!
  • But let's move on to other jobs they can do outside our bodies.
  • If I had to put a number on it, I would say ten thousandfold.
  • People specialized, technology advanced, and as a result, men walked on the moon.
  • Everything we have talked about relating to the Internet and technology is coming to bear on robotics and nanotechnology.
  • Fifteen years after that, I got the computer on which I currently am typing.
  • That could be true, but I don't think so, for reasons laid out in the chapter on scarcity.
  • I know that sounds preposterous—but only based on our assumptions that the future will be like the past.
  • (If you can reserve judgment on that statement, I'll explain my reasoning in the book's next section.)
  • They can't even put a value on it; they wouldn't sell it for a million dollars.
  • So, let's say on average the pan is worth $2,000 to everyone who uses it—all the way from the people who just think it is "cool" to the people who it saves from food poisoning to the people whose lives and houses it saves.
  • Its social good, on average, is $2,000 a pan.
  • How do you put a price on this house?
  • Of course, I stand to be corrected on many of the specifics.
  • On balance, this will be a hundredfold increase in productivity.
  • This per-person threshold actually exceeds the average income of three-quarters of the countries on the planet, including Mexico, Russia, and Brazil, and is about 20 percent higher than the average income of the entire planet.
  • The United Kingdom famously did this after World War II by raising marginal tax rates on earned income to more than 99 percent and, for some other kinds of income, to more than 100 percent.
  • They will simply complain about the tax rates and keep on working.
  • One way that society keeps a lid on the powder keg of tension between the rich and poor is through the welfare state.
  • When nations are young and when they are poor, they usually focus on two things: the military and civil order.
  • Wise nations then work on making a stable and valuable money supply.
  • They coin money in honest and accurate measures and allow this money to trade freely on open markets.
  • On the other hand, if you take the forty richest countries, each person earns on average around $33,000.
  • On the other hand, if you take the forty richest countries, each person earns on average around $33,000.
  • In 58 BC, Clodius Pulcher ran on a "free grain for the poor" platform as he tried to become tribune.
  • It seems that we can afford to spend more on government as income rises.
  • Well, on the one hand, you would be kind of cheesed-off.
  • That is something like what I expect will happen, but on a worldwide scale.
  • It will be regarded as interest payments on the accumulated riches of one thousand years of technical and material progress.
  • As we consider the lot of those left behind, it becomes clearer how the end of scarcity will have a profound impact on the world.
  • Pretend there is a spectrum of jobs from the best in the world down to the worst and everyone agrees on the order.
  • If you were male and born on a farm, you were almost certainly going to be a farmer.
  • Today we are on the cusp of a substantially more profound shift in work life.
  • It will not be welfare (or, at least depending on how you define the term, it will not be perceived as welfare).
  • They will take advantage of the freedom from financial want that the modern age gives them and will focus on improving themselves and the world they live in.
  • What if everyone on the planet had that luxury?
  • Won't all people (or at least most people) waste their lives on narcissistic, hedonistic pleasure?
  • One day, a tornado comes, lifts up your trailer with everyone in it, flies it around the world to the poorest nation on earth, and drops it in the middle of the village.
  • Everyone wants to come in and enjoy your AC and play on your Wii.
  • I base that expectation in part on the fact that today, many of us already live in more comfort than the richest king in the world did two hundred years ago.
  • These jobs can be market jobs that have the potential to make a person vastly richer, creating more and more wealth on the planet.
  • Structural famine exists when enough food is technically on hand or able to be imported, but some portion of the population is economically separated from it.
  • And he used his decades of dominance on the national scene, as well as his fantastic oratorical ability, to advance that belief and essentially invent the Democratic Party we know today.
  • In discussing nutrition, not only is there little agreement on the nature of the solutions, there is often disagreement on the nature of the problems.
  • This is the case on genetically modified crops and many other issues where passions run high.
  • Why are people so quick to vilify those on the "other side" of the issue—and why do we even think in terms of sides?
  • Given so many different nutritional theories and viewpoints, most people base their own nutritional philosophies on a combination of two factors: personal experience and social/political worldview.
  • In areas of uncertainty, we form our opinions on the basis of assumptions in other parts of our life.
  • At the same time, the percent of income we individually have to spend on feeding ourselves plummeted as well.
  • My point here is that currently the planet is producing enough food to feed everyone on it.
  • Just half a century ago, Americans on average spent more than 20 percent of their income on food.
  • At one point, Tiger Woods got a dime for every box of Wheaties cereal with his photo on it, while the farmer was paid only a nickel for the wheat in that same box—and the farmer still made a profit.
  • They need to be able to irrigate without relying solely on rain.
  • If, on the other hand, they want self-sufficiency in agriculture, then farm subsidies in other countries are bad for them.
  • When so many people farm and so much depends on it, innovation will happen.
  • To pay for his college education, Borlaug would periodically put his education on hold to find work.
  • All of this left scars on me.
  • Throughout this time, Borlaug constantly battled wheat's arch-nemesis: rust, a fungus that feeds on wheat, oats, and barley.
  • Based on this unprecedented success, samples of Borlaug's seeds were sent abroad.
  • In 1962, some of them were grown in India, and based on the results, Borlaug was invited to India.
  • Although Borlaug and company encountered many obstacles, they pressed on, planting seed at night illuminated by flashes of artillery fire.
  • To deal in generalities, plants capture, on average, about 5 percent of the solar energy that falls on their leaves.
  • Operating at basically 5 percent efficiency, they are less than half as efficient as solar panels now on the market.
  • From our standpoint, the plant wastes all the rest of its energy on riotous living: growing roots and leaves, soaking up water, separating carbon molecules from oxygen ones.
  • What if you could do agriculture perfectly on a per-grape basis, each grape getting individual attention?
  • If a fly lands on it, the fly is shooed off.
  • You can't do something that long and not have some strong opinions on the matter.
  • I grew up on a farm.
  • Every week, I buy my milk from a small local dairy on the day it comes forth from the cow.
  • At present, they win hands down on "less expensive" and put in a decent showing on a couple more factors.
  • But when the farm of tomorrow delivers on this holistic promise, I think all people will embrace it.
  • I foresee a day when, on a Sunday afternoon, a family might drive (or actually be driven by their car) out to a farm to see where food comes from.
  • That said, my "end hunger" case doesn't hang on the viability of GM crops.
  • Presently, labeling of GMO content isn't a requirement—and since labeling is a complex and controversial issue that has no bearing on my thesis, I will pass it by.
  • Me ordering a second helping of corn on the cob while dining at the Black Eyed Pea also increases demand for corn, but for doing so, I shouldn't stand trial for murder.
  • By taking this "Absolutely no GMOs" stance they completely remove themselves from the debate and as such have no voice in the discussion about what direction to take GM: what are safe testing practices, what factors will we optimize for, and the whole host of questions that face us on this, the eve of a momentous leap forward.
  • How about flowers that bloom in different colors when they are on top of land mines?
  • We are really good on the reasoning part, but as far as our sensory inputs go, we are massively outclassed by cheap sensors.
  • In the not too distant future, tiny robots will detect pests on produce and emit a signal to shoo them away.
  • In the future, each plant will be on the Internet.
  • Farming will be done on such a scale that thousands of experiments can be happening at any one time, putting a tiny fraction of the produce at risk.
  • It can sell produce abroad for better rates, give farmers predictability in pricing and flexibility on when to sell, and act as a storehouse against lean times in the future.
  • The access to information that mobile phones are bringing virtually everywhere on the planet is helping people raise their standard of living and will do so even more dramatically in the years to come.
  • You can install Boinc software on your computer, choose a project you want your computer to work on when you are away from it, and maybe do your bit to change the world.
  • Inspired by the Chinese effort, he, too, tried to increase the agricultural production of his country by emptying the cities and sending everyone to work on the farms under brutal conditions.
  • Roosevelt went on to outline what he believed would be in this Second Bill of Rights: food, medicine, shelter, and so on.
  • As people grow wealthier (as the whole world will), they typically spend more money on food, though it is less as a percentage of overall income.
  • The chapter on civilization describes humanity's progress through the years and the importance of it.
  • Jordanes, a Goth, wrote the following about the Huns in 551: They are beings who are cruel to their children on the very day they are born.
  • On July 29, 1014, Byzantine emperor Basil II defeated the Bulgarian army in the Battle of Kleidion.
  • They were lined up as far as the eye could see on the Apian Way, the main road through Rome, as a warning to other slaves who might consider rebellion.
  • In many places, we have ended the legal discrimination of people based on race.
  • In the past, when the power of the state was absolute in many parts of the world, it was harder to argue that every person on the planet had rights no monarch or state could violate.
  • We call these rights "human rights" because they apply to every single person on the planet by virtue of simply being alive.
  • The civilizing process is not flawless, and we may disagree on the ways it has manifested itself.
  • Maybe you think the British ban on fox hunting with dogs is ridiculous.
  • Maybe this is dawning on us.
  • President Dwight Eisenhower, lifelong military man and five-star general, had much to say on the waging of war.
  • Under the cloud of war, it is humanity hanging itself on a cross of iron.
  • After speaking about the economic costs of war, the burden it places on the economy, and the toll this takes on the people, Eisenhower closed by describing the peace proposals he was offering Russia and China.
  • These laws provide recourse in the event that one citizen infringes on the rights of another.
  • I won't speculate on what that size is, but it certainly is not a size 0.
  • The atmosphere on campus was electric!
  • And life went on for a decade.
  • Fifty years after Eisenhower's warning, the armament industry is the largest industry on the planet.
  • Technically speaking, I have included a few that are not dependent on the Internet per se, but in which the Internet and technology plays some role.
  • As recently as the early twentieth century, relatively few careers existed in which young men of drive and ambition could distinguish themselves and leave a mark on the world.
  • Imagine you are a defense contractor on top of the world.
  • You would argue that no other widget on the market can beat the C2000, no nation can ever gain widget superiority if the government just buys the C2000—and so they do.
  • Your contract goes on for years.
  • You are already on top of the world, remember?
  • (Not to mention the fact that, if the stuff all hits the fan, widget factories like yours would almost certainly be marked with bull's-eyes on the enemy's aerial bombing maps.)
  • In the affairs of nations, large and powerful ones long have imposed their wills on the small and weak ones.
  • In one sense, it's a peaceful world: The bully insists on the lunch money of the small kid, who has no recourse but to capitulate.
  • When might no longer makes right for the strong, they think twice about preying on the weak.
  • Now, let's move on to the political factors that will cause war to cease.
  • This led to Austria-Hungary declaring war on Serbia on July 28, 1914.
  • Germany viewed the Russian mobilization as an act of war and therefore declared war on Russia.
  • Between Austria-Hungary declaring war on Serbia and all the treaty partners entering the fray, how many days passed?
  • By the end of the month, Japan, bound by treaty with Great Britain, declared war on Germany.
  • In fact, virtually everyone should have wondered why he was fighting soldiers from places he couldn't find on a map.
  • It all happened because of military pacts in which an attack on one party was viewed as an attack on all.
  • If NATO is responsible for the bulk of the world's military spending and NATO no longer has the stomach for full-on war with modern states, then large-scale war seems less likely.
  • We could go on here and talk about other military powers and alliances, but the simple fact is that large countries are less willing to risk war in defense of small ones.
  • Formalized agreements on conventions, measurements, borders, and international conduct.
  • Tensions mounted all through the 1830s as militias were raised on both sides in what later came to be known as the Aroostook War, even though there was never actually a war or casualties.
  • With these powers should come enormous checks and balances on their use.
  • Cigarettes were advertised on TV and in magazines and their packages carried no warnings.
  • The World Wide Web will play an enormous role in ending war, on several levels.
  • When everyone, and every nation, and every organization, and every movement all have a presence on the web, they can be understood in terms of it.
  • Third, the web acts as a feedback loop in that it allows all people to say what is on their minds.
  • Before it is all over, the number of Facebook accounts will exceed the number of people on the planet.
  • Everyone will be on Facebook, as will be every business, every idea, every brand, and all the people who were once members but have since passed away.
  • Our "strong ties"—family, close friends and the like—we can always count on, but they are relatively few.
  • Friedman goes on to point out that almost anywhere in the world today, it would be impossible to get away with this fraud.
  • I mention FactCheck and Snopes as two examples of the many enterprises on the Internet that subject every government utterance to scrutiny in something approximating real time.
  • No one has the monopoly on truth.
  • However, practically speaking, it sometimes has a corrupting influence on those whom it empowers to act for the state.
  • That would average over three SMS messages per day per person on the planet.
  • History has rendered its judgment on such matters.
  • This list goes on, but I will spare you.
  • On the other end of the education spectrum, college degrees are up: A recent Harvard University study reports that 6.7 percent of the world has a college degree, up from 5.9 percent in 2000.
  • Younger people have less wealth than older ones, on average.
  • If your father is American and your mother Chinese, you will have a different understanding of differences between those countries, and, on balance, will be less amenable to war between those nations.
  • Half a century ago, the United States had three channels on TV and everyone watched them.
  • In an era when cameras were cumbersome and the number of channels on TV could be counted on one hand with enough fingers left over to snap, very little video of any kind was seen.
  • The range of subject matter on YouTube is as incomprehensibly large as the range in quality.
  • Now, on a regular basis, videos appear which bring to life something that would otherwise be merely an ill-formed image in our minds.
  • Instead of reading words on a page and trying to imagine a concept, we can see it, as the old expression goes, in Technicolor.
  • Nationalism is on the decline.
  • But we do not have to rely solely on those.
  • So let's address it head-on: In this world of the future, do we lose our humanity?
  • We would then work feverishly on them for months before selling them for slightly less than we had paid.
  • We embarked on these car projects with grandiose visions, many as unrealistic as they were ingenious.
  • Then we will list the things that might derail us on the way to that future.
  • The availability and propagation of cheap sensors, cheap storage, and cheap computational cycles will allow humanity to develop a collective memory of the activities and outcomes of everyone on the planet.
  • We all saw what happened on 9/11, and it is likely similar acts will occur in the future.
  • Without protections in place, the strong merely prey on the weak.
  • As a government grows in size, even if the growth is in social programs, it inevitably grows in its intrusion on civil liberty.
  • As I see it, the grandchildren of those who would strap bombs on themselves today will not be rushing to imitate their elders.
  • When confronted with any thorny societal problem, I apply the same basic thought process I used on the five topics of this book.
  • I will end on that same topic.
  • Optimism, on the other hand, says, "There is a way."
  • It is based on the idea that what we believe about the future determines what we do in the present.
  • One day some gentlemen called on my mother, and I felt the shutting of the front door and other sounds that indicated their arrival.
  • On a sudden thought I ran upstairs before any one could stop me, to put on my idea of a company dress.
  • On a sudden thought I ran upstairs before any one could stop me, to put on my idea of a company dress.
  • The milkers would let me keep my hands on the cows while they milked, and I often got well switched by the cow for my curiosity.
  • One day I happened to spill water on my apron, and I spread it out to dry before the fire which was flickering on the sitting-room hearth.
  • I made friends with many people on the train.
  • I pulled two beads off and indicated to her that I wanted her to sew them on my doll.
  • He held me on his knee while I examined his watch, and he made it strike for me.
  • The most important day I remember in all my life is the one on which my teacher, Anne Mansfield Sullivan, came to me.
  • On the afternoon of that eventful day, I stood on the porch, dumb, expectant.
  • On the afternoon of that eventful day, I stood on the porch, dumb, expectant.
  • I guessed vaguely from my mother's signs and from the hurrying to and fro in the house that something unusual was about to happen, so I went to the door and waited on the steps.
  • The afternoon sun penetrated the mass of honeysuckle that covered the porch, and fell on my upturned face.
  • My fingers lingered almost unconsciously on the familiar leaves and blossoms which had just come forth to greet the sweet southern spring.
  • "Light! give me light!" was the wordless cry of my soul, and the light of love shone on me in that very hour.
  • On entering the door I remembered the doll I had broken.
  • I had some difficulty in holding on, for the branches were very large and the bark hurt my hands.
  • I sat there for a long, long time, feeling like a fairy on a rosy cloud.
  • Sometimes a new word revived an image that some earlier experience had engraved on my brain.
  • The warm sun was shining on us.
  • Finally I noticed a very obvious error in the sequence and for an instant I concentrated my attention on the lesson and tried to think how I should have arranged the beads.
  • In a flash I knew that the word was the name of the process that was going on in my head.
  • As soon as I could spell a few words my teacher gave me slips of cardboard on which were printed words in raised letters.
  • One day, Miss Sullivan tells me, I pinned the word girl on my pinafore and stood in the wardrobe.
  • On the shelf I arranged the words, is, in, wardrobe.
  • Sometimes I rose at dawn and stole into the garden while the heavy dew lay on the grass and flowers.
  • Our favourite walk was to Keller's Landing, an old tumbledown lumber-wharf on the Tennessee River, used during the Civil War to land soldiers.
  • On Christmas Eve the Tuscumbia schoolchildren had their tree, to which they invited me.
  • I found surprises, not in the stocking only, but on the table, on all the chairs, at the door, on the very window-sill; indeed, I could hardly walk without stumbling on a bit of Christmas wrapped up in tissue paper.
  • Little Tim was so tame that he would hop on my finger and eat candied cherries out of my hand.
  • One morning I left the cage on the window-seat while I went to fetch water for his bath.
  • I was no longer a restless, excitable little creature, requiring the attention of everybody on the train to keep me amused.
  • On the seat opposite me sat my big rag doll, Nancy, in a new gingham dress and a beruffled sunbonnet, looking at me out of two bead eyes.
  • The story of the brave men who had fought on the spot where we stood excited me greatly.
  • This was my first trip on the ocean and my first voyage in a steamboat.
  • I was more interested, I think, in the great rock on which the Pilgrims landed than in anything else in Plymouth.
  • Just before the Perkins Institution closed for the summer, it was arranged that my teacher and I should spend our vacation at Brewster, on Cape Cod, with our dear friend, Mrs. Hopkins.
  • At last, however, the sea, as if weary of its new toy, threw me back on the shore, and in another instant I was clasped in my teacher's arms.
  • After I had recovered from my first experience in the water, I thought it great fun to sit on a big rock in my bathing-suit and feel wave after wave dash against the rock, sending up a shower of spray which quite covered me.
  • I could never stay long enough on the shore.
  • I felt of him and thought it very strange that he should carry his house on his back.
  • I spent the autumn months with my family at our summer cottage, on a mountain about fourteen miles from Tuscumbia.
  • Our cottage was a sort of rough camp, beautifully situated on the top of the mountain among oaks and pines.
  • The small rooms were arranged on each side of a long open hall.
  • We lived on the piazza most of the time--there we worked, ate and played.
  • The men slept in the hall outside our door, and I could feel the deep breathing of the dogs and the hunters as they lay on their improvised beds.
  • A fire was kindled at the bottom of a deep hole in the ground, big sticks were laid crosswise at the top, and meat was hung from them and turned on spits.
  • I called him Black Beauty, as I had just read the book, and he resembled his namesake in every way, from his glossy black coat to the white star on his forehead.
  • I spent many of my happiest hours on his back.
  • It was very difficult to walk over, the ties were wide apart and so narrow that one felt as if one were walking on knives.
  • I had to feel for the rails with my toe; but I was not afraid, and got on very well, until all at once there came a faint "puff, puff" from the distance.
  • I felt the hot breath from the engine on my face, and the smoke and ashes almost choked us.
  • Once I went on a visit to a New England village with its frozen lakes and vast snow fields.
  • I recall my surprise on discovering that a mysterious hand had stripped the trees and bushes, leaving only here and there a wrinkled leaf.
  • Winter was on hill and field.
  • On the third day after the beginning of the storm the snow ceased.
  • I put on my cloak and hood and went out.
  • As the days wore on, the drifts gradually shrunk, but before they were wholly gone another storm came, so that I scarcely felt the earth under my feet once all winter.
  • We would get on our toboggan, a boy would give us a shove, and off we went!
  • I used to make noises, keeping one hand on my throat while the other hand felt the movements of my lips.
  • I also liked to keep my hand on a singer's throat, or on a piano when it was being played.
  • I used to sit in my mother's lap all day long and keep my hands on her face because it amused me to feel the motions of her lips; and I moved my lips, too, although I had forgotten what talking was.
  • I stopped using it only after I had learned to spell the word on my fingers.
  • Mrs. Lamson had scarcely finished telling me about this girl's success before I was on fire with eagerness.
  • In reading my teacher's lips I was wholly dependent on my fingers: I had to use the sense of touch in catching the vibrations of the throat, the movements of the mouth and the expression of the face; and often this sense was at fault.
  • Discouragement and weariness cast me down frequently; but the next moment the thought that I should soon be at home and show my loved ones what I had accomplished, spurred me on, and I eagerly looked forward to their pleasure in my achievement.
  • It astonished me to find how much easier it is to talk than to spell with the fingers, and I discarded the manual alphabet as a medium of communication on my part; but Miss Sullivan and a few friends still use it in speaking to me, for it is more convenient and more rapid than lip-reading.
  • I place my hand on the hand of the speaker so lightly as not to impede its movements.
  • Constant practice makes the fingers very flexible, and some of my friends spell rapidly--about as fast as an expert writes on a typewriter.
  • Almost before I knew it, the train stopped at the Tuscumbia station, and there on the platform stood the whole family.
  • Words and images came tripping to my finger ends, and as I thought out sentence after sentence, I wrote them on my braille slate.
  • I carried the little story to the post-office myself, feeling as if I were walking on air.
  • He believed, or at least suspected, that Miss Sullivan and I had deliberately stolen the bright thoughts of another and imposed them on him to win his admiration.
  • Mr. Anagnos, in speaking of my composition on the cities, has said, "These ideas are poetic in their essence."
  • So this sad experience may have done me good and set me thinking on some of the problems of composition.
  • I wrote timidly, fearfully, but resolutely, urged on by my teacher, who knew that if I persevered, I should find my mental foothold again and get a grip on my faculties.
  • It is difficult to describe my emotions when I stood on the point which overhangs the American Falls and felt the air vibrate and the earth tremble.
  • I also went on board a Viking ship which lay a short distance from the little craft.
  • The captain showed me Columbus's cabin and the desk with an hour-glass on it.
  • In the electrical building we examined the telephones, autophones, phonographs, and other inventions, and he made me understand how it is possible to send a message on wires that mock space and outrun time, and, like Prometheus, to draw fire from the sky.
  • We sailed on the Hudson River and wandered about on its green banks, of which Bryant loved to sing.
  • I could not make notes in class or write exercises; but I wrote all my compositions and translations at home on my typewriter.
  • We read together, "As You Like It," Burke's "Speech on Conciliation with America," and Macaulay's "Life of Samuel Johnson."
  • Burke's speech was more instructive than any other book on a political subject that I had ever read.
  • I wondered more and more, while Burke's masterly speech rolled on in mighty surges of eloquence, how it was that King George and his ministers could have turned a deaf ear to his warning prophecy of our victory and their humiliation.
  • A man was placed on guard at the door to prevent interruption.
  • The papers were difficult, and I felt very anxious as I wrote out my answers on the typewriter.
  • This encouraged me greatly, and I sped on to the end of the ordeal with a light heart and a steady hand.
  • I could not follow with my eyes the geometrical figures drawn on the blackboard, and my only means of getting a clear idea of them was to make them on a cushion with straight and curved wires, which had bent and pointed ends.
  • The geometrical diagrams were particularly vexing because I could not see the relation of the different parts to one another, even on the cushion.
  • Just before the books came, Mr. Gilman had begun to remonstrate with Miss Sullivan on the ground that I was working too hard, and in spite of my earnest protestations, he reduced the number of my recitations.
  • On the seventeenth of November I was not very well, and did not go to school.
  • He explained each time what I did not understand in the previous lesson, assigned new work, and took home with him the Greek exercises which I had written during the week on my typewriter, corrected them fully, and returned them to me.
  • In this way my preparation for college went on without interruption.
  • My tutor had plenty of time to explain what I did not understand, so I got on faster and did better work than I ever did in school.
  • But on the night before the algebra examination, while I was struggling over some very complicated examples, I could not tell the combinations of bracket, brace and radical.
  • Besides, I could not see what I wrote on my typewriter.
  • With this machine movable type shuttles can be used, and one can have several shuttles, each with a different set of characters--Greek, French, or mathematical, according to the kind of writing one wishes to do on the typewriter.
  • You are amazed at all the things you know which are not on the examination paper.
  • In desperation you seize the budget and dump everything out, and there in a corner is your man, serenely brooding on his own private thought, unconscious of the catastrophe which he has brought upon you.
  • And read I did, whether I understood one word in ten or two words on a page.
  • As we hastened through the long grass toward the hammock, the grasshoppers swarmed about us and fastened themselves on our clothes, and I remember that my teacher insisted upon picking them all off before we sat down, which seemed to me an unnecessary waste of time.
  • The warm sun shone on the pine trees and drew out all their fragrance.
  • Before we began the story Miss Sullivan explained to me the things that she knew I should not understand, and as we read on she explained the unfamiliar words.
  • During the next two years I read many books at my home and on my visits to Boston.
  • In my fancy the pagan gods and goddesses still walked on earth and talked face to face with men, and in my heart I secretly built shrines to those I loved best.
  • How easy it is to fly on paper wings!
  • The first book that gave me any real sense of the value of history was Swinton's "World History," which I received on my thirteenth birthday.
  • I trust that my readers have not concluded from the preceding chapter on books that reading is my only pleasure; my pleasures and amusements are many and varied.
  • It is fun to try to steer by the scent of watergrasses and lilies, and of bushes that grow on the shore.
  • I have felt it on cold, stormy days and at night.
  • It is like the kiss of warm lips on my face.
  • There is a tradition that under this tree King Philip, the heroic Indian chief, gazed his last on earth and sky.
  • As soon as my examinations were over, Miss Sullivan and I hastened to this green nook, where we have a little cottage on one of the three lakes for which Wrentham is famous.
  • We heard of the cruel, unnecessary fighting in the far-away Pacific, and learned of the struggles going on between capital and labour.
  • In the country one sees only Nature's fair works, and one's soul is not saddened by the cruel struggle for mere existence that goes on in the crowded city.
  • Next to a leisurely walk I enjoy a "spin" on my tandem bicycle.
  • Whenever it is possible, my dog accompanies me on a walk or ride or sail.
  • I have a special board on which I play these games.
  • The black checkers are flat and the white ones curved on top.
  • Of course the little ones cannot spell on their fingers; but I manage to read their lips.
  • A medallion of Homer hangs on the wall of my study, conveniently low, so that I can easily reach it and touch the beautiful, sad face with loving reverence.
  • I enjoy having a play described to me while it is being acted on the stage far more than reading it, because then it seems as if I were living in the midst of stirring events.
  • Mr. Jefferson let me touch his face so that I could imagine how he looked on waking from that strange sleep of twenty years, and he showed me how poor old Rip staggered to his feet.
  • Once while I was calling on him in Boston he acted the most striking parts of "The Rivals" for me.
  • As a child I loved to sit on his knee and clasp his great hand with one of mine, while Miss Sullivan spelled into the other his beautiful words about God and the spiritual world.
  • Since Bishop Brooks died I have read the Bible through; also some philosophical works on religion, among them Swedenborg's "Heaven and Hell" and Drummond's "Ascent of Man," and I have found no creed or system more soul-satisfying than Bishop Brooks's creed of love.
  • He had invited Miss Sullivan and me to call on him one Sunday afternoon.
  • I felt tears on my hand.
  • One beautiful summer day, not long after my meeting with Dr. Holmes, Miss Sullivan and I visited Whittier in his quiet home on the Merrimac.
  • Then I asked many questions about the poem, and read his answers by placing my fingers on his lips.
  • Then he led me to the gate and kissed me tenderly on my forehead.
  • Here in Dr. Bell's laboratory, or in the fields on the shore of the great Bras d'Or, I have spent many delightful hours listening to what he had to tell me about his experiments, and helping him fly kites by means of which he expects to discover the laws that shall govern the future air-ship.
  • I was like little Ascanius, who followed with unequal steps the heroic strides of Aeneas on his march toward mighty destinies.
  • Miss Sullivan began to teach Helen Keller on March 3rd, 1887.
  • Twenty-five days later, while she was on a short visit away from home, she wrote to her mother.
  • They had a pretty Christmas-tree, and there were many pretty presents on it for little children.
  • Wool grows on sheep.
  • Cotton grows on large stalks in fields.
  • Cotton has pretty white and red flowers on it.
  • She wrote on the blackboard the names of all the gentlemen present.
  • It was on a large river.
  • She has on a pretty red dress.
  • Boat was on very large river.
  • On May 26th they arrived in Boston and went to the Perkins Institution; here Helen met the little blind girls with whom she had corresponded the year before.
  • When I visit many strange countries my brother and Mildred will stay with grandmother because they will be too small to see a great many people and I think they would cry loud on the great rough ocean.
  • Pony's name was Mollie and I had a nice ride on her back; I was not afraid, I hope my uncle will get me a dear little pony and a little cart very soon.
  • I rode on Carrie's tricicle and picked flowers and ate fruit and hopped and skipped and danced and went to ride.
  • Mr. Drew says little girls in China cannot talk on their fingers but I think when I go to China I will teach them.
  • One day there was a great shout on the ship for the people saw the land and they were full of joy because they had reached a new country safely.
  • I hope you will come to Alabama to visit me and I will take you to ride in my little cart and I think you will like to see me on my dear little pony's back.
  • Many years ago, before people came to live on the earth, great trees and tall grasses and huge ferns and all the beautiful flowers cover the earth.
  • Sometimes she tries to spell very short words on her small [fingers] but she is too young to remember hard words.
  • She has on a dainty lace dress and satin slippers.
  • One sits on the twig of a tree, just beneath our window, and he fills the air with his glad songs.
  • I am sitting on the piazza, and my little white pigeon is perched on the back of my chair, watching me write.
  • It is getting warm here now, so father is going to take us to the Quarry on the 20th of August.
  • He has on short dresses now.
  • There was a boat floating on the water, and the fragrant lilies were growing all around the boat.
  • There were eight pigeons on the roof of the house, and a great dog on the step.
  • At ten I study about the earth on which we all live.
  • Mr. Wilson came to call on us one Thursday.
  • We had a very nice dinner on Thanksgiving day,--turkey and plum-pudding.
  • Sunday I went to church on board a great warship.
  • I should like to be at home on Christmas day.
  • Please do not forget to send me some pretty presents to hang on my tree.
  • I hope I have written my letter nicely, but it is very difficult to write on this paper and teacher is not here to give me better.
  • I shall always keep them, and it will make me very happy to think that you found them, on that far away island, from which Columbus sailed to discover our dear country.
  • And I would keep my little hand on her face all the while, because it amused me to feel her face and lips move when she talked with people.
  • I should like very much to see you to-day Is the sun very hot in Boston now? this afternoon if it is cool enough I shall take Mildred for a ride on my donkey.
  • And Jesus, who is His Son, but is nearer to Him than all of us His other Children, came into the world on purpose to tell us all about our Father's Love.
  • I was delighted to get there, though I was much disappointed because we did not arrive on Mr. Anagnos' birthday.
  • My Dear Young Friend--I was very glad to have such a pleasant letter on my birthday.
  • He was admitted to the kindergarten on the sixth of April.
  • There is a hiatus of several months in the letters, caused by the depressing effect on Helen and Miss Sullivan of the "Frost King" episode.
  • We even ate our breakfast out on the piazza.
  • I do not write on a Braille tablet, as you suppose, but on a grooved board like the piece which I enclose.
  • Especially important are such details as her feeling the rush of the water by putting her hand on the window.
  • The hotel was so near the river that I could feel it rushing past by putting my hand on the window.
  • It seemed as if it were some living thing rushing on to some terrible fate.
  • It is thrown across the gorge at a height of two hundred and fifty-eight feet above the water and is supported on each bank by towers of solid rock, which are eight hundred feet apart.
  • Once, while we were out on the water, the sun went down over the rim of the earth, and threw a soft, rosy light over the White City, making it look more than ever like Dreamland....
  • I went into the streets of Cairo, and rode on the camel.
  • We also rode in the Ferris wheel, and on the ice-railway, and had a sail in the Whale-back....
  • They have now about 100 books and about $55 in money, and a kind gentleman has given us land on which to erect a library building.
  • She said we would, and he took us way out on the track and put us on board our train.
  • I read her lips almost exclusively, (she does not know the manual alphabet) and we get on quite well.
  • On the first of October Miss Keller entered the Cambridge School for Young Ladies, of which Mr. Arthur Gilman is Principal.
  • But it is harder for Teacher than it is for me because the strain on her poor eyes is so great, and I cannot help worrying about them.
  • Every morning, before lesson-time, we all go out to the steep hill on the northern shore of the lake near the house, and coast for an hour or so.
  • Some one balances the toboggan on the very crest of the hill, while we get on, and when we are ready, off we dash down the side of the hill in a headlong rush, and, leaping a projection, plunge into a snow-drift and go swimming far across the pond at a tremendous rate!...
  • I find I get on faster, and do better work with Mr. Keith than I did in the classes at the Cambridge School, and I think it was well that I gave up that kind of work.
  • TO MRS. LAURENCE HUTTON [Wrentham] May 29, 1898. ...My work goes on bravely.
  • On the other hand, when we learn a new word, it is the key to untold treasures....
  • This morning I rode over twelve miles on my tandem!
  • I rode on a rough road, and fell off three or four times, and am now awfully lame!
  • Indeed, I doubt if they are on speaking terms with their country cousins!
  • They look down pityingly on the country-folk, who have never had an opportunity "to see the great world."
  • On the other hand, it would be a pledge to the world that we intend to stand by our declaration of war, and give Cuba to the Cubans, as soon as we have fitted them to assume the duties and responsibilities of a self-governing people....
  • General Loring kindly showed me a copy of one of the wonderful bronze doors of the Baptistry of Florence, and I felt of the graceful pillars, resting on the backs of fierce lions.
  • We shall all live together in a small cottage on one of the lakes at Wrentham, while my dear teacher takes a much needed rest.
  • Why, I find it hard to understand them sometimes when they spell on their fingers.
  • On the whole, if they cannot be taught articulation, the manual alphabet seems the best and most convenient means of communication.
  • But I must confess, I had a hard time on the second day of my examinations.
  • On the 29th and 30th of June, 1899, I took my examinations for Radcliffe College.
  • Perhaps, if you would send a copy of this to the head of the Cambridge School, it might enlighten his mind on a few subjects, on which he seems to be in total darkness just now....
  • The waist is trimmed with pink and green brocaded velvet, and white lace, I think, and has double reefers on the front, tucked and trimmed with velvet, and also a row of tiny white buttons.
  • We could hear the yells of the boys and the cheers of the lookers-on as plainly in our room as if we had been on the field.
  • Colonel Roosevelt was there, on Harvard's side; but bless you, he wore a white sweater, and no crimson that we know of!
  • I do believe I sleep on books every night!
  • I had had misgivings on this point; but I could not see how we were to help it.
  • When the Indiana visited Halifax, we were invited to go on board, and she sent her own launch for us.
  • He has a charming, romantic house on a mountain called Beinn Bhreagh, which overlooks the Bras d'Or Lake....
  • On one of them I noticed that the strings were of wire, and having had some experience in bead work, I said I thought they would break.
  • I write all my themes and examinations on it, even Greek.
  • In rewriting the story, Miss Keller made corrections on separate pages on her braille machine.
  • Long corrections she wrote out on her typewriter, with catch-words to indicate where they belonged.
  • She sat running her finger over the braille manuscript, stopping now and then to refer to the braille notes on which she had indicated her corrections, all the time reading aloud to verify the manuscript.
  • On the other hand she does not know another's expression.
  • Mr. Joseph Jefferson was once explaining to Miss Keller what the bumps on her head meant.
  • Her whimsical and adventuresome spirit puts her so much on her mettle that she makes rather a poor subject for the psychological experimenter.
  • When a psychologist asked her if Miss Keller spelled on her fingers in her sleep, Miss Sullivan replied that she did not think it worth while to sit up and watch, such matters were of so little consequence.
  • She cannot sing and she cannot play the piano, although, as some early experiments show, she could learn mechanically to beat out a tune on the keys.
  • Sometimes she puts her hand on a singer's throat to feel the muscular thrill and contraction, and from this she gets genuine pleasure.
  • Miss Keller's effort to reach out and meet other people on their own intellectual ground has kept her informed of daily affairs.
  • She is a good talker on the little occasional affairs of life.
  • When she was at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston she stood on a step-ladder and let both hands play over the statues.
  • The only thing she does which requires skill with the hands is her work on the typewriter.
  • She keeps the relative position of the keys by an occasional touch of the little finger on the outer edge of the board.
  • The time that one of Miss Keller's friends realizes most strongly that she is blind is when he comes on her suddenly in the dark and hears the rustle of her fingers across the page.
  • The facsimile on page xv [omitted from etext] gives an idea of how the raised dots look.
  • Miss Keller has a braille writer on which she keeps notes and writes letters to her blind friends.
  • When a passage interests her, or she needs to remember it for some future use, she flutters it off swiftly on the fingers of her right hand.
  • For Miss Keller to spell a sentence in the manual alphabet impresses it on her mind just as we learn a thing from having heard it many times and can call back the memory of its sound.
  • Like every deaf or blind person, Miss Keller depends on her sense of smell to an unusual degree.
  • As her intellect grew she became less dependent on this sense.
  • She has not even learned that exhibition on which so many pride themselves, of 'righteous indignation.'
  • "Toleration," she said once, when she was visiting her friend Mrs. Laurence Hutton, "is the greatest gift of the mind; it requires the same effort of the brain that it takes to balance oneself on a bicycle."
  • Sometimes she gets started on a very solemn preachment.
  • And her sympathies go further and shape her opinions on political and national movements.
  • In the diary that she kept at the Wright-Humason School in New York she wrote on October 18, 1894, "I find that I have four things to learn in my school life here, and indeed, in life--to think clearly without hurry or confusion, to love everybody sincerely, to act in everything with the highest motives, and to trust in dear God unhesitatingly."
  • For Dr. Howe is the great pioneer on whose work that of Miss Sullivan and other teachers of the deaf-blind immediately depends.
  • As head of the Perkins Institution for the Blind in Boston, he heard of Laura Bridgman and had her brought to the Institution on October 4, 1837.
  • He pasted raised labels on objects and made her fit the labels to the objects and the objects to the labels.
  • She taught it to Laura, and from that time on the manual alphabet was the means of communicating with her.
  • After the first year or two Dr. Howe did not teach Laura Bridgman himself, but gave her over to other teachers, who under his direction carried on the work of teaching her language.
  • This in itself is a great comment on the difference between Laura Bridgman and Helen Keller.
  • On March 4, 1888, she writes in a letter:
  • As Mr. Anagnos was the head of a great institution, what he said had much more effect than the facts in Miss Sullivan's account on which he based his statements.
  • Teachers of the deaf proved a priori that what Miss Sullivan had done could not be, and some discredit was reflected on her statements, because they were surrounded by the vague eloquence of Mr. Anagnos.
  • Many people have thought that any attempt to find the principles in her method would be nothing but a later theory superimposed on Miss Sullivan's work.
  • She has a fine head, and it is set on her shoulders just right.
  • I shall not attempt to conquer her by force alone; but I shall insist on reasonable obedience from the start.
  • She kept coming up behind me and putting her hand on the paper and into the ink-bottle.
  • This time she put on the glass bead first and the two wooden ones next.
  • I took them off and showed her that the two wooden ones must go on first, then the glass bead.
  • Helen was lying on the floor, kicking and screaming and trying to pull my chair from under me.
  • I gave her a spoon, which she threw on the floor.
  • When she had finished, she threw it on the floor and ran toward the door.
  • Then I let her out into the warm sunshine and went up to my room and threw myself on the bed exhausted.
  • I told her that in my opinion the child ought to be separated from the family for a few weeks at least--that she must learn to depend on and obey me before I could make any headway.
  • Our meals are brought from the house, and we usually eat on the piazza.
  • She devoted herself to her dolls the first evening, and when it was bedtime she undressed very quietly, but when she felt me get into bed with her, she jumped out on the other side, and nothing that I could do would induce her to get in again.
  • I finally succeeded in getting her on the bed and covered her up, and she lay curled up as near the edge of the bed as possible.
  • This lasted for several minutes; then this mood passed, and Nancy was thrown ruthlessly on the floor and pushed to one side, while a large, pink-cheeked, fuzzy-haired member of the family received the little mother's undivided attention.
  • Her father looks in at us morning and evening as he goes to and from his office, and sees her contentedly stringing her beads or making horizontal lines on her sewing-card, and exclaims, "How quiet she is!"
  • When he succeeded in forming it to suit her, she patted him on his woolly head so vigorously that I thought some of his slips were intentional.
  • Her father objected and said that no child of his should be deprived of his food on any account.
  • I showed her the napkin and pinned it round her neck, then tore it off and threw it on the floor and shook my head.
  • I'd rather break stones on the king's highway than hem a handkerchief.
  • On March 31st I found that Helen knew eighteen nouns and three verbs.
  • Then she dropped on the ground and asked for its name and pointed to the pump and the trellis, and suddenly turning round she asked for my name.
  • I SHALL USE COMPLETE SENTENCES IN TALKING TO HER, and fill out the meaning with gestures and her descriptive signs when necessity requires it; but I shall not try to keep her mind fixed on any one thing.
  • They seem to me to be built up on the supposition that every child is a kind of idiot who must be taught to think.
  • If she finds anything in her way, she flings it on the floor, no matter what it is: a glass, a pitcher, or even a lamp.
  • I made her go through the motion of knocking the doll's head on the table and spelled to her: No, no, Helen is naughty.
  • Teacher is sad, and let her feel the grieved expression on my face.
  • She went through these motions several times, mimicking every movement, then she stood very still for a moment with a troubled look on her face, which suddenly cleared, and she spelled, "Good Helen," and wreathed her face in a very large, artificial smile.
  • Then she carried the doll upstairs and put it on the top shelf of the wardrobe, and she has not touched it since.
  • If I refuse to talk to her, she spells into her own hand, and apparently carries on the liveliest conversation with herself.
  • She knew, too, that I sometimes write "letters to blind girls" on the slate; but I didn't suppose that she had any clear idea what a letter was.
  • If, indeed, they apply to me even remotely, I do not see that I deserve any laudation on that account.
  • I shall write freely to you and tell you everything, on one condition: It is this: you must promise never to show my letters to any one.
  • The little fellow who whirls his "New York Flyer" round the nursery, making "horseshoe curves" undreamed of by less imaginative engineers, is concentrating his whole soul on his toy locomotive.
  • I happened to tell her the other day that the vine on the fence was a "creeper."
  • She was (or imagined she was) putting on paper the things which had interested her.
  • She will insist on having her hair put in curl papers when she is so sleepy she can scarcely stand.
  • She stood very still for a moment, and it was evident from her face, which was flushed and troubled, that a struggle was going on in her mind.
  • It was amusing to see her hold it before her eyes and spell the sentences out on her fingers, just as I had done.
  • This lesson was followed by one on words indicative of place-relations.
  • Very soon she learned the difference between ON and IN, though it was some time before she could use these words in sentences of her own.
  • "Helen is in wardrobe," "Mildred is in crib," "Box is on table," "Papa is on bed," are specimens of sentences constructed by her during the latter part of April.
  • Next came a lesson on words expressive of positive quality.
  • A slip on which was printed, in raised letters, the word BOX was placed on the object, and the same experiment was tried with a great many articles, but she did not immediately comprehend that the label-name represented the thing.
  • She moved her finger from one printed character to another as I formed each letter on my fingers.
  • Next I turned to the first page of the primer and made her touch the word CAT, spelling it on my fingers at the same time.
  • As she had now learned to express her ideas on paper, I next taught her the braille system.
  • On being told that she was white and that one of the servants was black, she concluded that all who occupied a similar menial position were of the same hue; and whenever I asked her the colour of a servant she would say "black."
  • On another occasion while walking with me she seemed conscious of the presence of her brother, although we were distant from him.
  • She fed the elephants, and was allowed to climb up on the back of the largest, and sit in the lap of the "Oriental Princess," while the elephant marched majestically around the ring.
  • The keeper of the bears made one big black fellow stand on his hind legs and hold out his great paw to us, which Helen shook politely.
  • She was greatly delighted with the monkeys and kept her hand on the star performer while he went through his tricks, and laughed heartily when he took off his hat to the audience.
  • At present I feel like a jungle on wheels!
  • Helen's dependence on me for almost everything makes me strong and glad.
  • Several little girls have learned to spell on their fingers and are very proud of the accomplishment.
  • Who put many things on tree?
  • One little girl had fewer presents than the rest, and Helen insisted on sharing her gifts with her.
  • It was nothing but excitement from first to last--drives, luncheons, receptions, and all that they involve when you have an eager, tireless child like Helen on your hands.
  • Helen was greatly interested in the boat, and insisted on being shown every inch of it from the engine to the flag on the flagstaff.
  • After dinner father went to Birmingham on train far away.
  • She hugged and kissed me, and the quiet-looking divine who sat on the other side of her.
  • Then she threw herself on the floor and began to swim so energetically that some of us thought we should be kicked out of our chairs!
  • Almost every one on the train was a physician, and Dr. Keller seemed to know them all.
  • He had never heard of "talking-gloves"; but I explained that she had seen a glove on which the alphabet was printed, and evidently thought they could be bought.
  • I told him he could buy some gloves if he wished, and that I would have the alphabet stamped on them.
  • When we entered the room, the children's attention was riveted on Helen.
  • The teacher was writing on the blackboard: The girl's name is Helen.
  • I said: Why do you write those sentences on the board?
  • On entering a greenhouse her countenance becomes radiant, and she will tell the names of the flowers with which she is familiar, by the sense of smell alone.
  • On one occasion, while walking on the Common with her, I saw a police officer taking a man to the station-house.
  • On one occasion, while walking on the Common with her, I saw a police officer taking a man to the station-house.
  • She smelt of the flowers, but showed no desire to pluck them; and, when I gathered a few for her, she refused to have them pinned on her dress.
  • On her return to the house after her visit to the cemetery, she ran to the closet where these toys were kept, and carried them to my friend, saying, "They are poor little Florence's."
  • Sitting beside her in the car, I describe what I see from the window--hills and valleys and the rivers; cotton-fields and gardens in which strawberries, peaches, pears, melons, and vegetables are growing; herds of cows and horses feeding in broad meadows, and flocks of sheep on the hillside; the cities with their churches and schools, hotels and warehouses, and the occupations of the busy people.
  • Naturally, there was at first a strong tendency on her part to use only the important words in a sentence.
  • This morning teacher and I sat by the window and we saw a little boy walking on the sidewalk.
  • She makes her nest on the ground.
  • Teacher and I went to ride on Tennessee River, in a boat.
  • Some of these words have successive steps of meaning, beginning with what is simple and leading on to what is abstract.
  • She had learned the printed letters, and for some time had amused herself by making simple sentences, using slips on which the words were printed in raised letters; but these sentences had no special relation to one another.
  • After a moment she went on: A. says God is everywhere, and that He is all love; but I do not think a person can be made out of love.
  • Early in May she wrote on her tablet the following list of questions:
  • When told that Jesus walked on the sea to meet His disciples, she said, decidedly, "It does not mean WALKED, it means SWAM."
  • "No one knows what the soul is like," I replied; "but we know that it is not the body, and it is that part of us which thinks and loves and hopes."
  • I was obliged to confess that I did not know, but suggested that it might be on one of the stars.
  • Good work in language presupposes and depends on a real knowledge of things.
  • I always tried to find out what interested her most, and made that the starting-point for the new lesson, whether it had any bearing on the lesson I had planned to teach or not.
  • And this does not mean that Miss Keller is unduly dependent on her teacher.
  • After the illness, when they were dependent on signs, Helen's tendency to gesture developed.
  • How far she could receive communications is hard to determine, but she knew much that was going on around her.
  • This is like the effect of the slow dwelling on long words, not quite well managed, that one notices in a child who is telling a solemn story.
  • The wavering is caused by the absence of accent on FUL, for she pronounces FULL correctly.
  • She kept one hand on the singer's mouth, while the other rested on the piano, and she stood in this position as long as any one would sing to her, and afterward she would make a continuous sound which she called singing.
  • After the first year or so of elementary work she met her pupil on equal terms, and they read and enjoyed good books together.
  • On the other hand, the peculiar value to her of language, which ordinary people take for granted as a necessary part of them like their right hand, made her think about language and love it.
  • The original story was read to her from a copy of "Andersen's Stories," published by Leavitt & Allen Bros., and may be found on p. 97 of Part I. in that volume.
  • The pictures the language paints on her memory appear to make an indelible impression; and many times, when an experience comes to her similar in character, the language starts forth with wonderful accuracy, like the reflection from a mirror.
  • I have now (March, 1892) read to Helen "The Frost Fairies," "The Rose Fairies," and a portion of "The Dew Fairies," but she is unable to throw any light on the matter.
  • She was playing on the pier with a wee brother.
  • One pleasant morning in the beautiful springtime, I thought I was sitting on the soft grass under my dear mother's window, looking very earnestly at the rose-bushes which were growing all around me.
  • The fairies promised obedience and soon started on their journey, dragging the great glass jars and vases along, as well as they could, and now and then grumbling a little at having such hard work to do, for they were idle fairies, and liked play better than work.
  • Still, for awhile, the frost fairies did not notice this strange occurrence, for they were down on the grass, so far below the tree-tops that the wonderful shower of treasure was a long time in reaching them; but at last one of them said, Hark!
  • Their fears were well founded, for their long absence had alarmed the king, and he had started out to look for his tardy servants, and just as they were all hidden, he came along slowly, looking on all sides for the fairies.
  • And when he came to the nut trees, and saw the shells left by the idle fairies and all the traces of their frolic, he knew exactly how they had acted, and that they had disobeyed him by playing and loitering on their way through the woods.
  • But on nearer approach we should discover our error.
  • Her father, Captain Keller, wrote to me as follows on the subject:
  • On Miss Sullivan's return to Brewster, she read to Helen the story of "Little Lord Fauntleroy," which she had purchased in Boston for the purpose.
  • The episode had a deadening effect on Helen Keller and on Miss Sullivan, who feared that she had allowed the habit of imitation, which has in truth made Miss Keller a writer, to go too far.
  • When she was twelve years old, she was asked what book she would take on a long railroad journey.
  • "Paradise Lost," she answered, and she read it on the train.
  • A beautiful summer day had dawned, the day on which I was to make the acquaintance of a somber and mysterious friend.
  • But, unfortunately, I struck my foot on a rock and fell forward into the cold water.
  • It is true, on the other hand, that in her descriptions, she is best from the point of view of art when she is faithful to her own sensations; and this is precisely true of all artists.
  • To be sure, I take the keenest interest in everything that concerns those who surround me; it is this very interest which makes it so difficult for me to carry on a conversation with some people who will not talk or say what they think, but I should not be sorry to find more friends ready to talk with me now and then about the wonderful things I read.
  • Sainte-Beuve says, "Il vient un age peut-etre quand on n'ecrit plus."
  • When all outside is cold and white, when the little children of the woodland are gone to their nurseries in the warm earth, and the empty nests on the bare trees fill with snow, my window-garden glows and smiles, making summer within while it is winter without.
  • I am not one of those on whom fortune deigns to smile.
  • My house is not resplendent with ivory and gold; nor is it adorned with marble arches, resting on graceful columns brought from the quarries of distant Africa.
  • Ah, the pranks that the nixies of Dreamland play on us while we sleep!
  • They strut about on the stage of the play like they were very famous actors.
  • I spurred my panting steed and waved my sword.
  • Suddenly I felt my bed shake, and a wolf seemed to spring on me and snarl in my face.
  • They have got to live a man's life, pushing all these things before them, and get on as well as they can.
  • When one man has reduced a fact of the imagination to be a fact to his understanding, I foresee that all men at length establish their lives on that basis.
  • I would gladly tell all that I know about it, and never paint "No Admittance" on my gate.
  • However, I have not set my heart on that.
  • I have thought that Walden Pond would be a good place for business, not solely on account of the railroad and the ice trade; it offers advantages which it may not be good policy to divulge; it is a good port and a good foundation.
  • Passing a cornfield the other day, close by a hat and coat on a stake, I recognized the owner of the farm.
  • I have heard of a dog that barked at every stranger who approached his master's premises with clothes on, but was easily quieted by a naked thief.
  • The head monkey at Paris puts on a traveller's cap, and all the monkeys in America do the same.
  • On the whole, I think that it cannot be maintained that dressing has in this or any country risen to the dignity of an art.
  • Of two patterns which differ only by a few threads more or less of a particular color, the one will be sold readily, the other lie on the shelf, though it frequently happens that after the lapse of a season the latter becomes the most fashionable.
  • What mean ye by saying that the poor ye have always with you, or that the fathers have eaten sour grapes, and the children's teeth are set on edge?
  • The man who has actually paid for his farm with labor on it is so rare that every neighbor can point to him.
  • But this puts an infinitely worse face on the matter, and suggests, beside, that probably not even the other three succeed in saving their souls, but are perchance bankrupt in a worse sense than they who fail honestly.
  • On the one side is the palace, on the other are the almshouse and "silent poor."
  • On the one side is the palace, on the other are the almshouse and "silent poor."
  • The myriads who built the pyramids to be the tombs of the Pharaohs were fed on garlic, and it may be were not decently buried themselves.
  • Or I could refer you to Ireland, which is marked as one of the white or enlightened spots on the map.
  • I would rather sit in the open air, for no dust gathers on the grass, unless where man has broken ground.
  • I would rather sit on a pumpkin and have it all to myself than be crowded on a velvet cushion.
  • I would rather ride on earth in an ox cart, with a free circulation, than go to heaven in the fancy car of an excursion train and breathe a malaria all the way.
  • We now no longer camp as for a night, but have settled down on earth and forgotten heaven.
  • There is not a nail to hang a picture on, nor a shelf to receive the bust of a hero or a saint.
  • In the course of three or four years, when the country became adapted to agriculture, they built themselves handsome houses, spending on them several thousands.
  • I speak understandingly on this subject, for I have made myself acquainted with it both theoretically and practically.
  • The owner of the axe, as he released his hold on it, said that it was the apple of his eye; but I returned it sharper than I received it.
  • On the 1st of April it rained and melted the ice, and in the early part of the day, which was very foggy, I heard a stray goose groping about over the pond and cackling as if lost, or like the spirit of the fog.
  • I had already bought the shanty of James Collins, an Irishman who worked on the Fitchburg Railroad, for boards.
  • At six I passed him and his family on the road.
  • I took down this dwelling the same morning, drawing the nails, and removed it to the pond-side by small cartloads, spreading the boards on the grass there to bleach and warp back again in the sun.
  • The sides were left shelving, and not stoned; but the sun having never shone on them, the sand still keeps its place.
  • But a man has no more to do with the style of architecture of his house than a tortoise with that of its shell: nor need the soldier be so idle as to try to paint the precise color of his virtue on his standard.
  • I have thus a tight shingled and plastered house, ten feet wide by fifteen long, and eight-feet posts, with a garret and a closet, a large window on each side, two trap doors, one door at the end, and a brick fireplace opposite.
  • Those conveniences which the student requires at Cambridge or elsewhere cost him or somebody else ten times as great a sacrifice of life as they would with proper management on both sides.
  • To my astonishment I was informed on leaving college that I had studied navigation!--why, if I had taken one turn down the harbor I should have known more about it.
  • I remember when wages were sixty cents a day for laborers on this very road.
  • I desire to speak impartially on this point, and as one not interested in the success or failure of the present economical and social arrangements.
  • Mr. Balcom, a promising young architect, designs it on the back of his Vitruvius, with hard pencil and ruler, and the job is let out to Dobson & Sons, stonecutters.
  • When the thirty centuries begin to look down on it, mankind begin to look up at it.
  • It was fit that I should live on rice, mainly, who love so well the philosophy of India.
  • I have made a satisfactory dinner, satisfactory on several accounts, simply off a dish of purslane (Portulaca oleracea) which I gathered in my cornfield, boiled and salted.
  • I give the Latin on account of the savoriness of the trivial name.
  • Bread I at first made of pure Indian meal and salt, genuine hoe-cakes, which I baked before my fire out of doors on a shingle or the end of a stick of timber sawed off in building my house; but it was wont to get smoked and to have a piny flavor.
  • Every New Englander might easily raise all his own breadstuffs in this land of rye and Indian corn, and not depend on distant and fluctuating markets for them.
  • None is so poor that he need sit on a pumpkin.
  • On the fourth morning, the high priest, by rubbing dry wood together, produces new fire in the public square, from whence every habitation in the town is supplied with the new and pure flame.
  • I have tried trade but I found that it would take ten years to get under way in that, and that then I should probably be on my way to the devil.
  • Being superior to physical suffering, it sometimes chanced that they were superior to any consolation which the missionaries could offer; and the law to do as you would be done by fell with less persuasiveness on the ears of those who, for their part, did not care how they were done by, who loved their enemies after a new fashion, and came very near freely forgiving them all they did.
  • I have thus surveyed the country on every side within a dozen miles of where I live.
  • The nearest that I came to actual possession was when I bought the Hollowell place, and had begun to sort my seeds, and collected materials with which to make a wheelbarrow to carry it on or off with; but before the owner gave me a deed of it, his wife--every man has such a wife--changed her mind and wished to keep it, and he offered me ten dollars to release him.
  • All that I could say, then, with respect to farming on a large scale--I have always cultivated a garden--was, that I had had my seeds ready.
  • To my imagination it retained throughout the day more or less of this auroral character, reminding me of a certain house on a mountain which I had visited a year before.
  • This frame, so slightly clad, was a sort of crystallization around me, and reacted on the builder.
  • The very dew seemed to hang upon the trees later into the day than usual, as on the sides of mountains.
  • They say that characters were engraven on the bathing tub of King Tchingthang to this effect: "Renew thyself completely each day; do it again, and again, and forever again."
  • I say, let your affairs be as two or three, and not a hundred or a thousand; instead of a million count half a dozen, and keep your accounts on your thumb-nail.
  • We do not ride on the railroad; it rides upon us.
  • The rails are laid on them, and they are covered with sand, and the cars run smoothly over them.
  • And every few years a new lot is laid down and run over; so that, if some have the pleasure of riding on a rail, others have the misfortune to be ridden upon.
  • "Pray tell me anything new that has happened to a man anywhere on this globe"--and he reads it over his coffee and rolls, that a man has had his eyes gouged out this morning on the Wachito River; never dreaming the while that he lives in the dark unfathomed mammoth cave of this world, and has but the rudiment of an eye himself.
  • If we read of one man robbed, or murdered, or killed by accident, or one house burned, or one vessel wrecked, or one steamboat blown up, or one cow run over on the Western Railroad, or one mad dog killed, or one lot of grasshoppers in the winter--we never need read of another.
  • Let us spend one day as deliberately as Nature, and not be thrown off the track by every nutshell and mosquito's wing that falls on the rails.
  • No dust has settled on that robe; no time has elapsed since that divinity was revealed.
  • I kept Homer's Iliad on my table through the summer, though I looked at his page only now and then.
  • They had not learned the nobler dialects of Greece and Rome, but the very materials on which they were written were waste paper to them, and they prized instead a cheap contemporary literature.
  • The astronomers forever comment on and observe them.
  • It may be translated into every language, and not only be read but actually breathed from all human lips;--not be represented on canvas or in marble only, but be carved out of the breath of life itself.
  • Books, the oldest and the best, stand naturally and rightfully on the shelves of every cottage.
  • Their authors are a natural and irresistible aristocracy in every society, and, more than kings or emperors, exert an influence on mankind.
  • We spend more on almost any article of bodily aliment or ailment than on our mental aliment.
  • It can spend money enough on such things as farmers and traders value, but it is thought Utopian to propose spending money for things which more intelligent men know to be of far more worth.
  • Read your fate, see what is before you, and walk on into futurity.
  • As the sparrow had its trill, sitting on the hickory before my door, so had I my chuckle or suppressed warble which he might hear out of my nest.
  • When my floor was dirty, I rose early, and, setting all my furniture out of doors on the grass, bed and bedstead making but one budget, dashed water on the floor, and sprinkled white sand from the pond on it, and then with a broom scrubbed it clean and white; and by the time the villagers had broken their fast the morning sun had dried my house sufficiently to allow me to move in again, and my meditations were almost uninterupted.
  • It was pleasant to see my whole household effects out on the grass, making a little pile like a gypsy's pack, and my three-legged table, from which I did not remove the books and pen and ink, standing amid the pines and hickories.
  • It was worth the while to see the sun shine on these things, and hear the free wind blow on them; so much more interesting most familiar objects look out of doors than in the house.
  • A bird sits on the next bough, life-everlasting grows under the table, and blackberry vines run round its legs; pine cones, chestnut burs, and strawberry leaves are strewn about.
  • My house was on the side of a hill, immediately on the edge of the larger wood, in the midst of a young forest of pitch pines and hickories, and half a dozen rods from the pond, to which a narrow footpath led down the hill.
  • Near the end of May, the sand cherry (Cerasus pumila) adorned the sides of the path with its delicate flowers arranged in umbels cylindrically about its short stems, which last, in the fall, weighed down with good-sized and handsome cherries, fell over in wreaths like rays on every side.
  • Nor is there any man so independent on his farm that he can say them nay.
  • If the snow lies deep, they strap on his snowshoes, and, with the giant plow, plow a furrow from the mountains to the seaboard, in which the cars, like a following drill-barrow, sprinkle all the restless men and floating merchandise in the country for seed.
  • Keep on your own track, then.
  • Here goes lumber from the Maine woods, which did not go out to sea in the last freshet, risen four dollars on the thousand because of what did go out or was split up; pine, spruce, cedar--first, second, third, and fourth qualities, so lately all of one quality, to wave over the bear, and moose, and caribou.
  • Here is a hogshead of molasses or of brandy directed to John Smith, Cuttingsville, Vermont, some trader among the Green Mountains, who imports for the farmers near his clearing, and now perchance stands over his bulkhead and thinks of the last arrivals on the coast, how they may affect the price for him, telling his customers this moment, as he has told them twenty times before this morning, that he expects some by the next train of prime quality.
  • A carload of drovers, too, in the midst, on a level with their droves now, their vocation gone, but still clinging to their useless sticks as their badge of office.
  • Sometimes, on Sundays, I heard the bells, the Lincoln, Acton, Bedford, or Concord bell, when the wind was favorable, a faint, sweet, and, as it were, natural melody, worth importing into the wilderness.
  • Regularly at half-past seven, in one part of the summer, after the evening train had gone by, the whip-poor-wills chanted their vespers for half an hour, sitting on a stump by my door, or upon the ridge-pole of the house.
  • To walk in a winter morning in a wood where these birds abounded, their native woods, and hear the wild cockerels crow on the trees, clear and shrill for miles over the resounding earth, drowning the feebler notes of other birds--think of it!
  • It would put nations on the alert.
  • Even the sailor on the Atlantic and Pacific is awakened by his voice; but its shrill sound never roused me from my slumbers.
  • The bullfrogs trump to usher in the night, and the note of the whip-poor-will is borne on the rippling wind from over the water.
  • I have my horizon bounded by woods all to myself; a distant view of the railroad where it touches the pond on the one hand, and of the fence which skirts the woodland road on the other.
  • But for the most part it is as solitary where I live as on the prairies.
  • If it should continue so long as to cause the seeds to rot in the ground and destroy the potatoes in the low lands, it would still be good for the grass on the uplands, and, being good for the grass, it would be good for me.
  • I one evening overtook one of my townsmen, who has accumulated what is called "a handsome property"--though I never got a fair view of it--on the Walden road, driving a pair of cattle to market, who inquired of me how I could bring my mind to give up so many of the comforts of life.
  • They are everywhere, above us, on our left, on our right; they environ us on all sides.
  • I may be either the driftwood in the stream, or Indra in the sky looking down on it.
  • I may be affected by a theatrical exhibition; on the other hand, I may not be affected by an actual event which appears to concern me much more.
  • We have had to agree on a certain set of rules, called etiquette and politeness, to make this frequent meeting tolerable and that we need not come to open war.
  • An elderly dame, too, dwells in my neighborhood, invisible to most persons, in whose odorous herb garden I love to stroll sometimes, gathering simples and listening to her fables; for she has a genius of unequalled fertility, and her memory runs back farther than mythology, and she can tell me the original of every fable, and on what fact every one is founded, for the incidents occurred when she was young.
  • I have found it a singular luxury to talk across the pond to a companion on the opposite side.
  • My "best" room, however, my withdrawing room, always ready for company, on whose carpet the sun rarely fell, was the pine wood behind my house.
  • You need not rest your reputation on the dinners you give.
  • When the night arrived, to quote their own words--He laid us on the bed with himself and his wife, they at the one end and we at the other, it being only planks laid a foot from the ground and a thin mat upon them.
  • But fewer came to see me on trivial business.
  • Beside, there were wafted to me evidences of unexplored and uncultivated continents on the other side.
  • Such an exuberance of animal spirits had he that he sometimes tumbled down and rolled on the ground with laughter at anything which made him think and tickled him.
  • In the winter he had a fire by which at noon he warmed his coffee in a kettle; and as he sat on a log to eat his dinner the chickadees would sometimes come round and alight on his arm and peck at the potato in his fingers; and he said that he "liked to have the little fellers about him."
  • If you told him that such a one was coming, he did as if he thought that anything so grand would expect nothing of himself, but take all the responsibility on itself, and let him be forgotten still.
  • I loved to sound him on the various reforms of the day, and he never failed to look at them in the most simple and practical light.
  • If an ox were his property, and he wished to get needles and thread at the store, he thought it would be inconvenient and impossible soon to go on mortgaging some portion of the creature each time to that amount.
  • He would sometimes ask me first on such occasions, if I had made any improvement.
  • I have rarely met a fellowman on such promising ground--it was so simple and sincere and so true all that he said.
  • Men of almost every degree of wit called on me in the migrating season.
  • It is one of the oldest scenes stamped on my memory.
  • It was the only open and cultivated field for a great distance on either side of the road, so they made the most of it; and sometimes the man in the field heard more of travellers' gossip and comment than was meant for his ear: "Beans so late! peas so late!"--for I continued to plant when others had begun to hoe--the ministerial husbandman had not suspected it.
  • When I paused to lean on my hoe, these sounds and sights I heard and saw anywhere in the row, a part of the inexhaustible entertainment which the country offers.
  • And when the sound died quite away, and the hum had ceased, and the most favorable breezes told no tale, I knew that they had got the last drone of them all safely into the Middlesex hive, and that now their minds were bent on the honey with which it was smeared.
  • A long war, not with cranes, but with weeds, those Trojans who had sun and rain and dews on their side.
  • It was on the whole a rare amusement, which, continued too long, might have become a dissipation.
  • But why should not the New Englander try new adventures, and not lay so much stress on his grain, his potato and grass crop, and his orchards--raise other crops than these?
  • We are wont to forget that the sun looks on our cultivated fields and on the prairies and forests without distinction.
  • The village appeared to me a great news room; and on one side, to support it, as once at Redding & Company's on State Street, they kept nuts and raisins, or salt and meal and other groceries.
  • I hardly ever failed, when I rambled through the village, to see a row of such worthies, either sitting on a ladder sunning themselves, with their bodies inclined forward and their eyes glancing along the line this way and that, from time to time, with a voluptuous expression, or else leaning against a barn with their hands in their pockets, like caryatides, as if to prop it up.
  • Signs were hung out on all sides to allure him; some to catch him by the appetite, as the tavern and victualling cellar; some by the fancy, as the dry goods store and the jeweller's; and others by the hair or the feet or the skirts, as the barber, the shoemaker, or the tailor.
  • For the most part I escaped wonderfully from these dangers, either by proceeding at once boldly and without deliberation to the goal, as is recommended to those who run the gauntlet, or by keeping my thoughts on high things, like Orpheus, who, "loudly singing the praises of the gods to his lyre, drowned the voices of the Sirens, and kept out of danger."
  • However, I was released the next day, obtained my mended shoe, and returned to the woods in season to get my dinner of huckleberries on Fair Haven Hill.
  • Once in a while we sat together on the pond, he at one end of the boat, and I at the other; but not many words passed between us, for he had grown deaf in his later years, but he occasionally hummed a psalm, which harmonized well enough with my philosophy.
  • The surrounding hills rise abruptly from the water to the height of forty to eighty feet, though on the southeast and east they attain to about one hundred and one hundred and fifty feet respectively, within a quarter and a third of a mile.
  • The first depends more on the light, and follows the sky.
  • The shore is composed of a belt of smooth rounded white stones like paving-stones, excepting one or two short sand beaches, and is so steep that in many places a single leap will carry you into water over your head; and were it not for its remarkable transparency, that would be the last to be seen of its bottom till it rose on the opposite side.
  • Perhaps on that spring morning when Adam and Eve were driven out of Eden Walden Pond was already in existence, and even then breaking up in a gentle spring rain accompanied with mist and a southerly wind, and covered with myriads of ducks and geese, which had not heard of the fall, when still such pure lakes sufficed them.
  • This is particularly distinct to one standing on the middle of the pond in winter, just after a light snow has fallen, appearing as a clear undulating white line, unobscured by weeds and twigs, and very obvious a quarter of a mile off in many places where in summer it is hardly distinguishable close at hand.
  • These are the lips of the lake, on which no beard grows.
  • Moreover, in summer, Walden never becomes so warm as most water which is exposed to the sun, on account of its depth.
  • I have sometimes disturbed a fish hawk sitting on a white pine over the water; but I doubt if it is ever profaned by the wind of a gull, like Fair Haven.
  • There is no rawness nor imperfection in its edge there, as where the axe has cleared a part, or a cultivated field abuts on it.
  • The trees have ample room to expand on the water side, and each sends forth its most vigorous branch in that direction.
  • Standing on the smooth sandy beach at the east end of the pond, in a calm September afternoon, when a slight haze makes the opposite shore-line indistinct, I have seen whence came the expression, "the glassy surface of a lake."
  • Nothing so fair, so pure, and at the same time so large, as a lake, perchance, lies on the surface of the earth.
  • It is a mirror which no stone can crack, whose quicksilver will never wear off, whose gilding Nature continually repairs; no storms, no dust, can dim its surface ever fresh;--a mirror in which all impurity presented to it sinks, swept and dusted by the sun's hazy brush--this the light dust-cloth--which retains no breath that is breathed on it, but sends its own to float as clouds high above its surface, and be reflected in its bosom still.
  • On land only the grass and trees wave, but the water itself is rippled by the wind.
  • It is remarkable that we can look down on its surface.
  • In such transparent and seemingly bottomless water, reflecting the clouds, I seemed to be floating through the air as in a balloon, and their swimming impressed me as a kind of flight or hovering, as if they were a compact flock of birds passing just beneath my level on the right or left, their fins, like sails, set all around them.
  • He came here a-fishing, and used an old log canoe which he found on the shore.
  • When I first paddled a boat on Walden, it was completely surrounded by thick and lofty pine and oak woods, and in some of its coves grape-vines had run over the trees next the water and formed bowers under which a boat could pass.
  • The hills which form its shores are so steep, and the woods on them were then so high, that, as you looked down from the west end, it had the appearance of an amphitheatre for some land of sylvan spectacle.
  • That devilish Iron Horse, whose ear-rending neigh is heard throughout the town, has muddied the Boiling Spring with his foot, and he it is that has browsed off all the woods on Walden shore, that Trojan horse, with a thousand men in his belly, introduced by mercenary Greeks!
  • Though the woodchoppers have laid bare first this shore and then that, and the Irish have built their sties by it, and the railroad has infringed on its border, and the ice-men have skimmed it once, it is itself unchanged, the same water which my youthful eyes fell on; all the change is in me.
  • I have said that Walden has no visible inlet nor outlet, but it is on the one hand distantly and indirectly related to Flint's Pond, which is more elevated, by a chain of small ponds coming from that quarter, and on the other directly and manifestly to Concord River, which is lower, by a similar chain of ponds through which in some other geological period it may have flowed, and by a little digging, which God forbid, it can be made to flow thither again.
  • It was worth the while, if only to feel the wind blow on your cheek freely, and see the waves run, and remember the life of mariners.
  • These wash back and forth in shallow water on a sandy bottom, and are sometimes cast on the shore.
  • He sawed a channel in the ice toward the shore, and hauled it over and along and out on to the ice with oxen; but, before he had gone far in his work, he was surprised to find that it was wrong end upward, with the stumps of the branches pointing down, and the small end firmly fastened in the sandy bottom.
  • There were marks of an axe and of woodpeckers on the butt.
  • Several pretty large logs may still be seen lying on the bottom, where, owing to the undulation of the surface, they look like huge water snakes in motion.
  • White Pond and Walden are great crystals on the surface of the earth, Lakes of Light.
  • I should be glad if all the meadows on the earth were left in a wild state, if that were the consequence of men's beginning to redeem themselves.
  • I like sometimes to take rank hold on life and spend my day more as the animals do.
  • The traveller on the prairie is naturally a hunter, on the head waters of the Missouri and Columbia a trapper, and at the Falls of St. Mary a fisherman.
  • No wonder, then, that he did not oftener stay to play on the common.
  • In the music of the harp which trembles round the world it is the insisting on this which thrills us.
  • Though the youth at last grows indifferent, the laws of the universe are not indifferent, but are forever on the side of the most sensitive.
  • Many an irksome noise, go a long way off, is heard as music, a proud, sweet satire on the meanness of our lives.
  • An unclean person is universally a slothful one, one who sits by a stove, whom the sun shines on prostrate, who reposes without being fatigued.
  • John Farmer sat at his door one September evening, after a hard day's work, his mind still running on his labor more or less.
  • He had not attended to the train of his thoughts long when he heard some one playing on a flute, and that sound harmonized with his mood.
  • I have water from the spring, and a loaf of brown bread on the shelf.--Hark!
  • It comes on apace; my sumachs and sweetbriers tremble.--Eh, Mr. Poet, is it you?
  • At length, as I leaned with my elbow on the bench one day, it ran up my clothes, and along my sleeve, and round and round the paper which held my dinner, while I kept the latter close, and dodged and played at bopeep with it; and when at last I held still a piece of cheese between my thumb and finger, it came and nibbled it, sitting in my hand, and afterward cleaned its face and paws, like a fly, and walked away.
  • You may even tread on them, or have your eyes on them for a minute, without discovering them.
  • So perfect is this instinct, that once, when I had laid them on the leaves again, and one accidentally fell on its side, it was found with the rest in exactly the same position ten minutes afterward.
  • It is said that when hatched by a hen they will directly disperse on some alarm, and so are lost, for they never hear the mother's call which gathers them again.
  • Having once got hold they never let go, but struggled and wrestled and rolled on the chips incessantly.
  • It was the only battle which I have ever witnessed, the only battle-field I ever trod while the battle was raging; internecine war; the red republicans on the one hand, and the black imperialists on the other.
  • Two killed on the patriots' side, and Luther Blanchard wounded!
  • I took up the chip on which the three I have particularly described were struggling, carried it into my house, and placed it under a tumbler on my window-sill, in order to see the issue.
  • At rumor of his arrival all the Mill-dam sportsmen are on the alert, in gigs and on foot, two by two and three by three, with patent rifles and conical balls and spy-glasses.
  • Some station themselves on this side of the pond, some on that, for the poor bird cannot be omnipresent; if he dive here he must come up there.
  • But I was more than a match for him on the surface.
  • It was a pretty game, played on the smooth surface of the pond, a man against a loon.
  • Sometimes he would come up unexpectedly on the opposite side of me, having apparently passed directly under the boat.
  • Yet he appeared to know his course as surely under water as on the surface, and swam much faster there.
  • I found that it was as well for me to rest on my oars and wait his reappearing as to endeavor to calculate where he would rise; for again and again, when I was straining my eyes over the surface one way, I would suddenly be startled by his unearthly laugh behind me.
  • It was very exciting at that season to roam the then boundless chestnut woods of Lincoln--they now sleep their long sleep under the railroad--with a bag on my shoulder, and a stick to open burs with in my hand, for I did not always wait for the frost, amid the rustling of leaves and the loud reproofs of the red squirrels and the jays, whose half-consumed nuts I sometimes stole, for the burs which they had selected were sure to contain sound ones.
  • The wasps came by thousands to my lodge in October, as to winter quarters, and settled on my windows within and on the walls overhead, sometimes deterring visitors from entering.
  • The mortar on them was fifty years old, and was said to be still growing harder; but this is one of those sayings which men love to repeat whether they are true or not.
  • Many of the villages of Mesopotamia are built of second-hand bricks of a very good quality, obtained from the ruins of Babylon, and the cement on them is older and probably harder still.
  • I had in my cellar a firkin of potatoes, about two quarts of peas with the weevil in them, and on my shelf a little rice, a jug of molasses, and of rye and Indian meal a peck each.
  • There are many furrows in the sand where some creature has travelled about and doubled on its tracks; and, for wrecks, it is strewn with the cases of caddis-worms made of minute grains of white quartz.
  • My employment out of doors now was to collect the dead wood in the forest, bringing it in my hands or on my shoulders, or sometimes trailing a dead pine tree under each arm to my shed.
  • In the course of the summer I had discovered a raft of pitch pine logs with the bark on, pinned together by the Irish when the railroad was built.
  • This I hauled up partly on the shore.
  • I amused myself one winter day with sliding this piecemeal across the pond, nearly half a mile, skating behind with one end of a log fifteen feet long on my shoulder, and the other on the ice; or I tied several logs together with a birch withe, and then, with a longer birch or alder which had a hook at the end, dragged them across.
  • Mechanics and tradesmen who come in person to the forest on no other errand, are sure to attend the wood auction, and even pay a high price for the privilege of gleaning after the woodchopper.
  • I had an old axe which nobody claimed, with which by spells in winter days, on the sunny side of the house, I played about the stumps which I had got out of my bean-field.
  • As my driver prophesied when I was plowing, they warmed me twice--once while I was splitting them, and again when they were on the fire, so that no fuel could give out more heat.
  • Some of my friends spoke as if I was coming to the woods on purpose to freeze myself.
  • In some places, within my own remembrance, the pines would scrape both sides of a chaise at once, and women and children who were compelled to go this way to Lincoln alone and on foot did it with fear, and often ran a good part of the distance.
  • Where now firm open fields stretch from the village to the woods, it then ran through a maple swamp on a foundation of logs, the remnants of which, doubtless, still underlie the present dusty highway, from the Stratton, now the Alms-House Farm, to Brister's Hill.
  • At length, in the war of 1812, her dwelling was set on fire by English soldiers, prisoners on parole, when she was away, and her cat and dog and hens were all burned up together.
  • Not long since I read his epitaph in the old Lincoln burying-ground, a little on one side, near the unmarked graves of some British grenadiers who fell in the retreat from Concord--where he is styled "Sippio Brister"--Scipio Africanus he had some title to be called--"a man of color," as if he were discolored.
  • Farther down the hill, on the left, on the old road in the woods, are marks of some homestead of the Stratton family; whose orchard once covered all the slope of Brister's Hill, but was long since killed out by pitch pines, excepting a few stumps, whose old roots furnish still the wild stocks of many a thrifty village tree.
  • It was set on fire by mischievous boys, one Election night, if I do not mistake.
  • I had just sunk my head on this when the bells rung fire, and in hot haste the engines rolled that way, led by a straggling troop of men and boys, and I among the foremost, for I had leaped the brook.
  • At first we thought to throw a frog-pond on to it; but concluded to let it burn, it was so far gone and so worthless.
  • It chanced that I walked that way across the fields the following night, about the same hour, and hearing a low moaning at this spot, I drew near in the dark, and discovered the only survivor of the family that I know, the heir of both its virtues and its vices, who alone was interested in this burning, lying on his stomach and looking over the cellar wall at the still smouldering cinders beneath, muttering to himself, as is his wont.
  • Once more, on the left, where are seen the well and lilac bushes by the wall, in the now open field, lived Nutting and Le Grosse.
  • I had read of the potter's clay and wheel in Scripture, but it had never occurred to me that the pots we use were not such as had come down unbroken from those days, or grown on trees like gourds somewhere, and I was pleased to hear that so fictile an art was ever practiced in my neighborhood.
  • His pipe lay broken on the hearth.
  • I am not aware that any man has ever built on the spot which I occupy.
  • Deliver me from a city built on the site of a more ancient city, whose materials are ruins, whose gardens cemeteries.
  • One afternoon I amused myself by watching a barred owl (Strix nebulosa) sitting on one of the lower dead limbs of a white pine, close to the trunk, in broad daylight, I standing within a rod of him.
  • Sometimes, notwithstanding the snow, when I returned from my walk at evening I crossed the deep tracks of a woodchopper leading from my door, and found his pile of whittlings on the hearth, and my house filled with the odor of his pipe.
  • We talked of rude and simple times, when men sat about large fires in cold, bracing weather, with clear heads; and when other dessert failed, we tried our teeth on many a nut which wise squirrels have long since abandoned, for those which have the thickest shells are commonly empty.
  • We waded so gently and reverently, or we pulled together so smoothly, that the fishes of thought were not scared from the stream, nor feared any angler on the bank, but came and went grandly, like the clouds which float through the western sky, and the mother-o'-pearl flocks which sometimes form and dissolve there.
  • They seemed to me to be rudimental, burrowing men, still standing on their defence, awaiting their transformation.
  • They were so familiar that at length one alighted on an armful of wood which I was carrying in, and pecked at the sticks without fear.
  • Whichever side you walk in the woods the partridge bursts away on whirring wings, jarring the snow from the dry leaves and twigs on high, which comes sifting down in the sunbeams like golden dust, for this brave bird is not to be scared by winter.
  • It is frequently covered up by drifts, and, it is said, "sometimes plunges from on wing into the soft snow, where it remains concealed for a day or two."
  • It is Nature's own bird which lives on buds and diet drink.
  • A hunter told me that he once saw a fox pursued by hounds burst out on to Walden when the ice was covered with shallow puddles, run part way across, and then return to the same shore.
  • Late in the afternoon, as he was resting in the thick woods south of Walden, he heard the voice of the hounds far over toward Fair Haven still pursuing the fox; and on they came, their hounding cry which made all the woods ring sounding nearer and nearer, now from Well Meadow, now from the Baker Farm.
  • Still on they came, and now the near woods resounded through all their aisles with their demoniac cry.
  • The hunter who told me this could remember one Sam Nutting, who used to hunt bears on Fair Haven Ledges, and exchange their skins for rum in Concord village; who told him, even, that he had seen a moose there.
  • I remember well one gaunt Nimrod who would catch up a leaf by the roadside and play a strain on it wilder and more melodious, if my memory serves me, than any hunting-horn.
  • It looked as if Nature no longer contained the breed of nobler bloods, but stood on her last toes.
  • The snow lying deep on the earth dotted with young pines, and the very slope of the hill on which my house is placed, seemed to say, Forward!
  • Would it not react on the minds of men?
  • But it is easiest, as they who work on the highways know, to find the hollows by the puddles after a shower.
  • Every harbor on the sea-coast, also, has its bar at its entrance.
  • In order to see how nearly I could guess, with this experience, at the deepest point in a pond, by observing the outlines of a surface and the character of its shores alone, I made a plan of White Pond, which contains about forty-one acres, and, like this, has no island in it, nor any visible inlet or outlet; and as the line of greatest breadth fell very near the line of least breadth, where two opposite capes approached each other and two opposite bays receded, I ventured to mark a point a short distance from the latter line, but still on the line of greatest length, as the deepest.
  • But a low and smooth shore proves him shallow on that side.
  • It is true, we are such poor navigators that our thoughts, for the most part, stand off and on upon a harborless coast, are conversant only with the bights of the bays of poesy, or steer for the public ports of entry, and go into the dry docks of science, where they merely refit for this world, and no natural currents concur to individualize them.
  • They also showed me in another place what they thought was a "leach-hole," through which the pond leaked out under a hill into a neighboring meadow, pushing me out on a cake of ice to see it.
  • It is well known that a level cannot be used on ice.
  • At one rod from the shore its greatest fluctuation, when observed by means of a level on land directed toward a graduated staff on the ice, was three quarters of an inch, though the ice appeared firmly attached to the shore.
  • When two legs of my level were on the shore and the third on the ice, and the sights were directed over the latter, a rise or fall of the ice of an almost infinitesimal amount made a difference of several feet on a tree across the pond.
  • Sometimes, also, when the ice was covered with shallow puddles, I saw a double shadow of myself, one standing on the head of the other, one on the ice, the other on the trees or hillside.
  • Deep ruts and "cradle-holes" were worn in the ice, as on terra firma, by the passage of the sleds over the same track, and the horses invariably ate their oats out of cakes of ice hollowed out like buckets.
  • But such was not the effect on Walden that year, for she had soon got a thick new garment to take the place of the old.
  • This pond has no stream passing through it to melt or wear away the ice.
  • It commonly opens about the first of April, a week or ten days later than Flint's Pond and Fair Haven, beginning to melt on the north side and in the shallower parts where it began to freeze.
  • A thermometer thrust into the middle of Walden on the 6th of March, 1847, stood at 32º, or freezing point; near the shore at 33º; in the middle of Flint's Pond, the same day, at 32º; at a dozen rods from the shore, in shallow water, under ice a foot thick, at 36º.
  • So, also, every one who has waded about the shores of the pond in summer must have perceived how much warmer the water is close to the shore, where only three or four inches deep, than a little distance out, and on the surface where it is deep, than near the bottom.
  • The phenomena of the year take place every day in a pond on a small scale.
  • One pleasant morning after a cold night, February 24th, 1850, having gone to Flint's Pond to spend the day, I noticed with surprise, that when I struck the ice with the head of my axe, it resounded like a gong for many rods around, or as if I had struck on a tight drum-head.
  • On the 13th of March, after I had heard the bluebird, song sparrow, and red-wing, the ice was still nearly a foot thick.
  • In 1845 Walden was first completely open on the 1st of April; in '46, the 25th of March; in '47, the 8th of April; in '51, the 28th of March; in '52, the 18th of April; in '53, the 23d of March; in '54, about the 7th of April.
  • Not seeing any ducks, he hid his boat on the north or back side of an island in the pond, and then concealed himself in the bushes on the south side, to await them.
  • At length the sun's rays have attained the right angle, and warm winds blow up mist and rain and melt the snowbanks, and the sun, dispersing the mist, smiles on a checkered landscape of russet and white smoking with incense, through which the traveller picks his way from islet to islet, cheered by the music of a thousand tinkling rills and rivulets whose veins are filled with the blood of winter which they are bearing off.
  • As it flows it takes the forms of sappy leaves or vines, making heaps of pulpy sprays a foot or more in depth, and resembling, as you look down on them, the laciniated, lobed, and imbricated thalluses of some lichens; or you are reminded of coral, of leopard's paws or birds' feet, of brains or lungs or bowels, and excrements of all kinds.
  • The whole bank, which is from twenty to forty feet high, is sometimes overlaid with a mass of this kind of foliage, or sandy rupture, for a quarter of a mile on one or both sides, the produce of one spring day.
  • Even ice begins with delicate crystal leaves, as if it had flowed into moulds which the fronds of waterplants have impressed on the watery mirror.
  • The ear may be regarded, fancifully, as a lichen, Umbilicaria, on the side of the head, with its lobe or drop.
  • It convinces me that Earth is still in her swaddling-clothes, and stretches forth baby fingers on every side.
  • I hear a song sparrow singing from the bushes on the shore,--olit, olit, olit,--chip, chip, chip, che char,--che wiss, wiss, wiss.
  • It is glorious to behold this ribbon of water sparkling in the sun, the bare face of the pond full of glee and youth, as if it spoke the joy of the fishes within it, and of the sands on its shore.
  • But when I stood on the shore they at once rose up with a great flapping of wings at the signal of their commander, and when they had got into rank circled about over my head, twenty-nine of them, and then steered straight to Canada, with a regular honk from the leader at intervals, trusting to break their fast in muddier pools.
  • So our prospects brighten on the influx of better thoughts.
  • Punishment and fear were not; nor were threatening words read On suspended brass; nor did the suppliant crowd fear The words of their judge; but were safe without an avenger.
  • Early in May, the oaks, hickories, maples, and other trees, just putting out amidst the pine woods around the pond, imparted a brightness like sunshine to the landscape, especially in cloudy days, as if the sun were breaking through mists and shining faintly on the hillsides here and there.
  • On the third or fourth of May I saw a loon in the pond, and during the first week of the month I heard the whip-poor-will, the brown thrasher, the veery, the wood pewee, the chewink, and other birds.
  • The phÅ“be had already come once more and looked in at my door and window, to see if my house was cavern-like enough for her, sustaining herself on humming wings with clinched talons, as if she held by the air, while she surveyed the premises.
  • And so the seasons went rolling on into summer, as one rambles into higher and higher grass.
  • Is not our own interior white on the chart? black though it may prove, like the coast, when discovered.
  • England and France, Spain and Portugal, Gold Coast and Slave Coast, all front on this private sea; but no bark from them has ventured out of sight of land, though it is without doubt the direct way to India.
  • Extra vagance! it depends on how you are yarded.
  • I do not suppose that I have attained to obscurity, but I should be proud if no more fatal fault were found with my pages on this score than was found with the Walden ice.
  • We will not be shipwrecked on a vain reality.
  • Before he had found a stock in all respects suitable the city of Kouroo was a hoary ruin, and he sat on one of its mounds to peel the stick.
  • Do not seek so anxiously to be developed, to subject yourself to many influences to be played on; it is all dissipation.
  • We are often reminded that if there were bestowed on us the wealth of Croesus, our aims must still be the same, and our means essentially the same.
  • No man loses ever on a lower level by magnanimity on a higher.
  • Do not depend on the putty.
  • Every nail driven should be as another rivet in the machine of the universe, you carrying on the work.
  • I called on the king, but he made me wait in his hall, and conducted like a man incapacitated for hospitality.
  • I should have done better had I called on him.
  • This generation inclines a little to congratulate itself on being the last of an illustrious line; and in Boston and London and Paris and Rome, thinking of its long descent, it speaks of its progress in art and science and literature with satisfaction.
  • We are acquainted with a mere pellicle of the globe on which we live.
  • But a government in which the majority rule in all cases cannot be based on justice, even as far as men understand it.
  • This people must cease to hold slaves, and to make war on Mexico, though it cost them their existence as a people.
  • Why does it not encourage its citizens to be on the alert to point out its faults, and do better than it would have them?
  • I think that it is enough if they have God on their side, without waiting for that other one.
  • For my own part, I should not like to think that I ever rely on the protection of the State.
  • If I had known how to name them, I should then have signed off in detail from all the societies which I never signed on to; but I did not know where to find a complete list.
  • I know of those whose serene and wise speculations on this theme would soon reveal the limits of his mind's range and hospitality.
  • Anna Pavlovna Scherer on the contrary, despite her forty years, overflowed with animation and impulsiveness.
  • In the midst of a conversation on political matters Anna Pavlovna burst out:
  • It shall be on your family's behalf that I'll start my apprenticeship as old maid.
  • The little princess went round the table with quick, short, swaying steps, her workbag on her arm, and gaily spreading out her dress sat down on a sofa near the silver samovar, as if all she was doing was a pleasure to herself and to all around her.
  • "Mind, Annette, I hope you have not played a wicked trick on me," she added, turning to her hostess.
  • On his way to the aunt he bowed to the little princess with a pleased smile, as to an intimate acquaintance.
  • Seeing the self-confident and refined expression on the faces of those present he was always expecting to hear something very profound.
  • The spindles hummed steadily and ceaselessly on all sides.
  • "How evidently he belongs to the best society," said she to a third; and the vicomte was served up to the company in the choicest and most advantageous style, like a well-garnished joint of roast beef on a hot dish.
  • Helene was so lovely that not only did she not show any trace of coquetry, but on the contrary she even appeared shy of her unquestionable and all too victorious beauty.
  • The princess rested her bare round arm on a little table and considered a reply unnecessary.
  • From time to time she smoothed the folds of her dress, and whenever the story produced an effect she glanced at Anna Pavlovna, at once adopted just the expression she saw on the maid of honor's face, and again relapsed into her radiant smile.
  • Now then, what are you thinking of? she went on, turning to Prince Hippolyte.
  • "Charming!" whispered the little princess, sticking the needle into her work as if to testify that the interest and fascination of the story prevented her from going on with it.
  • Prince Vasili knew this, and having once realized that if he asked on behalf of all who begged of him, he would soon be unable to ask for himself, he became chary of using his influence.
  • Here is my hand on it.
  • "And what do you think of this latest comedy, the coronation at Milan?" asked Anna Pavlovna, "and of the comedy of the people of Genoa and Lucca laying their petitions before Monsieur Buonaparte, and Monsieur Buonaparte sitting on a throne and granting the petitions of the nations?
  • "The execution of the Duc d'Enghien," declared Monsieur Pierre, "was a political necessity, and it seems to me that Napoleon showed greatness of soul by not fearing to take on himself the whole responsibility of that deed."
  • But when she saw that Pierre's sacrilegious words had not exasperated the vicomte, and had convinced herself that it was impossible to stop him, she rallied her forces and joined the vicomte in a vigorous attack on the orator.
  • She said, 'Girl,' to the maid, 'put on a livery, get up behind the carriage, and come with me while I make some calls.'
  • Here he could contain himself no longer and went on, between gasps of laughter: "And the whole world knew...."
  • Prince Andrew had gone out into the hall, and, turning his shoulders to the footman who was helping him on with his cloak, listened indifferently to his wife's chatter with Prince Hippolyte who had also come into the hall.
  • "I rely on you, my dear," said Anna Pavlovna, also in a low tone.
  • Pierre reaching the house first went into Prince Andrew's study like one quite at home, and from habit immediately lay down on the sofa, took from the shelf the first book that came to his hand (it was Caesar's Commentaries), and resting on his elbow, began reading it in the middle.
  • Well, have you at last decided on anything?
  • Pierre sat up on the sofa, with his legs tucked under him.
  • But you must decide on something!
  • "If no one fought except on his own conviction, there would be no wars," he said.
  • But she went on hurriedly:
  • "Mon Dieu, mon Dieu!" she muttered, and lifting her dress with one hand she went up to her husband and kissed him on the forehead.
  • It will all be wasted on trifles.
  • But the nearer he drew to the house the more he felt the impossibility of going to sleep on such a night.
  • A footman, thinking no one saw him, was drinking on the sly what was left in the glasses.
  • "I bet a hundred on Stevens!" shouted one.
  • "Mind, no holding on!" cried another.
  • "I bet on Dolokhov!" cried a third.
  • Anatole kept on refilling Pierre's glass while explaining that Dolokhov was betting with Stevens, an English naval officer, that he would drink a bottle of rum sitting on the outer ledge of the third floor window with his legs hanging out.
  • "Go on, you must drink it all," said Anatole, giving Pierre the last glass, "or I won't let you go!"
  • The window frame which prevented anyone from sitting on the outer sill was being forced out by two footmen, who were evidently flurried and intimidated by the directions and shouts of the gentlemen around.
  • "Take it right out, or they'll think I'm holding on," said Dolokhov.
  • Fifty imperials... that I will drink a whole bottle of rum without taking it from my mouth, sitting outside the window on this spot" (he stooped and pointed to the sloping ledge outside the window) "and without holding on to anything.
  • "Wait!" cried Dolokhov, hammering with the bottle on the window sill to attract attention.
  • Anatole did not release him, and though he kept nodding to show that he understood, Anatole went on translating Dolokhov's words into English.
  • Placing the bottle on the window sill where he could reach it easily, Dolokhov climbed carefully and slowly through the window and lowered his legs.
  • Anatole brought two candles and placed them on the window sill, though it was already quite light.
  • Dolokhov turned round and, again holding on with both hands, arranged himself on his seat.
  • The Englishman looked on sideways, pursing up his lips.
  • The man who had wished to stop the affair ran to a corner of the room and threw himself on a sofa with his face to the wall.
  • Suddenly Dolokhov made a backward movement with his spine, and his arm trembled nervously; this was sufficient to cause his whole body to slip as he sat on the sloping ledge.
  • He looked up: Dolokhov was standing on the window sill, with a pale but radiant face.
  • Why, you go giddy even on a staircase, exclaimed several voices.
  • "Come on then," cried Pierre.
  • Prince Vasili kept the promise he had given to Princess Drubetskaya who had spoken to him on behalf of her only son Boris on the evening of Anna Pavlovna's soiree.
  • The Guards had already left Petersburg on the tenth of August, and her son, who had remained in Moscow for his equipment, was to join them on the march to Radzivilov.
  • On behalf of the whole family I beg you to come, mon cher!
  • The countess reflected a moment and took a pinch from a gold snuffbox with her husband's portrait on it.
  • The conversation was on the chief topic of the day: the illness of the wealthy and celebrated beau of Catherine's day, Count Bezukhov, and about his illegitimate son Pierre, the one who had behaved so improperly at Anna Pavlovna's reception.
  • And there was the bear swimming about with the policeman on his back!
  • I hear he has come on some inspection business, remarked the visitor.
  • The visitor, compelled to look on at this family scene, thought it necessary to take some part in it.
  • Dark hairs were already showing on his upper lip, and his whole face expressed impetuosity and enthusiasm.
  • Boris on the contrary at once found his footing, and related quietly and humorously how he had known that doll Mimi when she was still quite a young lady, before her nose was broken; how she had aged during the five years he had known her, and how her head had cracked right across the skull.
  • The little kitten, feasting her eyes on him, seemed ready at any moment to start her gambols again and display her kittenish nature.
  • What a pity you weren't at the Arkharovs' on Thursday.
  • "How plainly all these young people wear their hearts on their sleeves!" said Anna Mikhaylovna, pointing to Nicholas as he went out.
  • "It all depends on the bringing up," remarked the visitor.
  • Natasha checked her first impulse to run out to her, and remained in her hiding place, watching--as under an invisible cap--to see what went on in the world.
  • She grew confused, glanced round, and, seeing the doll she had thrown down on one of the tubs, picked it up.
  • She caught the young officer by his cuffs, and a look of solemnity and fear appeared on her flushed face.
  • Suddenly she jumped up onto a tub to be higher than he, embraced him so that both her slender bare arms clasped him above his neck, and, tossing back her hair, kissed him full on the lips.
  • Then she slipped down among the flowerpots on the other side of the tubs and stood, hanging her head.
  • "Thirteen, fourteen, fifteen, sixteen," she counted on her slender little fingers.
  • You are a Madame de Genlis and nothing more" (this nickname, bestowed on Vera by Nicholas, was considered very stinging), "and your greatest pleasure is to be unpleasant to people!
  • "My dear Boris," said the mother, drawing her hand from beneath her old mantle and laying it timidly and tenderly on her son's arm, "be affectionate and attentive to him.
  • Count Cyril Vladimirovich is your godfather after all, your future depends on him.
  • "My dear!" exclaimed his mother imploringly, again laying her hand on his arm as if that touch might soothe or rouse him.
  • Are you here on leave? he went on in his usual tone of indifference.
  • "On the contrary," replied the prince, who had plainly become depressed, "I shall be only too glad if you relieve me of that young man....
  • The two younger ones were embroidering: both were rosy and pretty and they differed only in that one had a little mole on her lip which made her much prettier.
  • The will will show that, my dear; our fate also depends on it.
  • He sat down by his wife, his elbows on his knees and his hands ruffling his gray hair.
  • When Anna Mikhaylovna returned from Count Bezukhov's the money, all in clean notes, was lying ready under a handkerchief on the countess' little table, and Anna Mikhaylovna noticed that something was agitating her.
  • "Annette, for heaven's sake don't refuse me," the countess began, with a blush that looked very strange on her thin, dignified, elderly face, and she took the money from under the handkerchief.
  • The count sat on the sofa between two guests who were smoking and talking.
  • "Well, my boy, you'll get along wherever you go--foot or horse--that I'll warrant," said Shinshin, patting him on the shoulder and taking his feet off the sofa.
  • Pierre had come just at dinnertime and was sitting awkwardly in the middle of the drawing room on the first chair he had come across, blocking the way for everyone.
  • Countess Apraksina... was heard on all sides.
  • "Well, you old sinner," she went on, turning to the count who was kissing her hand, "you're feeling dull in Moscow, I daresay?
  • His father lies on his deathbed and he amuses himself setting a policeman astride a bear!
  • At one end of the table sat the countess with Marya Dmitrievna on her right and Anna Mikhaylovna on her left, the other lady visitors were farther down.
  • Midway down the long table on one side sat the grownup young people: Vera beside Berg, and Pierre beside Boris; and on the other side, the children, tutors, and governesses.
  • Of the two soups he chose turtle with savory patties and went on to the game without omitting a single dish or one of the wines.
  • Sometimes that same look fell on Pierre, and that funny lively little girl's look made him inclined to laugh without knowing why.
  • After she had played a little air with variations on the harp, she joined the other young ladies in begging Natasha and Nicholas, who were noted for their musical talent, to sing something.
  • Natasha wept, sitting on the blue-striped feather bed and hugging her friend.
  • Yes, these verses Nicholas wrote himself and I copied some others, and she found them on my table and said she'd show them to Mamma, and that I was ungrateful, and that Mamma would never allow him to marry me, but that he'll marry Julie.
  • Natasha kissed her on the hair.
  • The little kitten brightened, its eyes shone, and it seemed ready to lift its tail, jump down on its soft paws, and begin playing with the ball of worsted as a kitten should.
  • As soon as the provocatively gay strains of Daniel Cooper (somewhat resembling those of a merry peasant dance) began to sound, all the doorways of the ballroom were suddenly filled by the domestic serfs--the men on one side and the women on the other--who with beaming faces had come to see their master making merry.
  • Everyone stood up respectfully when the Military Governor, having stayed about half an hour alone with the dying man, passed out, slightly acknowledging their bows and trying to escape as quickly as possible from the glances fixed on him by the doctors, clergy, and relatives of the family.
  • When the Military Governor had gone, Prince Vasili sat down all alone on a chair in the ballroom, crossing one leg high over the other, leaning his elbow on his knee and covering his face with his hand.
  • The second princess had just come from the sickroom with her eyes red from weeping and sat down beside Dr. Lorrain, who was sitting in a graceful pose under a portrait of Catherine, leaning his elbow on a table.
  • Prince Vasili said no more and his cheeks began to twitch nervously, now on one side, now on the other, giving his face an unpleasant expression which was never to be seen on it in a drawing room.
  • The princess, holding her little dog on her lap with her thin bony hands, looked attentively into Prince Vasili's eyes evidently resolved not to be the first to break silence, if she had to wait till morning.
  • "And then of course my family has also to be considered," Prince Vasili went on, testily pushing away a little table without looking at her.
  • Pausing for a moment, Pierre noticed several other men of the same kind hiding in the shadow of the house on both sides.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna, addressing a maid who was hurrying past with a decanter on a tray as "my dear" and "my sweet," asked about the princess' health and then led Pierre along a stone passage.
  • The first door on the left led into the princesses' apartments.
  • They were met by a deacon with a censer and by a servant who passed out on tiptoe without heeding them.
  • He was wearing his long coat with three stars on his breast.
  • Prince Vasili said something to Lorrain in passing and went through the door on tiptoe.
  • He could not walk well on tiptoe and his whole body jerked at each step.
  • The part of the room behind the columns, with a high silk-curtained mahogany bedstead on one side and on the other an immense case containing icons, was brightly illuminated with red light like a Russian church during evening service.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna, with a meek, sorrowful, and all-forgiving expression on her face, stood by the door near the strange lady.
  • On leaving the bed both Prince Vasili and the princess passed out by a back door, but returned to their places one after the other before the service was concluded.
  • Pierre paid no more attention to this occurrence than to the rest of what went on, having made up his mind once for all that what he saw happening around him that evening was in some way essential.
  • The chanting of the service ceased, and the voice of the priest was heard respectfully congratulating the dying man on having received the sacrament.
  • He lay with his head propped high on the pillows.
  • His hands were symmetrically placed on the green silk quilt, the palms downward.
  • "Wants to turn on the other side," whispered the servant, and got up to turn the count's heavy body toward the wall.
  • The sick man was turned on to his side with his face to the wall.
  • He looked inquiringly at his monitress and saw that she was again going on tiptoe to the reception room where they had left Prince Vasili and the eldest princess.
  • Dear princess, I beg and implore you, have some pity on him!
  • Though the latter held on tenaciously, her voice lost none of its honeyed firmness and softness.
  • Why do you remain silent when heaven knows who permits herself to interfere, making a scene on the very threshold of a dying man's room?
  • But Anna Mikhaylovna went forward a step or two to keep her hold on the portfolio, and changed her grip.
  • He staggered to the sofa on which Pierre was sitting and dropped onto it, covering his face with his hand.
  • She kissed the young man on his forehead, wetting him with her tears.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna left him, and when she returned he was fast asleep with his head on his arm.
  • I know you well enough to be sure that this will not turn your head, but it imposes duties on you, and you must be a man.
  • On waking in the morning she told the Rostovs and all her acquaintances the details of Count Bezukhov's death.
  • He was himself always occupied: writing his memoirs, solving problems in higher mathematics, turning snuffboxes on a lathe, working in the garden, or superintending the building that was always going on at his estate.
  • On the morning of the day that the young couple were to arrive, Princess Mary entered the antechamber as usual at the time appointed for the morning greeting.
  • The large table covered with books and plans, the tall glass-fronted bookcases with keys in the locks, the high desk for writing while standing up, on which lay an open exercise book, and the lathe with tools laid ready to hand and shavings scattered around--all indicated continuous, varied, and orderly activity.
  • The princess bent over the exercise book on the table.
  • At the sight of the letter red patches showed themselves on the princess' face.
  • "The third, I said the third!" cried the prince abruptly, pushing the letter away, and leaning his elbows on the table he drew toward him the exercise book containing geometrical figures.
  • "Well, madam," he began, stooping over the book close to his daughter and placing an arm on the back of the chair on which she sat, so that she felt herself surrounded on all sides by the acrid scent of old age and tobacco, which she had known so long.
  • He patted her on the shoulder and himself closed the door after her.
  • She sat down at her writing table, on which stood miniature portraits and which was littered with books and papers.
  • Why are we not together as we were last summer, in your big study, on the blue sofa, the confidential sofa?
  • Having read thus far, Princess Mary sighed and glanced into the mirror which stood on her right.
  • She went on reading:
  • One of my two brothers is already abroad, the other is with the Guards, who are starting on their march to the frontier.
  • Why do you suppose that I should look severely on your affection for that young man?
  • On such matters I am only severe with myself.
  • If I were asked what I desire most on earth, it would be to be poorer than the poorest beggar.
  • I never could understand the fondness some people have for confusing their minds by dwelling on mystical books that merely awaken their doubts and excite their imagination, giving them a bent for exaggeration quite contrary to Christian simplicity.
  • In regard to this project of marriage for me, I will tell you, dear sweet friend, that I look on marriage as a divine institution to which we must conform.
  • The princess glanced at her watch and, seeing that she was five minutes late in starting her practice on the clavichord, went into the sitting room with a look of alarm.
  • The two women let go of one another, and then, as if afraid of being too late, seized each other's hands, kissing them and pulling them away, and again began kissing each other on the face, and then to Prince Andrew's surprise both began to cry and kissed again.
  • Princess Mary had turned toward her brother, and through her tears the loving, warm, gentle look of her large luminous eyes, very beautiful at that moment, rested on Prince Andrew's face.
  • The old prince always dressed in old-fashioned style, wearing an antique coat and powdered hair; and when Prince Andrew entered his father's dressing room (not with the contemptuous look and manner he wore in drawing rooms, but with the animated face with which he talked to Pierre), the old man was sitting on a large leather-covered chair, wrapped in a powdering mantle, entrusting his head to Tikhon.
  • You at least must tackle him properly, or else if he goes on like this he'll soon have us, too, for his subjects!
  • Prince Andrew went up and kissed his father on the spot indicated to him.
  • He made no reply on his father's favorite topic-- making fun of the military men of the day, and more particularly of Bonaparte.
  • Well, go on," he continued, returning to his hobby; "tell me how the Germans have taught you to fight Bonaparte by this new science you call 'strategy.'"
  • Prince Andrew, seeing that his father insisted, began--at first reluctantly, but gradually with more and more animation, and from habit changing unconsciously from Russian to French as he went on--to explain the plan of operation for the coming campaign.
  • He explained how an army, ninety thousand strong, was to threaten Prussia so as to bring her out of her neutrality and draw her into the war; how part of that army was to join some Swedish forces at Stralsund; how two hundred and twenty thousand Austrians, with a hundred thousand Russians, were to operate in Italy and on the Rhine; how fifty thousand Russians and as many English were to land at Naples, and how a total force of five hundred thousand men was to attack the French from different sides.
  • The prince, who generally kept very strictly to social distinctions and rarely admitted even important government officials to his table, had unexpectedly selected Michael Ivanovich (who always went into a corner to blow his nose on his checked handkerchief) to illustrate the theory that all men are equals, and had more than once impressed on his daughter that Michael Ivanovich was "not a whit worse than you or I."
  • The head butler, napkin on arm, was scanning the setting of the table, making signs to the footmen, and anxiously glancing from the clock to the door by which the prince was to enter.
  • The prince stood still; his lively glittering eyes from under their thick, bushy eyebrows sternly scanned all present and rested on the little princess.
  • He stroked her hair and then patted her awkwardly on the back of her neck.
  • "Ho, ho!" said the old man, casting his eyes on her rounded figure.
  • Michael Ivanovich did not at all know when "you and I" had said such things about Bonaparte, but understanding that he was wanted as a peg on which to hang the prince's favorite topic, he looked inquiringly at the young prince, wondering what would follow.
  • And the conversation again turned on the war, on Bonaparte, and the generals and statesmen of the day.
  • Prince Andrew gaily bore with his father's ridicule of the new men, and drew him on and listened to him with evident pleasure.
  • No, my dear boy," he continued, "you and your generals won't get on against Buonaparte; you'll have to call in the French, so that birds of a feather may fight together.
  • When starting on a journey or changing their mode of life, men capable of reflection are generally in a serious frame of mind.
  • She was so tired that she has fallen asleep on the sofa in my room.
  • What a treasure of a wife you have, said she, sitting down on the sofa, facing her brother.
  • Prince Andrew was silent, but the princess noticed the ironical and contemptuous look that showed itself on his face.
  • There was a look of tenderness, for he was touched, but also a gleam of irony on his face.
  • She kissed him on the forehead and sat down again on the sofa.
  • Red patches appeared on Princess Mary's face and she was silent as if she felt guilty.
  • The patches grew deeper on her forehead, neck, and cheeks.
  • Put this on the seat and this to the right.
  • On the way to his sister's room, in the passage which connected one wing with the other, Prince Andrew met Mademoiselle Bourienne smiling sweetly.
  • And he went on writing.
  • And he went on writing, so that his quill spluttered and squeaked.
  • I am ashamed as it is to leave her on your hands...
  • The old prince stopped writing and, as if not understanding, fixed his stern eyes on his son.
  • The old man's sharp eyes were fixed straight on his son's.
  • She screamed and fell unconscious on his shoulder.
  • He cautiously released the shoulder she leaned on, looked into her face, and carefully placed her in an easy chair.
  • On October 11, 1805, one of the infantry regiments that had just reached Braunau had halted half a mile from the town, waiting to be inspected by the commander-in-chief.
  • Though the words of the order were not clear to the regimental commander, and the question arose whether the troops were to be in marching order or not, it was decided at a consultation between the battalion commanders to present the regiment in parade order, on the principle that it is always better to "bow too low than not bow low enough."
  • It would not be turned off the field even on the Tsaritsin Meadow.
  • On hearing this the regimental commander hung his head, silently shrugged his shoulders, and spread out his arms with a choleric gesture.
  • On all sides soldiers were running to and fro, throwing up their knapsacks with a jerk of their shoulders and pulling the straps over their heads, unstrapping their overcoats and drawing the sleeves on with upraised arms.
  • On all sides soldiers were running to and fro, throwing up their knapsacks with a jerk of their shoulders and pulling the straps over their heads, unstrapping their overcoats and drawing the sleeves on with upraised arms.
  • When the eager but misrepeated words had reached their destination in a cry of: "The general to the third company," the missing officer appeared from behind his company and, though he was a middle-aged man and not in the habit of running, trotted awkwardly stumbling on his toes toward the general.
  • Spots appeared on his nose, the redness of which was evidently due to intemperance, and his mouth twitched nervously.
  • Your excellency, you gave him leave yourself, on the march.
  • Along the broad country road, edged on both sides by trees, came a high, light blue Viennese caleche, slightly creaking on its springs and drawn by six horses at a smart trot.
  • The regimental commander ran forward on each such occasion, fearing to miss a single word of the commander-in-chief's regarding the regiment.
  • On reaching the third company he suddenly stopped.
  • "You won't bear me a grudge, Prokhor Ignatych?" said the regimental commander, overtaking the third company on its way to its quarters and riding up to Captain Timokhin who was walking in front.
  • It's in the Emperor's service... it can't be helped... one is sometimes a bit hasty on parade...
  • "It's different on different days," answered the captain.
  • Still, one must have pity on a young man in misfortune.
  • Dolokhov looked round but did not say anything, nor did the mocking smile on his lips change.
  • The company marched on gaily.
  • The soldiers' voices could be heard on every side.
  • A drummer, their leader, turned round facing the singers, and flourishing his arm, began a long-drawn-out soldiers' song, commencing with the words: "Morning dawned, the sun was rising," and concluding: "On then, brothers, on to glory, led by Father Kamenski."
  • A drummer, their leader, turned round facing the singers, and flourishing his arm, began a long-drawn-out soldiers' song, commencing with the words: "Morning dawned, the sun was rising," and concluding: "On then, brothers, on to glory, led by Father Kamenski."
  • "And how do you get on with the officers?" inquired Zherkov.
  • I was attached; I'm on duty.
  • One can at least be of use on the staff...
  • On returning from the review, Kutuzov took the Austrian general into his private room and, calling his adjutant, asked for some papers relating to the condition of the troops on their arrival, and the letters that had come from the Archduke Ferdinand, who was in command of the advanced army.
  • On returning from the review, Kutuzov took the Austrian general into his private room and, calling his adjutant, asked for some papers relating to the condition of the troops on their arrival, and the letters that had come from the Archduke Ferdinand, who was in command of the advanced army.
  • Kutuzov and the Austrian member of the Hofkriegsrath were sitting at the table on which a plan was spread out.
  • And believe me on my honour that to me personally it would be a pleasure to hand over the supreme command of the army into the hands of a better informed and more skillful general--of whom Austria has so many--and to lay down all this heavy responsibility.
  • But Kutuzov went on blandly smiling with the same expression, which seemed to say that he had a right to suppose so.
  • Also, as we are masters of Ulm, we cannot be deprived of the advantage of commanding both sides of the Danube, so that should the enemy not cross the Lech, we can cross the Danube, throw ourselves on his line of communications, recross the river lower down, and frustrate his intention should he try to direct his whole force against our faithful ally.
  • Kutuzov sighed deeply on finishing this paragraph and looked at the member of the Hofkriegsrath mildly and attentively.
  • He now looked like a man who has time to think of the impression he makes on others, but is occupied with agreeable and interesting work.
  • On Kutuzov's staff, among his fellow officers and in the army generally, Prince Andrew had, as he had had in Petersburg society, two quite opposite reputations.
  • Coming out of Kutuzov's room into the waiting room with the papers in his hand Prince Andrew came up to his comrade, the aide-de-camp on duty, Kozlovski, who was sitting at the window with a book.
  • But at that instant a tall Austrian general in a greatcoat, with the order of Maria Theresa on his neck and a black bandage round his head, who had evidently just arrived, entered quickly, slamming the door.
  • On October 11, the day when all was astir at headquarters over the news of Mack's defeat, the camp life of the officers of this squadron was proceeding as usual.
  • His landlord, who in a waistcoat and a pointed cap, pitchfork in hand, was clearing manure from the cowhouse, looked out, and his face immediately brightened on seeing Rostov.
  • He wore an unfastened cloak, wide breeches hanging down in creases, and a crumpled shako on the back of his head.
  • He took the lighted pipe that was offered to him, gripped it in his fist, and tapped it on the floor, making the sparks fly, while he continued to shout.
  • "He's begun to go a little lame on the left foreleg," he added.
  • In the passage Denisov, with a pipe, was squatting on the threshold facing the quartermaster who was reporting to him.
  • On seeing Rostov, Denisov screwed up his face and pointing over his shoulder with his thumb to the room where Telyanin was sitting, he frowned and gave a shudder of disgust.
  • When Rostov went back there was a bottle of vodka and a sausage on the table.
  • Denisov was sitting there scratching with his pen on a sheet of paper.
  • He leaned his elbows on the table with his pen in his hand and, evidently glad of a chance to say quicker in words what he wanted to write, told Rostov the contents of his letter.
  • We are childwen of the dust... but one falls in love and one is a God, one is pua' as on the first day of cweation...
  • Denisov threw both pillows on the floor.
  • Rostov felt Denisov's gaze fixed on him, raised his eyes, and instantly dropped them again.
  • Rostov, his eyes avoiding Denisov, began buttoning his coat, buckled on his saber, and put on his cap.
  • "Nonsense!" he cried, and the veins on his forehead and neck stood out like cords.
  • But Rostov pulled away his arm and, with as much anger as though Denisov were his worst enemy, firmly fixed his eyes directly on his face.
  • He threw it on the table.
  • "And I tell you, Rostov, that you must apologize to the colonel!" said a tall, grizzly-haired staff captain, with enormous mustaches and many wrinkles on his large features, to Rostov who was crimson with excitement.
  • He may keep me on duty every day, or may place me under arrest, but no one can make me apologize, because if he, as commander of this regiment, thinks it beneath his dignity to give me satisfaction, then...
  • "Not on any account!" exclaimed Rostov.
  • You are offended at being put on duty a bit, but why not apologize to an old and honorable officer?
  • "Come, that's right, Count!" cried the staff captain, turning round and clapping Rostov on the shoulder with his big hand.
  • No, on my word it's not obstinacy!
  • I congratulated him on Mack's arrival...
  • On October 23 the Russian troops were crossing the river Enns.
  • At midday the Russian baggage train, the artillery, and columns of troops were defiling through the town of Enns on both sides of the bridge.
  • The wide expanse that opened out before the heights on which the Russian batteries stood guarding the bridge was at times veiled by a diaphanous curtain of slanting rain, and then, suddenly spread out in the sunlight, far-distant objects could be clearly seen glittering as though freshly varnished.
  • Down below, the little town could be seen with its white, red-roofed houses, its cathedral, and its bridge, on both sides of which streamed jostling masses of Russian troops.
  • The turrets of a convent stood out beyond a wild virgin pine forest, and far away on the other side of the Enns the enemy's horse patrols could be discerned.
  • Among the field guns on the brow of the hill the general in command of the rearguard stood with a staff officer, scanning the country through his fieldglass.
  • The officers gladly gathered round him, some on their knees, some squatting Turkish fashion on the wet grass.
  • On my word I'd give five years of my life for it!
  • They'll be fired on at the crossing.
  • On the opposite side the enemy could be seen by the naked eye, and from their battery a milk-white cloud arose.
  • "I'll really call in on the nuns," he said to the officers who watched him smilingly, and he rode off by the winding path down the hill.
  • Each time Prince Nesvitski tried to move on, soldiers and carts pushed him back again and pressed him against the railings, and all he could do was to smile.
  • Sometimes through the monotonous waves of men, like a fleck of white foam on the waves of the Enns, an officer, in a cloak and with a type of face different from that of the men, squeezed his way along; sometimes like a chip of wood whirling in the river, an hussar on foot, an orderly, or a townsman was carried through the waves of infantry; and sometimes like a log floating down the river, an officers' or company's baggage wagon, piled high, leather covered, and hemmed in on all sides, moved across the bridge.
  • "A million all but one!" replied a waggish soldier in a torn coat, with a wink, and passed on followed by another, an old man.
  • That soldier passed on, and after him came another sitting on a cart.
  • And he also passed on with the wagon.
  • A woman with an unweaned baby, an old woman, and a healthy German girl with bright red cheeks were sitting on some feather beds.
  • There, Fedotov, you should be quartered on them!
  • Nesvitski like the rest of the men on the bridge did not take his eyes off the women till they had passed.
  • The crowd moved on again.
  • Nesvitski looked round and saw, some fifteen paces away but separated by the living mass of moving infantry, Vaska Denisov, red and shaggy, with his cap on the back of his black head and a cloak hanging jauntily over his shoulder.
  • Then the clang of hoofs, as of several horses galloping, resounded on the planks of the bridge, and the squadron, officers in front and men four abreast, spread across the bridge and began to emerge on his side of it.
  • I'd like to put you on a two days' march with a knapsack!
  • Suddenly on the road at the top of the high ground, artillery and troops in blue uniform were seen.
  • On the high ground where the enemy was, the smoke of a cannon rose, and a ball flew whistling over the heads of the hussar squadron.
  • Silence fell on the whole squadron.
  • But despite himself, on his face too that same indication of something new and stern showed round the mouth.
  • Look at me, cried Denisov who, unable to keep still on one spot, kept turning his horse in front of the squadron.
  • The staff captain on his broad-backed, steady mare came at a walk to meet him.
  • Just then the commander appeared on the bridge.
  • Next he thought that his enemy would send the squadron on a desperate attack just to punish him--Rostov.
  • After his dismissal from headquarters Zherkov had not remained in the regiment, saying he was not such a fool as to slave at the front when he could get more rewards by doing nothing on the staff, and had succeeded in attaching himself as an orderly officer to Prince Bagration.
  • After him the stout Nesvitski came galloping up on a Cossack horse that could scarcely carry his weight.
  • On the same business.
  • Again on all the bright faces of the squadron the serious expression appeared that they had worn when under fire.
  • Rostov did not think what this call for stretchers meant; he ran on, trying only to be ahead of the others; but just at the bridge, not looking at the ground, he came on some sticky, trodden mud, stumbled, and fell on his hands.
  • Rostov wiping his muddy hands on his breeches looked at his enemy and was about to run on, thinking that the farther he went to the front the better.
  • Who's that running on the middle of the bridge?
  • Come back, Cadet! he cried angrily; and turning to Denisov, who, showing off his courage, had ridden on to the planks of the bridge:
  • These were the questions each man of the troops on the high ground above the bridge involuntarily asked himself with a sinking heart--watching the bridge and the hussars in the bright evening light and the blue tunics advancing from the other side with their bayonets and guns.
  • On the French side, amid the groups with cannon, a cloud of smoke appeared, then a second and a third almost simultaneously, and at the moment when the first report was heard a fourth was seen.
  • Rostov, absorbed by his relations with Bogdanich, had paused on the bridge not knowing what to do.
  • He stood looking about him, when suddenly he heard a rattle on the bridge as if nuts were being spilt, and the hussar nearest to him fell against the rails with a groan.
  • For Christ's sake let me alone! cried the wounded man, but still he was lifted and laid on the stretcher.
  • On the twenty-eighth of October Kutuzov with his army crossed to the left bank of the Danube and took up a position for the first time with the river between himself and the main body of the French.
  • On the thirtieth he attacked Mortier's division, which was on the left bank, and broke it up.
  • On the thirtieth he attacked Mortier's division, which was on the left bank, and broke it up.
  • Despite his apparently delicate build Prince Andrew could endure physical fatigue far better than many very muscular men, and on the night of the battle, having arrived at Krems excited but not weary, with dispatches from Dokhturov to Kutuzov, he was sent immediately with a special dispatch to Brunn.
  • Then he began to imagine that the Russians were running away and that he himself was killed, but he quickly roused himself with a feeling of joy, as if learning afresh that this was not so but that on the contrary the French had run away.
  • The snow was thawing in the sunshine, the horses galloped quickly, and on both sides of the road were forests of different kinds, fields, and villages.
  • "Day before yesterday, on the Danube," answered the soldier.
  • Go on! he shouted to the driver, and they galloped on.
  • There you will find the adjutant on duty, said the official.
  • The adjutant on duty, meeting Prince Andrew, asked him to wait, and went in to the Minister of War.
  • The adjutant by his elaborate courtesy appeared to wish to ward off any attempt at familiarity on the part of the Russian messenger.
  • He went on reading to the end, without raising his eyes at the opening of the door and the sound of footsteps.
  • He had an intellectual and distinctive head, but the instant he turned to Prince Andrew the firm, intelligent expression on his face changed in a way evidently deliberate and habitual to him.
  • Having glanced through the dispatch he laid it on the table and looked at Prince Andrew, evidently considering something.
  • And, in fact, Bilibin's witticisms were hawked about in the Viennese drawing rooms and often had an influence on matters considered important.
  • The movement of these wrinkles formed the principal play of expression on his face.
  • Bilibin smiled and the wrinkles on his face disappeared.
  • You with all your forces fall on the unfortunate Mortier and his one division, and even then Mortier slips through your fingers!
  • "I know," interrupted Bilibin, "you're thinking it's very easy to take marshals, sitting on a sofa by the fire!
  • But this destruction seems to have been done on purpose to vex us.
  • The one general whom we all loved, Schmidt, you expose to a bullet, and then you congratulate us on the victory!
  • Prince Auersperg is on this, on our side of the river, and is defending us--doing it very badly, I think, but still he is defending us.
  • But Vienna is on the other side.
  • When Prince Andrew reached the room prepared for him and lay down in a clean shirt on the feather bed with its warmed and fragrant pillows, he felt that the battle of which he had brought tidings was far, far away from him.
  • "Demosthenes, I know thee by the pebble thou secretest in thy golden mouth!" said Bilibin, and the mop of hair on his head moved with satisfaction.
  • According to the scouts the last of them crossed on rafts during the night.
  • Prince Andrew withdrew and was immediately surrounded by courtiers on all sides.
  • The Minister of War came up and congratulated him on the Maria Theresa Order of the third grade, which the Emperor was conferring on him.
  • Bolkonski was invited everywhere, and had to spend the whole morning calling on the principal Austrian dignitaries.
  • "Oh, your excellency!" said Franz, with difficulty rolling the portmanteau into the vehicle, "we are to move on still farther.
  • And off they go and take the bridge, cross it, and now with their whole army are on this side of the Danube, marching on us, you, and your lines of communication.
  • Listening to Bilibin he was already imagining how on reaching the army he would give an opinion at the war council which would be the only one that could save the army, and how he alone would be entrusted with the executing of the plan.
  • But what is best of all," he went on, his excitement subsiding under the delightful interest of his own story, "is that the sergeant in charge of the cannon which was to give the signal to fire the mines and blow up the bridge, this sergeant, seeing that the French troops were running onto the bridge, was about to fire, but Lannes stayed his hand.
  • But as you are a philosopher, be a consistent one, look at the other side of the question and you will see that your duty, on the contrary, is to take care of yourself.
  • That same night, having taken leave of the Minister of War, Bolkonski set off to rejoin the army, not knowing where he would find it and fearing to be captured by the French on the way to Krems.
  • "And who are you?" cried the officer, turning on him with tipsy rage, "who are you?
  • "It's all the fault of these fellows on the staff that there's this disorder," he muttered.
  • On reaching the village he dismounted and went to the nearest house, intending to rest if but for a moment, eat something, and try to sort out the stinging and tormenting thoughts that confused his mind.
  • On their familiar faces he read agitation and alarm.
  • This was particularly noticeable on Nesvitski's usually laughing countenance.
  • In the passage little Kozlovski was squatting on his heels in front of a clerk.
  • With his left hand he drew Bagration toward him, and with his right, on which he wore a ring, he made the sign of the cross over him with a gesture evidently habitual, offering his puffy cheek, but Bagration kissed him on the neck instead.
  • Five minutes later, gently swaying on the soft springs of the carriage, he turned to Prince Andrew.
  • There was not a trace of agitation on his face.
  • On November 1 Kutuzov had received, through a spy, news that the army he commanded was in an almost hopeless position.
  • If Kutuzov decided to retreat along the road from Krems to Olmutz, to unite with the troops arriving from Russia, he risked being forestalled on that road by the French who had crossed the Vienna bridge, and encumbered by his baggage and transport, having to accept battle on the march against an enemy three times as strong, who would hem him in from two sides.
  • The French, the spy reported, having crossed the Vienna bridge, were advancing by forced marches toward Znaim, which lay sixty-six miles off on the line of Kutuzov's retreat.
  • Marching thirty miles that stormy night across roadless hills, with his hungry, ill-shod soldiers, and losing a third of his men as stragglers by the way, Bagration came out on the Vienna-Znaim road at Hollabrunn a few hours ahead of the French who were approaching Hollabrunn from Vienna.
  • Meeting Bagration's weak detachment on the Znaim road he supposed it to be Kutuzov's whole army.
  • To be able to crush it absolutely he awaited the arrival of the rest of the troops who were on their way from Vienna, and with this object offered a three days' truce on condition that both armies should remain in position without moving.
  • On receiving the news he immediately dispatched Adjutant General Wintzingerode, who was in attendance on him, to the enemy camp.
  • On receiving the news he immediately dispatched Adjutant General Wintzingerode, who was in attendance on him, to the enemy camp.
  • Break the armistice immediately and march on the enemy.
  • March on, destroy the Russian army....
  • The officer on duty was a handsome, elegantly dressed man with a diamond ring on his forefinger.
  • On all sides they saw rain-soaked officers with dejected faces who seemed to be seeking something, and soldiers dragging doors, benches, and fencing from the village.
  • Having ridden beyond the village, continually meeting and overtaking soldiers and officers of various regiments, they saw on their left some entrenchments being thrown up, the freshly dug clay of which showed up red.
  • Prince Andrew and the officer rode up, looked at the entrenchment, and went on again.
  • "Thank you very much, I will go on alone," said Prince Andrew, wishing to rid himself of this staff officer's company, "please don't trouble yourself further."
  • The staff officer remained behind and Prince Andrew rode on alone.
  • The soldiers lifted the canteen lids to their lips with reverential faces, emptied them, rolling the vodka in their mouths, and walked away from the sergeant major with brightened expressions, licking their lips and wiping them on the sleeves of their greatcoats.
  • All their faces were as serene as if all this were happening at home awaiting peaceful encampment, and not within sight of the enemy before an action in which at least half of them would be left on the field.
  • "Go on, go on!" said the major.
  • A young officer with a bewildered and pained expression on his face stepped away from the man and looked round inquiringly at the adjutant as he rode by.
  • Our front line and that of the enemy were far apart on the right and left flanks, but in the center where the men with a flag of truce had passed that morning, the lines were so near together that the men could see one another's faces and speak to one another.
  • Besides the soldiers who formed the picket line on either side, there were many curious onlookers who, jesting and laughing, stared at their strange foreign enemies.
  • "Now then, go on, go on!" incited the officer, bending forward and trying not to lose a word of the speech which was incomprehensible to him.
  • * "On vous fera danser."
  • Just facing it, on the crest of the opposite hill, the village of Schon Grabern could be seen, and in three places to left and right the French troops amid the smoke of their campfires, the greater part of whom were evidently in the village itself and behind the hill.
  • Our right flank was posted on a rather steep incline which dominated the French position.
  • On the left our troops were close to a copse, in which smoked the bonfires of our infantry who were felling wood.
  • The French line was wider than ours, and it was plain that they could easily outflank us on both sides.
  • Prince Andrew took out his notebook and, leaning on the cannon, sketched a plan of the position.
  • He made some notes on two points, intending to mention them to Bagration.
  • If they attack our center we, having the center battery on this high ground, shall withdraw the left flank under its cover, and retreat to the dip by echelons.
  • Here it is! was seen even on Prince Bagration's hard brown face with its half-closed, dull, sleepy eyes.
  • Behind Prince Bagration rode an officer of the suite, the prince's personal adjutant, Zherkov, an orderly officer, the staff officer on duty, riding a fine bobtailed horse, and a civilian--an accountant who had asked permission to be present at the battle out of curiosity.
  • The French had advanced nearest on our right.
  • Prince Bagration, having reached the highest point of our right flank, began riding downhill to where the roll of musketry was heard but where on account of the smoke nothing could be seen.
  • Crossing a road they descended a steep incline and saw several men lying on the ground; they also met a crowd of soldiers some of whom were unwounded.
  • Prince Andrew was struck by the changed expression on Prince Bagration's face at this moment.
  • While he was speaking, the curtain of smoke that had concealed the hollow, driven by a rising wind, began to move from right to left as if drawn by an invisible hand, and the hill opposite, with the French moving about on it, opened out before them.
  • All eyes fastened involuntarily on this French column advancing against them and winding down over the uneven ground.
  • It was as if all the powers of his soul were concentrated on passing the commander in the best possible manner, and feeling that he was doing it well he was happy.
  • A morose soldier marching on the left turned his eyes on Bagration as he shouted, with an expression that seemed to say: "We know that ourselves!"
  • Prince Bagration gave no further orders and silently continued to walk on in front of the ranks.
  • The two commanders were much exasperated with one another and, long after the action had begun on the right flank and the French were already advancing, were engaged in discussion with the sole object of offending one another.
  • Cannon and musketry, mingling together, thundered on the right and in the center, while the capotes of Lannes' sharpshooters were already seen crossing the milldam and forming up within twice the range of a musket shot.
  • They were cut off from the line of retreat on the left by the French.
  • Before him, on the right, Rostov saw the front lines of his hussars and still farther ahead a dark line which he could not see distinctly but took to be the enemy.
  • Rook tried to rise on his forelegs but fell back, pinning his rider's leg.
  • "Where, on which side, was now the line that had so sharply divided the two armies?" he asked himself and could not answer.
  • "Can something bad have happened to me?" he wondered as he got up: and at that moment he felt that something superfluous was hanging on his benumbed left arm.
  • He examined his hand carefully, vainly trying to find blood on it.
  • But Dolokhov did not go away; he untied the handkerchief around his head, pulled it off, and showed the blood congealed on his hair.
  • On the contrary, the energetic action of that battery led the French to suppose that here--in the center--the main Russian forces were concentrated.
  • As if urging each other on, the soldiers cried at each shot: Fine!
  • The soldiers, for the most part handsome fellows and, as is always the case in an artillery company, a head and shoulders taller and twice as broad as their officer--all looked at their commander like children in an embarrassing situation, and the expression on his face was invariably reflected on theirs.
  • On the contrary, he became more and more elated.
  • It seemed to him that it was a very long time ago, almost a day, since he had first seen the enemy and fired the first shot, and that the corner of the field he stood on was well-known and familiar ground.
  • "Why are they down on me?" thought Tushin, looking in alarm at his superior.
  • The first thing he saw on riding up to the space where Tushin's guns were stationed was an unharnessed horse with a broken leg, that lay screaming piteously beside the harnessed horses.
  • The wind had fallen and black clouds, merging with the powder smoke, hung low over the field of battle on the horizon.
  • The cannonade was dying down, but the rattle of musketry behind and on the right sounded oftener and nearer.
  • Tushin gave no orders, and, silently-- fearing to speak because at every word he felt ready to weep without knowing why--rode behind on his artillery nag.
  • Though the orders were to abandon the wounded, many of them dragged themselves after troops and begged for seats on the gun carriages.
  • "Lay a cloak for him to sit on, lad," he said, addressing his favorite soldier.
  • He was placed on "Matvevna," the gun from which they had removed the dead officer.
  • "What, are you wounded, my lad?" said Tushin, approaching the gun on which Rostov sat.
  • "Then what is this blood on the gun carriage?" inquired Tushin.
  • Suddenly, near by on the right, shouting and firing were again heard.
  • After a while the moving mass became agitated, someone rode past on a white horse followed by his suite, and said something in passing: What did he say?
  • Captain Tushin, having given orders to his company, sent a soldier to find a dressing station or a doctor for the cadet, and sat down by a bonfire the soldiers had kindled on the road.
  • Tushin's large, kind, intelligent eyes were fixed with sympathy and commiseration on Rostov, who saw that Tushin with his whole heart wished to help him but could not.
  • An infantryman came to the fire, squatted on his heels, held his hands to the blaze, and turned away his face.
  • Next came four soldiers, carrying something heavy on a cloak, and passed by the fire.
  • "Who the devil has put the logs on the road?" snarled he.
  • When I saw, your excellency, that their first battalion was disorganized, I stopped in the road and thought: 'I'll let them come on and will meet them with the fire of the whole battalion'--and that's what I did.
  • "I think I sent you?" he added, turning to the staff officer on duty.
  • He was afraid of getting some other officer into trouble, and silently fixed his eyes on Bagration as a schoolboy who has blundered looks at an examiner.
  • He was merely a man of the world who had got on and to whom getting on had become a habit.
  • He had Pierre at hand in Moscow and procured for him an appointment as Gentleman of the Bedchamber, which at that time conferred the status of Councilor of State, and insisted on the young man accompanying him to Petersburg and staying at his house.
  • Pierre, on unexpectedly becoming Count Bezukhov and a rich man, felt himself after his recent loneliness and freedom from cares so beset and preoccupied that only in bed was he able to be by himself.
  • He was always hearing such words as: "With your remarkable kindness," or, "With your excellent heart," "You are yourself so honorable Count," or, "Were he as clever as you," and so on, till he began sincerely to believe in his own exceptional kindness and extraordinary intelligence, the more so as in the depth of his heart it had always seemed to him that he really was very kind and intelligent.
  • Formerly in Anna Pavlovna's presence, Pierre had always felt that what he was saying was out of place, tactless and unsuitable, that remarks which seemed to him clever while they formed in his mind became foolish as soon as he uttered them, while on the contrary Hippolyte's stupidest remarks came out clever and apt.
  • When he read that sentence, Pierre felt for the first time that some link which other people recognized had grown up between himself and Helene, and that thought both alarmed him, as if some obligation were being imposed on him which he could not fulfill, and pleased him as an entertaining supposition.
  • Princess Helene asked to see the portrait of the aunt's husband on the box lid.
  • In November, 1805, Prince Vasili had to go on a tour of inspection in four different provinces.
  • On Helene's name day, a small party of just their own people--as his wife said--met for supper at Prince Vasili's.
  • On either side of her sat the more important guests--an old general and his wife, and Anna Pavlovna Scherer.
  • Prince Vasili mimicked the sobbing of Sergey Kuzmich and at the same time his eyes glanced toward his daughter, and while he laughed the expression on his face clearly said: "Yes... it's getting on, it will all be settled today."
  • Anna Pavlovna threatened him on behalf of "our dear Vyazmitinov," and in her eyes, which, for an instant, glanced at Pierre, Prince Vasili read a congratulation on his future son-in-law and on his daughter's happiness.
  • It seemed as if the very light of the candles was focused on those two happy faces alone.
  • He felt it awkward to attract everyone's attention and to be considered a lucky man and, with his plain face, to be looked on as a sort of Paris possessed of a Helen.
  • Prince Vasili passed by, seeming not to hear the ladies, and sat down on a sofa in a far corner of the room.
  • His face was so unusually triumphant that Pierre rose in alarm on seeing it.
  • "It seems that there will be no need to bring Mary out, suitors are coming to us of their own accord," incautiously remarked the little princess on hearing the news.
  • On the day of Prince Vasili's arrival, Prince Bolkonski was particularly discontented and out of temper.
  • Stepping flat on his heels--we know what that means....
  • The prince turned round to the overseer and fixed his eyes on him, frowning.
  • What she found hardest to bear was to know that on such occasions she ought to behave like Mademoiselle Bourienne, but could not.
  • She grew pale on seeing her father-in-law.
  • Anatole, having taken off his overcoat, sat with arms akimbo before a table on a corner of which he smilingly and absent-mindedly fixed his large and handsome eyes.
  • Remember, for you everything depends on this.
  • She was no longer in the loose gown she generally wore in the morning, but had on one of her best dresses.
  • She flushed, her beautiful eyes grew dim, red blotches came on her face, and it took on the unattractive martyrlike expression it so often wore, as she submitted herself to Mademoiselle Bourienne and Lise.
  • It was not the dress, but the face and whole figure of Princess Mary that was not pretty, but neither Mademoiselle Bourienne nor the little princess felt this; they still thought that if a blue ribbon were placed in the hair, the hair combed up, and the blue scarf arranged lower on the best maroon dress, and so on, all would be well.
  • This expression in Princess Mary did not frighten them (she never inspired fear in anyone), but they knew that when it appeared on her face, she became mute and was not to be shaken in her determination.
  • When she entered with her heavy step, treading on her heels, the gentlemen and Mademoiselle Bourienne rose and the little princess, indicating her to the gentlemen, said: "Voila Marie!"
  • She saw Prince Vasili's face, serious for an instant at the sight of her, but immediately smiling again, and the little princess curiously noting the impression "Marie" produced on the visitors.
  • And she saw Mademoiselle Bourienne, with her ribbon and pretty face, and her unusually animated look which was fixed on him, but him she could not see, she only saw something large, brilliant, and handsome moving toward her as she entered the room.
  • Prince Vasili approached first, and she kissed the bold forehead that bent over her hand and answered his question by saying that, on the contrary, she remembered him quite well.
  • "On the contrary, that coiffure suits the princess very well," said Prince Vasili.
  • After tea, the company went into the sitting room and Princess Mary was asked to play on the clavichord.
  • Anatole, laughing and in high spirits, came and leaned on his elbows, facing her and beside Mademoiselle Bourienne.
  • But Anatole's expression, though his eyes were fixed on her, referred not to her but to the movements of Mademoiselle Bourienne's little foot, which he was then touching with his own under the clavichord.
  • She could not lie either on her face or on her side.
  • "No good... no good..." said the prince rapidly, and thrusting his feet into his slippers and his arms into the sleeves of his dressing gown, he went to the couch on which he slept.
  • Last night a proposition was made me on your account and, as you know my principles, I refer it to you.
  • Prince Vasili finds you to his taste as a daughter-in-law and makes a proposal to you on his pupil's behalf.
  • He saw the effect these words had produced on his daughter.
  • Only remember that your life's happiness depends on your decision.
  • She was going straight on through the conservatory, neither seeing nor hearing anything, when suddenly the well-known whispering of Mademoiselle Bourienne aroused her.
  • When Tikhon came to her Princess Mary was sitting on the sofa in her room, holding the weeping Mademoiselle Bourienne in her arms and gently stroking her hair.
  • On receiving it, he ran on tiptoe to his study in alarm and haste, trying to escape notice, closed the door, and began to read the letter.
  • On receiving it, he ran on tiptoe to his study in alarm and haste, trying to escape notice, closed the door, and began to read the letter.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna, who always knew everything that passed in the house, on hearing of the arrival of the letter went softly into the room and found the count with it in his hand, sobbing and laughing at the same time.
  • After dinner, she rushed head long after Anna Mikhaylovna and, dashing at her, flung herself on her neck as soon as she overtook her in the sitting room.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna, in a few words, told her the contents of the letter, on condition that she should tell no one.
  • "No, on my true word of honor," said Natasha, crossing herself, "I won't tell anyone!" and she ran off at once to Sonya.
  • Natasha, seeing the impression the news of her brother's wound produced on Sonya, felt for the first time the sorrowful side of the news.
  • Now that he was already an officer and a wounded hero, would it be right to remind him of herself and, as it might seem, of the obligations to her he had taken on himself?
  • On retiring to her own room, she sat in an armchair, her eyes fixed on a miniature portrait of her son on the lid of a snuffbox, while the tears kept coming into her eyes.
  • On retiring to her own room, she sat in an armchair, her eyes fixed on a miniature portrait of her son on the lid of a snuffbox, while the tears kept coming into her eyes.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna, with the letter, came on tiptoe to the countess' door and paused.
  • When she heard this Sonya blushed so that tears came into her eyes and, unable to bear the looks turned upon her, ran away into the dancing hall, whirled round it at full speed with her dress puffed out like a balloon, and, flushed and smiling, plumped down on the floor.
  • On the twelfth of November, Kutuzov's active army, in camp before Olmutz, was preparing to be reviewed next day by the two Emperors--the Russian and the Austrian.
  • On receiving Boris' letter he rode with a fellow officer to Olmutz, dined there, drank a bottle of wine, and then set off alone to the Guards' camp to find his old playmate.
  • He had on a shabby cadet jacket, decorated with a soldier's cross, equally shabby cadet's riding breeches lined with worn leather, and an officer's saber with a sword knot.
  • The Guards had made their whole march as if on a pleasure trip, parading their cleanliness and discipline.
  • They had come by easy stages, their knapsacks conveyed on carts, and the Austrian authorities had provided excellent dinners for the officers at every halting place.
  • The regiments had entered and left the town with their bands playing, and by the Grand Duke's orders the men had marched all the way in step (a practice on which the Guards prided themselves), the officers on foot and at their proper posts.
  • Boris, during the campaign, had made the acquaintance of many persons who might prove useful to him, and by a letter of recommendation he had brought from Pierre had become acquainted with Prince Andrew Bolkonski, through whom he hoped to obtain a post on the commander-in-chief's staff.
  • They had not met for nearly half a year and, being at the age when young men take their first steps on life's road, each saw immense changes in the other, quite a new reflection of the society in which they had taken those first steps.
  • Rostov took the letter and, throwing the money on the sofa, put both arms on the table and began to read.
  • As for us, Count, we get along on our pay.
  • Because when once a man starts on military service, he should try to make as successful a career of it as possible.
  • This pleased Rostov and he began talking about it, and as he went on became more and more animated.
  • Rostov was a truthful young man and would on no account have told a deliberate lie.
  • Rostov flushed up on noticing this, but he did not care, this was a mere stranger.
  • In spite of Prince Andrew's disagreeable, ironical tone, in spite of the contempt with which Rostov, from his fighting army point of view, regarded all these little adjutants on the staff of whom the newcomer was evidently one, Rostov felt confused, blushed, and became silent.
  • Boris inquired what news there might be on the staff, and what, without indiscretion, one might ask about our plans.
  • Our stories have some weight, not like the stories of those fellows on the staff who get rewards without doing anything!
  • Well then, on Friday after the review I shall expect you, Drubetskoy.
  • From early morning the smart clean troops were on the move, forming up on the field before the fortress.
  • And at that moment, though the day was still, a light gust of wind blowing over the army slightly stirred the streamers on the lances and the unfolded standards fluttered against their staffs.
  • When the Emperor had passed nearly all the regiments, the troops began a ceremonial march past him, and Rostov on Bedouin, recently purchased from Denisov, rode past too, at the rear of his squadron--that is, alone and in full view of the Emperor.
  • Another, the red, stout Nesvitski, lay on a bed with his arms under his head, laughing with an officer who had sat down beside him.
  • A third was playing a Viennese waltz on the clavichord, while a fourth, lying on the clavichord, sang the tune.
  • None of these gentlemen changed his position on seeing Boris.
  • The one who was writing and whom Boris addressed turned round crossly and told him Bolkonski was on duty and that he should go through the door on the left into the reception room if he wished to see him.
  • When he entered, Prince Andrew, his eyes drooping contemptuously (with that peculiar expression of polite weariness which plainly says, "If it were not my duty I would not talk to you for a moment"), was listening to an old Russian general with decorations, who stood very erect, almost on tiptoe, with a soldier's obsequious expression on his purple face, reporting something.
  • All the advantages were on our side.
  • "So the attack is definitely resolved on?" asked Bolkonski.
  • But I have come to you, Prince, as a petitioner on behalf of this young man.
  • Prince Andrew did neither: a look of animosity appeared on his face and the other turned away and went down the side of the corridor.
  • At dawn on the sixteenth of November, Denisov's squadron, in which Nicholas Rostov served and which was in Prince Bagration's detachment, moved from the place where it had spent the night, advancing into action as arranged, and after going behind other columns for about two thirds of a mile was stopped on the highroad.
  • The day was bright and sunny after a sharp night frost, and the cheerful glitter of that autumn day was in keeping with the news of victory which was conveyed, not only by the tales of those who had taken part in it, but also by the joyful expression on the faces of soldiers, officers, generals, and adjutants, as they passed Rostov going or coming.
  • Casually, while surveying the squadron, the Emperor's eyes met Rostov's and rested on them for not more than two seconds.
  • The Emperor, surrounded by his suite of officers and courtiers, was riding a bobtailed chestnut mare, a different one from that which he had ridden at the review, and bending to one side he gracefully held a gold lorgnette to his eyes and looked at a soldier who lay prone, with blood on his uncovered head.
  • The campfires crackled and the soldiers' songs resounded even more merrily than on the previous night.
  • Late that night, when all had separated, Denisov with his short hand patted his favorite, Rostov, on the shoulder.
  • "As there's no one to fall in love with on campaign, he's fallen in love with the Tsar," he said.
  • The cause of this indisposition was the strong impression made on his sensitive mind by the sight of the killed and wounded.
  • On the eighteenth and nineteenth of November, the army advanced two days' march and the enemy's outposts after a brief interchange of shots retreated.
  • In the highest army circles from midday on the nineteenth, a great, excitedly bustling activity began which lasted till the morning of the twentieth, when the memorable battle of Austerlitz was fought.
  • Till midday on the nineteenth, the activity--the eager talk, running to and fro, and dispatching of adjutants--was confined to the Emperor's headquarters.
  • But on the afternoon of that day, this activity reached Kutuzov's headquarters and the staffs of the commanders of columns.
  • Wheels creak on their axles as the cogs engage one another and the revolving pulleys whirr with the rapidity of their movement, but a neighboring wheel is as quiet and motionless as though it were prepared to remain so for a hundred years; but the moment comes when the lever catches it and obeying the impulse that wheel begins to creak and joins in the common motion the result and aim of which are beyond its ken.
  • Just as in a clock, the result of the complicated motion of innumerable wheels and pulleys is merely a slow and regular movement of the hands which show the time, so the result of all the complicated human activities of 160,000 Russians and French--all their passions, desires, remorse, humiliations, sufferings, outbursts of pride, fear, and enthusiasm--was only the loss of the battle of Austerlitz, the so-called battle of the three Emperors--that is to say, a slow movement of the hand on the dial of human history.
  • Prince Andrew was on duty that day and in constant attendance on the commander-in-chief.
  • "Oh, that is all the same," Dolgorukov said quickly, and getting up he spread a map on the table.
  • The commanders are: Herr General Wimpfen, le Comte de Langeron, le Prince de Lichtenstein, le Prince, de Hohenlohe, and finally Prishprish, and so on like all those Polish names.
  • On the way home, Prince Andrew could not refrain from asking Kutuzov, who was sitting silently beside him, what he thought of tomorrow's battle.
  • "Since Prince Bagration is not coming, we may begin," said Weyrother, hurriedly rising from his seat and going up to the table on which an enormous map of the environs of Brunn was spread out.
  • Kutuzov, with his uniform unbuttoned so that his fat neck bulged over his collar as if escaping, was sitting almost asleep in a low chair, with his podgy old hands resting symmetrically on its arms.
  • Dispositions for an attack on the enemy position behind Kobelnitz and Sokolnitz, November 30, 1805.
  • The third column marches... and so on, read Weyrother.
  • Exactly opposite Weyrother, with his glistening wide-open eyes fixed upon him and his mustache twisted upwards, sat the ruddy Miloradovich in a military pose, his elbows turned outwards, his hands on his knees, and his shoulders raised.
  • "Ma foi!" said he, "tomorrow we shall see all that on the battlefield."
  • Is it possible that on account of court and personal considerations tens of thousands of lives, and my life, my life," he thought, "must be risked?"
  • Prince Andrew, however, did not answer that voice and went on dreaming of his triumphs.
  • Nominally he is only an adjutant on Kutuzov's staff, but he does everything alone.
  • That same night, Rostov was with a platoon on skirmishing duty in front of Bagration's detachment.
  • On this knoll there was a white patch that Rostov could not at all make out: was it a glade in the wood lit up by the moon, or some unmelted snow, or some white houses?
  • He even thought something moved on that white spot.
  • Over there, where the shouting came from, a fire flared up and went out again, then another, and all along the French line on the hill fires flared up and the shouting grew louder and louder.
  • The gay triumphant shouting of the enemy army had a stimulating effect on him.
  • One was on a white horse.
  • I saw them this evening on that knoll; if they had retreated they would have withdrawn from that too....
  • Bagration called to him from the hill not to go beyond the stream, but Rostov pretended not to hear him and did not stop but rode on and on, continually mistaking bushes for trees and gullies for men and continually discovering his mistakes.
  • Oh, very well, you may stay in attendance on me.
  • Then I may reckon on it, your excellency?
  • The soldiers, on seeing him, lit wisps of straw and ran after him, shouting, "Vive l'Empereur!"
  • The position we occupy is a strong one, and while they are marching to go round me on the right they will expose a flank to me.
  • Do not break your ranks on the plea of removing the wounded!
  • The officers buttoned up their coats, buckled on their swords and pouches, and moved along the ranks shouting.
  • The train drivers and orderlies harnessed and packed the wagons and tied on the loads.
  • A soldier on the march is hemmed in and borne along by his regiment as much as a sailor is by his ship.
  • On the day of battle the soldiers excitedly try to get beyond the interests of their regiment, they listen intently, look about, and eagerly ask concerning what is going on around them.
  • On the day of battle the soldiers excitedly try to get beyond the interests of their regiment, they listen intently, look about, and eagerly ask concerning what is going on around them.
  • Yes, I'd send them on in front, but no fear, they're crowding up behind.
  • You should have gone on long ago, now you won't get there till evening.
  • Fine orders! was being repeated on different sides.
  • After an hour's delay they at last moved on, descending the hill.
  • The fog that was dispersing on the hill lay still more densely below, where they were descending.
  • The fourth column, with which Kutuzov was, stood on the Pratzen Heights.
  • Above him was a clear blue sky, and the sun's vast orb quivered like a huge hollow, crimson float on the surface of that milky sea of mist.
  • The whole French army, and even Napoleon himself with his staff, were not on the far side of the streams and hollows of Sokolnitz and Schlappanitz beyond which we intended to take up our position and begin the action, but were on this side, so close to our own forces that Napoleon with the naked eye could distinguish a mounted man from one on foot.
  • Napoleon, in the blue cloak which he had worn on his Italian campaign, sat on his small gray Arab horse a little in front of his marshals.
  • He gazed silently at the hills which seemed to rise out of the sea of mist and on which the Russian troops were moving in the distance, and he listened to the sounds of firing in the valley.
  • His gleaming eyes were fixed intently on one spot.
  • In the morning all that was left of the night mist on the heights was a hoar frost now turning to dew, but in the valleys it still lay like a milk-white sea.
  • In front, far off on the farther shore of that sea of mist, some wooded hills were discernible, and it was there the enemy probably was, for something could be descried.
  • On the right the Guards were entering the misty region with a sound of hoofs and wheels and now and then a gleam of bayonets; to the left beyond the village similar masses of cavalry came up and disappeared in the sea of mist.
  • The troops were no longer moving, but stood with the butts of their muskets on the ground.
  • He put on the air of a subordinate who obeys without reasoning.
  • Czartoryski, Novosiltsev, Prince Volkonsky, Strogonov, and the others, all richly dressed gay young men on splendid, well-groomed, fresh, only slightly heated horses, exchanging remarks and smiling, had stopped behind the Emperor.
  • The Emperor Francis, a rosy, long faced young man, sat very erect on his handsome black horse, looking about him in a leisurely and preoccupied manner.
  • "You know, Michael Ilarionovich, we are not on the Empress' Field where a parade does not begin till all the troops are assembled," said the Tsar with another glance at the Emperor Francis, as if inviting him if not to join in at least to listen to what he was saying.
  • The fog had begun to clear and enemy troops were already dimly visible about a mile and a half off on the opposite heights.
  • Down below, on the left, the firing became more distinct.
  • The expression on all their faces suddenly changed to one of horror.
  • Having forced his way out of the crowd of fugitives, Prince Andrew, trying to keep near Kutuzov, saw on the slope of the hill amid the smoke a Russian battery that was still firing and Frenchmen running toward it.
  • It swayed and fell, but caught on the muskets of the nearest soldiers.
  • Prince Andrew again seized the standard and, dragging it by the staff, ran on with the battalion.
  • But he did not look at them: he looked only at what was going on in front of him--at the battery.
  • It seemed to him as though one of the soldiers near him hit him on the head with the full swing of a bludgeon.
  • My legs are giving way, thought he, and fell on his back.
  • On our right flank commanded by Bagration, at nine o'clock the battle had not yet begun.
  • On being relieved from picket duty Rostov had managed to get a few hours' sleep before morning and felt cheerful, bold, and resolute, with elasticity of movement, faith in his good fortune, and generally in that state of mind which makes everything seem possible, pleasant, and easy.
  • On receiving the order he gave his horse the rein and galloped along the line.
  • These sights and sounds had no depressing or intimidating effect on him; on the contrary, they stimulated his energy and determination.
  • He had not ridden many hundred yards after that before he saw to his left, across the whole width of the field, an enormous mass of cavalry in brilliant white uniforms, mounted on black horses, trotting straight toward him and across his path.
  • Rostov, fearing to be crushed or swept into the attack on the French, galloped along the front as hard as his horse could go, but still was not in time to avoid them.
  • Rostov was horrified to hear later that of all that mass of huge and handsome men, of all those brilliant, rich youths, officers and cadets, who had galloped past him on their thousand-ruble horses, only eighteen were left after the charge.
  • He urged on his already weary horse to get quickly past these crowds, but the farther he went the more disorganized they were.
  • The highroad on which he had come out was thronged with caleches, carriages of all sorts, and Russian and Austrian soldiers of all arms, some wounded and some not.
  • Rostov let go of the horse and was about to ride on, when a wounded officer passing by addressed him:
  • Rostov rode on at a footpace not knowing why or to whom he was now going.
  • He rode on to the region where the greatest number of men had perished in fleeing from Pratzen.
  • The French, who had ceased firing at this field strewn with dead and wounded where there was no one left to fire at, on seeing an adjutant riding over it trained a gun on him and fired several shots.
  • "What would she feel," thought he, "if she saw me here now on this field with the cannon aimed at me?"
  • When he had ridden about two miles and had passed the last of the Russian troops, he saw, near a kitchen garden with a ditch round it, two men on horseback facing the ditch.
  • At that moment Alexander turned his head and Rostov saw the beloved features that were so deeply engraved on his memory.
  • After five o'clock it was only at the Augesd Dam that a hot cannonade (delivered by the French alone) was still to be heard from numerous batteries ranged on the slopes of the Pratzen Heights, directed at our retreating forces.
  • Dolokhov--now an officer--wounded in the arm, and on foot, with the regimental commander on horseback and some ten men of his company, represented all that was left of that whole regiment.
  • "Move on a hundred yards and we are certainly saved, remain here another two minutes and it is certain death," thought each one.
  • The general on horseback at the entrance to the dam raised his hand and opened his mouth to address Dolokhov.
  • Go on! innumerable voices suddenly shouted after the ball had struck the general, the men themselves not knowing what, or why, they were shouting.
  • The ice, that had held under those on foot, collapsed in a great mass, and some forty men who were on it dashed, some forward and some back, drowning one another.
  • On the Pratzen Heights, where he had fallen with the flagstaff in his hand, lay Prince Andrew Bolkonski bleeding profusely and unconsciously uttering a gentle, piteous, and childlike moan.
  • Bonaparte riding over the battlefield had given final orders to strengthen the batteries firing at the Augesd Dam and was looking at the killed and wounded left on the field.
  • "Fine men!" remarked Napoleon, looking at a dead Russian grenadier, who, with his face buried in the ground and a blackened nape, lay on his stomach with an already stiffened arm flung wide.
  • Having said this, Napoleon rode on to meet Marshal Lannes, who, hat in hand, rode up smiling to the Emperor to congratulate him on the victory.
  • The first words he heard on coming to his senses were those of a French convoy officer, who said rapidly: "We must halt here: the Emperor will pass here immediately; it will please him to see these gentlemen prisoners."
  • "Which is the senior?" he asked, on seeing the prisoners.
  • Napoleon apparently remembered seeing him on the battlefield and, addressing him, again used the epithet "young man" that was connected in his memory with Prince Andrew.
  • Early in the year 1806 Nicholas Rostov returned home on leave.
  • Meeting a comrade at the last post station but one before Moscow, Denisov had drunk three bottles of wine with him and, despite the jolting ruts across the snow-covered road, did not once wake up on the way to Moscow, but lay at the bottom of the sleigh beside Rostov, who grew more and more impatient the nearer they got to Moscow.
  • "Dmitri," said Rostov to his valet on the box, "those lights are in our house, aren't they?"
  • "Now then, get on," he shouted to the driver.
  • "Do wake up, Vaska!" he went on, turning to Denisov, whose head was again nodding.
  • Old Michael was asleep on the chest.
  • Rostov, who had completely forgotten Denisov, not wishing anyone to forestall him, threw off his fur coat and ran on tiptoe through the large dark ballroom.
  • When they met, she fell on his breast, sobbing.
  • Rostov hurriedly put something on his feet, drew on his dressing gown, and went out.
  • Natasha had put on one spurred boot and was just getting her foot into the other.
  • She pulled up her muslin sleeve and showed him a red scar on her long, slender, delicate arm, high above the elbow on that part that is covered even by a ball dress.
  • Sitting on the sofa with the little cushions on its arms, in what used to be his old schoolroom, and looking into Natasha's wildly bright eyes, Rostov re-entered that world of home and childhood which had no meaning for anyone else, but gave him some of the best joys of his life; and the burning of an arm with a ruler as a proof of love did not seem to him senseless, he understood and was not surprised at it.
  • "I never go back on my word," he said.
  • Sonya had already struck him by her beauty on the preceding day.
  • Curving her arms, Natasha held out her skirts as dancers do, ran back a few steps, turned, cut a caper, brought her little feet sharply together, and made some steps on the very tips of her toes.
  • See! she said, but could not maintain herself on her toes any longer.
  • And Natasha rose and went out of the room on tiptoe, like a ballet dancer, but smiling as only happy girls of fifteen can smile.
  • On his return to Moscow from the army, Nicholas Rostov was welcomed by his home circle as the best of sons, a hero, and their darling Nikolenka; by his relations as a charming, attractive, and polite young man; by his acquaintances as a handsome lieutenant of hussars, a good dancer, and one of the best matches in the city.
  • He knew a lady on one of the boulevards whom he visited of an evening.
  • To him the club entrusted the arrangement of the festival in honor of Bagration, for few men knew so well how to arrange a feast on an open-handed, hospitable scale, and still fewer men would be so well able and willing to make up out of their own resources what might be needed for the success of the fete.
  • I must have two hundred pots here on Friday.
  • Thank God, Boris is now on the staff.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna turned up her eyes, and profound sadness was depicted on her face.
  • At that time, the Russians were so used to victories that on receiving news of the defeat some would simply not believe it, while others sought some extraordinary explanation of so strange an event.
  • The men who set the tone in conversation--Count Rostopchin, Prince Yuri Dolgorukov, Valuev, Count Markov, and Prince Vyazemski--did not show themselves at the club, but met in private houses in intimate circles, and the Moscovites who took their opinions from others--Ilya Rostov among them--remained for a while without any definite opinion on the subject of the war and without leaders.
  • All Moscow repeated Prince Dolgorukov's saying: "If you go on modeling and modeling you must get smeared with clay," suggesting consolation for our defeat by the memory of former victories; and the words of Rostopchin, that French soldiers have to be incited to battle by highfalutin words, and Germans by logical arguments to show them that it is more dangerous to run away than to advance, but that Russian soldiers only need to be restrained and held back!
  • On all sides, new and fresh anecdotes were heard of individual examples of heroism shown by our officers and men at Austerlitz.
  • On that third of March, all the rooms in the English Club were filled with a hum of conversation, like the hum of bees swarming in springtime.
  • He had no lambskin cap on his head, nor had he a loaded whip over his shoulder, as when Rostov had seen him on the eve of the battle of Austerlitz, but wore a tight new uniform with Russian and foreign Orders, and the Star of St. George on his left breast.
  • On the salver lay some verses composed and printed in the hero's honor.
  • Bagration, on seeing the salver, glanced around in dismay, as though seeking help.
  • Bagration seemed to say, and, fixing his weary eyes on the paper, began to read them with a fixed and serious expression.
  • Bring glory then to Alexander's reign And on the throne our Titus shield.
  • And Count Rostov, glancing angrily at the author who went on reading his verses, bowed to Bagration.
  • Bagration also rose and shouted "Hurrah!" in exactly the same voice in which he had shouted it on the field at Schon Grabern.
  • He seemed to see and hear nothing of what was going on around him and to be absorbed by some depressing and unsolved problem.
  • It would be particularly pleasant to him to dishonor my name and ridicule me, just because I have exerted myself on his behalf, befriended him, and helped him.
  • That expression was often on Dolokhov's face when looking at him.
  • Hearing that cry and seeing to whom it was addressed, Nesvitski and the neighbor on his right quickly turned in alarm to Bezukhov.
  • Pierre went home, but Rostov with Dolokhov and Denisov stayed on at the club till late, listening to the gypsies and other singers.
  • There was no insult on either side.
  • And after stumbling a few staggering steps right up to the saber, he sank on the snow beside it.
  • His left hand was bloody; he wiped it on his coat and supported himself with it.
  • "Missed!" shouted Dolokhov, and he lay helplessly, face downwards on the snow.
  • But on entering Moscow he suddenly came to and, lifting his head with an effort, took Rostov, who was sitting beside him, by the hand.
  • Rostov was struck by the totally altered and unexpectedly rapturous and tender expression on Dolokhov's face.
  • He implored Rostov to go on and prepare her.
  • Rostov went on ahead to do what was asked, and to his great surprise learned that Dolokhov the brawler, Dolokhov the bully, lived in Moscow with an old mother and a hunchback sister, and was the most affectionate of sons and brothers.
  • He lay down on the sofa meaning to fall asleep and forget all that had happened to him, but could not do so.
  • A slur on my name?
  • The slur on my name and honor--that's all apart from myself.
  • Next morning when the valet came into the room with his coffee, Pierre was lying asleep on the ottoman with an open book in his hand.
  • Pierre turned over heavily on the ottoman and opened his mouth, but could not reply.
  • He was suffering physically at that moment, there was a weight on his chest and he could not breathe.
  • He flung down the slab, broke it, and swooping down on her with outstretched hands shouted, "Get out!" in such a terrible voice that the whole house heard it with horror.
  • She was already pale, but on hearing these words her face changed and something brightened in her beautiful, radiant eyes.
  • She saw him tender and amused as he was when he put on the little icon.
  • "Nothing... only I feel sad... sad about Andrew," she said, wiping away her tears on her sister-in-law's knee.
  • The midwife was already on her way to meet her, rubbing her small, plump white hands with an air of calm importance.
  • On their faces was a quiet and solemn look.
  • Princess Mary sat alone in her room listening to the sounds in the house, now and then opening her door when someone passed and watching what was going on in the passage.
  • Suddenly her door opened softly and her old nurse, Praskovya Savishna, who hardly ever came to that room as the old prince had forbidden it, appeared on the threshold with a shawl round her head.
  • The old prince, stepping on his heels, paced up and down his study and sent Tikhon to ask Mary Bogdanovna what news.--"Say only that 'the prince told me to ask,' and come and tell me her answer."
  • After a while he re-entered it as if to snuff the candles, and, seeing the prince was lying on the sofa, looked at him, noticed his perturbed face, shook his head, and going up to him silently kissed him on the shoulder and left the room without snuffing the candles or saying why he had entered.
  • She went out on the stairs.
  • On a banister post stood a tallow candle which guttered in the draft.
  • On the landing below, Philip, the footman, stood looking scared and holding another candle.
  • "No it can't be, that would be too extraordinary," and at the very moment she thought this, the face and figure of Prince Andrew, in a fur cloak the deep collar of which covered with snow, appeared on the landing where the footman stood with the candle.
  • Yes, it was he, pale, thin, with a changed and strangely softened but agitated expression on his face.
  • The little princess lay supported by pillows, with a white cap on her head (the pains had just left her).
  • Prince Andrew entered and paused facing her at the foot of the sofa on which she was lying.
  • Her glittering eyes, filled with childlike fear and excitement, rested on him without changing their expression.
  • A woman rushed out and seeing Prince Andrew stopped, hesitating on the threshold.
  • She was lying dead, in the same position he had seen her in five minutes before and, despite the fixed eyes and the pallor of the cheeks, the same expression was on her charming childlike face with its upper lip covered with tiny black hair.
  • The old man too came up and kissed the waxen little hands that lay quietly crossed one on the other on her breast, and to him, too, her face seemed to say: "Ah, what have you done to me, and why?"
  • Those pranks in Petersburg when they played some tricks on a policeman, didn't they do it together?
  • Bezukhov got off scotfree, while Fedya had to bear the whole burden on his shoulders.
  • Why, if he was so jealous, as I see things he should have shown it sooner, but he lets it go on for months.
  • And then to call him out, reckoning on Fedya not fighting because he owed him money!
  • On the third day after Christmas Nicholas dined at home, a thing he had rarely done of late.
  • If you refuse him on my account, I must tell you the whole truth.
  • Denisov sat down by the old ladies and, leaning on his saber and beating time with his foot, told them something funny and kept them amused, while he watched the young people dancing, Iogel with Natasha, his pride and his best pupil, were the first couple.
  • Noiselessly, skillfully stepping with his little feet in low shoes, Iogel flew first across the hall with Natasha, who, though shy, went on carefully executing her steps.
  • Only on horse back and in the mazurka was Denisov's short stature not noticeable and he looked the fine fellow he felt himself to be.
  • He glided silently on one foot half across the room, and seeming not to notice the chairs was dashing straight at them, when suddenly, clinking his spurs and spreading out his legs, he stopped short on his heels, stood so a second, stamped on the spot clanking his spurs, whirled rapidly round, and, striking his left heel against his right, flew round again in a circle.
  • First he spun her round, holding her now with his left, now with his right hand, then falling on one knee he twirled her round him, and again jumping up, dashed so impetuously forward that it seemed as if he would rush through the whole suite of rooms without drawing breath, and then he suddenly stopped and performed some new and unexpected steps.
  • She fixed her eyes on him in amazement, smiling as if she did not recognize him.
  • For two days after that Rostov did not see Dolokhov at his own or at Dolokhov's home: on the third day he received a note from him:
  • On the table was a pile of gold and paper money, and he was keeping the bank.
  • And strange to say Nicholas felt that he could not help taking up a card, putting a small stake on it, and beginning to play.
  • Rostov staked five rubles on a card and lost, staked again, and again lost.
  • Please place your money on the cards or I may get muddled in the reckoning.
  • So I ask you to put the money on your cards, replied Dolokhov.
  • He wrote "800 rubles" on a card, but while the waiter filled his glass he changed his mind and altered it to his usual stake of twenty rubles.
  • He laid down the seven of hearts, on which with a broken bit of chalk he had written "800 rubles" in clear upright figures; he emptied the glass of warm champagne that was handed him, smiled at Dolokhov's words, and with a sinking heart, waiting for a seven to turn up, gazed at Dolokhov's hands which held the pack.
  • Much depended on Rostov's winning or losing on that seven of hearts.
  • On the previous Sunday the old count had given his son two thousand rubles, and though he always disliked speaking of money difficulties had told Nicholas that this was all he could let him have till May, and asked him to be more economical this time.
  • Now only twelve hundred rubles was left of that money, so that this seven of hearts meant for him not only the loss of sixteen hundred rubles, but the necessity of going back on his word.
  • At that moment his home life, jokes with Petya, talks with Sonya, duets with Natasha, piquet with his father, and even his comfortable bed in the house on the Povarskaya rose before him with such vividness, clearness, and charm that it seemed as if it were all a lost and unappreciated bliss, long past.
  • The whole interest was concentrated on Rostov.
  • He had fixed on that number because forty-three was the sum of his and Sonya's joint ages.
  • Rostov, leaning his head on both hands, sat at the table which was scrawled over with figures, wet with spilled wine, and littered with cards.
  • He knew what a shock he would inflict on his father and mother by the news of this loss, he knew what a relief it would be to escape it all, and felt that Dolokhov knew that he could save him from all this shame and sorrow, but wanted now to play with him as a cat does with a mouse.
  • What spark has set my inmost soul on fire, What is this bliss that makes my fingers thrill?
  • Sonya's eyes fixed on him seemed to ask.
  • And suddenly the whole world centered for him on anticipation of the next note, the next phrase, and everything in the world was divided into three beats: "Oh mio crudele affetto."...
  • Papa, I have come on a matter of business.
  • "Well!..." said the old count, spreading out his arms and sinking helplessly on the sofa.
  • The old count cast down his eyes on hearing his son's words and began bustlingly searching for something.
  • No, not on any account!
  • I will tell him myself, and you'll listen at the door, and Natasha ran across the drawing room to the dancing hall, where Denisov was sitting on the same chair by the clavichord with his face in his hands.
  • "Countess, I have done w'ong," Denisov went on in an unsteady voice, "but believe me, I so adore your daughter and all your family that I would give my life twice over..."
  • Without undressing, he lay down on the leather sofa in front of a round table, put his big feet in their overboots on the table, and began to reflect.
  • He had begun to think of the last station and was still pondering on the same question--one so important that he took no notice of what went on around him.
  • Without changing his careless attitude, Pierre looked at them over his spectacles unable to understand what they wanted or how they could go on living without having solved the problems that so absorbed him.
  • It was as if the thread of the chief screw which held his life together were stripped, so that the screw could not get in or out, but went on turning uselessly in the same place.
  • But the officer thrashed him because he had to get on as quickly as possible.
  • With a pair of felt boots on his thin bony legs, and keeping on a worn, nankeen-covered, sheepskin coat, the traveler sat down on the sofa, leaned back his big head with its broad temples and close-cropped hair, and looked at Bezukhov.
  • His shriveled old hands were folded and on the finger of one of them Pierre noticed a large cast iron ring with a seal representing a death's head.
  • All at once the stranger closed the book, putting in a marker, and again, leaning with his arms on the back of the sofa, sat in his former position with his eyes shut.
  • He paused, his gaze still on Pierre, and moved aside on the sofa by way of inviting the other to take a seat beside him.
  • On the contrary, I am very glad to make your acquaintance, said Pierre.
  • Only by laying stone on stone with the cooperation of all, by the millions of generations from our forefather Adam to our own times, is that temple reared which is to be a worthy dwelling place of the Great God, he added, and closed his eyes.
  • Thou dreamest that thou art wise because thou couldst utter those blasphemous words, he went on, with a somber and scornful smile.
  • What hast thou attained relying on reason only?
  • After these words, the Mason, as if tired by his long discourse, again leaned his arms on the back of the sofa and closed his eyes.
  • Hand this to Count Willarski (he took out his notebook and wrote a few words on a large sheet of paper folded in four).
  • The hairs tied in the knot hurt Pierre and there were lines of pain on his face and a shamefaced smile.
  • Left alone, Pierre went on smiling in the same way.
  • Pierre went nearer and saw that the lamp stood on a black table on which lay an open book.
  • Hoping to enter on an entirely new life quite unlike the old one, he expected everything to be unusual, even more unusual than what he was seeing.
  • This short man had on a white leather apron which covered his chest and part of his legs; he had on a kind of necklace above which rose a high white ruffle, outlining his rather long face which was lit up from below.
  • "Very well," said Smolyaninov, and went on at once: "Have you any idea of the means by which our holy Order will help you to reach your aim?" said he quietly and quickly.
  • The Rhetor cleared his throat, crossed his gloved hands on his breast, and began to speak.
  • "I must also inform you," said the Rhetor, "that our Order delivers its teaching not in words only but also by other means, which may perhaps have a stronger effect on the sincere seeker after wisdom and virtue than mere words.
  • "That passion which more than all others caused you to waver on the path of virtue," said the Mason.
  • After that they took his right hand, placed it on something, and told him to hold a pair of compasses to his left breast with the other hand and to repeat after someone who read aloud an oath of fidelity to the laws of the Order.
  • On seeing this, Pierre moved forward with his breast toward the swords, meaning them to pierce it.
  • On his right sat the Italian abbe whom Pierre had met at Anna Pavlovna's two years before.
  • This silence was broken by one of the brethren, who led Pierre up to the rug and began reading to him from a manuscript book an explanation of all the figures on it: the sun, the moon, a hammer, a plumb line, a trowel, a rough stone and a squared stone, a pillar, three windows, and so on.
  • He finished and, getting up, embraced and kissed Pierre, who, with tears of joy in his eyes, looked round him, not knowing how to answer the congratulations and greetings from acquaintances that met him on all sides.
  • All the Masons sat down in their places, and one of them read an exhortation on the necessity of humility.
  • The meeting was at an end, and on reaching home Pierre felt as if he had returned from a long journey on which he had spent dozens of years, had become completely changed, and had quite left behind his former habits and way of life.
  • On the previous evening at the Lodge, he had heard that a rumor of his duel had reached the Emperor and that it would be wiser for him to leave Petersburg.
  • Pierre tried several times to speak, but, on one hand, Prince Vasili did not let him and, on the other, Pierre himself feared to begin to speak in the tone of decided refusal and disagreement in which he had firmly resolved to answer his father-in-law.
  • "Go!" he repeated, amazed at himself and glad to see the look of confusion and fear that showed itself on Prince Vasili's face.
  • We shall not cease to express our sincere views on that subject, and can only say to the King of Prussia and others: 'So much the worse for you.
  • On Tuesday between eight and nine.
  • Anna Pavlovna waited for him to go on, but as he seemed quite decided to say no more she began to tell of how at Potsdam the impious Bonaparte had stolen the sword of Frederick the Great.
  • The conversation did not flag all evening and turned chiefly on the political news.
  • When everybody rose to go, Helene who had spoken very little all the evening again turned to Boris, asking him in a tone of caressing significant command to come to her on Tuesday.
  • She seemed to promise to explain that necessity to him when he came on Tuesday.
  • There were other guests and the countess talked little to him, and only as he kissed her hand on taking leave said unexpectedly and in a whisper, with a strangely unsmiling face: Come to dinner tomorrow... in the evening.
  • Everywhere one heard curses on Bonaparte, "the enemy of mankind."
  • But what was still stranger, though of this Prince Andrew said nothing to his sister, was that in the expression the sculptor had happened to give the angel's face, Prince Andrew read the same mild reproach he had read on the face of his dead wife: "Ah, why have you done this to me?"
  • The old man, roused by activity, expected the best results from the new campaign, while Prince Andrew on the contrary, taking no part in the war and secretly regretting this, saw only the dark side.
  • On February 26, 1807, the old prince set off on one of his circuits.
  • On February 26, 1807, the old prince set off on one of his circuits.
  • "If you please, your excellency, Petrusha has brought some papers," said one of the nursemaids to Prince Andrew who was sitting on a child's little chair while, frowning and with trembling hands, he poured drops from a medicine bottle into a wineglass half full of water.
  • There were in the room a child's cot, two boxes, two armchairs, a table, a child's table, and the little chair on which Prince Andrew was sitting.
  • Prince Andrew got up and went on tiptoe up to the little bed, wineglass in hand.
  • Worn out by sleeplessness and anxiety they threw their burden of sorrow on one another and reproached and disputed with each other.
  • Prince Andrew winced and, clutching his head, went out and sat down on a sofa in the next room.
  • The Prussian generals pride themselves on being polite to the French and lay down their arms at the first demand.
  • On the 4th, the first courier arrives from Petersburg.
  • The field marshal looks on and waits for letters addressed to him.
  • Ah, ordered to keep an eye on me!
  • Both generals are angry, and the result is a challenge on Buxhowden's part and an epileptic fit on Bennigsen's.
  • He went on tiptoe to the nursery door and opened it.
  • "All is over," he thought, and a cold sweat broke out on his forehead.
  • About 80,000 went in payments on all the estates to the Land Bank, about 30,000 went for the upkeep of the estate near Moscow, the town house, and the allowance to the three princesses; about 15,000 was given in pensions and the same amount for asylums; 150,000 alimony was sent to the countess; about 70,000 went for interest on debts.
  • Continuing to represent the liberation of the serfs as impracticable, he arranged for the erection of large buildings--schools, hospitals, and asylums--on all the estates before the master arrived.
  • The southern spring, the comfortable rapid traveling in a Vienna carriage, and the solitude of the road, all had a gladdening effect on Pierre.
  • The estates he had not before visited were each more picturesque than the other; the serfs everywhere seemed thriving and touchingly grateful for the benefits conferred on them.
  • On a third estate the priest, bearing a cross, came to meet him surrounded by children whom, by the count's generosity, he was instructing in reading, writing, and religion.
  • On all his estates Pierre saw with his own eyes brick buildings erected or in course of erection, all on one plan, for hospitals, schools, and almshouses, which were soon to be opened.
  • On all his estates Pierre saw with his own eyes brick buildings erected or in course of erection, all on one plan, for hospitals, schools, and almshouses, which were soon to be opened.
  • What Pierre did not know was that the place where they presented him with bread and salt and wished to build a chantry in honor of Peter and Paul was a market village where a fair was held on St. Peter's day, and that the richest peasants (who formed the deputation) had begun the chantry long before, but that nine tenths of the peasants in that villages were in a state of the greatest poverty.
  • He did not know that since the nursing mothers were no longer sent to work on his land, they did still harder work on their own land.
  • He did not know that the brick buildings, built to plan, were being built by serfs whose manorial labor was thus increased, though lessened on paper.
  • He quickly entered the small reception room with its still-unplastered wooden walls redolent of pine, and would have gone farther, but Anton ran ahead on tiptoe and knocked at a door.
  • Pierre embraced him and lifting his spectacles kissed his friend on the cheek and looked at him closely.
  • As is usually the case with people meeting after a prolonged separation, it was long before their conversation could settle on anything.
  • At last the conversation gradually settled on some of the topics at first lightly touched on: their past life, plans for the future, Pierre's journeys and occupations, the war, and so on.
  • Prince Andrew spoke with some animation and interest only of the new homestead he was constructing and its buildings, but even here, while on the scaffolding, in the midst of a talk explaining the future arrangements of the house, he interrupted himself:
  • At dinner, conversation turned on Pierre's marriage.
  • "When you see my sister, Princess Mary, you'll get on with her," he said.
  • Well, you want an argument," he added, "come on then."
  • "Come, let's argue then," said Prince Andrew, "You talk of schools," he went on, crooking a finger, "education and so forth; that is, you want to raise him" (pointing to a peasant who passed by them taking off his cap) "from his animal condition and awaken in him spiritual needs, while it seems to me that animal happiness is the only happiness possible, and that is just what you want to deprive him of.
  • Prince Andrew expressed his ideas so clearly and distinctly that it was evident he had reflected on this subject more than once, and he spoke readily and rapidly like a man who has not talked for a long time.
  • That is not cleanly," said Prince Andrew; "on the contrary one must try to make one's life as pleasant as possible.
  • I should be thankful to do nothing, but here on the one hand the local nobility have done me the honor to choose me to be their marshal; it was all I could do to get out of it.
  • In Siberia they lead the same animal life, and the stripes on their bodies heal, and they are happy as before.
  • While the carriage and horses were being placed on it, they also stepped on the raft.
  • Prince Andrew, leaning his arms on the raft railing, gazed silently at the flooding waters glittering in the setting sun.
  • You see a reign of goodness and truth on earth, but I don't see it.
  • You say you can't see a reign of goodness and truth on earth.
  • Nor could I, and it cannot be seen if one looks on our life here as the end of everything.
  • On earth, here on this earth" (Pierre pointed to the fields), "there is no truth, all is false and evil; but in the universe, in the whole universe there is a kingdom of truth, and we who are now the children of earth are--eternally--children of the whole universe.
  • On earth, here on this earth" (Pierre pointed to the fields), "there is no truth, all is false and evil; but in the universe, in the whole universe there is a kingdom of truth, and we who are now the children of earth are--eternally--children of the whole universe.
  • The sun had sunk half below the horizon and an evening frost was starring the puddles near the ferry, but Pierre and Andrew, to the astonishment of the footmen, coachmen, and ferrymen, still stood on the raft and talked.
  • We must live, we must love, and we must believe that we live not only today on this scrap of earth, but have lived and shall live forever, there, in the Whole, said Pierre, and he pointed to the sky.
  • Prince Andrew stood leaning on the railing of the raft listening to Pierre, and he gazed with his eyes fixed on the red reflection of the sun gleaming on the blue waters.
  • As they approached the house, Prince Andrew with a smile drew Pierre's attention to a commotion going on at the back porch.
  • A woman, bent with age, with a wallet on her back, and a short, long-haired, young man in a black garment had rushed back to the gate on seeing the carriage driving up.
  • Princess Mary really was disconcerted and red patches came on her face when they went in.
  • In her snug room, with lamps burning before the icon stand, a young lad with a long nose and long hair, wearing a monk's cassock, sat on the sofa beside her, behind a samovar.
  • Near them, in an armchair, sat a thin, shriveled, old woman, with a meek expression on her childlike face.
  • It was evident that Prince Andrew's ironical tone toward the pilgrims and Princess Mary's helpless attempts to protect them were their customary long-established relations on the matter.
  • Princess Mary's embarrassment on her people's account was quite unnecessary.
  • On hearing those words I said good-by to the holy folk and went.
  • All were silent, only the pilgrim woman went on in measured tones, drawing in her breath.
  • Such a brightness on the face like the light of heaven, and from the blessed Mother's cheek it drops and drops....
  • "They impose on the people," he repeated.
  • * "Princess, on my word, I did not wish to offend her."
  • Old women's nonsense--old women's nonsense! he repeated, but still he patted Pierre affectionately on the shoulder, and then went up to the table where Prince Andrew, evidently not wishing to join in the conversation, was looking over the papers his father had brought from town.
  • Well, my boy, the old prince went on, addressing his son and patting Pierre on the shoulder.
  • The old prince came in to supper; this was evidently on Pierre's account.
  • On approaching it, Rostov felt as he had done when approaching his home in Moscow.
  • Having once more entered into the definite conditions of this regimental life, Rostov felt the joy and relief a tired man feels on lying down to rest.
  • A thaw had set in, it was muddy and cold, the ice on the river broke, and the roads became impassable.
  • In the hospitals, death was so certain that soldiers suffering from fever, or the swelling that came from bad food, preferred to remain on duty, and hardly able to drag their legs went to the front rather than to the hospitals.
  • When spring came on, the soldiers found a plant just showing out of the ground that looked like asparagus, which, for some reason, they called "Mashka's sweet root."
  • Despite this destitution, the soldiers and officers went on living just as usual.
  • On one of his foraging expeditions, in a deserted and ruined village to which he had come in search of provisions, Rostov found a family consisting of an old Pole and his daughter with an infant in arms.
  • They were half clad, hungry, too weak to get away on foot and had no means of obtaining a conveyance.
  • Denisov patted him on the shoulder and began rapidly pacing the room without looking at Rostov, as was his way at moments of deep feeling.
  • The trench itself was the room, in which the lucky ones, such as the squadron commander, had a board, lying on piles at the end opposite the entrance, to serve as a table.
  • On each side of the trench, the earth was cut out to a breadth of about two and a half feet, and this did duty for bedsteads and couches.
  • The roof was so constructed that one could stand up in the middle of the trench and could even sit up on the beds if one drew close to the table.
  • In April, Rostov was on orderly duty.
  • One morning, between seven and eight, returning after a sleepless night, he sent for embers, changed his rain-soaked underclothes, said his prayers, drank tea, got warm, then tidied up the things on the table and in his own corner, and, his face glowing from exposure to the wind and with nothing on but his shirt, lay down on his back, putting his arms under his head.
  • Rostov lay down again on his bed and thought complacently: "Let him fuss and bustle now, my job's done and I'm lying down--capitally!"
  • Five minutes later, Denisov came into the hut, climbed with muddy boots on the bed, lit his pipe, furiously scattered his things about, took his leaded whip, buckled on his saber, and went out again.
  • In the middle of the game, the officers saw some wagons approaching with fifteen hussars on their skinny horses behind them.
  • "Go to the devil! quick ma'ch, while you're safe and sound!" and Denisov turned his horse on the officer.
  • From the regimental commander's, Denisov rode straight to the staff with a sincere desire to act on this advice.
  • Then he says: 'Go and give a weceipt to the commissioner, but your affair will be passed on to headquarters.'
  • Who is it that's starving us? shouted Denisov, hitting the table with the fist of his newly bled arm so violently that the table nearly broke down and the tumblers on it jumped about.
  • Take this and this!' and I hit him so pat, stwaight on his snout...
  • The case, as represented by the offended parties, was that, after seizing the transports, Major Denisov, being drunk, went to the chief quartermaster and without any provocation called him a thief, threatened to strike him, and on being led out had rushed into the office and given two officials a thrashing, and dislocated the arm of one of them.
  • Every day, letters of inquiry and notices from the court arrived, and on the first of May, Denisov was ordered to hand the squadron over to the next in seniority and appear before the staff of his division to explain his violence at the commissariat office.
  • On the previous day Platov reconnoitered with two Cossack regiments and two squadrons of hussars.
  • On the stairs he met a Russian army doctor smoking a cigar.
  • Only we two, Makeev and I" (he pointed to the assistant), "keep on here.
  • Glancing in at the door, Rostov saw that the sick and wounded were lying on the floor on straw and overcoats.
  • Just before him, almost across the middle of the passage on the bare floor, lay a sick man, probably a Cossack to judge by the cut of his hair.
  • The man lay on his back, his huge arms and legs outstretched.
  • Close to the corner, on an overcoat, sat an old, unshaven, gray-bearded soldier as thin as a skeleton, with a stern sallow face and eyes intently fixed on Rostov.
  • The man's neighbor on one side whispered something to him, pointing at Rostov, who noticed that the old man wanted to speak to him.
  • His neighbor on the other side, who lay motionless some distance from him with his head thrown back, was a young soldier with a snub nose.
  • There were beds in these rooms and the sick and wounded officers were lying or sitting on them.
  • Denisov lay asleep on his bed with his head under the blanket, though it was nearly noon.
  • Rostov even noticed that Denisov did not like to be reminded of the regiment, or in general of that other free life which was going on outside the hospital.
  • On Rostov's inquiry as to how the matter stood, he at once produced from under his pillow a paper he had received from the commission and the rough draft of his answer to it.
  • Only the man who had the next bed, a stout Uhlan, continued to sit on his bed, gloomily frowning and smoking a pipe, and little one-armed Tushin still listened, shaking his head disapprovingly.
  • No doubt he" (indicating Rostov) "has connections on the staff.
  • Denisov interrupted him, went on reading his paper.
  • On the thirteenth of June the French and Russian Emperors arrived in Tilsit.
  • Boris Drubetskoy had asked the important personage on whom he was in attendance, to include him in the suite appointed for the stay at Tilsit.
  • The general patted him on the shoulder, with a smile.
  • Boris was among the few present at the Niemen on the day the two Emperors met.
  • Since he had begun to move in the highest circles Boris had made it his habit to watch attentively all that went on around him and to note it down.
  • On the evening of the twenty-fourth of June, Count Zhilinski arranged a supper for his French friends.
  • An expression of annoyance showed itself for a moment on his face on first recognizing Rostov.
  • "No, I came on business," replied Rostov, briefly.
  • The looks the visitors cast on him seemed to say: "And what is he sitting here for?"
  • On the contrary, I will do what I can.
  • Rostov had come to Tilsit the day least suitable for a petition on Denisov's behalf.
  • He could not himself go to the general in attendance as he was in mufti and had come to Tilsit without permission to do so, and Boris, even had he wished to, could not have done so on the following day.
  • He would understand on whose side justice lies.
  • This way, to the officer on duty" (he was shown the door leading downstairs), "only it won't be accepted."
  • On hearing this indifferent voice, Rostov grew frightened at what he was doing; the thought of meeting the Emperor at any moment was so fascinating and consequently so alarming that he was ready to run away, but the official who had questioned him opened the door, and Rostov entered.
  • "A good figure and in her first bloom," he was saying, but on seeing Rostov, he stopped short and frowned.
  • And go along with you... go, and he continued to put on the uniform the valet handed him.
  • Hardly had Rostov handed him the letter and finished explaining Denisov's case, when hasty steps and the jingling of spurs were heard on the stairs, and the general, leaving him, went to the porch.
  • In the uniform of the Preobrazhensk regiment--white chamois-leather breeches and high boots-- and wearing a star Rostov did not know (it was that of the Legion d'honneur), the monarch came out into the porch, putting on his gloves and carrying his hat under his arm.
  • Stopping beside his horse, with his hand on the saddle, the Emperor turned to the cavalry general and said in a loud voice, evidently wishing to be heard by all:
  • The Emperor rode to the square where, facing one another, a battalion of the Preobrazhensk regiment stood on the right and a battalion of the French Guards in their bearskin caps on the left.
  • On approaching Alexander he raised his hat, and as he did so, Rostov, with his cavalryman's eye, could not help noticing that Napoleon did not sit well or firmly in the saddle.
  • In spite of the trampling of the French gendarmes' horses, which were pushing back the crowd, Rostov kept his eyes on every movement of Alexander and Bonaparte.
  • The members of his suite, guessing at once what he wanted, moved about and whispered as they passed something from one to another, and a page--the same one Rostov had seen the previous evening at Boris'--ran forward and, bowing respectfully over the outstretched hand and not keeping it waiting a moment, laid in it an Order on a red ribbon.
  • Napoleon merely laid the cross on Lazarev's breast and, dropping his hand, turned toward Alexander as though sure that the cross would adhere there.
  • All on silver plate, one of them was saying.
  • On his way back, he noticed Rostov standing by the corner of a house.
  • In his mind, a painful process was going on which he could not bring to a conclusion.
  • The conversation naturally turned on the peace.
  • The process in his mind went on tormenting him without reaching a conclusion.
  • But besides considerations of foreign policy, the attention of Russian society was at that time keenly directed on the internal changes that were being undertaken in all the departments of government.
  • All the plans Pierre had attempted on his estates--and constantly changing from one thing to another had never accomplished--were carried out by Prince Andrew without display and without perceptible difficulty.
  • He had in the highest degree a practical tenacity which Pierre lacked, and without fuss or strain on his part this set things going.
  • On one of his estates the three hundred serfs were liberated and became free agricultural laborers--this being one of the first examples of the kind in Russia.
  • On other estates the serfs' compulsory labor was commuted for a quitrent.
  • Warmed by the spring sunshine he sat in the caleche looking at the new grass, the first leaves on the birches, and the first puffs of white spring clouds floating across the clear blue sky.
  • On entering the forest the horses began to snort and sweated visibly.
  • But apparently the coachman's sympathy was not enough for Peter, and he turned on the box toward his master.
  • It was dusty and so hot that on passing near water one longed to bathe.
  • He heard merry girlish cries behind some trees on the right and saw a group of girls running to cross the path of his caleche.
  • Ahead of the rest and nearer to him ran a dark- haired, remarkably slim, pretty girl in a yellow chintz dress, with a white handkerchief on her head from under which loose locks of hair escaped.
  • He was glad to see Prince Andrew, as he was to see any new visitor, and insisted on his staying the night.
  • During the dull day, in the course of which he was entertained by his elderly hosts and by the more important of the visitors (the old count's house was crowded on account of an approaching name day), Prince Andrew repeatedly glanced at Natasha, gay and laughing among the younger members of the company, and asked himself each time, What is she thinking about?
  • Just before the window was a row of pollard trees, looking black on one side and with a silvery light on the other.
  • Prince Andrew leaned his elbows on the window ledge and his eyes rested on that sky.
  • His room was on the first floor.
  • I feel like sitting down on my heels, putting my arms round my knees like this, straining tight, as tight as possible, and flying away!
  • As if it were on purpose, thought he.
  • It was already the beginning of June when on his return journey he drove into the birch forest where the gnarled old oak had made so strange and memorable an impression on him.
  • On reaching home Prince Andrew decided to go to Petersburg that autumn and found all sorts of reasons for this decision.
  • He did not even remember how formerly, on the strength of similar wretched logical arguments, it had seemed obvious that he would be degrading himself if he now, after the lessons he had had in life, allowed himself to believe in the possibility of being useful and in the possibility of happiness or love.
  • Now all these men were replaced by Speranski on the civil side, and Arakcheev on the military.
  • On the appointed day Prince Andrew entered Count Arakcheev's waiting room at nine in the morning.
  • But the moment the door opened one feeling alone appeared on all faces-- that of fear.
  • Prince Andrew for the second time asked the adjutant on duty to take in his name, but received an ironical look and was told that his turn would come in due course.
  • After this Prince Andrew was conducted to the door and the officer on duty said in a whisper, "To the right, at the window."
  • I have endorsed a resolution on your memorandum and sent it to the committee.
  • The newcomer wore a blue swallow-tail coat with a cross suspended from his neck and a star on his left breast.
  • Speranski did not shift his eyes from one face to another as people involuntarily do on entering a large company and was in no hurry to speak.
  • As happens to some people, especially to men who judge those near to them severely, he always on meeting anyone new-- especially anyone whom, like Speranski, he knew by reputation--expected to discover in him the perfection of human qualities.
  • Speranski went on to say that honor, l'honneur, cannot be upheld by privileges harmful to the service; that honor, l'honneur, is either a negative concept of not doing what is blameworthy or it is a source of emulation in pursuit of commendation and rewards, which recognize it.
  • "If you will do me the honor of calling on me on Wednesday," he added, "I will, after talking with Magnitski, let you know what may interest you, and shall also have the pleasure of a more detailed chat with you."
  • On returning home in the evening he would jot down in his notebook four or five necessary calls or appointments for certain hours.
  • He sometimes noticed with dissatisfaction that he repeated the same remark on the same day in different circles.
  • As he had done on their first meeting at Kochubey's, Speranski produced a strong impression on Prince Andrew on the Wednesday, when he received him tête-à-tête at his own house and talked to him long and confidentially.
  • Nearly two years before this, in 1808, Pierre on returning to Petersburg after visiting his estates had involuntarily found himself in a leading position among the Petersburg Freemasons.
  • Amid the turmoil of his activities and distractions, however, Pierre at the end of a year began to feel that the more firmly he tried to rest upon it, the more masonic ground on which he stood gave way under him.
  • Often after collecting alms, and reckoning up twenty to thirty rubles received for the most part in promises from a dozen members, of whom half were as well able to pay as himself, Pierre remembered the masonic vow in which each Brother promised to devote all his belongings to his neighbor, and doubts on which he tried not to dwell arose in his soul.
  • Even those members who seemed to be on his side understood him in their own way with limitations and alterations he could not agree to, as what he always wanted most was to convey his thought to others just as he himself understood it.
  • For three days after the delivery of his speech at the lodge he lay on a sofa at home receiving no one and going nowhere.
  • He received me graciously and made me sit down on the bed on which he lay.
  • On this ground Joseph Alexeevich condemned my speech and my whole activity, and in the depth of my soul I agreed with him.
  • I knew that if I once let myself see her I should not have strength to go on refusing what she wanted.
  • Pierre went on with his diary, and this is what he wrote in it during that time:
  • On waking I lay long in bed yielding to sloth.
  • They laid on me the duty of Rhetor.
  • My God, I cannot get on with him at all.
  • I dreamed that I was walking in the dark and was suddenly surrounded by dogs, but I went on undismayed.
  • I stepped on it, but it bent and gave way and I began to clamber up a fence which I could scarcely reach with my hands.
  • After much effort I dragged myself up, so that my leg hung down on one side and my body on the other.
  • I looked round and saw Brother A. standing on the fence and pointing me to a broad avenue and garden, and in the garden was a large and beautiful building.
  • We were sitting or lying on the floor.
  • He lay down on the edge of it and I burned with longing to caress him and lie down too.
  • I looked at him, still holding him in my arms, and saw that his face was young, but that he had no hair on his head and his features were quite changed.
  • And on its pages I saw a beautiful representation of a maiden in transparent garments and with a transparent body, flying up to the clouds.
  • In Petersburg they were provincials, and the very people they had entertained in Moscow without inquiring to what set they belonged, here looked down on them.
  • Though some skeptics smiled when told of Berg's merits, it could not be denied that he was a painstaking and brave officer, on excellent terms with his superiors, and a moral young man with a brilliant career before him and an assured position in society.
  • But on the contrary, my papa and mamma are now provided for--I have arranged that rent for them in the Baltic Provinces--and I can live in Petersburg on my pay, and with her fortune and my good management we can get along nicely.
  • At one time the count thought of giving her the Ryazan estate or of selling a forest, at another time of borrowing money on a note of hand.
  • And patting Berg on the shoulder he got up, wishing to end the conversation.
  • Berg smiled meekly, kissed the count on the shoulder, and said that he was very grateful, but that it was impossible for him to arrange his new life without receiving thirty thousand in ready money.
  • Natasha was sixteen and it was the year 1809, the very year to which she had counted on her fingers with Boris after they had kissed four years ago.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna also had of late visited them less frequently, seemed to hold herself with particular dignity, and always spoke rapturously and gratefully of the merits of her son and the brilliant career on which he had entered.
  • When the Rostovs came to Petersburg Boris called on them.
  • But he went with the firm intention of letting her and her parents feel that the childish relations between himself and Natasha could not be binding either on her or on him.
  • This expression on his face pleased Natasha.
  • Seeing that her mother was still praying she ran on tiptoe to the bed and, rapidly slipping one little foot against the other, pushed off her slippers and jumped onto the bed the countess had feared might become her grave.
  • Natasha jumped on it, sank into the feather bed, rolled over to the wall, and began snuggling up the bedclothes as she settled down, raising her knees to her chin, kicking out and laughing almost inaudibly, now covering herself up head and all, and now peeping at her mother.
  • Now, just one on your throat and another... that'll do!
  • And seizing her mother round the neck, she kissed her on the throat.
  • Natasha put her hand on her mother's mouth.
  • Natasha was lying looking steadily straight before her at one of the mahogany sphinxes carved on the corners of the bedstead, so that the countess only saw her daughter's face in profile.
  • The grandee's well-known mansion on the English Quay glittered with innumerable lights.
  • The countess was to wear a claret-colored velvet dress, and the two girls white gauze over pink silk slips, with roses on their bodices and their hair dressed a la grecque.
  • Sonya stood ready dressed in the middle of the room and, pressing the head of a pin till it hurt her dainty finger, was fixing on a last ribbon that squeaked as the pin went through it.
  • Sonya sat down and Natasha pinned the ribbon on differently.
  • Turning her mother's head this way and that, she fastened on the cap and, hurriedly kissing her gray hair, ran back to the maids who were turning up the hem of her skirt.
  • A third with pins in her mouth was running about between the countess and Sonya, and a fourth held the whole of the gossamer garment up high on one uplifted hand.
  • Natasha began putting on the dress.
  • "If you please, Miss! allow me," said the maid, who on her knees was pulling the skirt straight and shifting the pins from one side of her mouth to the other with her tongue.
  • "Really, madam, it is not at all too long," said Mavra, crawling on her knees after her young lady.
  • Only then did she remember how she must behave at a ball, and tried to assume the majestic air she considered indispensable for a girl on such an occasion.
  • The mirrors on the landing reflected ladies in white, pale-blue, and pink dresses, with diamonds and pearls on their bare necks and arms.
  • On entering the ballroom the regular hum of voices, footsteps, and greetings deafened Natasha, and the light and glitter dazzled her still more.
  • The two girls in their white dresses, each with a rose in her black hair, both curtsied in the same way, but the hostess' eye involuntarily rested longer on the slim Natasha.
  • And that stout one in spectacles is the universal Freemason, she went on, indicating Pierre.
  • The Emperor passed on to the drawing room, the crowd made a rush for the doors, and several persons with excited faces hurried there and back again.
  • A young man, looking distraught, pounced down on the ladies, asking them to move aside.
  • The handsome Anatole was smilingly talking to a partner on his arm and looked at Natasha as one looks at a wall.
  • She smilingly raised her hand and laid it on his shoulder without looking at him.
  • He recognized her, guessed her feelings, saw that it was her debut, remembered her conversation at the window, and with an expression of pleasure on his face approached Countess Rostova.
  • That tremulous expression on Natasha's face, prepared either for despair or rapture, suddenly brightened into a happy, grateful, childlike smile.
  • Such as she are rare here, he thought, as Natasha, readjusting a rose that was slipping on her bodice, settled herself beside him.
  • On her way to supper Natasha passed him.
  • She wished to help him, to bestow on him the superabundance of her own happiness.
  • Next day Prince Andrew thought of the ball, but his mind did not dwell on it long.
  • The visitor was Bitski, who served on various committees, frequented all the societies in Petersburg, and a passionate devotee of the new ideas and of Speranski, and a diligent Petersburg newsmonger--one of those men who choose their opinions like their clothes according to the fashion, but who for that very reason appear to be the warmest partisans.
  • While still in the anteroom Prince Andrew heard loud voices and a ringing staccato laugh--a laugh such as one hears on the stage.
  • Prince Andrew had never before heard Speranski's famous laugh, and this ringing, high-pitched laughter from a statesman made a strange impression on him.
  • Speranski, wearing a gray swallow-tail coat with a star on the breast, and evidently still the same waistcoat and high white stock he had worn at the meeting of the Council of State, stood at the table with a beaming countenance.
  • "One moment..." he went on, turning to Magnitski and interrupting his story.
  • Speranski's high-pitched voice struck him unpleasantly, and the incessant laughter grated on him like a false note.
  • Prince Andrew did not laugh and feared that he would be a damper on the spirits of the company, but no one took any notice of his being out of harmony with the general mood.
  • He recalled his labors on the Legal Code, and how painstakingly he had translated the articles of the Roman and French codes into Russian, and he felt ashamed of himself.
  • Then he vividly pictured to himself Bogucharovo, his occupations in the country, his journey to Ryazan; he remembered the peasants and Dron the village elder, and mentally applying to them the Personal Rights he had divided into paragraphs, he felt astonished that he could have spent so much time on such useless work.
  • This contrast weighed on and yet cheered him while she sang.
  • Berg explained so clearly why he wanted to collect at his house a small but select company, and why this would give him pleasure, and why though he grudged spending money on cards or anything harmful, he was prepared to run into some expense for the sake of good society--that Pierre could not refuse, and promised to come.
  • Contrary to his habit of being late, Pierre on that day arrived at the Bergs' house, not at ten but at fifteen minutes to eight.
  • (He rose and kissed Vera's hand, and on the way to her straightened out a turned-up corner of the carpet.)
  • Berg rose and embraced his wife carefully, so as not to crush her lace fichu for which he had paid a good price, kissing her straight on the lips.
  • The old people sat with the old, the young with the young, and the hostess at the tea table, on which stood exactly the same kind of cakes in a silver cake basket as the Panins had at their party.
  • Natasha on one side was talking with Sonya and Boris, and Vera with a subtle smile was saying something to Prince Andrew.
  • "Well?" asked Pierre, seeing his friend's strange animation with surprise, and noticing the glance he turned on Natasha as he rose.
  • "I... but no, I will talk to you later on," and with a strange light in his eyes and restlessness in his movements, Prince Andrew approached Natasha and sat down beside her.
  • But at that moment Berg came to Pierre and began insisting that he should take part in an argument between the general and the colonel on the affairs in Spain.
  • Prince Andrew, with a beaming, ecstatic expression of renewed life on his face, paused in front of Pierre and, not noticing his sad look, smiled at him with the egotism of joy.
  • Suddenly Pierre heaved a deep sigh and dumped his heavy person down on the sofa beside Prince Andrew.
  • And that's my last word on it.
  • On the second and third day it was the same.
  • Her voice trembled, and she again nearly cried, but recovered and went on quietly:
  • Things are nice as it is, she said to herself, and she began walking up and down the room, not stepping simply on the resounding parquet but treading with each step from the heel to the toe (she had on a new and favorite pair of shoes) and listening to the regular tap of the heel and creak of the toe as gladly as she had to the sounds of her own voice.
  • I hope... but it will depend on her....
  • Natasha was sitting on the bed, pale and dry eyed, and was gazing at the icons and whispering something as she rapidly crossed herself.
  • She did not even cry when, on taking leave, he kissed her hand for the last time.
  • The first death I saw, and one I shall never forget--that of my dear sister-in-law--left that impression on me.
  • But not to speak of her alone, that early and terrible death has had the most beneficent influence on me and on my brother in spite of all our grief.
  • He cannot endure the notion that Buonaparte is negotiating on equal terms with all the sovereigns of Europe and particularly with our own, the grandson of the Great Catherine!
  • Our family life goes on in the old way except for my brother Andrew's absence.
  • On his arrival in Petersburg he received only his due.
  • But I am running on too long and am at the end of my second sheet.
  • My father then insisted on a delay of a year and now already six months, half of that period, have passed, and my resolution is firmer than ever.
  • When Theodosia had gone to sleep Princess Mary thought about this for a long time, and at last made up her mind that, strange as it might seem, she must go on a pilgrimage.
  • Often, listening to the pilgrims' tales, she was so stimulated by their simple speech, mechanical to them but to her so full of deep meaning, that several times she was on the point of abandoning everything and running away from home.
  • Fallen man has retained a love of idleness, but the curse weighs on the race not only because we have to seek our bread in the sweat of our brows, but because our moral nature is such that we cannot be both idle and at ease.
  • The right thing now was, if not to retire from the service, at any rate to go home on leave.
  • At the last post station before Otradnoe he gave the driver a three-ruble tip, and on arriving he ran breathlessly, like a boy, up the steps of his home.
  • She exhaled happiness and love from the time Nicholas returned, and the faithful, unalterable love of this girl had a gladdening effect on him.
  • On the contrary, but what dignity?
  • Once, when he had touched on this topic with his mother, he discovered, to his surprise and somewhat to his satisfaction, that in the depth of her soul she too had doubts about this marriage.
  • To throw off this burden as quickly as possible, on the third day after his arrival he went, angry and scowling and without answering questions as to where he was going, to Mitenka's lodge and demanded an account of everything.
  • The countess, who heard at once from the maids what had happened at the lodge, was calmed by the thought that now their affairs would certainly improve, but on the other hand felt anxious as to the effect this excitement might have on her son.
  • She went several times to his door on tiptoe and listened, as he lighted one pipe after another.
  • On the fifteenth, when young Rostov, in his dressing gown, looked out of the window, he saw it was an unsurpassable morning for hunting: it was as if the sky were melting and sinking to the earth without any wind.
  • The bare twigs in the garden were hung with transparent drops which fell on the freshly fallen leaves.
  • Milka, a black-spotted, broad-haunched bitch with prominent black eyes, got up on seeing her master, stretched her hind legs, lay down like a hare, and then suddenly jumped up and licked him right on his nose and mustache.
  • Though Daniel was not a big man, to see him in a room was like seeing a horse or a bear on the floor among the furniture and surroundings of human life.
  • He cast down his eyes and hurried out as if it were none of his business, careful as he went not to inflict any accidental injury on the young lady.
  • The old count had always kept up an enormous hunting establishment.
  • He had a look at all the details of the hunt, sent a pack of hounds and huntsmen on ahead to find the quarry, mounted his chestnut Donets, and whistling to his own leash of borzois, set off across the threshing ground to a field leading to the Otradnoe wood.
  • The old count's horse, a sorrel gelding called Viflyanka, was led by the groom in attendance on him, while the count himself was to drive in a small trap straight to a spot reserved for him.
  • Besides the family, there were eight borzoi kennelmen and more than forty borzois, so that, with the borzois on the leash belonging to members of the family, there were about a hundred and thirty dogs and twenty horsemen.
  • The hounds were joined into one pack, and "Uncle" and Nicholas rode on side by side.
  • Natasha sat easily and confidently on her black Arabchik and reined him in without effort with a firm hand.
  • "A good thing too, little countess," said "Uncle," "only mind you don't fall off your horse," he added, "because--that's it, come on!--you've nothing to hold on to."
  • Rostov, having finally settled with "Uncle" where they should set on the hounds, and having shown Natasha where she was to stand--a spot where nothing could possibly run out--went round above the ravine.
  • Having straightened his coat and fastened on his hunting knives and horn, he mounted his good, sleek, well-fed, and comfortable horse, Viflyanka, which was turning gray, like himself.
  • The thin, hollow-cheeked Chekmar, having got everything ready, kept glancing at his master with whom he had lived on the best of terms for thirty years, and understanding the mood he was in expected a pleasant chat.
  • This person was a gray-bearded old man in a woman's cloak, with a tall peaked cap on his head.
  • And how well he looks on his horse, eh?
  • Simon did not finish, for on the still air he had distinctly caught the music of the hunt with only two or three hounds giving tongue.
  • "They are on the scent of the cubs..." he whispered, "straight to the Lyadov uplands."
  • The whippers-in no longer set on the hounds, but changed to the cry of ulyulyu, and above the others rose Daniel's voice, now a deep bass, now piercingly shrill.
  • The count turned and saw on his right Mitka staring at him with eyes starting out of his head, raising his cap and pointing before him to the other side.
  • The count and Simon galloped out of the wood and saw on their left a wolf which, softly swaying from side to side, was coming at a quiet lope farther to the left to the very place where they were standing.
  • On its long back sat Daniel, hunched forward, capless, his disheveled gray hair hanging over his flushed, perspiring face.
  • He was galloping round by the bushes while the field was coming up on both sides, all trying to head the wolf, but it vanished into the wood before they could do so.
  • A thousand times during that half-hour Rostov cast eager and restless glances over the edge of the wood, with the two scraggy oaks rising above the aspen undergrowth and the gully with its water-worn side and "Uncle's" cap just visible above the bush on his right.
  • Nicholas did not hear his own cry nor feel that he was galloping, nor see the borzois, nor the ground over which he went: he saw only the wolf, who, increasing her speed, bounded on in the same direction along the hollow.
  • Nearer and nearer... now she was ahead of it; but the wolf turned its head to face her, and instead of putting on speed as she usually did Milka suddenly raised her tail and stiffened her forelegs.
  • But the wolf jumped up more quickly than anyone could have expected and, gnashing her teeth, flew at the yellowish borzoi, which, with a piercing yelp, fell with its head on the ground, bleeding from a gash in its side.
  • But here Nicholas only saw that something happened to Karay--the borzoi was suddenly on the wolf, and they rolled together down into a gully just in front of them.
  • With his hand on his saddlebow, he was ready to dismount and stab the wolf, when she suddenly thrust her head up from among that mass of dogs, and then her forepaws were on the edge of the gully.
  • Daniel rose a little, took a step, and with his whole weight, as if lying down to rest, fell on the wolf, seizing her by the ears.
  • We'll gag her! and, changing his position, set his foot on the wolf's neck.
  • He saw the whips in their red caps galloping along the edge of the ravine, he even saw the hounds, and was expecting a fox to show itself at any moment on the ryefield opposite.
  • The borzois bore down on it....
  • Then from that spot came the sound of a horn, with the signal agreed on in case of a fight.
  • Here it is on my saddle!
  • Hardly had he passed an angle of the wood before a stout gentleman in a beaver cap came riding toward him on a handsome raven-black horse, accompanied by two hunt servants.
  • Rostov was particularly struck by the beauty of a small, pure-bred, red- spotted bitch on Ilagin's leash, slender but with muscles like steel, a delicate muzzle, and prominent black eyes.
  • "So in your parts, too, the harvest is nothing to boast of, Count?" he went on, continuing the conversation they had begun.
  • He stood on a knoll in the stubble, holding his whip aloft, and again repeated his long-drawn cry, "A-tu!"
  • The latter was riding with a sullen expression on his face.
  • "Rugayushka!" he added, involuntarily by this diminutive expressing his affection and the hopes he placed on this red borzoi.
  • The huntsman stood halfway up the knoll holding up his whip and the gentlefolk rode up to him at a footpace; the hounds that were far off on the horizon turned away from the hare, and the whips, but not the gentlefolk, also moved away.
  • The pack on leash rushed downhill in full cry after the hare, and from all sides the borzois that were not on leash darted after the hounds and the hare.
  • He took a dozen bounds, not very quickly, letting the borzois gain on him, and, finally having chosen his direction and realized his danger, laid back his ears and rushed off headlong.
  • From behind Erza rushed the broad- haunched, black-spotted Milka and began rapidly gaining on the hare.
  • That's it, come on! said he, panting and looking wrathfully around as if he were abusing someone, as if they were all his enemies and had insulted him, and only now had he at last succeeded in justifying himself.
  • That's it, come on!" said "Uncle."
  • Rugay, his back still muddy, came into the room and lay down on the sofa, cleaning himself with his tongue and teeth.
  • Natasha, Nicholas, and Petya took off their wraps and sat down on the sofa.
  • Petya, leaning on his elbow, fell asleep at once.
  • When she had finished, she stepped aside and stopped at the door with a smile on her face.
  • On the tray was a bottle of herb wine, different kinds of vodka, pickled mushrooms, rye cakes made with buttermilk, honey in the comb, still mead and sparkling mead, apples, nuts (raw and roasted), and nut-and-honey sweets.
  • After supper, over their cherry brandy, Rostov and "Uncle" talked of past and future hunts, of Rugay and Ilagin's dogs, while Natasha sat upright on the sofa and listened with sparkling eyes.
  • "Uncle" sat listening, slightly smiling, with his head on one side.
  • Go on, Uncle, go on! shouted Natasha as soon as he had finished.
  • "Go on, Uncle dear," Natasha wailed in an imploring tone as if her life depended on it.
  • "Well, little countess; that's it--come on!" cried "Uncle," with a joyous laugh, having finished the dance.
  • He accompanied them on foot as far as the bridge that could not be crossed, so that they had to go round by the ford, and he sent huntsmen to ride in front with lanterns.
  • There was still the hunting establishment which Nicholas had enlarged.
  • Karagina had replied that for her part she was agreeable, and everything depend on her daughter's inclination.
  • On the third day of Christmas week, after the midday dinner, all the inmates of the house dispersed to various rooms.
  • On her way past the butler's pantry she told them to set a samovar, though it was not at all the time for tea.
  • She could not see people unconcernedly, but had to send them on some errand.
  • And tapping with her heels, she ran quickly upstairs to see Vogel and his wife who lived on the upper story.
  • Two governesses were sitting with the Vogels at a table, on which were plates of raisins, walnuts, and almonds.
  • Her brother Petya was upstairs too; with the man in attendance on him he was preparing fireworks to let off that night.
  • She jumped on it, putting her arms round his neck, and he pranced along with her.
  • She sat behind the bookcase with her eyes fixed on a streak of light escaping from the pantry door and listened to herself and pondered.
  • She was in a mood for brooding on the past.
  • The servants stood round the table--but Prince Andrew was not there and life was going on as before.
  • And do you remember how we rolled hard-boiled eggs in the ballroom, and suddenly two old women began spinning round on the carpet?
  • Dimmler began to play; Natasha went on tiptoe noiselessly to the table, took up a candle, carried it out, and returned, seating herself quietly in her former place.
  • It was dark in the room especially where they were sitting on the sofa, but through the big windows the silvery light of the full moon fell on the floor.
  • "Do you know," said Natasha in a whisper, moving closer to Nicholas and Sonya, "that when one goes on and on recalling memories, one at last begins to remember what happened before one was in the world..."
  • "Idiot!" she screamed at her brother and, running to a chair, threw herself on it, sobbing so violently that she could not stop for a long time.
  • The old count's troyka, with Dimmler and his party, started forward, squeaking on its runners as though freezing to the snow, its deep-toned bell clanging.
  • The horses showered the fine dry snow on the faces of those in the sleigh--beside them sounded quick ringing bells and they caught confused glimpses of swiftly moving legs and the shadows of the troyka they were passing.
  • The whistling sound of the runners on the snow and the voices of girls shrieking were heard from different sides.
  • They were quietly dropping melted wax into snow and looking at the shadows the wax figures would throw on the wall, when they heard the steps and voices of new arrivals in the vestibule.
  • It depends on what you hear; hammering and knocking--that's bad; but a sound of shifting grain is good and one sometimes hears that, too.
  • Halfway lay some snow-covered piles of firewood and across and along them a network of shadows from the bare old lime trees fell on the snow and on the path.
  • He slipped his arms under the cloak that covered her head, embraced her, pressed her to him, and kissed her on the lips that wore a mustache and had a smell of burnt cork.
  • Sonya kissed him full on the lips, and disengaging her little hands pressed them to his cheeks.
  • On the way back Nicholas drove at a steady pace instead of racing and kept peering by that fantastic all-transforming light into Sonya's face and searching beneath the eyebrows and mustache for his former and his present Sonya from whom he had resolved never to be parted again.
  • On Natasha's table stood two looking glasses which Dunyasha had prepared beforehand.
  • Natasha lit the candles, one on each side of one of the looking glasses, and sat down.
  • Is he ill? asked Natasha, her frightened eyes fixed on her friend.
  • No, on the contrary, on the contrary!
  • Nicholas replied that he could not go back on his word, and his father, sighing and evidently disconcerted, very soon became silent and went in to the countess.
  • She could not help loving the countess and the whole Rostov family, but neither could she help loving Nicholas and knowing that his happiness depended on that love.
  • The countess, sobbing heavily, hid her face on her daughter's breast, while Nicholas rose, clutching his head, and left the room.
  • Natasha set to work to effect a reconciliation, and so far succeeded that Nicholas received a promise from his mother that Sonya should not be troubled, while he on his side promised not to undertake anything without his parents' knowledge.
  • Sonya was unhappy at the separation from Nicholas and still more so on account of the hostile tone the countess could not help adopting toward her.
  • As soon as he sank into his place on the sofa after two bottles of Margaux he was surrounded, and talking, disputing, and joking began.
  • The Spaniards, through the Catholic clergy, offer praise to God for their victory over the French on the fourteenth of June, and the French, also through the Catholic clergy, offer praise because on that same fourteenth of June they defeated the Spaniards.
  • On coming home, while his valets were still taking off his things, he picked up a book and began to read.
  • But the later on never came.
  • Don't let me set eyes on you; beg her pardon!
  • Prince Nicholas had always ridiculed medicine, but latterly on Mademoiselle Bourienne's advice had allowed this doctor to visit him and had grown accustomed to him.
  • On December 6--St.
  • It happened that on that morning of his name day the prince was in one of his worst moods.
  • At first she heard only Metivier's voice, then her father's, then both voices began speaking at the same time, the door was flung open, and on the threshold appeared the handsome figure of the terrified Metivier with his shock of black hair, and the prince in his dressing gown and fez, his face distorted with fury and the pupils of his eyes rolled downwards.
  • After Metivier's departure the old prince called his daughter in, and the whole weight of his wrath fell on her.
  • Had he not told her, yes, told her to make a list, and not to admit anyone who was not on that list?
  • Boris had realized this the week before when the commander-in-chief in his presence invited Rostopchin to dinner on St. Nicholas' Day, and Rostopchin had replied that he could not come:
  • On that day I always go to pay my devotions to the relics of Prince Nicholas Bolkonski.
  • He said this because on his journey from Petersburg he had had the honor of being presented to the Duke.
  • On this fact relating to the Emperor personally, it was impossible to pass any judgment.
  • He was here; they admitted him in spite of my request that they should let no one in, he went on, glancing angrily at his daughter.
  • Prince Nicholas grew more animated and expressed his views on the impending war.
  • There now, you turned Metivier out by the scruff of his neck because he is a Frenchman and a scoundrel, but our ladies crawl after him on their knees.
  • I went to a party last night, and there out of five ladies three were Roman Catholics and had the Pope's indulgence for doing woolwork on Sundays.
  • Because I have noticed that when a young man comes on leave from Petersburg to Moscow it is usually with the object of marrying an heiress.
  • "Ah, how bitter it is to love someone near to you and to feel that..." she went on in a trembling voice, "that you can do nothing for him but grieve him, and to know that you cannot alter this.
  • Princess Mary sighed, and the expression on her face said: "Yes, that's what I expected and feared."
  • When they had last met on the old prince's name day, she had answered at random all his attempts to talk sentimentally, evidently not listening to what he was saying.
  • Julie on the contrary accepted his attentions readily, though in a manner peculiar to herself.
  • On another page he drew a tomb, and wrote:
  • Meeting at large gatherings Julie and Boris looked on one another as the only souls who understood one another in a world of indifferent people.
  • "And how I pity her mother," she went on; "today she showed me her accounts and letters from Penza (they have enormous estates there), and she, poor thing, has no one to help her, and they do cheat her so!"
  • He spent every day and whole days at the Karagins', and every day on thinking the matter over told himself that he would propose tomorrow.
  • Her irritability had suddenly quite vanished, and her anxious, imploring eyes were fixed on him with greedy expectation.
  • There was no need to say more: Julie's face shone with triumph and self- satisfaction; but she forced Boris to say all that is said on such occasions--that he loved her and had never loved any other woman more than her.
  • From early in the morning, wearing a dressing jacket, she attended to her household affairs, and then she drove out: on holy days to church and after the service to jails and prisons on affairs of which she never spoke to anyone.
  • On ordinary days, after dressing, she received petitioners of various classes, of whom there were always some.
  • Marya Dmitrievna, with her spectacles hanging down on her nose and her head flung back, stood in the hall doorway looking with a stern, grim face at the new arrivals.
  • But we'll speak of that later on, she added, glancing at Sonya with a look that showed she did not want to speak of it in her presence.
  • He dined with me on Wednesday.
  • One thing has come on top of another: her rags to buy, and now a purchaser has turned up for the Moscow estate and for the house.
  • I congratulate you on your betrothed.
  • The count did not set out cheerfully on this visit, at heart he felt afraid.
  • Natasha, on the other hand, having put on her best gown, was in the highest spirits.
  • They drove up to the gloomy old house on the Vozdvizhenka and entered the vestibule.
  • Natasha raised her head and, kissing her friend on the lips, pressed her wet face against her.
  • Behind them sat Anna Mikhaylovna wearing a green headdress and with a happy look of resignation to the will of God on her face.
  • While Natasha was fixing her gaze on her for the second time the lady looked round and, meeting the count's eyes, nodded to him and smiled.
  • I'm here on business and have brought my girls with me.
  • They sang together and everyone in the theater began clapping and shouting, while the man and woman on the stage--who represented lovers-- began smiling, spreading out their arms, and bowing.
  • She did not realize who and where she was, nor what was going on before her.
  • At a moment when all was quiet before the commencement of a song, a door leading to the stalls on the side nearest the Rostovs' box creaked, and the steps of a belated arrival were heard.
  • Having looked at Natasha he approached his sister, laid his well gloved hand on the edge of her box, nodded to her, and leaning forward asked a question, with a motion toward Natasha.
  • On seeing Natasha Pierre grew animated and, hastily passing between the rows, came toward their box.
  • When he got there he leaned on his elbows and, smiling, talked to her for a long time.
  • The scene of the third act represented a palace in which many candles were burning and pictures of knights with short beards hung on the walls.
  • The king waved his right arm and, evidently nervous, sang something badly and sat down on a crimson throne.
  • But suddenly a storm came on, chromatic scales and diminished sevenths were heard in the orchestra, everyone ran off, again dragging one of their number away, and the curtain dropped.
  • Kuragin asked her opinion of the performance and told her how at a previous performance Semenova had fallen down on the stage.
  • All that was going on before her now seemed quite natural, but on the other hand all her previous thoughts of her betrothed, of Princess Mary, or of life in the country did not once recur to her mind and were as if belonging to a remote past.
  • I have done nothing, I didn't lead him on at all.
  • His father announced to him that he would now pay half his debts for the last time, but only on condition that he went to Moscow as adjutant to the commander-in-chief--a post his father had procured for him--and would at last try to make a good match there.
  • Pierre received him unwillingly at first, but got used to him after a while, sometimes even accompanied him on his carousals, and gave him money under the guise of loans.
  • As Shinshin had remarked, from the time of his arrival Anatole had turned the heads of the Moscow ladies, especially by the fact that he slighted them and plainly preferred the gypsy girls and French actresses--with the chief of whom, Mademoiselle George, he was said to be on intimate relations.
  • Natasha had made a strong impression on Kuragin.
  • On Sunday morning Marya Dmitrievna invited her visitors to Mass at her parish church--the Church of the Assumption built over the graves of victims of the plague.
  • "I don't like those fashionable churches," she said, evidently priding herself on her independence of thought.
  • Her whole house was scrubbed and cleaned on Saturdays; neither she nor the servants worked, and they all wore holiday dress and went to church.
  • But in nothing in the house was the holiday so noticeable as in Marya Dmitrievna's broad, stern face, which on that day wore an invariable look of solemn festivity.
  • After she had gone, a dressmaker from Madame Suppert-Roguet waited on the Rostovs, and Natasha, very glad of this diversion, having shut herself into a room adjoining the drawing room, occupied herself trying on the new dresses.
  • Anatole had asked her to bring him and Natasha together, and she was calling on the Rostovs for that purpose.
  • On hearing of Countess Bezukhova's visit and the invitation for that evening, Marya Dmitrievna remarked:
  • Anatole was at the door, evidently on the lookout for the Rostovs.
  • Natasha looked at the fat actress, but neither saw nor heard nor understood anything of what went on before her.
  • She understood hardly anything that went on that evening.
  • Later on she recalled how she had asked her father to let her go to the dressing room to rearrange her dress, that Helene had followed her and spoken laughingly of her brother's love, and that she again met Anatole in the little sitting room.
  • If your betrothed comes here now--there will be no avoiding a quarrel; but alone with the old man he will talk things over and then come on to you.
  • If the old man came round it would be all the better to visit him in Moscow or at Bald Hills later on; and if not, the wedding, against his wishes, could only be arranged at Otradnoe.
  • Princess Mary went on to ask Natasha to fix a time when she could see her again.
  • Then he went on to say that he knew her parents would not give her to him--for this there were secret reasons he could reveal only to her--but that if she loved him she need only say the word yes, and no human power could hinder their bliss.
  • On returning late in the evening Sonya went to Natasha's room, and to her surprise found her still dressed and asleep on the sofa.
  • On returning late in the evening Sonya went to Natasha's room, and to her surprise found her still dressed and asleep on the sofa.
  • Open on the table, beside her lay Anatole's letter.
  • How could you let him go so far? she went on, with a horror and disgust she could hardly conceal.
  • On Friday the Rostovs were to return to the country, but on Wednesday the count went with the prospective purchaser to his estate near Moscow.
  • On Friday the Rostovs were to return to the country, but on Wednesday the count went with the prospective purchaser to his estate near Moscow.
  • On the day the count left, Sonya and Natasha were invited to a big dinner party at the Karagins', and Marya Dmitrievna took them there.
  • In his large study, the walls of which were hung to the ceiling with Persian rugs, bearskins, and weapons, sat Dolokhov in a traveling cloak and high boots, at an open desk on which lay an abacus and some bundles of paper money.
  • He took Dolokhov's hand and put it on his heart.
  • Anatole lay on the sofa in the study leaning on his elbow and smiling pensively, while his handsome lips muttered tenderly to himself.
  • More than once they had beaten him, and more than once they had made him drunk on champagne and Madeira, which he loved; and he knew more than one thing about each of them which would long ago have sent an ordinary man to Siberia.
  • Get on! when it was impossible to go any faster.
  • He liked giving a painful lash on the neck to some peasant who, more dead than alive, was already hurrying out of his way.
  • On entering the room now he crossed himself, turning toward the front corner of the room, and went up to Dolokhov, holding out a small, black hand.
  • "I say, Balaga," said Anatole, putting his hands on the man's shoulders, "do you care for me or not?
  • "That depends on our luck in starting, else why shouldn't we be there in time?" replied Balaga.
  • "That time I'd harnessed two young side horses with the bay in the shafts," he went on, turning to Dolokhov.
  • I couldn't hold them in, my hands grew numb in the sharp frost so that I threw down the reins--'Catch hold yourself, your excellency!' says I, and I just tumbled on the bottom of the sleigh and sprawled there.
  • It wasn't a case of urging them on, there was no holding them in till we reached the place.
  • Anatole went out of the room and returned a few minutes later wearing a fur coat girt with a silver belt, and a sable cap jauntily set on one side and very becoming to his handsome face.
  • Hurrah!... he cried, and emptying his glass flung it on the floor.
  • On the Arbat Square the troyka caught against a carriage; something cracked, shouts were heard, and the troyka flew along the Arbat Street.
  • The young fellow on the box jumped down to hold the horses and Anatole and Dolokhov went along the pavement.
  • Natasha lying on the sofa, her head hidden in her hands, and she did not stir.
  • Who asked you to? shouted Natasha, raising herself on the sofa and looking malignantly at Marya Dmitrievna.
  • Marya Dmitrievna went on admonishing her for some time, enjoining on her that it must all be kept from her father and assuring her that nobody would know anything about it if only Natasha herself would undertake to forget it all and not let anyone see that something had happened.
  • He was in very good spirits; the affair with the purchaser was going on satisfactorily, and there was nothing to keep him any longer in Moscow, away from the countess whom he missed.
  • Soon after the Rostovs came to Moscow the effect Natasha had on him made him hasten to carry out his intention.
  • When he returned to Moscow Pierre was handed a letter from Marya Dmitrievna asking him to come and see her on a matter of great importance relating to Andrew Bolkonski and his betrothed.
  • "If only Prince Andrew would hurry up and come and marry her!" thought he on his way to the house.
  • On the Tverskoy Boulevard a familiar voice called to him.
  • Then at least she won't go on expecting him.
  • And clutching the spare gray locks on his temples the count left the room.
  • In the club all was going on as usual.
  • Pierre felt it strange to see this calm, indifferent crowd of people unaware of what was going on in his soul.
  • Pierre took the letter Anatole handed him and, pushing aside a table that stood in his way, threw himself on the sofa.
  • "I don't know that and don't want to," he said, not looking at Pierre and with a slight tremor of his lower jaw, "but you have used such words to me--'mean' and so on--which as a man of honor I can't allow anyone to use."
  • Pierre dined at the club that day and heard on all sides gossip about the attempted abduction of Rostova.
  • Still getting stouter? he said with animation, but the new wrinkle on his forehead deepened.
  • At dinner the talk turned on the war, the approach of which was becoming evident.
  • "Natasha insists on seeing Count Peter Kirilovich," said she.
  • She trembled all over and sat down on a chair.
  • If I were not myself, but the handsomest, cleverest, and best man in the world, and were free, I would this moment ask on my knees for your hand and your love!
  • Pierre too when she had gone almost ran into the anteroom, restraining tears of tenderness and joy that choked him, and without finding the sleeves of his fur cloak threw it on and got into his sleigh.
  • On the twelfth of June, 1812, the forces of Western Europe crossed the Russian frontier and war began, that is, an event took place opposed to human reason and to human nature.
  • It naturally seemed to Napoleon that the war was caused by England's intrigues (as in fact he said on the island of St. Helena).
  • The actions of Napoleon and Alexander, on whose words the event seemed to hang, were as little voluntary as the actions of any soldier who was drawn into the campaign by lot or by conscription.
  • We are forced to fall back on fatalism as an explanation of irrational events (that is to say, events the reasonableness of which we do not understand).
  • The higher a man stands on the social ladder, the more people he is connected with and the more power he has over others, the more evident is the predestination and inevitability of his every action.
  • On the twenty-ninth of May Napoleon left Dresden, where he had spent three weeks surrounded by a court that included princes, dukes, kings, and even an emperor.
  • On the tenth of June, * coming up with the army, he spent the night in apartments prepared for him on the estate of a Polish count in the Vilkavisski forest.
  • On the tenth of June, * coming up with the army, he spent the night in apartments prepared for him on the estate of a Polish count in the Vilkavisski forest.
  • Early in the morning of the twelfth of June he came out of his tent, which was pitched that day on the steep left bank of the Niemen, and looked through a spyglass at the streams of his troops pouring out of the Vilkavisski forest and flowing over the three bridges thrown across the river.
  • On the faces of all was one common expression of joy at the commencement of the long-expected campaign and of rapture and devotion to the man in the gray coat who was standing on the hill.
  • On the faces of all was one common expression of joy at the commencement of the long-expected campaign and of rapture and devotion to the man in the gray coat who was standing on the hill.
  • On the thirteenth of June a rather small, thoroughbred Arab horse was brought to Napoleon.
  • On reaching the broad river Viliya, he stopped near a regiment of Polish uhlans stationed by the river.
  • Napoleon looked up and down the river, dismounted, and sat down on a log that lay on the bank.
  • Then he became absorbed in a map laid out on the logs.
  • In evident fear of refusal, like a boy asking for permission to get on a horse, he begged to be allowed to swim across the river before the Emperor's eyes.
  • Some of the horses were drowned and some of the men; the others tried to swim on, some in the saddle and some clinging to their horses' manes.
  • They tried to make their way forward to the opposite bank and, though there was a ford one third of a mile away, were proud that they were swimming and drowning in this river under the eyes of the man who sat on the log and was not even looking at what they were doing.
  • The colonel and some of his men got across and with difficulty clambered out on the further bank.
  • Boris was now a rich man who had risen to high honors and no longer sought patronage but stood on an equal footing with the highest of those of his own age.
  • As the mazurka began, Boris saw that Adjutant General Balashev, one of those in closest attendance on the Emperor, went up to him and contrary to court etiquette stood near him while he was talking to a Polish lady.
  • Hardly had Balashev begun to speak before a look of amazement appeared on the Emperor's face.
  • He took Balashev by the arm and crossed the room with him, unconsciously clearing a path seven yards wide as the people on both sides made way for him.
  • On first receiving the news, under the influence of indignation and resentment the Emperor had found a phrase that pleased him, fully expressed his feelings, and has since become famous.
  • The reasons on which the Duc de Bassano based his refusal to deliver them to him would never have led me to suppose that that could serve as a pretext for aggression.
  • In the contrary case, Your Majesty, I shall see myself forced to repel an attack that nothing on my part has provoked.
  • It still depends on Your Majesty to preserve humanity from the calamity of another war.
  • Having set off in the small hours of the fourteenth, accompanied by a bugler and two Cossacks, Balashev reached the French outposts at the village of Rykonty, on the Russian side of the Niemen, by dawn.
  • A French colonel of hussars, who had evidently just left his bed, came riding from the village on a handsome sleek gray horse, accompanied by two hussars.
  • The sun had by now risen and shone gaily on the bright verdure.
  • In front of the group, on a black horse with trappings that glittered in the sun, rode a tall man with plumes in his hat and black hair curling down to his shoulders.
  • On seeing the Russian general he threw back his head, with its long hair curling to his shoulders, in a majestically royal manner, and looked inquiringly at the French colonel.
  • He laid his hand on the withers of Balashev's horse and said:
  • But royaute oblige! * and he felt it incumbent on him, as a king and an ally, to confer on state affairs with Alexander's envoy.
  • And he went on to inquiries about the Grand Duke and the state of his health, and to reminiscences of the gay and amusing times he had spent with him in Naples.
  • Balashev rode on, supposing from Murat's words that he would very soon be brought before Napoleon himself.
  • Balashev took out the packet containing the Emperor's letter and laid it on the table (made of a door with its hinges still hanging on it, laid across two barrels).
  • Davout glanced at him silently and plainly derived pleasure from the signs of agitation and confusion which appeared on Balashev's face.
  • That day he dined with the marshal, at the same board on the barrels.
  • Four days before, sentinels of the Preobrazhensk regiment had stood in front of the house to which Balashev was conducted, and now two French grenadiers stood there in blue uniforms unfastened in front and with shaggy caps on their heads, and an escort of hussars and uhlans and a brilliant suite of aides-de-camp, pages, and generals, who were waiting for Napoleon to come out, were standing at the porch, round his saddle horse and his Mameluke, Rustan.
  • Napoleon received Balashev in the very house in Vilna from which Alexander had dispatched him on his mission.
  • After some minutes, the gentleman-in-waiting who was on duty came into the great reception room and, bowing politely, asked Balashev to follow him.
  • Balashev went into a small reception room, one door of which led into a study, the very one from which the Russian Emperor had dispatched him on his mission.
  • Nothing outside himself had any significance for him, because everything in the world, it seemed to him, depended entirely on his will.
  • The Emperor, my master... but the sight of the Emperor's eyes bent on him confused him.
  • Balashev remembered these words, "So long as a single armed foe remains on Russian soil," but some complex feeling restrained him.
  • He grew confused and said: "On condition that the French army retires beyond the Niemen."
  • They compromise him and throw on him the responsibility for all that happens.
  • To the alleged insanity of the Swedes, Balashev wished to reply that when Russia is on her side Sweden is practically an island: but Napoleon gave an angry exclamation to drown his voice.
  • Balashev, feeling it incumbent on him to reply, said that from the Russian side things did not appear in so gloomy a light.
  • When Balashev had ended, Napoleon again took out his snuffbox, sniffed at it, and stamped his foot twice on the floor as a signal.
  • He not only showed no sign of constraint or self-reproach on account of his outburst that morning, but, on the contrary, tried to reassure Balashev.
  • Balashev, who was on the alert all through the dinner, replied that just as "all roads lead to Rome," so all roads lead to Moscow: there were many roads, and "among them the road through Poltava, which Charles XII chose."
  • Has he not thought that I may do the same? and he turned inquiringly to Balashev, and evidently this thought turned him back on to the track of his morning's anger, which was still fresh in him.
  • Why has he taken on himself such a responsibility?
  • After his interview with Pierre in Moscow, Prince Andrew went to Petersburg, on business as he told his family, but really to meet Anatole Kuragin whom he felt it necessary to encounter.
  • On reaching Petersburg he inquired for Kuragin but the latter had already left the city.
  • Pierre had warned his brother-in-law that Prince Andrew was on his track.
  • So Prince Andrew, having received an appointment on the headquarters staff, left for Turkey.
  • Not only could he no longer think the thoughts that had first come to him as he lay gazing at the sky on the field of Austerlitz and had later enlarged upon with Pierre, and which had filled his solitude at Bogucharovo and then in Switzerland and Rome, but he even dreaded to recall them and the bright and boundless horizons they had revealed.
  • He was now concerned only with the nearest practical matters unrelated to his past interests, and he seized on these the more eagerly the more those past interests were closed to him.
  • As a general on duty on Kutuzov's staff, he applied himself to business with zeal and perseverance and surprised Kutuzov by his willingness and accuracy in work.
  • Before joining the Western Army which was then, in May, encamped at Drissa, Prince Andrew visited Bald Hills which was directly on his way, being only two miles off the Smolensk highroad.
  • The boy, curly- headed like his mother and glowing with health, sat on his knee, and Prince Andrew began telling him the story of Bluebeard, but fell into a reverie without finishing the story.
  • He thought not of this pretty child, his son whom he held on his knee, but of himself.
  • He sought in himself either remorse for having angered his father or regret at leaving home for the first time in his life on bad terms with him, and was horrified to find neither.
  • What meant still more to him was that he sought and did not find in himself the former tenderness for his son which he had hoped to reawaken by caressing the boy and taking him on his knee.
  • "Well, go on!" said his son.
  • As there was not a single town or large village in the vicinity of the camp, the immense number of generals and courtiers accompanying the army were living in the best houses of the villages on both sides of the river, over a radius of six miles.
  • Already from his military experience and what he had seen in the Austrian campaign, he had come to the conclusion that in war the most deeply considered plans have no significance and that all depends on the way unexpected movements of the enemy--that cannot be foreseen--are met, and on how and by whom the whole matter is handled.
  • In attendance on him was the head of the imperial staff, Quartermaster General Prince Volkonski, as well as generals, imperial aides-de-camp, diplomatic officials, and a large number of foreigners, but not the army staff.
  • They insisted on the retention of the camp at Drissa, according to Pfuel's plan, but on changing the movements of the other armies.
  • It will at any rate be understood all the sooner that things cannot go on like this.
  • A man who simply wished to retain his lucrative post would today agree with Pfuel, tomorrow with his opponent, and the day after, merely to avoid responsibility or to please the Emperor, would declare that he had no opinion at all on the matter.
  • Whatever question arose, a swarm of these drones, without having finished their buzzing on a previous theme, flew over to the new one and by their hum drowned and obscured the voices of those who were disputing honestly.
  • This adjutant was also there and sat dozing on the rolled-up bedding, evidently exhausted by work or by feasting.
  • He nodded hurriedly in reply to Chernyshev, and smiled ironically on hearing that the sovereign was inspecting the fortifications that he, Pfuel, had planned in accord with his theory.
  • Prince Andrew did not catch what he said and would have passed on, but Chernyshev introduced him to Pfuel, remarking that Prince Andrew was just back from Turkey where the war had terminated so fortunately.
  • The unbrushed tufts of hair sticking up behind and the hastily brushed hair on his temples expressed this most eloquently.
  • The Emperor was following him, and Bennigsen had hastened on to make some preparations and to be ready to receive the sovereign.
  • So when Prince Volkonski, who was in the chair, called on him to give his opinion, he merely said:
  • The principles laid down by me must be strictly adhered to, said he, drumming on the table with his bony fingers.
  • But Pfuel, like a man heated in a fight who strikes those on his own side, shouted angrily at his own supporter, Wolzogen:
  • Of all those present, evidently he alone was not seeking anything for himself, nursed no hatred against anyone, and only desired that the plan, formed on a theory arrived at by years of toil, should be carried out.
  • And despite his self-confidence and grumpy German sarcasm he was pitiable, with his hair smoothly brushed on the temples and sticking up in tufts behind.
  • The best generals I have known were, on the contrary, stupid or absent-minded men.
  • Not only does a good army commander not need any special qualities, on the contrary he needs the absence of the highest and best human attributes--love, poetry, tenderness, and philosophic inquiring doubt.
  • The success of a military action depends not on them, but on the man in the ranks who shouts, 'We are lost!' or who shouts, 'Hurrah!'
  • On receiving this letter, Nicholas did not even make any attempt to get leave of absence or to retire from the army, but wrote to his parents that he was sorry Natasha was ill and her engagement broken off, and that he would do all he could to meet their wishes.
  • Rostov remembered Sventsyani, because on the first day of their arrival at that small town he changed his sergeant major and was unable to manage all the drunken men of his squadron who, unknown to him, had appropriated five barrels of old beer.
  • On the thirteenth of July the Pavlograds took part in a serious action for the first time.
  • On the twelfth of July, on the eve of that action, there was a heavy storm of rain and hail.
  • On the twelfth of July, on the eve of that action, there was a heavy storm of rain and hail.
  • My stockings and shirt... and the water is running on my seat!
  • Mary Hendrikhovna, a plump little blonde German, in a dressing jacket and nightcap, was sitting on a broad bench in the front corner.
  • Rostov and Ilyin, on entering the room, were welcomed with merry shouts and laughter.
  • A board was found, fixed on two saddles and covered with a horsecloth, a small samovar was produced and a cellaret and half a bottle of rum, and having asked Mary Hendrikhovna to preside, they all crowded round her.
  • Perhaps he'll take pity on me someday, when it comes to cutting off a leg or an arm for me.
  • "I'll stand guard on it myself!" said Ilyin.
  • Half an hour later the squadron was lined up on the road.
  • Rostov riding in front gave the order "Forward!" and the hussars, with clanking sabers and subdued talk, their horses' hoofs splashing in the mud, defiled in fours and moved along the broad road planted with birch trees on each side, following the infantry and a battery that had gone on in front.
  • The whole sun appeared on the horizon and disappeared behind a long narrow cloud that hung above it.
  • And the hussars, passing along the line of troops on the left flank of our position, halted behind our uhlans who were in the front line.
  • Higher up the hill, on the very horizon, our guns were visible through the wonderfully clear air, brightly illuminated by slanting morning sunbeams.
  • Again all was silent and then again it sounded as if someone were walking on detonators and exploding them.
  • The uhlans started, the streamers on their spears fluttering, and trotted downhill toward the French cavalry which was seen below to the left.
  • The sounds, which he had not heard for so long, had an even more pleasurable and exhilarating effect on Rostov than the previous sounds of firing.
  • A captain, standing beside him, was gazing like himself with eyes fixed on the cavalry below them.
  • On seeing the hussars, the foremost began to turn, while those behind began to halt.
  • One Uhlan stopped, another who was on foot flung himself to the ground to avoid being knocked over, and a riderless horse fell in among the hussars.
  • Rostov, picking out one on a gray horse, dashed after him.
  • On the way he came upon a bush, his gallant horse cleared it, and almost before he had righted himself in his saddle he saw that he would immediately overtake the enemy he had selected.
  • That Frenchman, by his uniform an officer, was going at a gallop, crouching on his gray horse and urging it on with his saber.
  • The French dragoon officer was hopping with one foot on the ground, the other being caught in the stirrup.
  • On all sides, the hussars were busy with the dragoons; one was wounded, but though his face was bleeding, he would not give up his horse; another was perched up behind an hussar with his arms round him; a third was being helped by an hussar to mount his horse.
  • "But what on earth is worrying me?" he asked himself as he rode back from the general.
  • Rostov saw the prisoners being led away and galloped after them to have a look at his Frenchman with the dimple on his chin.
  • Doctors came to see her singly and in consultation, talked much in French, German, and Latin, blamed one another, and prescribed a great variety of medicines for all the diseases known to them, but the simple idea never occurred to any of them that they could not know the disease Natasha was suffering from, as no disease suffered by a live man can be known, for every living person has his own peculiarities and always has his own peculiar, personal, novel, complicated disease, unknown to medicine--not a disease of the lungs, liver, skin, heart, nerves, and so on mentioned in medical books, but a disease consisting of one of the innumerable combinations of the maladies of those organs.
  • The doctors said that she could not get on without medical treatment, so they kept her in the stifling atmosphere of the town, and the Rostovs did not move to the country that summer of 1812.
  • Natasha's grief began to be overlaid by the impressions of daily life, it ceased to press so painfully on her heart, it gradually faded into the past, and she began to recover physically.
  • But she was not even grateful to him for it; nothing good on Pierre's part seemed to her to be an effort, it seemed so natural for him to be kind to everyone that there was no merit in his kindness.
  • Sometimes Natasha noticed embarrassment and awkwardness on his part in her presence, especially when he wanted to do something to please her, or feared that something they spoke of would awaken memories distressing to her.
  • After those involuntary words--that if he were free he would have asked on his knees for her hand and her love--uttered at a moment when she was so strongly agitated, Pierre never spoke to Natasha of his feelings; and it seemed plain to her that those words, which had then so comforted her, were spoken as all sorts of meaningless words are spoken to comfort a crying child.
  • On her way home at an early hour when she met no one but bricklayers going to work or men sweeping the street, and everybody within the houses was still asleep, Natasha experienced a feeling new to her, a sense of the possibility of correcting her faults, the possibility of a new, clean life, and of happiness.
  • The countess, with a cheerful expression on her face, looked down at her nails and spat a little for luck as she returned to the drawing room.
  • Even at ten o'clock, when the Rostovs got out of their carriage at the chapel, the sultry air, the shouts of hawkers, the light and gay summer clothes of the crowd, the dusty leaves of the trees on the boulevard, the sounds of the band and the white trousers of a battalion marching to parade, the rattling of wheels on the cobblestones, and the brilliant, hot sunshine were all full of that summer languor, that content and discontent with the present, which is most strongly felt on a bright, hot day in town.
  • On the contrary it tormented her more than anything else of late, and particularly so on this bright, hot summer day in town.
  • On the contrary it tormented her more than anything else of late, and particularly so on this bright, hot summer day in town.
  • A comely, fresh-looking old man was conducting the service with that mild solemnity which has so elevating and soothing an effect on the souls of the worshipers.
  • Unexpectedly, in the middle of the service, and not in the usual order Natasha knew so well, the deacon brought out a small stool, the one he knelt on when praying on Trinity Sunday, and placed it before the doors of the sanctuary screen.
  • The priest came out with his purple velvet biretta on his head, adjusted his hair, and knelt down with an effort.
  • "Lord God of might, God of our salvation!" began the priest in that voice, clear, not grandiloquent but mild, in which only the Slav clergy read and which acts so irresistibly on a Russian heart.
  • But neither could she doubt the righteousness of the prayer that was being read on bended knees.
  • From the day when Pierre, after leaving the Rostovs' with Natasha's grateful look fresh in his mind, had gazed at the comet that seemed to be fixed in the sky and felt that something new was appearing on his own horizon--from that day the problem of the vanity and uselessness of all earthly things, that had incessantly tormented him, no longer presented itself.
  • A few intimate friends were dining with the Rostovs that day, as usual on Sundays.
  • "Count, is it wrong of me to sing?" she said blushing, and fixing her eyes inquiringly on him.
  • "On my word, I don't know what I've done with it," he said.
  • Pierre felt her eyes on him and tried not to look round.
  • May the ruin he hopes to bring upon us recoil on his own head, and may Europe delivered from bondage glorify the name of Russia!
  • Before Shinshin had time to utter the joke he was ready to make on the count's patriotism, Natasha jumped up from her place and ran to her father.
  • Your mother's milk has hardly dried on your lips and you want to go into the army!
  • There were people not only in the square, but everywhere--on the slopes and on the roofs.
  • Petya stood on tiptoe and pushed and pinched, but could see nothing except the people about him.
  • "Hurrah!" was heard on all sides.
  • But in spite of this he continued to struggle desperately forward, and from between the backs of those in front he caught glimpses of an open space with a strip of red cloth spread out on it; but just then the crowd swayed back--the police in front were pushing back those who had pressed too close to the procession: the Emperor was passing from the palace to the Cathedral of the Assumption--and Petya unexpectedly received such a blow on his side and ribs and was squeezed so hard that suddenly everything grew dim before his eyes and he lost consciousness.
  • He sat on his elevation--the pedestal of the cannon--still agitated as before by the thought of the Emperor and by his love for him.
  • He sprang forward and upset an old woman who was catching at a biscuit; the old woman did not consider herself defeated though she was lying on the ground--she grabbed at some biscuits but her hand did not reach them.
  • He did not go straight home from the Kremlin, but called on his friend Obolenski, who was fifteen and was also entering the regiment.
  • On returning home Petya announced resolutely and firmly that if he was not allowed to enter the service he would run away.
  • Two days later, on the fifteenth of July, an immense number of carriages were standing outside the Sloboda Palace.
  • The chief magnates sat on high- backed chairs at a large table under the portrait of the Emperor, but most of the gentry were strolling about the room.
  • On all these faces, as on the faces of the crowd Petya had seen in the Square, there was a striking contradiction: the general expectation of a solemn event, and at the same time the everyday interests in a boston card party, Peter the cook, Zinaida Dmitrievna's health, and so on.
  • On all these faces, as on the faces of the crowd Petya had seen in the Square, there was a striking contradiction: the general expectation of a solemn event, and at the same time the everyday interests in a boston card party, Peter the cook, Zinaida Dmitrievna's health, and so on.
  • The retired naval man was speaking very boldly, as was evident from the expression on the faces of the listeners and from the fact that some people Pierre knew as the meekest and quietest of men walked away disapprovingly or expressed disagreement with him.
  • (He was well acquainted with the senator, but thought it necessary on this occasion to address him formally.)
  • With a sudden expression of malevolence on his aged face, Adraksin shouted at Pierre:
  • The enormous Drissa camp was formed on Pfuel's plan, and there was no intention of retiring farther.
  • On August 1, a second letter was received from Prince Andrew.
  • In this letter Prince Andrew pointed out to his father the danger of staying at Bald Hills, so near the theater of war and on the army's direct line of march, and advised him to move to Moscow.
  • You know--under the paperweight on the little table.
  • His face suddenly took on a morose expression.
  • Well, Michael Ivanovich," he suddenly went on, raising his head and pointing to the plan of the building, "tell me how you mean to alter it...."
  • Princess Mary saw Dessalles' embarrassed and astonished look fixed on her father, noticed his silence, and was struck by the fact that her father had forgotten his son's letter on the drawing-room table; but she was not only afraid to speak of it and ask Dessalles the reason of his confusion and silence, but was afraid even to think about it.
  • When Michael Ivanovich returned to the study with the letter, the old prince, with spectacles on and a shade over his eyes, was sitting at his open bureau with screened candles, holding a paper in his outstretched hand, and in a somewhat dramatic attitude was reading his manuscript-- his "Remarks" as he termed it--which was to be transmitted to the Emperor after his death.
  • Frowning with vexation at the effort necessary to divest himself of his coat and trousers, the prince undressed, sat down heavily on the bed, and appeared to be meditating as he looked contemptuously at his withered yellow legs.
  • He was not meditating, but only deferring the moment of making the effort to lift those legs up and turn over on the bed.
  • The prince slapped his hand on the table.
  • He had the letter taken from his pocket and the table--on which stood a glass of lemonade and a spiral wax candle--moved close to the bed, and putting on his spectacles he began reading.
  • The larger bell was muffled and the little bells on the harness stuffed with paper.
  • The prince allowed no one at Bald Hills to drive with ringing bells; but on a long journey Alpatych liked to have them.
  • His daughter placed chintz-covered down cushions for him to sit on and behind his back.
  • Women's fuss! muttered Alpatych to himself and started on his journey, looking round at the fields of yellow rye and the still- green, thickly growing oats, and at other quite black fields just being plowed a second time.
  • Having baited the horses twice on the way, he arrived at the town toward evening on the fourth of August.
  • Alpatych kept meeting and overtaking baggage trains and troops on the road.
  • On seeing Alpatych he went up to him.
  • Next morning Alpatych donned a jacket he wore only in town and went out on business.
  • "Inform the prince and princess that I knew nothing: I acted on the highest instructions--here..." and he handed a paper to Alpatych.
  • Eager, frightened, helpless glances were turned on Alpatych when he came out of the Governor's room.
  • Ferapontov came out after her, but on seeing Alpatych adjusted his waistcoat, smoothed his hair, yawned, and followed Alpatych into the opposite room.
  • From different sides came whistling sounds and the thud of cannon balls and bursting shells falling on the town.
  • Others joined those men and stopped and told how cannon balls had fallen on a house close to them.
  • On two sides black curling clouds of smoke rose and spread from the fires.
  • On seeing the soldiers he was about to shout at them, but suddenly stopped and, clutching at his hair, burst into sobs and laughter:
  • Some of the soldiers were frightened and ran away, others went on filling their bags.
  • On seeing Alpatych, Ferapontov turned to him:
  • Alpatych, I'll set the place on fire myself.
  • On the sloping descent to the Dnieper Alpatych's cart and that of the innkeeper's wife, which were slowly moving amid the rows of soldiers and of other vehicles, had to stop.
  • In a side street near the crossroads where the vehicles had stopped, a house and some shops were on fire.
  • Seeing that his trap would not be able to move on for some time, Alpatych got down and turned into the side street to look at the fire.
  • The walls were all on fire and the back wall had fallen in, the wooden roof was collapsing, and the rafters were alight.
  • Prince Andrew in his riding cloak, mounted on a black horse, was looking at Alpatych from the back of the crowd.
  • Prince Andrew without replying took out a notebook and raising his knee began writing in pencil on a page he tore out.
  • Houses are set on fire in your presence and you stand by!
  • Prince Andrew looked at him and without replying went on speaking to Alpatych.
  • You must please excuse me, he went on apologetically.
  • On the tenth of August the regiment Prince Andrew commanded was marching along the highroad past the avenue leading to Bald Hills.
  • The cattle lowed from hunger, finding no food on the sun-parched meadows.
  • But on the road, the highroad along which the troops marched, there was no such freshness even at night or when the road passed through the forest; the dew was imperceptible on the sandy dust churned up more than six inches deep.
  • Riding past the pond where there used always to be dozens of women chattering as they rinsed their linen or beat it with wooden beetles, Prince Andrew noticed that there was not a soul about and that the little washing wharf, torn from its place and half submerged, was floating on its side in the middle of the pond.
  • Grass had already begun to grow on the garden paths, and horses and calves were straying in the English park.
  • An old peasant whom Prince Andrew in his childhood had often seen at the gate was sitting on a green garden seat, plaiting a bast shoe.
  • He was sitting on the seat the old prince used to like to sit on, and beside him strips of bast were hanging on the broken and withered branch of a magnolia.
  • Then, vexed at his own weakness, he turned away and began to report on the position of affairs.
  • The old man was still sitting in the ornamental garden, like a fly impassive on the face of a loved one who is dead, tapping the last on which he was making the bast shoe, and two little girls, running out from the hot house carrying in their skirts plums they had plucked from the trees there, came upon Prince Andrew.
  • On seeing the young master, the elder one with frightened look clutched her younger companion by the hand and hid with her behind a birch tree, not stopping to pick up some green plums they had dropped.
  • But not far from Bald Hills he again came out on the road and overtook his regiment at its halting place by the dam of a small pond.
  • Everywhere on the bank, on the dam, and in the pond, there was healthy, white, muscular flesh.
  • The officer, Timokhin, with his red little nose, standing on the dam wiping himself with a towel, felt confused at seeing the prince, but made up his mind to address him nevertheless.
  • On the seventh of August Prince Bagration wrote as follows from his quarters at Mikhaylovna on the Smolensk road:
  • On the seventh of August Prince Bagration wrote as follows from his quarters at Mikhaylovna on the Smolensk road:
  • I swear to you on my honor that Napoleon was in such a fix as never before and might have lost half his army but could not have taken Smolensk.
  • It is disgraceful, a stain on our army, and as for him, he ought, it seems to me, not to live.
  • Consider that on our retreat we have lost by fatigue and left in the hospital more than fifteen thousand men, and had we attacked this would not have happened.
  • Anna Pavlovna's circle on the contrary was enraptured by this enthusiasm and spoke of it as Plutarch speaks of the deeds of the ancients.
  • This was quite correct on the twenty-fourth of July.
  • But on the twenty- ninth of July Kutuzov received the title of Prince.
  • On the ninth of August Prince Vasili at Anna Pavlovna's again met the "man of great merit."
  • The "man of great merit," who was still a novice in court circles, wishing to flatter Anna Pavlovna by defending her former position on this question, observed:
  • From Vyazma Napoleon ordered a direct advance on Moscow.
  • On the march from Vyazma to Tsarevo-Zaymishche he rode his light bay bobtailed ambler accompanied by his Guards, his bodyguard, his pages, and aides-de-camp.
  • So he rattled on, telling all the gossip he had heard among the orderlies.
  • "As soon as Napoleon's interpreter had spoken," says Thiers, "the Cossack, seized by amazement, did not utter another word, but rode on, his eyes fixed on the conqueror whose fame had reached him across the steppes of the East.
  • Napoleon rode on, dreaming of the Moscow that so appealed to his imagination, and "the bird restored to its native fields" galloped to our outposts, inventing on the way all that had not taken place but that he meant to relate to his comrades.
  • He repeated every injustice he had ever inflicted on her.
  • On seeing his daughter he moved his helpless lips and made a hoarse sound.
  • He was lifted up, carried to his study, and laid on the very couch he had so feared of late.
  • He muttered unceasingly, his eyebrows and lips twitching, and it was impossible to tell whether he understood what was going on around him or not.
  • It was impossible for him to travel, it would not do to let him die on the road.
  • The princess decided to leave on the fifteenth.
  • Though he did not speak, Princess Mary saw and knew how unpleasant every sign of anxiety on his account was to him.
  • She had noticed with what dissatisfaction he turned from the look she sometimes involuntarily fixed on him.
  • On waking she listened to what was going on behind the door and, hearing him groan, said to herself with a sigh that things were still the same.
  • On waking she listened to what was going on behind the door and, hearing him groan, said to herself with a sigh that things were still the same.
  • He was lying on his back propped up high, and his small bony hands with their knotted purple veins were lying on the quilt; his left eye gazed straight before him, his right eye was awry, and his brows and lips motionless.
  • "Call Andrew!" he said suddenly, and a childish, timid expression of doubt showed itself on his face as he spoke.
  • Put on your white dress.
  • Princess Mary stayed on the veranda.
  • She returned to the garden and sat down on the grass at the foot of the slope by the pond, where no one could see her.
  • She rose and saw Dunyasha her maid, who was evidently looking for her, and who stopped suddenly as if in alarm on seeing her mistress.
  • He was still lying on the bed as before, but the stern expression of his quiet face made Princess Mary stop short on the threshold.
  • Then they dressed him in uniform with his decorations and placed his shriveled little body on a table.
  • Many of them were punished, some sent to Siberia, many died of cold and hunger on the road, many returned of their own accord, and the movement died down of itself just as it had sprung up, without apparent reason.
  • Alpatych also knew that on the previous day another peasant had even brought from the village of Visloukhovo, which was occupied by the French, a proclamation by a French general that no harm would be done to the inhabitants, and if they remained they would be paid for anything taken from them.
  • On the fifteenth, the day of the old prince's death, the Marshal had insisted on Princess Mary's leaving at once, as it was becoming dangerous.
  • On the fifteenth, the day of the old prince's death, the Marshal had insisted on Princess Mary's leaving at once, as it was becoming dangerous.
  • On the evening of the day the old prince died the Marshal went away, promising to return next day for the funeral.
  • Dron was one of those physically and mentally vigorous peasants who grow big beards as soon as they are of age and go on unchanged till they are sixty or seventy, without a gray hair or the loss of a tooth, as straight and strong at sixty as at thirty.
  • Alpatych, arriving from the devastated Bald Hills estate, sent for his Dron on the day of the prince's funeral and told him to have twelve horses got ready for the princess' carriages and eighteen carts for the things to be removed from Bogucharovo.
  • But on hearing the order Dron lowered his eyes and remained silent.
  • Dron suddenly fell on his knees.
  • She lay on the sofa with her face to the wall, fingering the buttons of the leather cushion and seeing nothing but that cushion, and her confused thoughts were centered on one subject--the irrevocability of death and her own spiritual baseness, which she had not suspected, but which had shown itself during her father's illness.
  • He is gone and no one will hinder you, she said to herself, and sinking into a chair she let her head fall on the window sill.
  • Mademoiselle Bourienne took from her reticule a proclamation (not printed on ordinary Russian paper) of General Rameau's, telling people not to leave their homes and that the French authorities would afford them proper protection.
  • Neither could the architect Michael Ivanovich, who on being sent for came in with sleepy eyes, tell Princess Mary anything.
  • So many different eyes, old and young, were fixed on her, and there were so many different faces, that she could not distinguish any of them and, feeling that she must speak to them all at once, did not know how to do it.
  • On the contrary, I ask you to go with all your belongings to our estate near Moscow, and I promise you I will see to it that there you shall want for nothing.
  • She could not fathom whether it was curiosity, devotion, gratitude, or apprehension and distrust--but the expression on all the faces was identical.
  • "Why don't you speak?" she inquired of a very old man who stood just in front of her leaning on his stick.
  • She had not slept and had stolen downstairs on tiptoe, and going to the door of the conservatory where he slept that night had listened at the door.
  • From behind the door I heard how he lay down on his bed groaning and loudly exclaimed, 'My God!'
  • And Princess Mary uttered aloud the caressing word he had said to her on the day of his death.
  • On the way to Bogucharovo, a princely estate with a dwelling house and farm where they hoped to find many domestic serfs and pretty girls, they questioned Lavrushka about Napoleon and laughed at his stories, and raced one another to try Ilyin's horse.
  • "Yes, always first both on the grassland and here," answered Rostov, stroking his heated Donets horse.
  • At that moment, on the road leading from the big house, two women and a man in a white hat were seen coming toward the officers.
  • "The one in pink is mine, so keep off!" said Ilyin on seeing Dunyasha running resolutely toward him.
  • "My mistress, daughter of General in Chief Prince Nicholas Bolkonski who died on the fifteenth of this month, finding herself in difficulties owing to the boorishness of these people"--he pointed to the peasants--"asks you to come up to the house....
  • "No, there's not much to be amused at here," said Rostov, and rode on a little way.
  • But on glancing at Rostov's face Ilyin stopped short.
  • Rostov stopped and, clenching his fists, suddenly and sternly turned on Alpatych.
  • Dron on the contrary retired to the rear and the crowd drew closer together.
  • "Yes, they worked all day and didn't play!" remarked the tall, round- faced peasant gravely, pointing with a significant wink at the dictionaries that were on the top.
  • Unwilling to obtrude himself on the princess, Rostov did not go back to the house but remained in the village awaiting her departure.
  • On the rest of the way to Moscow, though the princess' position was not a cheerful one, Dunyasha, who went with her in the carriage, more than once noticed that her mistress leaned out of the window and smiled at something with an expression of mingled joy and sorrow.
  • The impression the princess made on Rostov was a very agreeable one.
  • To remember her gave him pleasure, and when his comrades, hearing of his adventure at Bogucharovo, rallied him on having gone to look for hay and having picked up one of the wealthiest heiresses in Russia, he grew angry.
  • Prince Andrew arrived at Tsarevo-Zaymishche on the very day and at the very hour that Kutuzov was reviewing the troops for the first time.
  • He stopped in the village at the priest's house in front of which stood the commander-in-chief's carriage, and he sat down on the bench at the gate awaiting his Serene Highness, as everyone now called Kutuzov.
  • Prince Andrew replied that he was not on his Serene Highness' staff but was himself a new arrival.
  • Bolkonski made room for him on the bench and the lieutenant colonel sat down beside him.
  • Of late he had received so many new and very serious impressions--such as the retreat from Smolensk, his visit to Bald Hills, and the recent news of his father's death--and had experienced so many emotions, that for a long time past those memories had not entered his mind, and now that they did, they did not act on him with nearly their former strength.
  • Kutuzov was impatiently urging on his horse, which ambled smoothly under his weight, and he raised his hand to his white Horse Guard's cap with a red band and no peak, nodding his head continually.
  • He sat heavily and swayed limply on his brisk little horse.
  • He drew his left foot out of the stirrup and, lurching with his whole body and puckering his face with the effort, raised it with difficulty onto the saddle, leaned on his knee, groaned, and slipped down into the arms of the Cossacks and adjutants who stood ready to assist him.
  • He unbuttoned his coat and sat down on a bench in the porch.
  • He sighed and pressed on the bench with both hands to raise himself.
  • Kutuzov, his hands still pressed on the seat, glanced at him glumly.
  • "Would not your Serene Highness like to come inside?" said the general on duty in a discontented voice, "the plans must be examined and several papers have to be signed."
  • Several times on glancing that way he noticed behind that door a plump, rosy, handsome woman in a pink dress with a lilac silk kerchief on her head, holding a dish and evidently awaiting the entrance of the commander-in-chief.
  • One can't get on without it.
  • He took some gold pieces from his trouser pocket and put them on the dish for her.
  • "Well, my dear, and how are we getting on?" he asked, moving to the door of the room assigned to him.
  • Tout vient a point a celui qui sait attendre. * And there were as many advisers there as here..." he went on, returning to the subject of "advisers" which evidently occupied him.
  • After the Emperor had left Moscow, life flowed on there in its usual course, and its course was so very usual that it was difficult to remember the recent days of patriotic elation and ardor, hard to believe that Russia was really in danger and that the members of the English Club were also sons of the Fatherland ready to sacrifice everything for it.
  • It was said that Mamonov's regiment would cost him eight hundred thousand rubles, and that Bezukhov had spent even more on his, but that the best thing about Bezukhov's action was that he himself was going to don a uniform and ride at the head of his regiment without charging anything for the show.
  • And why do they stay on so long in Moscow?
  • The first declared that the report that Count Rostopchin had forbidden people to leave Moscow was false; on the contrary he was glad that ladies and tradesmen's wives were leaving the city.
  • "There will be less panic and less gossip," ran the broadsheet "but I will stake my life on it that scoundrel will not enter Moscow."
  • He took a pack of cards that lay on the table and began to lay them out for a game of patience.
  • "On the contrary, things seem satisfactory, ma cousine," said Pierre in the bantering tone he habitually adopted toward her, always feeling uncomfortable in the role of her benefactor.
  • I ask just one thing of you, cousin," she went on, "arrange for me to be taken to Petersburg.
  • Muttering to herself, she sat down on a chair.
  • Count Rostopchin writes that he will stake his life on it that the enemy will not enter Moscow.
  • On his way home from Vorontsovo, as he was passing the Bolotnoe Place Pierre, seeing a large crowd round the Lobnoe Place, stopped and got out of his trap.
  • With a frightened and suffering look resembling that on the thin Frenchman's face, Pierre pushed his way in through the crowd.
  • But the attention of the crowd--officials, burghers, shopkeepers, peasants, and women in cloaks and in pelisses--was so eagerly centered on what was passing in Lobnoe Place that no one answered him.
  • The stout man rose, frowned, shrugged his shoulders, and evidently trying to appear firm began to pull on his jacket without looking about him, but suddenly his lips trembled and he began to cry, in the way full-blooded grown-up men cry, though angry with himself for doing so.
  • "Eh, mounseer, Russian sauce seems to be sour to a Frenchman... sets his teeth on edge!" said a wrinkled clerk who was standing behind Pierre, when the Frenchman began to cry.
  • On reaching home Pierre gave orders to Evstafey--his head coachman who knew everything, could do anything, and was known to all Moscow--that he would leave that night for the army at Mozhaysk, and that his saddle horses should be sent there.
  • On the twenty-fourth the weather cleared up after a spell of rain, and after dinner Pierre left Moscow.
  • Everywhere in Mozhaysk and beyond it, troops were stationed or on the march.
  • On the twenty-fourth of August the battle of the Shevardino Redoubt was fought, on the twenty-fifth not a shot was fired by either side, and on the twenty-sixth the battle of Borodino itself took place.
  • On the twenty-fourth of August the battle of the Shevardino Redoubt was fought, on the twenty-fifth not a shot was fired by either side, and on the twenty-sixth the battle of Borodino itself took place.
  • But later on, to fit what had occurred, the historians provided cunningly devised evidence of the foresight and genius of the generals who, of all the blind tools of history were the most enslaved and involuntary.
  • On the other question, how the battle of Borodino and the preceding battle of Shevardino were fought, there also exists a definite and well- known, but quite false, conception.
  • The Russians, they say, fortified this position in advance on the left of the highroad (from Moscow to Smolensk) and almost at a right angle to it, from Borodino to Utitsa, at the very place where the battle was fought.
  • On the twenty-fourth, we are told, Napoleon attacked this advanced post and took it, and, on the twenty-sixth, attacked the whole Russian army, which was in position on the field of Borodino.
  • On the twenty-fourth, we are told, Napoleon attacked this advanced post and took it, and, on the twenty-sixth, attacked the whole Russian army, which was in position on the field of Borodino.
  • The Russians did not seek out the best position but, on the contrary, during the retreat passed many positions better than Borodino.
  • Not only did the Russians not fortify the position on the field of Borodino to the left of, and at a right angle to, the highroad (that is, the position on which the battle took place), but never till the twenty- fifth of August, 1812, did they think that a battle might be fought there.
  • This was shown first by the fact that there were no entrenchments there by the twenty fifth and that those begun on the twenty-fifth and twenty-sixth were not completed, and secondly, by the position of the Shevardino Redoubt.
  • And why were all efforts exhausted and six thousand men sacrificed to defend it till late at night on the twenty-fourth?
  • Napoleon, riding to Valuevo on the twenty-fourth, did not see (as the history books say he did) the position of the Russians from Utitsa to Borodino (he could not have seen that position because it did not exist), nor did he see an advanced post of the Russian army, but while pursuing the Russian rearguard he came upon the left flank of the Russian position--at the Shevardino Redoubt--and unexpectedly for the Russians moved his army across the Kolocha.
  • Had Napoleon not ridden out on the evening of the twenty-fourth to the Kolocha, and had he not then ordered an immediate attack on the redoubt but had begun the attack next morning, no one would have doubted that the Shevardino Redoubt was the left flank of our position, and the battle would have taken place where we expected it.
  • We should have attacked Napoleon in the center or on the right, and the engagement would have taken place on the twenty-fifth, in the position we intended and had fortified.
  • (Poniatowski's action against Utitsa, and Uvarov's on the right flank against the French, were actions distinct from the main course of the battle.)
  • The battle of Borodino was not fought on a chosen and entrenched position with forces only slightly weaker than those of the enemy, but, as a result of the loss of the Shevardino Redoubt, the Russians fought the battle of Borodino on an open and almost unentrenched position, with forces only half as numerous as the French; that is to say, under conditions in which it was not merely unthinkable to fight for ten hours and secure an indecisive result, but unthinkable to keep an army even from complete disintegration and flight.
  • On the morning of the twenty-fifth Pierre was leaving Mozhaysk.
  • At the descent of the high steep hill, down which a winding road led out of the town past the cathedral on the right, where a service was being held and the bells were ringing, Pierre got out of his vehicle and proceeded on foot.
  • The wounded, bandaged with rags, with pale cheeks, compressed lips, and knitted brows, held on to the sides of the carts as they were jolted against one another.
  • The driver in his bast shoes ran panting up to it, placed a stone under one of its tireless hind wheels, and began arranging the breech-band on his little horse.
  • One of the wounded, an old soldier with a bandaged arm who was following the cart on foot, caught hold of it with his sound hand and turned to look at Pierre.
  • Will they set us down here or take us on to Moscow? he asked.
  • He was driving toward Pierre in a covered gig, sitting beside a young surgeon, and on recognizing Pierre he told the Cossack who occupied the driver's seat to pull up.
  • Drive past Tatarinova, a lot of digging is going on there.
  • "I would go with you but on my honor I'm up to here"--and he pointed to his throat.
  • Pierre drove on toward Gorki.
  • When he had ascended the hill and reached the little village street, he saw for the first time peasant militiamen in their white shirts and with crosses on their caps, who, talking and laughing loudly, animated and perspiring, were at work on a huge knoll overgrown with grass to the right of the road.
  • Two officers were standing on the knoll, directing the men.
  • On seeing these peasants, who were evidently still amused by the novelty of their position as soldiers, Pierre once more thought of the wounded men at Mozhaysk and understood what the soldier had meant when he said: "They want the whole nation to fall on them."
  • On seeing these peasants, who were evidently still amused by the novelty of their position as soldiers, Pierre once more thought of the wounded men at Mozhaysk and understood what the soldier had meant when he said: "They want the whole nation to fall on them."
  • From above on the left, bisecting that amphitheater, wound the Smolensk highroad, passing through a village with a white church some five hundred paces in front of the knoll and below it.
  • Beyond Valuevo the road disappeared into a yellowing forest on the horizon.
  • "Yes, and there, further on, are the French," said the officer.
  • The officer pointed with his hand to the smoke visible on the left beyond the river, and the same stern and serious expression that Pierre had noticed on many of the faces he had met came into his face.
  • Pierre pointed to another knoll in the distance with a big tree on it, near a village that lay in a hollow where also some campfires were smoking and something black was visible.
  • "No, I've come on my own," answered Pierre, and he went down the hill again, passing the militiamen.
  • Behind, before, and on both sides, crowds of militiamen with bared heads walked, ran, and bowed to the ground.
  • Behind the priest and a chanter stood the notabilities on a spot reserved for them.
  • Standing among the crowd of peasants, Pierre recognized several acquaintances among these notables, but did not look at them--his whole attention was absorbed in watching the serious expression on the faces of the crowd of soldiers and militiamen who were all gazing eagerly at the icon.
  • With a long overcoat on his exceedingly stout, round-shouldered body, with uncovered white head and puffy face showing the white ball of the eye he had lost, Kutuzov walked with plunging, swaying gait into the crowd and stopped behind the priest.
  • When the service was over, Kutuzov stepped up to the icon, sank heavily to his knees, bowed to the ground, and for a long time tried vainly to rise, but could not do so on account of his weakness and weight.
  • I am in attendance on him, you know; I'll mention it to him.
  • The faces all expressed animation and apprehension, but it seemed to Pierre that the cause of the excitement shown in some of these faces lay chiefly in questions of personal success; his mind, however, was occupied by the different expression he saw on other faces--an expression that spoke not of personal matters but of the universal questions of life and death.
  • The militia have put on clean white shirts to be ready to die.
  • Half an hour later Kutuzov left for Tatarinova, and Bennigsen and his suite, with Pierre among them, set out on their ride along the line.
  • He did not know that it would become more memorable to him than any other spot on the plain of Borodino.
  • "On the contrary it's very interesting!" replied Pierre not quite truthfully.
  • After going through the wood for about a mile and a half they came out on a glade where troops of Tuchkov's corps were stationed to defend the left flank.
  • This disposition on the left flank increased Pierre's doubt of his own capacity to understand military matters.
  • Through a gap in the broken wall he could see, beside the wooden fence, a row of thirty year-old birches with their lower branches lopped off, a field on which shocks of oats were standing, and some bushes near which rose the smoke of campfires-- the soldiers' kitchens.
  • Narrow and burdensome and useless to anyone as his life now seemed to him, Prince Andrew on the eve of battle felt agitated and irritable as he had done seven years before at Austerlitz.
  • Prince Andrew looked out of the shed and saw Pierre, who had tripped over a pole on the ground and had nearly fallen, coming his way.
  • He had approached the shed full of animation, but on seeing Prince Andrew's face he felt constrained and ill at ease.
  • Success never depends, and never will depend, on position, or equipment, or even on numbers, and least of all on position.
  • But on what then?
  • "On the feeling that is in me and in him," he pointed to Timokhin, "and in each soldier."
  • After they had gone Pierre approached Prince Andrew and was about to start a conversation when they heard the clatter of three horses' hoofs on the road not far from the shed, and looking in that direction Prince Andrew recognized Wolzogen and Clausewitz accompanied by a Cossack.
  • The French have destroyed my home and are on their way to destroy Moscow, they have outraged and are outraging me every moment.
  • The question that had perturbed Pierre on the Mozhaysk hill and all that day now seemed to him quite clear and completely solved.
  • All he had seen that day, all the significant and stern expressions on the faces he had seen in passing, were lit up for him by a new light.
  • On re-entering the shed Prince Andrew lay down on a rug, but he could not sleep.
  • On re-entering the shed Prince Andrew lay down on a rug, but he could not sleep.
  • On one of them he dwelt long and joyfully.
  • Another valet, with his finger over the mouth of a bottle, was sprinkling Eau de Cologne on the Emperor's pampered body with an expression which seemed to say that he alone knew where and how much Eau de Cologne should be sprinkled.
  • Napoleon's short hair was wet and matted on the forehead, but his face, though puffy and yellow, expressed physical satisfaction.
  • "Go on, harder, go on!" he muttered to the valet who was rubbing him, slightly twitching and grunting.
  • Go on... harder, harder! he muttered, hunching his back and presenting his fat shoulders.
  • "I'll see you later," he added, and summoned de Beausset, who by that time had prepared the surprise, having placed something on the chairs and covered it with a cloth.
  • His eyes grew dim, he moved forward, glanced round at a chair (which seemed to place itself under him), and sat down on it before the portrait.
  • At a single gesture from him everyone went out on tiptoe, leaving the great man to himself and his emotion.
  • Having sat still for a while he touched--himself not knowing why--the thick spot of paint representing the highest light in the portrait, rose, and recalled de Beausset and the officer on duty.
  • Victory depends on you.
  • On the twenty-fifth of August, so his historians tell us, Napoleon spent the whole day on horseback inspecting the locality, considering plans submitted to him by his marshals, and personally giving commands to his generals.
  • On the twenty-fifth of August, so his historians tell us, Napoleon spent the whole day on horseback inspecting the locality, considering plans submitted to him by his marshals, and personally giving commands to his generals.
  • At dawn the two new batteries established during the night on the plain occupied by the Prince d'Eckmuhl will open fire on the opposing batteries of the enemy.
  • The commander of the artillery of the 3rd Corps, General Fouche, will place the howitzers of the 3rd and 8th Corps, sixteen in all, on the flanks of the battery that is to bombard the entrenchment on the left, which will have forty guns in all directed against it.
  • During the cannonade Prince Poniatowski is to advance through the wood on the village and turn the enemy's position.
  • The cannonade on the left flank will begin as soon as the guns of the right wing are heard.
  • In the disposition it is said first that the batteries placed on the spot chosen by Napoleon, with the guns of Pernetti and Fouche; which were to come in line with them, 102 guns in all, were to open fire and shower shells on the Russian fleches and redoubts.
  • This could not be done and was not done, because Poniatowski, advancing on the village through the wood, met Tuchkov there barring his way, and could not and did not turn the Russian position.
  • General Campan's division did not seize the first fortification but was driven back, for on emerging from the wood it had to reform under grapeshot, of which Napoleon was unaware.
  • And it was not Napoleon who directed the course of the battle, for none of his orders were executed and during the battle he did not know what was going on before him.
  • On returning from a second inspection of the lines, Napoleon remarked:
  • Napoleon frowned and sat silent for a long time leaning his head on his hand.
  • Let life go on in it unhindered and let it defend itself, it will do more than if you paralyze it by encumbering it with remedies.
  • And having entered on the path of definition, of which he was fond, Napoleon suddenly and unexpectedly gave a new one.
  • He rose, walked to and fro, put on a warm overcoat and a hat, and went out of the tent.
  • On the right a single deep report of a cannon resounded and died away in the prevailing silence.
  • On returning to Gorki after having seen Prince Andrew, Pierre ordered his groom to get the horses ready and to call him early in the morning, and then immediately fell asleep behind a partition in a corner Boris had given up to him.
  • The sun, just bursting forth from behind a cloud that had concealed it, was shining, with rays still half broken by the clouds, over the roofs of the street opposite, on the dew- besprinkled dust of the road, on the walls of the houses, on the windows, the fence, and on Pierre's horses standing before the hut.
  • All this was vivid, majestic, and unexpected; but what impressed Pierre most of all was the view of the battlefield itself, of Borodino and the hollows on both sides of the Kolocha.
  • Having received this order the general passed by Pierre on his way down the knoll.
  • Pierre saw that there was a bridge in front of him and that soldiers were doing something on both sides of it and in the meadow, among the rows of new-mown hay which he had taken no notice of amid the smoke of the campfires the day before; but despite the incessant firing going on there he had no idea that this was the field of battle.
  • He did not notice the sound of the bullets whistling from every side, or the projectiles that flew over him, did not see the enemy on the other side of the river, and for a long time did not notice the killed and wounded, though many fell near him.
  • The adjutant looked angrily at him, evidently also intending to shout at him, but on recognizing him he nodded.
  • "Here it's tolerable," said he, "but with Bagration on the left flank they're getting it frightfully hot."
  • It was only now that he noticed wounded men staggering along or being carried on stretchers.
  • On that very meadow he had ridden over the day before, a soldier was lying athwart the rows of scented hay, with his head thrown awkwardly back and his shako off.
  • I congratulate you, Count, on your baptism of fire!
  • Pierre and the adjutant dismounted and walked up the hill on foot.
  • "Is the general here?" asked the adjutant on reaching the knoll.
  • In line with the knoll on both sides stood other guns which also fired incessantly.
  • On the contrary, just because he happened to be there he thought it one of the least significant parts of the field.
  • Having reached the knoll, Pierre sat down at one end of a trench surrounding the battery and gazed at what was going on around him with an unconsciously happy smile.
  • But the men in the battery seemed not to notice this, and merry voices and jokes were heard on all sides.
  • From the battery they could be seen running back past it carrying their wounded on their muskets.
  • They gave little jumps as they walked, as though they were on springs.
  • Suddenly something happened: the young officer gave a gasp and bending double sat down on the ground like a bird shot on the wing.
  • On the right of the battery soldiers shouting "Hurrah!" were running not forwards but backwards, it seemed to Pierre.
  • On entering the earthwork he noticed that there were men doing something there but that no shots were being fired from the battery.
  • He saw the senior officer lying on the earth wall with his back turned as if he were examining something down below and that one of the soldiers he had noticed before was struggling forward shouting "Brothers!" and trying to free himself from some men who were holding him by the arm.
  • Crowds of wounded- -some known to Pierre and some unknown--Russians and French, with faces distorted by suffering, walked, crawled, and were carried on stretchers from the battery.
  • On the field between Borodino and the fleches, beside the wood, the chief action of the day took place on an open space visible from both sides and was fought in the simplest and most artless way.
  • On the field between Borodino and the fleches, beside the wood, the chief action of the day took place on an open space visible from both sides and was fought in the simplest and most artless way.
  • The battle began on both sides with a cannonade from several hundred guns.
  • Then when the whole field was covered with smoke, two divisions, Campan's and Dessaix's, advanced from the French right, while Murat's troops advanced on Borodino from their left.
  • Napoleon, standing on the knoll, looked through a field glass, and in its small circlet saw smoke and men, sometimes his own and sometimes Russians, but when he looked again with the naked eye, he could not tell where what he had seen was.
  • But not only was it impossible to make out what was happening from where he was standing down below, or from the knoll above on which some of his generals had taken their stand, but even from the fleches themselves--in which by this time there were now Russian and now French soldiers, alternately or together, dead, wounded, alive, frightened, or maddened-- even at those fleches themselves it was impossible to make out what was taking place.
  • Napoleon gave orders that the troops should form up on the farther side and wait.
  • All their rushing and galloping at one another did little harm, the harm of disablement and death was caused by the balls and bullets that flew over the fields on which these men were floundering about.
  • In the midst of this conversation, which was beginning to interest Napoleon, Berthier's eyes turned to look at a general with a suite, who was galloping toward the knoll on a lathering horse.
  • He swore on his honor that the Russians were lost if the Emperor would give another division.
  • Napoleon sat on a campstool, wrapped in thought.
  • "I hope I may now congratulate Your Majesty on a victory?" said he.
  • He knew that it was a lost battle and that the least accident might now--with the fight balanced on such a strained center--destroy him and his army.
  • The Russians might fall on his left wing, might break through his center, he himself might be killed by a stray cannon ball.
  • He sat silently on a campstool below the knoll, with head bowed and elbows on his knees.
  • He could not stop what was going on before him and around him and was supposed to be directed by him and to depend on him, and from its lack of success this affair, for the first time, seemed to him unnecessary and horrible.
  • On the rug-covered bench where Pierre had seen him in the morning sat Kutuzov, his gray head hanging, his heavy body relaxed.
  • On the faces of all who came from the field of battle, and of those who stood around him, Kutuzov noticed an expression of extreme tension.
  • Wolzogen had come from Barclay de Tolly to report on the progress of affairs on the left flank.
  • Kutuzov ceased chewing and fixed an astonished gaze on Wolzogen, as if not understanding what was said to him.
  • "On the contrary, your Highness, in indecisive actions it is always the most stubborn who remain victors," replied Raevski, "and in my opinion..."
  • Toward two o'clock the regiment, having already lost more than two hundred men, was moved forward into a trampled oatfield in the gap between Semenovsk and the Knoll Battery, where thousands of men perished that day and on which an intense, concentrated fire from several hundred enemy guns was directed between one and two o'clock.
  • Most of the time, by their officers' order, the men sat on the ground.
  • But when our artillery or cavalry advanced or some of our infantry were seen to move forward, words of approval were heard on all sides.
  • Everything went on of itself.
  • All the powers of his soul, as of every soldier there, were unconsciously bent on avoiding the contemplation of the horrors of their situation.
  • "Look out!" came a frightened cry from a soldier and, like a bird whirring in rapid flight and alighting on the ground, a shell dropped with little noise within two steps of Prince Andrew and close to the battalion commander's horse.
  • "Lie down!" cried the adjutant, throwing himself flat on the ground.
  • At one and the same moment came the sound of an explosion, a whistle of splinters as from a breaking window frame, a suffocating smell of powder, and Prince Andrew started to one side, raising his arm, and fell on his chest.
  • From the right side of his abdomen, blood was welling out making a large stain on the grass.
  • Prince Andrew lay on his chest with his face in the grass, breathing heavily and noisily.
  • They again took him by the shoulders and laid him on the stretcher.
  • Eh, Prince! said the trembling voice of Timokhin, who had run up and was looking down on the stretcher.
  • Prince Andrew opened his eyes and for a long time could not make out what was going on around him.
  • All he saw about him merged into a general impression of naked, bleeding human bodies that seemed to fill the whole of the low tent, as a few weeks previously, on that hot August day, such bodies had filled the dirty pond beside the Smolensk road.
  • Two were occupied, and on the third they placed Prince Andrew.
  • For a little while he was left alone and involuntarily witnessed what was taking place on the other two tables.
  • On the nearest one sat a Tartar, probably a Cossack, judging by the uniform thrown down beside him.
  • On the other table, round which many people were crowding, a tall well-fed man lay on his back with his head thrown back.
  • On the other table, round which many people were crowding, a tall well-fed man lay on his back with his head thrown back.
  • Water was being sprinkled on his face.
  • As soon as Prince Andrew opened his eyes, the doctor bent over, kissed him silently on the lips, and hurried away.
  • He rode hurriedly from the battlefield and returned to the Shevardino knoll, where he sat on his campstool, his sallow face swollen and heavy, his eyes dim, his nose red, and his voice hoarse, involuntarily listening, with downcast eyes, to the sounds of firing.
  • He felt in his own person the sufferings and death he had witnessed on the battlefield.
  • "Our fire is mowing them down by rows, but still they hold on," said the adjutant.
  • On returning to France, to the bosom of the great, strong, magnificent, peaceful, and glorious fatherland, I should have proclaimed her frontiers immutable; all future wars purely defensive, all aggrandizement antinational.
  • The Imperial army, strictly speaking, was one third composed of Dutch, Belgians, men from the borders of the Rhine, Piedmontese, Swiss, Genevese, Tuscans, Romans, inhabitants of the Thirty-second Military Division, of Bremen, of Hamburg, and so on: it included scarcely a hundred and forty thousand who spoke French.
  • Clouds gathered and drops of rain began to fall on the dead and wounded, on the frightened, exhausted, and hesitating men, as if to say: Enough, men!
  • Not that sort of victory which is defined by the capture of pieces of material fastened to sticks, called standards, and of the ground on which the troops had stood and were standing, but a moral victory that convinces the enemy of the moral superiority of his opponent and of his own impotence was gained by the Russians at Borodino.
  • By the time Achilles has covered the distance that separated him from the tortoise, the tortoise has covered one tenth of that distance ahead of him: when Achilles has covered that tenth, the tortoise has covered another one hundredth, and so on forever.
  • On the evening of the twenty-sixth of August, Kutuzov and the whole Russian army were convinced that the battle of Borodino was a victory.
  • It was impossible not to retreat a day's march, and then in the same way it was impossible not to retreat another and a third day's march, and at last, on the first of September when the army drew near Moscow--despite the strength of the feeling that had arisen in all ranks--the force of circumstances compelled it to retire beyond Moscow.
  • The activity of a commander-in-chief does not at all resemble the activity we imagine to ourselves when we sit at ease in our studies examining some campaign on the map, with a certain number of troops on this and that side in a certain known locality, and begin our plans from some given moment.
  • For instance, on the twenty-eighth it is suggested to him to cross to the Kaluga road, but just then an adjutant gallops up from Miloradovich asking whether he is to engage the French or retire.
  • At Drissa and at Smolensk and most palpably of all on the twenty-fourth of August at Shevardino and on the twenty- sixth at Borodino, and each day and hour and minute of the retreat from Borodino to Fili.
  • On the Poklonny Hill, four miles from the Dorogomilov gate of Moscow, Kutuzov got out of his carriage and sat down on a bench by the roadside.
  • On the Poklonny Hill, four miles from the Dorogomilov gate of Moscow, Kutuzov got out of his carriage and sat down on a bench by the roadside.
  • "My head, be it good or bad, must depend on itself," said he, rising from the bench, and he rode to Fili where his carriages were waiting.
  • Only Malasha, Andrew's six-year-old granddaughter whom his Serene Highness had petted and to whom he had given a lump of sugar while drinking his tea, remained on the top of the brick oven in the larger room.
  • Malasha looked down from the oven with shy delight at the faces, uniforms, and decorations of the generals, who one after another came into the room and sat down on the broad benches in the corner under the icons.
  • Ermolov, Kaysarov, and Toll, who had just arrived, sat down on this bench.
  • Chubby little Dokhturov was listening attentively with eyebrows raised and arms folded on his stomach.
  • On the other side sat Count Ostermann- Tolstoy, seemingly absorbed in his own thoughts.
  • His broad head with its bold features and glittering eyes was resting on his hand.
  • Raevski, twitching forward the black hair on his temples as was his habit, glanced now at Kutuzov and now at the door with a look of impatience.
  • That is the question on which I want your opinion, and he sank back in his chair.
  • Malasha, who kept her eyes fixed on what was going on before her, understood the meaning of the council differently.
  • When he had dismissed the generals Kutuzov sat a long time with his elbows on the table, thinking always of the same terrible question: When, when did the abandonment of Moscow become inevitable?
  • The same thing that took place in Moscow had happened in all the towns and villages on Russian soil beginning with Smolensk, without the participation of Count Rostopchin and his broadsheets.
  • In his broadsheets Rostopchin impressed on them that to leave Moscow was shameful.
  • "Well, yes," said she, "it may be that he has other sentiments for me than those of a father, but that is not a reason for me to shut my door on him.
  • The enchanting, middle-aged Frenchman laid his hands on her head and, as she herself afterward described it, she felt something like a fresh breeze wafted into her soul.
  • This letter was brought to Pierre's house when he was on the field of Borodino.
  • Toward the end of the battle of Borodino, Pierre, having run down from Raevski's battery a second time, made his way through a gully to Knyazkovo with a crowd of soldiers, reached the dressing station, and seeing blood and hearing cries and groans hurried on, still entangled in the crowds of soldiers.
  • Pierre lay leaning on his elbow for a long time, gazing at the shadows that moved past him in the darkness.
  • Pierre went on with the soldiers, quite forgetting that his inn was at the bottom of the hill and that he had already passed it.
  • How is it you are on foot?
  • Scarcely had Pierre laid his head on the pillow before he felt himself falling asleep, but suddenly, almost with the distinctness of reality, he heard the boom, boom, boom of firing, the thud of projectiles, groans and cries, and smelled blood and powder, and a feeling of horror and dread of death seized him.
  • And they with their simple, kind, firm faces surrounded his benefactor on all sides.
  • The hardest thing (Pierre went on thinking, or hearing, in his dream) is to be able in your soul to unite the meaning of all.
  • Pierre turned away with repugnance, and closing his eyes quickly fell back on the carriage seat.
  • Pierre got up and, having told them to harness and overtake him, went on foot through the town.
  • The troops were moving on, leaving about ten thousand wounded behind them.
  • On the way Pierre was told of the death of his brother-in-law Anatole and of that of Prince Andrew.
  • On the thirteenth of August Pierre reached Moscow.
  • He asks you to come to him at once on a very important matter.
  • If they're sent out and brought back again later on it will do no harm, but as things are now one can't answer for anything.
  • 'From whom did you get it?' and so on till he reached Vereshchagin, a half educated tradesman, you know, 'a pet of a trader,' said the adjutant smiling.
  • 'How could you have written it yourself?' said he, and he took up the Hamburg Gazette that was lying on the table.
  • And I will knock the nonsense out of anybody"-- but probably realizing that he was shouting at Bezukhov who so far was not guilty of anything, he added, taking Pierre's hand in a friendly manner, "We are on the eve of a public disaster and I haven't time to be polite to everybody who has business with me.
  • And going to his bed he threw himself on it without undressing and immediately fell asleep.
  • Petya could not return unless his regiment did so or unless he was transferred to another regiment on active service.
  • On the twenty-eighth of August he arrived.
  • But despite her grief, or perhaps just because of it, she took on herself all the difficult work of directing the storing and packing of their things and was busy for whole days.
  • On Saturday, the thirty-first of August, everything in the Rostovs' house seemed topsy-turvy.
  • The peasants and house serfs carrying out the things were treading heavily on the parquet floors.
  • Natasha ran into the house and went on tiptoe through the half-open door into the sitting room, where there was a smell of vinegar and Hoffman's drops.
  • There was also much china standing on the tables, and still more was being brought in from the storeroom.
  • She packed, repacked, pressed, made the butler's assistant and Petya--whom she had drawn into the business of packing--press on the lid, and made desperate efforts herself.
  • Thanks to Natasha's directions the work now went on expeditiously, unnecessary things were left, and the most valuable packed as compactly as possible.
  • On the box beside the driver sat a venerable old attendant.
  • The church bells everywhere were ringing for service, just as usual on Sundays.
  • Not only were huge sums offered for the horses and carts, but on the previous evening and early in the morning of the first of September, orderlies and servants sent by wounded officers came to the Rostovs' and wounded men dragged themselves there from the Rostovs' and from neighboring houses where they were accommodated, entreating the servants to try to get them a lift out of Moscow.
  • So thought the major-domo on his master's behalf.
  • On waking up that morning Count Ilya Rostov left his bedroom softly, so as not to wake the countess who had fallen asleep only toward morning, and came out to the porch in his lilac silk dressing gown.
  • On seeing the count the major- domo made a significant and stern gesture to them both to go away.
  • I shall be all right on a loaded cart...
  • Before the officer had finished speaking the orderly made the same request on behalf of his master.
  • If you have no pity on me, have some for the children.
  • On the first of September he had come to Moscow from the army.
  • I tell you, Papa" (he smote himself on the breast as a general he had heard speaking had done, but Berg did it a trifle late for he should have struck his breast at the words "Russian army"), "I tell you frankly that we, the commanders, far from having to urge the men on or anything of that kind, could hardly restrain those... those... yes, those exploits of antique valor," he went on rapidly.
  • Our corps was stationed on a hillside.
  • "Mamma, it's impossible: see what is going on in the yard!" she cried.
  • Only look what is going on in the yard...
  • "The eggs... the eggs are teaching the hen," muttered the count through tears of joy, and he embraced his wife who was glad to hide her look of shame on his breast.
  • It no longer seemed strange to them but on the contrary it seemed the only thing that could be done, just as a quarter of an hour before it had not seemed strange to anyone that the wounded should be left behind and the goods carted away but that had seemed the only thing to do.
  • Many of the wounded asked them not to unload the carts but only to let them sit on the top of the things.
  • "What could we fasten this onto?" asked the servants, trying to fix a trunk on the narrow footboard behind a carriage.
  • You'll sit on the box, won't you, Petya? cried Natasha.
  • And Dunyasha, with clenched teeth, without replying but with an aggrieved look on her face, hastily got into the coach to rearrange the seat.
  • Efim, the old coachman, who was the only one the countess trusted to drive her, sat perched up high on the box and did not so much as glance round at what was going on behind him.
  • "Off, in God's name!" said Efim, putting on his hat.
  • Those who were to remain in Moscow walked on either side of the vehicles seeing the travelers off.
  • But the coachman could not stop, for from the Meshchanski Street came more carts and carriages, and the Rostovs were being shouted at to move on and not block the way.
  • When he woke up on the morning after his return to Moscow and his interview with Count Rostopchin, he could not for some time make out where he was and what was expected of him.
  • Smiling unnaturally and muttering to himself, he first sat down on the sofa in an attitude of despair, then rose, went to the door of the reception room and peeped through the crack, returned flourishing his arms, and took up a book.
  • But as soon as the man had left the room Pierre took up his hat which was lying on the table and went out of his study by the other door.
  • On seeing Pierre he muttered something angrily and went away along the passage.
  • Gerasim opened one of the shutters and left the room on tiptoe.
  • He sat down at the dusty writing table, and, having laid the manuscripts before him, opened them out, closed them, finally pushed them away, and resting his head on his hand sank into meditation.
  • And he spent the night on a bed made up for him there.
  • It was when Pierre (wearing the coachman's coat which Gerasim had procured for him and had disinfected by steam) was on his way with the old man to buy the pistol at the Sukharev market that he met the Rostovs.
  • Kutuzov's order to retreat through Moscow to the Ryazan road was issued at night on the first of September.
  • At daybreak, however, those nearing the town at the Dorogomilov bridge saw ahead of them masses of soldiers crowding and hurrying across the bridge, ascending on the opposite side and blocking the streets and alleys, while endless masses of troops were bearing down on them from behind, and an unreasoning hurry and alarm overcame them.
  • The main army was on the other side of Moscow or beyond it.
  • At that very time, at ten in the morning of the second of September, Napoleon was standing among his troops on the Poklonny Hill looking at the panorama spread out before him.
  • Napoleon had lunched and was again standing in the same place on the Poklonny Hill awaiting the deputation.
  • Having learned that there were many charitable institutions in Moscow he mentally decided that he would shower favors on them all.
  • Meanwhile an agitated consultation was being carried on in whispers among his generals and marshals at the rear of his suite.
  • A single report of a signaling gun followed, and the troops, who were already spread out on different sides of Moscow, moved into the city through Tver, Kaluga, and Dorogomilov gates.
  • Only a few of them still move, rise, and feebly fly to settle on the enemy's hand, lacking the spirit to die stinging him; the rest are dead and fall as lightly as fish scales.
  • The beekeeper closes the hive, chalks a mark on it, and when he has time tears out its contents and burns it clean.
  • On the square in front of the Bazaar were drummers beating the muster call.
  • But the roll of the drums did not make the looting soldiers run in the direction of the drum as formerly, but made them, on the contrary, run farther away.
  • Two officers, one with a scarf over his uniform and mounted on a lean, dark-gray horse, the other in an overcoat and on foot, stood at the corner of Ilyinka Street, talking.
  • They are stuck there, wedged on the bridge, and don't move.
  • A shopkeeper with red pimples on his cheeks near the nose, and a calm, persistent, calculating expression on his plump face, hurriedly and ostentatiously approached the officer, swinging his arms.
  • "It's not my business!" he exclaimed, and strode on quickly down one of the passages.
  • The officer pounced on the soldiers who were in the shops, but at that moment fearful screams reached them from the huge crowd on the Moskva bridge and the officer ran out into the square.
  • Mishka had opened the clavichord and was strumming on it with one finger.
  • "Only fancy!" answered Ignat, surprised at the broadening grin on his face in the mirror.
  • "Oh well... it can't be helped!" said he in a tone of vexation and placed his hand on the gate as if to leave.
  • And as soon as the officer let go of the gate handle she turned and, hurrying away on her old legs, went through the back yard to the servants' quarters.
  • Mavra Kuzminichna went on apologetically.
  • From an unfinished house on the Varvarka, the ground floor of which was a dramshop, came drunken shouts and songs.
  • On benches round the tables in a dirty little room sat some ten factory hands.
  • They were singing discordantly, arduously, and with great effort, evidently not because they wished to sing, but because they wanted to show they were drunk and on a spree.
  • The publican was fighting one of the smiths at the door, and when the workmen came out the smith, wrenching himself free from the tavern keeper, fell face downward on the pavement.
  • "I daresay you would like to bind me!" shouted the publican, pushing away the men advancing on him, and snatching his cap from his head he flung it on the ground.
  • On seeing the crowd and the bloodstained man the workman ceased speaking, and with eager curiosity all the bootmakers joined the moving crowd.
  • Aren't there plenty of troops on the march?
  • We too will take part..." the reader went on, and then paused ("Do you see," shouted the youth victoriously, "he's going to clear up the whole affair for you...."), "in destroying them, and will send these visitors to the devil.
  • The superintendent of police, who had gone that morning by Count Rostopchin's orders to burn the barges and had in connection with that matter acquired a large sum of money which was at that moment in his pocket, on seeing a crowd bearing down upon him told his coachman to stop.
  • "Go on!" he ordered his coachman.
  • After supper he lay down on a sofa without undressing, and was awakened soon after midnight by a courier bringing him a letter from Kutuzov.
  • When later on in his memoirs Count Rostopchin explained his actions at this time, he repeatedly says that he was then actuated by two important considerations: to maintain tranquillity in Moscow and expedite the departure of the inhabitants.
  • All the horrors of the reign of terror were based only on solicitude for public tranquillity.
  • If the government offices were removed, this was only done on the demand of officials to whom the count yielded reluctantly.
  • While the sea of history remains calm the ruler-administrator in his frail bark, holding on with a boat hook to the ship of the people and himself moving, naturally imagines that his efforts move the ship he is holding on to.
  • As often happens with passionate people, he was mastered by anger but was still seeking an object on which to vent it.
  • And this thought occurred to him just because he himself desired a victim, something on which to vent his rage.
  • On his thin, weak legs were heavy chains which hampered his irresolute movements.
  • For several seconds while the young man was taking his place on the step the silence continued.
  • While waiting for the young man to take his place on the step Rostopchin stood frowning and rubbing his face with his hand.
  • All eyes were fixed on him.
  • The tall youth, with a stony look on his face, and rigid and uplifted arm, stood beside Vereshchagin.
  • And one of the soldiers, his face all at once distorted with fury, struck Vereshchagin on the head with the blunt side of his saber.
  • And the screams of those that were being trampled on and of those who tried to rescue the tall lad only increased the fury of the crowd.
  • At the moment when Vereshchagin fell and the crowd closed in with savage yells and swayed about him, Rostopchin suddenly turned pale and, instead of going to the back entrance where his carriage awaited him, went with hurried steps and bent head, not knowing where and why, along the passage leading to the rooms on the ground floor.
  • Swaying from side to side on his long, thin legs in his fluttering dressing gown, this lunatic was running impetuously, his gaze fixed on Rostopchin, shouting something in a hoarse voice and making signs to him to stop.
  • Count Rostopchin suddenly grew pale as he had done when the crowd closed in on Vereshchagin.
  • Even now he felt clearly that the gory trace of that recollection would not pass with time, but that the terrible memory would, on the contrary, dwell in his heart ever more cruelly and painfully to the end of his life.
  • Kutuzov, dejected and frowning, sat on a bench by the bridge toying with his whip in the sand when a caleche dashed up noisily.
  • Kutuzov looked at Rostopchin as if, not grasping what was said to him, he was trying to read something peculiar written at that moment on the face of the man addressing him.
  • And strange to say, the Governor of Moscow, the proud Count Rostopchin, took up a Cossack whip and went to the bridge where he began with shouts to drive on the carts that blocked the way.
  • "Clear that away!" was all that was said of them, and they were thrown over the parapet and removed later on that they might not stink.
  • No masters of the houses being found anywhere, the French were not billeted on the inhabitants as is usual in towns but lived in it as in a camp.
  • Many of them appropriated several houses, chalked their names on them, and quarreled and even fought with other companies for them.
  • Moscow was set on fire by the soldiers' pipes, kitchens, and campfires, and by the carelessness of enemy soldiers occupying houses they did not own.
  • After the last two days spent in solitude and unusual circumstances, Pierre was in a state bordering on insanity.
  • Then during the first day spent in inaction and solitude (he tried several times to fix his attention on the masonic manuscripts, but was unable to do so) the idea that had previously occurred to him of the cabalistic significance of his name in connection with Bonaparte's more than once vaguely presented itself.
  • The unaccustomed coarse food, the vodka he drank during those days, the absence of wine and cigars, his dirty unchanged linen, two almost sleepless nights passed on a short sofa without bedding--all this kept him in a state of excitement bordering on insanity.
  • "Well then, take me and execute me!" he went on, speaking to himself and bowing his head with a sad but firm expression.
  • While Pierre, standing in the middle of the room, was talking to himself in this way, the study door opened and on the threshold appeared the figure of Makar Alexeevich, always so timid before but now quite transformed.
  • On seeing Pierre he grew confused at first, but noticing embarrassment on Pierre's face immediately grew bold and, staggering on his thin legs, advanced into the middle of the room.
  • On seeing Pierre he grew confused at first, but noticing embarrassment on Pierre's face immediately grew bold and, staggering on his thin legs, advanced into the middle of the room.
  • He paused and then suddenly seeing the pistol on the table seized it with unexpected rapidity and ran out into the corridor.
  • Makar Alexeevich, frowning with exertion, held on to the pistol and screamed hoarsely, evidently with some heroic fancy in his head.
  • The officer walked in front, leaning on a stick and slightly limping.
  • Hearing the yell the officer turned round, and at the same moment Pierre threw himself on the drunkard.
  • Just when Pierre snatched at and struck up the pistol Makar Alexeevich at last got his fingers on the trigger, there was a deafening report, and all were enveloped in a cloud of smoke.
  • "A Frenchman or a Russian prince incognito," said the officer, looking at Pierre's fine though dirty linen and at the ring on his finger.
  • Here is one I got at Wagram" (he touched his side) "and a second at Smolensk"--he showed a scar on his cheek--"and this leg which as you see does not want to march, I got that on the seventh at the great battle of la Moskowa.
  • And on my honor, in spite of the cough I caught there, I should be ready to begin again.
  • I saw them close up their ranks six times in succession and march as if on parade.
  • The Frenchman emitted a merry, sanguine chuckle, patting Pierre on the shoulder.
  • The captain, on the other hand, seemed very cheerful.
  • The captain looked at Pierre by the candlelight and was evidently struck by the troubled expression on his companion's face.
  • I say it with my hand on my heart! said he, striking his chest.
  • Ramballe emptied his too, again pressed Pierre's hand, and leaned his elbows on the table in a pensive attitude.
  • Urged on by Ramballe's questions he also told what he had at first concealed--his own position and even his name.
  • To the left of the house on the Pokrovka a fire glowed--the first of those that were beginning in Moscow.
  • Without taking leave of his new friend, Pierre left the gate with unsteady steps and returning to his room lay down on the sofa and immediately fell asleep.
  • The glow of the first fire that began on the second of September was watched from the various roads by the fugitive Muscovites and by the retreating troops, with many different feelings.
  • She moved simply to be farther away from the wounded man.
  • Two of the gazers went round to the other side of the coach and sat down on its steps.
  • It's more to the left, why, Little Mytishchi is over there, and this is right on the other side.
  • Petya was no longer with the family, he had gone on with his regiment which was making for Troitsa.
  • The countess, on hearing that Moscow was on fire, began to cry.
  • Natasha, pale, with a fixed look, was sitting on the bench under the icons just where she had sat down on arriving and paid no attention to her father's words.
  • But Natasha looked at her as if not understanding what was said to her and again fixed her eyes on the corner of the stove.
  • Natasha, undress, darling; lie down on my bed.
  • A bed had been made on a bedstead for the countess only.
  • Madame Schoss and the two girls were to sleep on some hay on the floor.
  • "No, Mamma, I will lie down here on the floor," Natasha replied irritably and she went to the window and opened it.
  • When her toilet for the night was finished she sank gently onto the sheet spread over the hay on the side nearest the door.
  • Natasha did not move, though her little bare foot, thrust out from under the quilt, was growing cold on the bare floor.
  • Natasha rose slowly and carefully, crossed herself, and stepped cautiously on the cold and dirty floor with her slim, supple, bare feet.
  • Another man--Timokhin--was lying in a corner on the benches beneath the icons, and two others--the doctor and a valet--lay on the floor.
  • He was the same as ever, but the feverish color of his face, his glittering eyes rapturously turned toward her, and especially his neck, delicate as a child's, revealed by the turn-down collar of his shirt, gave him a peculiarly innocent, childlike look, such as she had never seen on him before.
  • She went up to him and with a swift, flexible, youthful movement dropped on her knees.
  • Seven days had passed since Prince Andrew found himself in the ambulance station on the field of Borodino.
  • When he had been placed on his camp bed he lay for a long time motionless with closed eyes.
  • A happiness lying beyond material forces, outside the material influences that act on man--a happiness of the soul alone, the happiness of loving.
  • "But perhaps that's my shirt on the table," he thought, "and that's my legs, and that is the door, but why is it always stretching and drawing itself out, and 'piti-piti-piti' and 'ti-ti' and 'piti-piti-piti'...?
  • Natasha, motionless on her knees (she was unable to stir), with frightened eyes riveted on him, was restraining her sobs.
  • With a rapid but careful movement Natasha drew nearer to him on her knees and, taking his hand carefully, bent her face over it and began kissing it, just touching it lightly with her lips.
  • Like a somnambulist aroused from her sleep Natasha went out of the room and, returning to her hut, fell sobbing on her bed.
  • On the third of September Pierre awoke late.
  • Pierre rose, rubbed his eyes, and seeing the pistol with an engraved stock which Gerasim had replaced on the writing table, he remembered where he was and what lay before him that very day.
  • Having tied a girdle over his coat and pulled his cap low on his head, Pierre went down the corridor, trying to avoid making a noise or meeting the captain, and passed out into the street.
  • Moscow was on fire in several places.
  • The buildings in Carriage Row, across the river, in the Bazaar and the Povarskoy, as well as the barges on the Moskva River and the timber yards by the Dorogomilov Bridge, were all ablaze.
  • Pierre's way led through side streets to the Povarskoy and from there to the church of St. Nicholas on the Arbat, where he had long before decided that the deed should be done.
  • In another side street a sentinel standing beside a green caisson shouted at him, but only when the shout was threateningly repeated and he heard the click of the man's musket as he raised it did Pierre understand that he had to pass on the other side of the street.
  • He heard nothing and saw nothing of what went on around him.
  • As he was going along a foot path across a wide- open space adjoining the Povarskoy on one side and the gardens of Prince Gruzinski's house on the other, Pierre suddenly heard the desperate weeping of a woman close to him.
  • By the side of the path, on the dusty dry grass, all sorts of household goods lay in a heap: featherbeds, a samovar, icons, and trunks.
  • On the ground, beside the trunks, sat a thin woman no longer young, with long, prominent upper teeth, and wearing a black cloak and cap.
  • Two girls of about ten and twelve, dressed in dirty short frocks and cloaks, were staring at their mother with a look of stupefaction on their pale frightened faces.
  • A dirty, barefooted maid was sitting on a trunk, and, having undone her pale-colored plait, was pulling it straight and sniffing at her singed hair.
  • The woman's husband, a short, round- shouldered man in the undress uniform of a civilian official, with sausage-shaped whiskers and showing under his square-set cap the hair smoothly brushed forward over his temples, with expressionless face was moving the trunks, which were placed one on another, and was dragging some garments from under them.
  • He held his head higher, his eyes shone with the light of life, and with swift steps he followed the maid, overtook her, and came out on the Povarskoy.
  • "On ne passe pas!" * cried a voice.
  • She ran across the street, turned down a side street to the left, and, passing three houses, turned into a yard on the right.
  • One of its sides had fallen in, another was on fire, and bright flames issued from the openings of the windows and from under the roof.
  • It had a peculiarly strong effect on him because at the sight of the fire he felt himself suddenly freed from the ideas that had weighed him down.
  • And a minute or two later the Frenchman, a black-eyed fellow with a spot on his cheek, in shirt sleeves, really did jump out of a window on the ground floor, and clapping Pierre on the shoulder ran with him into the garden.
  • We must be human, we are all mortal you know! and the Frenchman with the spot on his cheek ran back to his comrades.
  • Glowing with the heat and from running, he felt at that moment more strongly than ever the sense of youth, animation, and determination that had come on him when he ran to save the child.
  • She had now become quiet and, clinging with her little hands to Pierre's coat, sat on his arm gazing about her like some little wild animal.
  • Amid the scattered property and the crowd on the open space, she, in her rich satin cloak with a bright lilac shawl on her head, suggested a delicate exotic plant thrown out onto the snow.
  • She was sitting on some bundles a little behind the old woman, and looked from under her long lashes with motionless, large, almond-shaped eyes at the ground before her.
  • She kept on lamenting and crying, continued the woman.
  • He had for some seconds been intently watching what was going on a few steps away.
  • He had a nightcap on his head and his feet were bare.
  • "Give her back to them, give her back!" he almost shouted, putting the child, who began screaming, on the ground, and again looking at the Frenchman and the Armenian family.
  • His face probably looked very terrible, for the officer said something in a whisper and four more uhlans left the ranks and placed themselves on both sides of Pierre.
  • In Petersburg at that time a complicated struggle was being carried on with greater heat than ever in the highest circles, between the parties of Rumyantsev, the French, Marya Fedorovna, the Tsarevich, and others, drowned as usual by the buzzing of the court drones.
  • At Anna Pavlovna's on the twenty-sixth of August, the very day of the battle of Borodino, there was a soiree, the chief feature of which was to be the reading of a letter from His Lordship the Bishop when sending the Emperor an icon of the Venerable Sergius.
  • Oh, she is certainly the most charming woman in the world, she went on, with a smile at her own enthusiasm.
  • "The Emperor returns these Austrian banners," said Bilibin, "friendly banners gone astray and found on a wrong path," and his brow became smooth again.
  • It was Kutuzov's report, written from Tatarinova on the day of the battle.
  • On the third day after Kutuzov's report a country gentleman arrived from Moscow, and news of the surrender of Moscow to the French spread through the whole town.
  • On receiving this dispatch the Emperor sent Prince Volkonski to Kutuzov with the following rescript:
  • You can yourself imagine the effect this news has had on me, and your silence increases my astonishment.
  • The Emperor at once received this messenger in his study at the palace on Stone Island.
  • In Petersburg and in the provinces at a distance from Moscow, ladies, and gentlemen in militia uniforms, wept for Russia and its ancient capital and talked of self-sacrifice and so on; but in the army which retired beyond Moscow there was little talk or thought of Moscow, and when they caught sight of its burned ruins no one swore to be avenged on the French, but they thought about their next pay, their next quarters, of Matreshka the vivandiere, and like matters.
  • A few days before the battle of Borodino, Nicholas received the necessary money and warrants, and having sent some hussars on in advance, he set out with post horses for Voronezh.
  • We are at home on Thursdays--today is Thursday, so please come and see us quite informally, said the governor, taking leave of him.
  • Immediately on leaving the governor's, Nicholas hired post horses and, taking his squadron quartermaster with him, drove at a gallop to the landowner, fourteen miles away, who had the stud.
  • When he had changed, poured water over his head, and scented himself, Nicholas arrived at the governor's rather late, but with the phrase "better late than never" on his lips.
  • As soon as Nicholas entered in his hussar uniform, diffusing around him a fragrance of perfume and wine, and had uttered the words "better late than never" and heard them repeated several times by others, people clustered around him; all eyes turned on him, and he felt at once that he had entered into his proper position in the province--that of a universal favorite: a very pleasant position, and intoxicatingly so after his long privations.
  • With the naive conviction of young men in a merry mood that other men's wives were created for them, Rostov did not leave the lady's side and treated her husband in a friendly and conspiratorial style, as if, without speaking of it, they knew how capitally Nicholas and the lady would get on together.
  • This was Malvintseva, Princess Mary's aunt on her mother's side, a rich, childless widow who always lived in Voronezh.
  • When he had parted from Malvintseva Nicholas wished to return to the dancing, but the governor's little wife placed her plump hand on his sleeve and, saying that she wanted to have a talk with him, led him to her sitting room, from which those who were there immediately withdrew so as not to be in her way.
  • "Do you know, dear boy," began the governor's wife with a serious expression on her kind little face, "that really would be the match for you: would you like me to arrange it?"
  • And on taking leave of the governor's wife, when she again smilingly said to him, "Well then, remember!" he drew her aside.
  • On reaching Moscow after her meeting with Rostov, Princess Mary had found her nephew there with his tutor, and a letter from Prince Andrew giving her instructions how to get to her Aunt Malvintseva at Voronezh.
  • But when on Sunday after church the footman announced in the drawing room that Count Rostov had called, the princess showed no confusion, only a slight blush suffused her cheeks and her eyes lit up with a new and radiant light.
  • Herself a consummate coquette, she could not have maneuvered better on meeting a man she wished to attract.
  • For the first time all that pure, spiritual, inward travail through which she had lived appeared on the surface.
  • He took the boy on his knee, played with him, and looked round at Princess Mary.
  • After meeting Princess Mary, though the course of his life went on externally as before, all his former amusements lost their charm for him and he often thought about her.
  • He had pictured each of those young ladies as almost all honest-hearted young men do, that is, as a possible wife, adapting her in his imagination to all the conditions of married life: a white dressing gown, his wife at the tea table, his wife's carriage, little ones, Mamma and Papa, their relations to her, and so on--and these pictures of the future had given him pleasure.
  • He stood a little behind the governor and held himself with military decorum through the service, meditating on a great variety of subjects.
  • "Have you seen the princess?" she asked, indicating with a movement of her head a lady standing on the opposite side, beyond the choir.
  • The princess looked at him, not grasping what he was saying, but cheered by the expression of regretful sympathy on his face.
  • When he had finished that business it was already too late to go anywhere but still too early to go to bed, and for a long time he paced up and down the room, reflecting on his life, a thing he rarely did.
  • Princess Mary had made an agreeable impression on him when he had met her in Smolensk province.
  • When he met her again in Voronezh the impression she made on him was not merely pleasing but powerful.
  • The following day he saw Princess Mary off on her journey to Yaroslavl, and a few days later left to rejoin his regiment.
  • But a few days before they left Moscow, moved and excited by all that was going on, she called Sonya to her and, instead of reproaching and making demands on her, tearfully implored her to sacrifice herself and repay all that the family had done for her by breaking off her engagement with Nicholas.
  • In the next room sat the count and countess respectfully conversing with the prior, who was calling on them as old acquaintances and benefactors of the monastery.
  • Not noticing the monk, who had risen to greet her and was drawing back the wide sleeve on his right arm, she went up to Sonya and took her hand.
  • Prince Andrew was lying raised high on three pillows.
  • I saw him lying on a bed," said she, making a gesture with her hand and a lifted finger at each detail, "and that he had his eyes closed and was covered just with a pink quilt, and that his hands were folded," she concluded, convincing herself that the details she had just seen were exactly what she had seen in the mirror.
  • On the third day he was taken with the others to a house where a French general with a white mustache sat with two colonels and other Frenchmen with scarves on their arms.
  • On the third day he was taken with the others to a house where a French general with a white mustache sat with two colonels and other Frenchmen with scarves on their arms.
  • On the fourth day fires broke out on the Zubovski rampart.
  • On the fourth day fires broke out on the Zubovski rampart.
  • On his way through the streets Pierre felt stifled by the smoke which seemed to hang over the whole city.
  • Fires were visible on all sides.
  • On the eighth of September an officer--a very important one judging by the respect the guards showed him--entered the coach house where the prisoners were.
  • This officer, probably someone on the staff, was holding a paper in his hand, and called over all the Russians there, naming Pierre as "the man who does not give his name."
  • No flames were seen, but columns of smoke rose on all sides, and all Moscow as far as Pierre could see was one vast charred ruin.
  • On all sides there were waste spaces with only stoves and chimney stacks still standing, and here and there the blackened walls of some brick houses.
  • He felt this in the looks of the soldiers who, marching in regular ranks briskly and gaily, were escorting him and the other criminals; he felt it in the looks of an important French official in a carriage and pair driven by a soldier, whom they met on the way.
  • But before he had decided what to do, Davout raised his head, pushed his spectacles back on his forehead, screwed up his eyes, and looked intently at him.
  • His faculties were quite numbed, he was stupefied, and noticing nothing around him went on moving his legs as the others did till they all stopped and he stopped too.
  • Not the men on the commission that had first examined him--not one of them wished to or, evidently, could have done it.
  • The crowd consisted of a few Russians and many of Napoleon's soldiers who were not on duty--Germans, Italians, and Frenchmen, in a variety of uniforms.
  • On the faces of all the Russians and of the French soldiers and officers without exception, he read the same dismay, horror, and conflict that were in his own heart.
  • The moment they laid hands on him he sprang aside in terror and clutched at Pierre.
  • Pierre was taken back to his place, and the rows of troops on both sides of the post made a half turn and went past it at a measured pace.
  • This one, a young soldier, his face deadly pale, his shako pushed back, and his musket resting on the ground, still stood near the pit at the spot from which he had fired.
  • Then they led him away somewhere, and at last he found himself in a corner of the shed among men who were laughing and talking on all sides.
  • Sitting silent and motionless on a heap of straw against the wall, Pierre sometimes opened and sometimes closed his eyes.
  • On growing used to the darkness Pierre saw that the man was taking off his leg bands, and the way he did it aroused Pierre's interest.
  • Having unwound the string that tied the band on one leg, he carefully coiled it up and immediately set to work on the other leg, glancing up at Pierre.
  • While one hand hung up the first string the other was already unwinding the band on the second leg.
  • Then he took out a knife, cut something, closed the knife, placed it under the head of his bed, and, seating himself comfortably, clasped his arms round his lifted knees and fixed his eyes on Pierre.
  • He took a potato, drew out his clasp knife, cut the potato into two equal halves on the palm of his hand, sprinkled some salt on it from the rag, and handed it to Pierre.
  • "Well, and have you little ones?" he went on asking.
  • I come home on leave and I'll tell you how it was, I look and see that they are living better than before.
  • And Platon shifted his seat on the straw.
  • But his brilliantly white, strong teeth which showed in two unbroken semicircles when he laughed--as he often did--were all sound and good, there was not a gray hair in his beard or on his head, and his whole body gave an impression of suppleness and especially of firmness and endurance.
  • Every night before lying down, he said: "Lord, lay me down as a stone and raise me up as a loaf!" and every morning on getting up, he said: "I lay down and curled up, I get up and shake myself."
  • "A soldier on leave--a shirt outside breeches," he would say.
  • He would often say the exact opposite of what he had said on a previous occasion, yet both would be right.
  • They called him "little falcon" or "Platosha," chaffed him good-naturedly, and sent him on errands.
  • That feeling was so strong at the moment of leaving Voronezh that those who saw her off, as they looked at her careworn, despairing face, felt sure she would fall ill on the journey.
  • On the left there was water--a great river--and on the right a porch.
  • On the left there was water--a great river--and on the right a porch.
  • In spite of her one desire to see her brother as soon as possible, and her vexation that at the moment when all she wanted was to see him they should be trying to entertain her and pretending to admire her nephew, the princess noticed all that was going on around her and felt the necessity of submitting, for a time, to this new order of things which she had entered.
  • She ran to meet her, embraced her, and began to cry on her shoulder.
  • There was only one expression on her agitated face when she ran into the drawing room--that of love--boundless love for him, for her, and for all that was near to the man she loved; and of pity, suffering for others, and passionate desire to give herself entirely to helping them.
  • He was lying in a squirrel-fur dressing gown on a divan, surrounded by pillows.
  • On seeing his face and meeting his eyes Princess Mary's pace suddenly slackened, she felt her tears dry up and her sobs ceased.
  • She suddenly felt guilty and grew timid on catching the expression of his face and eyes.
  • "He wrote here that he took a great liking to you," he went on simply and calmly, evidently unable to understand all the complex significance his words had for living people.
  • She set herself a task on her stocking and resolved not to turn round till it was finished.
  • Everything depended on whether he was, or was not, in time to lock it.
  • But just when he was clumsily creeping toward the door, that dreadful something on the other side was already pressing against it and forcing its way in.
  • When, waking in a cold perspiration, he moved on the divan, Natasha went up and asked him what was the matter.
  • When the body, washed and dressed, lay in the coffin on a table, everyone came to take leave of him and they all wept.
  • What would have happened if on approaching Tarutino, Napoleon had attacked the Russians with but a tenth of the energy he had shown when he attacked them at Smolensk?
  • What would have happened had the French moved on Petersburg?...
  • Lanskoy informed the commander-in-chief that the army supplies were for the most part stored along the Oka in the Tula and Ryazan provinces, and that if they retreated on Nizhni the army would be separated from its supplies by the broad river Oka, which cannot be crossed early in winter.
  • This was the first indication of the necessity of deviating from what had previously seemed the most natural course--a direct retreat on Nizhni-Novgorod.
  • As a result of the hostility between Kutuzov and Bennigsen, his Chief of Staff, the presence of confidential representatives of the Emperor, and these transfers, a more than usually complicated play of parties was going on among the staff of the army.
  • The war went on independently of them, as it had to go: that is, never in the way people devised, but flowing always from the essential attitude of the masses.
  • From General Wintzingerode's reports, I see that an enemy corps of ten thousand men is moving on the Petersburg road.
  • Another corps of several thousand men is moving on Dmitrov.
  • On the contrary, he is probably pursuing you with detachments, or at most with an army corps much weaker than the army entrusted to you.
  • On the second of October a Cossack, Shapovalov, who was out scouting, killed one hare and wounded another.
  • The state of things on the staff had of late been exceedingly strained.
  • On the morning of the fourth of October Kutuzov signed the dispositions.
  • Ermolov came forward with a frown on his face and, hearing what the officer had to say, took the papers from him without a word.
  • "You think he went off just by chance?" said a comrade, who was on the staff that evening, to the officer of the Horse Guards, referring to Ermolov.
  • It was done on purpose to get Konovnitsyn into trouble.
  • He sat in the caleche, dozing and waking up by turns, and listening for any sound of firing on the right as an indication that the action had begun.
  • On approaching Tarutino Kutuzov noticed cavalrymen leading their horses to water across the road along which he was driving.
  • Trembling and panting the old man fell into that state of fury in which he sometimes used to roll on the ground, and he fell upon Eykhen, threatening him with his hands, shouting and loading him with gross abuse.
  • Some columns, supposing they had reached their destination, halted, piled arms, and settled down on the cold ground, but the majority marched all night and arrived at places where they evidently should not have been.
  • This detachment halted at the outskirts of a forest, on the path leading from the village of Stromilova to Dmitrovsk.
  • They disappeared into the forest, and Count Orlov-Denisov, having seen Grekov off, returned, shivering from the freshness of the early dawn and excited by what he had undertaken on his own responsibility, and began looking at the enemy camp, now just visible in the deceptive light of dawn and the dying campfires.
  • Our columns ought to have begun to appear on an open declivity to his right.
  • Should we let them go on or not?
  • Fifteen hundred prisoners and thirty-eight guns were taken on the spot, besides standards and (what seemed most important to the Cossacks) horses, saddles, horsecloths, and the like.
  • All this had to be dealt with, the prisoners and guns secured, the booty divided--not without some shouting and even a little fighting among themselves--and it was on this that the Cossacks all busied themselves.
  • Meantime, according to the dispositions which said that "the First Column will march" and so on, the infantry of the belated columns, commanded by Bennigsen and directed by Toll, had started in due order and, as always happens, had got somewhere, but not to their appointed places.
  • Thus he stumbled on Bagovut's corps in a wood when it was already broad daylight, though the corps should long before have joined Orlov-Denisov.
  • He rode silently on his small gray horse, indolently answering suggestions that they should attack.
  • "The word attack is always on your tongue, but you don't see that we are unable to execute complicated maneuvers," said he to Miloradovich who asked permission to advance.
  • Ermolov screwed up his eyes and smiled faintly on hearing these words.
  • He not merely did nothing of the kind, but on the contrary he used his power to select the most foolish and ruinous of all the courses open to him.
  • Of all that Napoleon might have done: wintering in Moscow, advancing on Petersburg or on Nizhni-Novgorod, or retiring by a more northerly or more southerly route (say by the road Kutuzov afterwards took), nothing more stupid or disastrous can be imagined than what he actually did.
  • With regard to military matters, Napoleon immediately on his entry into Moscow gave General Sabastiani strict orders to observe the movements of the Russian army, sent army corps out along the different roads, and charged Murat to find Kutuzov.
  • But when not on duty they will only wear a red ribbon round the left arm.
  • The city police is established on its former footing, and better order already prevails in consequence of its activity.
  • You will recognize them by the white ribbon they will wear on the left arm.
  • Your fellow countrymen are emerging boldly from their hiding places on finding that they are respected.
  • (2) Such supplies will be bought from them at such prices as seller and buyer may agree on, and if a seller is unable to obtain a fair price he will be free to take his goods back to his village and no one may hinder him under any pretense.
  • (3) Sunday and Wednesday of each week are appointed as the chief market days and to that end a sufficient number of troops will be stationed along the highroads on Tuesdays and Saturdays at such distances from the town as to protect the carts.
  • It began to run away only when suddenly seized by a panic caused by the capture of transport trains on the Smolensk road, and by the battle of Tarutino.
  • Napoleon, too, carried away his own personal tresor, but on seeing the baggage trains that impeded the army, he was (Thiers says) horror-struck.
  • Early in the morning of the sixth of October Pierre went out of the shed, and on returning stopped by the door to play with a little blue- gray dog, with a long body and short bandy legs, that jumped about him.
  • Its furry tail stood up firm and round as a plume, its bandy legs served it so well that it would often gracefully lift a hind leg and run very easily and quickly on three legs, as if disdaining to use all four.
  • Now it would roll on its back, yelping with delight, now bask in the sun with a thoughtful air of importance, and now frolic about playing with a chip of wood or a straw.
  • On everything--far and near--lay the magic crystal glitter seen only at that time of autumn.
  • A French corporal, with coat unbuttoned in a homely way, a skullcap on his head, and a short pipe in his mouth, came from behind a corner of the shed and approached Pierre with a friendly wink.
  • "To be on the march in such weather..." he began.
  • He was evidently afraid the prisoners looking on would laugh at him, and thrust his head into the shirt hurriedly.
  • Pierre saw that Platon did not want to understand what the Frenchman was saying, and he looked on without interfering.
  • Karataev thanked the Frenchman for the money and went on admiring his own work.
  • The Frenchman insisted on having the pieces returned that were left over and asked Pierre to translate what he said.
  • All Pierre's daydreams now turned on the time when he would be free.
  • The French evacuation began on the night between the sixth and seventh of October: kitchens and sheds were dismantled, carts loaded, and troops and baggage trains started.
  • The shed became semidark, and the sharp rattle of the drums on two sides drowned the sick man's groans.
  • The captain was also in marching kit, and on his cold face appeared that same it which Pierre had recognized in the corporal's words and in the roll of the drums.
  • "Pass on, pass on!" the captain reiterated, frowning sternly, and looking at the prisoners who thronged past him.
  • "Pass on, pass on!" he continued without looking at Pierre.
  • What have they done? the prisoners on one side and another were heard saying as they gazed on the charred ruins.
  • When they had crossed the Crimean bridge the prisoners moved a few steps forward, halted, and again moved on, and from all sides vehicles and men crowded closer and closer together.
  • They've loaded goods even on the cannon!
  • See that fellow there sitting on the trunks....
  • That's right, hit him on the snout--on his snout!
  • All that he now witnessed scarcely made an impression on him--as if his soul, making ready for a hard struggle, refused to receive impressions that might weaken it.
  • During the hour Pierre watched them they all came flowing from the different streets with one and the same desire to get on quickly; they all jostled one another, began to grow angry and to fight, white teeth gleamed, brows frowned, ever the same words of abuse flew from side to side, and all the faces bore the same swaggeringly resolute and coldly cruel expression that had struck Pierre that morning on the corporal's face when the drums were beating.
  • It was not till nearly evening that the officer commanding the escort collected his men and with shouts and quarrels forced his way in among the baggage trains, and the prisoners, hemmed in on all sides, emerged onto the Kaluga road.
  • Several soldiers ran toward the cart from different sides: some beat the carriage horses on their heads, turning them aside, others fought among themselves, and Pierre saw that one German was badly wounded on the head by a sword.
  • It seemed that all these men, now that they had stopped amid fields in the chill dusk of the autumn evening, experienced one and the same feeling of unpleasant awakening from the hurry and eagerness to push on that had seized them at the start.
  • This spite increased still more when, on calling over the roll of prisoners, it was found that in the bustle of leaving Moscow one Russian soldier, who had pretended to suffer from colic, had escaped.
  • On the road he was stopped by a French sentinel who ordered him back.
  • Tucking his legs under him and dropping his head he sat down on the cold ground by the wheel of the cart and remained motionless a long while sunk in thought.
  • In the early days of October another envoy came to Kutuzov with a letter from Napoleon proposing peace and falsely dated from Moscow, though Napoleon was already not far from Kutuzov on the old Kaluga road.
  • Generals on the staff, excited by the memory of the easy victory at Tarutino, urged Kutuzov to carry out Dorokhov's suggestion.
  • On the evening of October 11 Seslavin came to the Aristovo headquarters with a French guardsman he had captured.
  • Ermolov wished to act on his own judgment, but Dokhturov insisted that he must have Kutuzov's instructions.
  • Dismounting at a cottage on whose wattle fence hung a signboard, GENERAL STAFF, and throwing down his reins, he entered a dark passage.
  • The general on duty, quick!
  • My orders are to give it at once to the general on duty.
  • The orderly was striking a light and Shcherbinin was fumbling for something on the candlestick.
  • On Konovnitsyn's handsome, resolute face with cheeks flushed by fever, there still remained for an instant a faraway dreamy expression remote from present affairs, but then he suddenly started and his face assumed its habitual calm and firm appearance.
  • Since his appointment as general on duty he had always slept with his door open, giving orders that every messenger should be allowed to wake him up.
  • He often fell asleep unexpectedly in the daytime, but at night, lying on his bed without undressing, he generally remained awake thinking.
  • So he lay now on his bed, supporting his large, heavy, scarred head on his plump hand, with his one eye open, meditating and peering into the darkness.
  • Since Bennigsen, who corresponded with the Emperor and had more influence than anyone else on the staff, had begun to avoid him, Kutuzov was more at ease as to the possibility of himself and his troops being obliged to take part in useless aggressive movements.
  • The lesson of the Tarutino battle and of the day before it, which Kutuzov remembered with pain, must, he thought, have some effect on others too.
  • It will fall of itself when ripe, but if picked unripe the apple is spoiled, the tree is harmed, and your teeth are set on edge.
  • On the one hand the French had occupied Moscow.
  • Lying on his bed during those sleepless nights he did just what he reproached those younger generals for doing.
  • He imagined all sorts of possible contingencies, just like the younger men, but with this difference, that he saw thousands of contingencies instead of two or three and based nothing on them.
  • On the night of the eleventh of October he lay leaning on his arm and thinking of that.
  • On the night of the eleventh of October he lay leaning on his arm and thinking of that.
  • The day after the council at Malo-Yaroslavets Napoleon rode out early in the morning amid the lines of his army with his suite of marshals and an escort, on the pretext of inspecting the army and the scene of the previous and of the impending battle.
  • Some Cossacks on the prowl for booty fell in with the Emperor and very nearly captured him.
  • If the Cossacks did not capture Napoleon then, what saved him was the very thing that was destroying the French army, the booty on which the Cossacks fell.
  • That Napoleon agreed with Mouton, and that the army retreated, does not prove that Napoleon caused it to retreat, but that the forces which influenced the whole army and directed it along the Mozhaysk (that is, the Smolensk) road acted simultaneously on him also.
  • So both those who knew and those who did not know deceived themselves, and pushed on to Smolensk as to a promised land.
  • Each of them desired nothing more than to give himself up as a prisoner to escape from all this horror and misery; but on the one hand the force of this common attraction to Smolensk, their goal, drew each of them in the same direction; on the other hand an army corps could not surrender to a company, and though the French availed themselves of every convenient opportunity to detach themselves and to surrender on the slightest decent pretext, such pretexts did not always occur.
  • On the contrary the greater the heat the more solidified the remaining snow becomes.
  • When the flight of the French army along the Smolensk road became well defined, what Konovnitsyn had foreseen on the night of the eleventh of October began to occur.
  • What is the use of that, when a third of their army has melted away on the road from Moscow to Vyazma without any battle?
  • But drawing from his aged wisdom what they could understand, he told them of the golden bridge, and they laughed at and slandered him, flinging themselves on, rending and exulting over the dying beast.
  • Such action always occurs in wars that take on a national character.
  • Ten men, battalions, or divisions, fighting fifteen men, battalions, or divisions, conquer--that is, kill or take captive--all the others, while themselves losing four, so that on the one side four and on the other fifteen were lost.
  • The tactical rule that an army should act in masses when attacking, and in smaller groups in retreat, unconsciously confirms the truth that the strength of an army depends on its spirit.
  • On August 24 Davydov's first partisan detachment was formed and then others were recognized.
  • On October 22, Denisov (who was one of the irregulars) was with his group at the height of the guerrilla enthusiasm.
  • Since early morning he and his party had been on the move.
  • On October 22 it was moving from the village of Mikulino to that of Shamshevo.
  • It was necessary to let the French reach Shamshevo quietly without alarming them and then, after joining Dolokhov who was to come that evening to a consultation at a watchman's hut in the forest less than a mile from Shamshevo, to surprise the French at dawn, falling like an avalanche on their heads from two sides, and rout and capture them all at one blow.
  • Beside him rode an hussar, with a boy in a tattered French uniform and blue cap behind him on the crupper of his horse.
  • The boy held on to the hussar with cold, red hands, and raising his eyebrows gazed about him with surprise.
  • There'll hardly be another such chance to fall on a transport as today.
  • On coming to a path in the forest along which he could see far to the right, Denisov stopped.
  • And turning to his men he directed a party to go on to the halting place arranged near the watchman's hut in the forest, and told the officer on the Kirghiz horse (who performed the duties of an adjutant) to go and find out where Dolokhov was and whether he would come that evening.
  • On reaching a large oak tree that had not yet shed its leaves, he stopped and beckoned mysteriously to them with his hand.
  • Immediately beyond the forest, on a downward slope, lay a field of spring rye.
  • The man whom they called Tikhon, having run to the stream, plunged in so that the water splashed in the air, and, having disappeared for an instant, scrambled out on all fours, all black with the wet, and ran on.
  • Tikhon, who at first did rough work, laying campfires, fetching water, flaying dead horses, and so on, soon showed a great liking and aptitude for partisan warfare.
  • Denisov then relieved him from drudgery and began taking him with him when he went out on expeditions and had him enrolled among the Cossacks.
  • Tikhon did not like riding, and always went on foot, never lagging behind the cavalry.
  • The only effect of this incident on Tikhon was that after being wounded he seldom brought in prisoners.
  • After talking for some time with the esaul about next day's attack, which now, seeing how near they were to the French, he seemed to have definitely decided on, Denisov turned his horse and rode back.
  • The clothes on him--poor stuff!
  • In ten minutes the table was ready and a napkin spread on it.
  • On the table were vodka, a flask of rum, white bread, roast mutton, and salt.
  • N'ayez pas peur, on ne vous fera pas de mal, * he added shyly and affectionately, touching the boy's hand.
  • He was clean-shaven and wore a Guardsman's padded coat with an Order of St. George at his buttonhole and a plain forage cap set straight on his head.
  • Denisov told him of the designs the large detachments had on the transport, of the message Petya had brought, and his own replies to both generals.
  • "There's no need for you to go at all," said Denisov, addressing Dolokhov, "and as for him, I won't let him go on any account."
  • And I say boldly that I have not a single man's life on my conscience.
  • "Now, why have you kept this lad?" he went on, swaying his head.
  • I do not wish to take it on my conscience.
  • For you'll admit that if we don't know for sure how many of them there are... hundreds of lives may depend on it, while there are only two of us.
  • On reaching the bottom, Dolokhov told the Cossacks accompanying him to await him there and rode on at a quick trot along the road to the bridge.
  • On reaching the bottom, Dolokhov told the Cossacks accompanying him to await him there and rode on at a quick trot along the road to the bridge.
  • The black figure of a sentinel stood on the bridge.
  • Having ridden up the road, on both sides of which French talk could be heard around the campfires, Dolokhov turned into the courtyard of the landowner's house.
  • "He'll make them get a move on, those fellows!" said another, laughing.
  • "If you were counting on the evening soup, you have come too late," said a voice from behind the fire with a repressed laugh.
  • Dolokhov replied that they were not hungry and must push on farther that night.
  • He handed the horses over to the soldier who was stirring the pot and squatted down on his heels by the fire beside the officer with the long neck.
  • Likhachev got up, rummaged in his pack, and soon Petya heard the warlike sound of steel on whetstone.
  • He climbed onto the wagon and sat on its edge.
  • Perhaps he was really sitting on a wagon, but it might very well be that he was not sitting on a wagon but on a terribly high tower from which, if he fell, he would have to fall for a whole day or a whole month, or go on falling and never reach the bottom.
  • Well, go on, my music!
  • On the bridge he collided with a Cossack who had fallen behind, but he galloped on.
  • "Too late again!" flashed through Petya's mind and he galloped on to the place from which the rapid firing could be heard.
  • His horse, having galloped up to a campfire that was smoldering in the morning light, stopped suddenly, and Petya fell heavily on to the wet ground.
  • On the twenty-second of October that party was no longer with the same troops and baggage trains with which it had left Moscow.
  • From Vyazma onwards the French army, which had till then moved in three columns, went on as a single group.
  • The road along which they moved was bordered on both sides by dead horses; ragged men who had fallen behind from various regiments continually changed about, now joining the moving column, now again lagging behind it.
  • They understood that the saddles and Junot's spoon might be of some use, but that cold and hungry soldiers should have to stand and guard equally cold and hungry Russians who froze and lagged behind on the road (in which case the order was to shoot them) was not merely incomprehensible but revolting.
  • On the third day after leaving Moscow Karataev again fell ill with the fever he had suffered from in the hospital in Moscow, and as he grew gradually weaker Pierre kept away from him.
  • After the second day's march Pierre, having examined his feet by the campfire, thought it would be impossible to walk on them; but when everybody got up he went along, limping, and, when he had warmed up, walked without feeling the pain, though at night his feet were more terrible to look at than before.
  • At midday on the twenty-second of October Pierre was going uphill along the muddy, slippery road, looking at his feet and at the roughness of the way.
  • The blue-gray bandy legged dog ran merrily along the side of the road, sometimes in proof of its agility and self-satisfaction lifting one hind leg and hopping along on three, and then again going on all four and rushing to bark at the crows that sat on the carrion.
  • Pierre walked along, looking from side to side, counting his steps in threes, and reckoning them off on his fingers.
  • 'And he went on to tell them all about it in due order.
  • From all sides came shouts of command, and from the left came smartly dressed cavalrymen on good horses, passing the prisoners at a trot.
  • The expression on all faces showed the tension people feel at the approach of those in authority.
  • Pierre caught a glimpse of a man in a three-cornered hat with a tranquil look on his handsome, plump, white face.
  • On his face, besides the look of joyful emotion it had worn yesterday while telling the tale of the merchant who suffered innocently, there was now an expression of quiet solemnity.
  • They both looked pale, and in the expression on their faces--one of them glanced timidly at Pierre-- there was something resembling what he had seen on the face of the young soldier at the execution.
  • A Frenchman who had just pushed a Russian soldier away was squatting by the fire, engaged in roasting a piece of meat stuck on a ramrod.
  • On the opposite side stood Dolokhov's Cossack, counting the prisoners and marking off each hundred with a chalk line on the gate.
  • On the opposite side stood Dolokhov's Cossack, counting the prisoners and marking off each hundred with a chalk line on the gate.
  • Beyond Vyazma the French army instead of moving in three columns huddled together into one mass, and so went on to the end.
  • Many have died these last days on the road or at the bivouacs.
  • But these orders and reports were only on paper, nothing in them was acted upon for they could not be carried out, and though they entitled one another Majesties, Highnesses, or Cousins, they all felt that they were miserable wretches who had done much evil for which they had now to pay.
  • How was it that the Russian army, which when numerically weaker than the French had given battle at Borodino, did not achieve its purpose when it had surrounded the French on three sides and when its aim was to capture them?
  • So what was the use of performing various operations on the French who were running away as fast as they possibly could?
  • All the profound plans about cutting off and capturing Napoleon and his army were like the plan of a market gardener who, when driving out of his garden a cow that had trampled down the beds he had planted, should run to the gate and hit the cow on the head.
  • It was impossible first because--as experience shows that a three-mile movement of columns on a battlefield never coincides with the plans--the probability of Chichagov, Kutuzov, and Wittgenstein effecting a junction on time at an appointed place was so remote as to be tantamount to impossibility, as in fact thought Kutuzov, who when he received the plan remarked that diversions planned over great distances do not yield the desired results.
  • It is only possible to capture prisoners if they agree to be captured, just as it is only possible to catch a swallow if it settles on one's hand.
  • She felt all the time as if she might at any moment penetrate that on which--with a terrible questioning too great for her strength--her spiritual gaze was fixed.
  • There he is lying back in an armchair in his velvet cloak, leaning his head on his thin pale hand.
  • His lips are firmly closed, his eyes glitter, and a wrinkle comes and goes on his pale forehead.
  • She said: This can't go on--it won't.
  • But at the instant when it seemed that the incomprehensible was revealing itself to her a loud rattle of the door handle struck painfully on her ears.
  • Dunyasha, her maid, entered the room quickly and abruptly with a frightened look on her face and showing no concern for her mistress.
  • Go, go, she... is calling... and weeping like a child and quickly shuffling on his feeble legs to a chair, he almost fell into it, covering his face with his hands.
  • "My darling Mummy!" she repeated, straining all the power of her love to find some way of taking on herself the excess of grief that crushed her mother.
  • During the third night the countess kept very quiet for a few minutes, and Natasha rested her head on the arm of her chair and closed her eyes, but opened them again on hearing the bedstead creak.
  • One afternoon noticing Natasha shivering with fever, Princess Mary took her to her own room and made her lie down on the bed.
  • Natasha lay on the bed and in the semidarkness of the room scanned Princess Mary's face.
  • Sometimes they were silent for hours; sometimes after they were already in bed they would begin talking and go on till morning.
  • At the end of January Princess Mary left for Moscow, and the count insisted on Natasha's going with her to consult the doctors.
  • The road the French would take was unknown, and so the closer our troops trod on their heels the greater distance they had to cover.
  • This longing to distinguish themselves, to maneuver, to overthrow, and to cut off showed itself particularly whenever the Russians stumbled on the French army.
  • So it was at Krasnoe, where they expected to find one of the three French columns and stumbled instead on Napoleon himself with sixteen thousand men.
  • The character of Kutuzov and reflections on the unsatisfactory results of the battles at Krasnoe, by Bogdanovich.
  • And only that feeling placed him on that highest human pedestal from which he, the commander-in-chief, devoted all his powers not to slaying and destroying men but to saving and showing pity on them.
  • Kutuzov rode to Dobroe on his plump little white horse, followed by an enormous suite of discontented generals who whispered among themselves behind his back.
  • There was something horrible and bestial in the fleeting glance they threw at the riders and in the malevolent expression with which, after a glance at Kutuzov, the soldier with the sores immediately turned away and went on with what he was doing.
  • At another spot he noticed a Russian soldier laughingly patting a Frenchman on the shoulder, saying something to him in a friendly manner, and Kutuzov with the same expression on his face again swayed his head.
  • When the troops reached their night's halting place on the eighth of November, the last day of the Krasnoe battles, it was already growing dusk.
  • An infantry regiment which had left Tarutino three thousand strong but now numbered only nine hundred was one of the first to arrive that night at its halting place--a village on the highroad.
  • Some twenty men of the Sixth Company who were on their way into the village joined the haulers, and the wattle wall, which was about thirty- five feet long and seven feet high, moved forward along the village street, swaying, pressing upon and cutting the shoulders of the gasping men.
  • "There are gentry here; the general himself is in that hut, and you foul-mouthed devils, you brutes, I'll give it to you!" shouted he, hitting the first man who came in his way a swinging blow on the back.
  • On the contrary, the army had never under the best material conditions presented a more cheerful and animated aspect.
  • They split up the wood, pressed it down on the fire, blew at it with their mouths, and fanned it with the skirts of their greatcoats, making the flames hiss and crackle.
  • The handsome young soldier who had brought the wood, setting his arms akimbo, began stamping his cold feet rapidly and deftly on the spot where he stood.
  • The dancer stopped, pulled off the loose piece of leather, and threw it on the fire.
  • "I've had an eye on him this long while," said the other.
  • "What a lot of those Frenchies were taken today, and the fact is that not one of them had what you might call real boots on," said a soldier, starting a new theme.
  • "But they're a clean folk, lads," the first man went on; "he was white-- as white as birchbark--and some of them are such fine fellows, you might think they were nobles."
  • And do you know, Daddy, the day before yesterday we ran at them and, my word, they didn't let us get near before they just threw down their muskets and went on their knees.
  • The soldiers surrounded the Frenchmen, spread a greatcoat on the ground for the sick man, and brought some buckwheat porridge and vodka for both of them.
  • Ramballe refused food and resting his head on his elbow lay silent beside the campfire, looking at the Russian soldiers with red and vacant eyes.
  • Morel, pointing to his shoulders, tried to impress on the soldiers the fact that Ramballe was an officer and ought to be warmed.
  • They surrounded Ramballe, lifted him on the crossed arms of two soldiers, and carried him to the hut.
  • They gave him some more porridge and Morel with a laugh set to work on his third bowl.
  • The older men, who thought it undignified to amuse themselves with such nonsense, continued to lie at the opposite side of the fire, but one would occasionally raise himself on an elbow and glance at Morel with a smile.
  • Even wormwood grows on its own root.
  • When the bridges broke down, unarmed soldiers, people from Moscow and women with children who were with the French transport, all--carried on by vis inertiae-- pressed forward into boats and into the ice-covered water and did not, surrender.
  • On the twenty-ninth of November Kutuzov entered Vilna--his "dear Vilna" as he called it.
  • Having left Petersburg on the seventh of December with his suite--Count Tolstoy, Prince Volkonski, Arakcheev, and others--the Emperor reached Vilna on the eleventh, and in his traveling sleigh drove straight to the castle.
  • There was running to and fro and whispering; another troyka flew furiously up, and then all eyes were turned on an approaching sleigh in which the figures of the Emperor and Volkonski could already be descried.
  • From the habit of fifty years all this had a physically agitating effect on the old general.
  • And this embrace too, owing to a long-standing impression related to his innermost feelings, had its usual effect on Kutuzov and he gave a sob.
  • The same submissive, expressionless look with which he had listened to the Emperor's commands on the field of Austerlitz seven years before settled on his face now.
  • Kutuzov raised his head and looked for a long while into the eyes of Count Tolstoy, who stood before him holding a silver salver on which lay a small object.
  • When on the following morning the Emperor said to the officers assembled about him: "You have not only saved Russia, you have saved Europe!" they all understood that the war was not ended.
  • After his liberation he reached Orel, and on the third day there, when preparing to go to Kiev, he fell ill and was laid up for three months.
  • Scarcely any impression was left on Pierre's mind by all that happened to him from the time of his rescue till his illness.
  • On the day of his rescue he had seen the body of Petya Rostov.
  • Just then he was only anxious to get away as quickly as possible from places where people were killing one another, to some peaceful refuge where he could recover himself, rest, and think over all the strange new facts he had learned; but on reaching Orel he immediately fell ill.
  • How splendid! said he to himself when a cleanly laid table was moved up to him with savory beef tea, or when he lay down for the night on a soft clean bed, or when he remembered that the French had gone and that his wife was no more.
  • The doctor who attended Pierre and visited him every day, though he considered it his duty as a doctor to pose as a man whose every moment was of value to suffering humanity, would sit for hours with Pierre telling him his favorite anecdotes and his observations on the characters of his patients in general, and especially of the ladies.
  • Throughout his journey he felt like a schoolboy on holiday.
  • Gangs of carpenters hoping for high pay arrived in Moscow every day, and on all sides logs were being hewn, new houses built, and old, charred ones repaired.
  • He called on Count Rostopchin and on some acquaintances who were back in Moscow, and he intended to leave for Petersburg two days later.
  • Pierre felt particularly well disposed toward them all, but was now instinctively on his guard for fear of binding himself in any way.
  • On the third day after his arrival he heard from the Drubetskoys that Princess Mary was in Moscow.
  • He spoke of you even at the very last, she went on, turning her eyes from Pierre to her companion with a shyness that surprised him for an instant.
  • He glanced once at the companion's face, saw her attentive and kindly gaze fixed on him, and, as often happens when one is talking, felt somehow that this companion in the black dress was a good, kind, excellent creature who would not hinder his conversing freely with Princess Mary.
  • Pierre's confusion was not reflected by any confusion on Natasha's part, but only by the pleasure that just perceptibly lit up her whole face.
  • They insisted on her coming with me.
  • As he spoke now he was considering what impression his words would make on Natasha.
  • She blushed, pressed her clasped hands on her knees, and then controlling herself with an evident effort lifted her head and began to speak rapidly.
  • Natasha was calm, though a severe and grave expression had again settled on her face.
  • Natasha smiled and was on the point of speaking.
  • We were not an exemplary couple," he added quickly, glancing at Natasha and noticing on her face curiosity as to how he would speak of his wife, "but her death shocked me terribly.
  • Supper was over, and Pierre who at first declined to speak about his captivity was gradually led on to do so.
  • "Yes, yes, go on!" said Natasha.
  • And Pierre, his voice trembling continually, went on to tell of the last days of their retreat, of Karataev's illness and his death.
  • And the same mischievous smile lingered for a long time on her face as if it had been forgotten there.
  • He paced up and down his room, now turning his thoughts on a difficult problem and frowning, now suddenly shrugging his shoulders and wincing, and now smiling happily.
  • A few days previously Pierre had decided to go to Petersburg on the Friday.
  • When he awoke on the Thursday, Savelich came to ask him about packing for the journey.
  • On the same day the Chief of Police came to Pierre, inviting him to send a representative to the Faceted Palace to recover things that were to be returned to their owners that day.
  • She was as he had known her almost as a child and later on as Prince Andrew's fiancee.
  • He felt uneasy and embarrassed, but sat on because he simply could not get up and take his leave.
  • "Well," he went on with an evident effort at self-control and coherence.
  • When on saying good-by he took her thin, slender hand, he could not help holding it a little longer in his own.
  • "Can she have loved my brother so little as to be able to forget him so soon?" she thought when she reflected on the change.
  • When Princess Mary returned to her room after her nocturnal talk with Pierre, Natasha met her on the threshold.
  • On hearing that he was going to Petersburg Natasha was astounded.
  • But noticing the grieved expression on Princess Mary's face she guessed the reason of that sadness and suddenly began to cry.
  • Though the surface of the sea of history seemed motionless, the movement of humanity went on as unceasingly as the flow of time.
  • They now seemed to rotate on one spot.
  • During the war in Italy he is several times on the verge of destruction and each time is saved in an unexpected manner.
  • It is not Napoleon who prepares himself for the accomplishment of his role, so much as all those round him who prepare him to take on himself the whole responsibility for what is happening and has to happen.
  • But suddenly instead of those chances and that genius which hitherto had so consistently led him by an uninterrupted series of successes to the predestined goal, an innumerable sequence of inverse chances occur--from the cold in his head at Borodino to the sparks which set Moscow on fire, and the frosts--and instead of genius, stupidity and immeasurable baseness become evident.
  • And some years pass during which he plays a pitiful comedy to himself in solitude on his island, justifying his actions by intrigues and lies when the justification is no longer needed, and displaying to the whole world what it was that people had mistaken for strength as long as an unseen hand directed his actions.
  • A bee settling on a flower has stung a child.
  • The events of the previous year: the burning of Moscow and the flight from it, the death of Prince Andrew, Natasha's despair, Petya's death, and the old countess' grief fell blow after blow on the old count's head.
  • On his last day, sobbing, he asked her and his absent son to forgive him for having dissipated their property--that being the chief fault of which he was conscious.
  • Making a great effort she did however go to call on them a few weeks after her arrival in Moscow.
  • But instead of being greeted with pleasure as she had expected, at his first glance at her his face assumed a cold, stiff, proud expression she had not seen on it before.
  • "She is a very admirable and excellent young woman," said she, "and you must go and call on her.
  • She still sat motionless with a look of suffering on her gentle face.
  • On the contrary I continually reproach myself....
  • "There are a thousand reasons why," laying special emphasis on the why.
  • Within four years he had paid off all his remaining debts without selling any of his wife's property, and having received a small inheritance on the death of a cousin he paid his debt to Pierre as well.
  • He was hard alike on the lazy, the depraved, and the weak, and tried to get them expelled from the commune.
  • He did not allow himself either to be hard on or punish a man, or to make things easy for or reward anyone, merely because he felt inclined to do so.
  • "Nicholas, when did you break your cameo?" she asked to change the subject, looking at his finger on which he wore a ring with a cameo of Laocoon's head.
  • The whole summer, from spring sowing to harvest, he was busy with the work on his farm.
  • The books he read were chiefly historical, and on these he spent a certain sum every year.
  • She waited on the old countess, petted and spoiled the children, was always ready to render the small services for which she had a gift, and all this was unconsciously accepted from her with insufficient gratitude.
  • The immense house on the old stone foundations was of wood, plastered only inside.
  • Besides that, four times a year, on the name days and birthdays of the hosts, as many as a hundred visitors would gather there for a day or two.
  • Pierre had gone to Petersburg on business of his own for three weeks as he said, but had remained there nearly seven weeks and was expected back every minute.
  • Having taken precautions against the general drunkenness to be expected on the morrow because it was a great saint's day, he returned to dinner, and without having time for a private talk with his wife sat down at the long table laid for twenty persons, at which the whole household had assembled.
  • At that table were his mother, his mother's old lady companion Belova, his wife, their three children with their governess and tutor, his wife's nephew with his tutor, Sonya, Denisov, Natasha, her three children, their governess, and old Michael Ivanovich, the late prince's architect, who was living on in retirement at Bald Hills.
  • She again inquired whether everything was going well on the farm.
  • And without a word to his wife he went to the little sitting room and lay down on the sofa.
  • She got up and, walking on tiptoe with difficulty, went to the small sitting room.
  • Little Andrew, her eldest boy, imitating his mother, followed her on tiptoe.
  • Nicholas turned with a tender smile on his face.
  • And Nicholas, taking his little daughter in his strong hand, lifted her high, placed her on his shoulder, held her by the legs, and paced the room with her.
  • There was an expression of carefree happiness on the faces of both father and daughter.
  • That happened only when, as was the case that day, her husband returned home, or a sick child was convalescent, or when she and Countess Mary spoke of Prince Andrew (she never mentioned him to her husband, who she imagined was jealous of Prince Andrew's memory), or on the rare occasions when something happened to induce her to sing, a practice she had quite abandoned since her marriage.
  • Since their marriage Natasha and her husband had lived in Moscow, in Petersburg, on their estate near Moscow, or with her mother, that is to say, in Nicholas' house.
  • And she not only saw no need of any other or better husband, but as all the powers of her soul were intent on serving that husband and family, she could not imagine and saw no interest in imagining how it would be if things were different.
  • At home Natasha placed herself in the position of a slave to her husband, and the whole household went on tiptoe when he was occupied--that is, was reading or writing in his study.
  • On reading that letter (she always read her husband's letters) Natasha herself suggested that he should go to Petersburg, though she would feel his absence very acutely.
  • Denisov, now a general on the retired list and much dissatisfied with the present state of affairs, had arrived during that fortnight.
  • On reaching the vestibule Natasha saw a tall figure in a fur coat unwinding his scarf.
  • I could not, on my honor.
  • When Nicholas and his wife came to look for Pierre he was in the nursery holding his baby son, who was again awake, on his huge right palm and dandling him.
  • A blissful bright smile was fixed on the baby's broad face with its toothless open mouth.
  • The storm was long since over and there was bright, joyous sunshine on Natasha's face as she gazed tenderly at her husband and child.
  • Pierre with the baby on his hand stooped, kissed them, and replied to their inquiries.
  • But in spite of much that was interesting and had to be discussed, the baby with the little cap on its unsteady head evidently absorbed all his attention.
  • He alone could play on the clavichord that ecossaise (his only piece) to which, as he said, all possible dances could be danced, and they felt sure he had brought presents for them all.
  • Natasha, who was sitting opposite to him with her eldest daughter on her lap, turned her sparkling eyes swiftly from her husband to the things he showed her.
  • "Adele tempted me: she kept on telling me to buy it," returned Pierre.
  • But until death came she had to go on living, that is, to use her vital forces.
  • She had to eat, sleep, think, speak, weep, work, give vent to her anger, and so on, merely because she had a stomach, a brain, muscles, nerves, and a liver.
  • They consisted of a box for cards, of splendid workmanship, a bright- blue Sevres tea cup with shepherdesses depicted on it and with a lid, and a gold snuffbox with the count's portrait on the lid which Pierre had had done by a miniaturist in Petersburg.
  • Doesn't see anything, doesn't remember anything, she went on, repeating her usual phrases.
  • At tea all sat in their accustomed places: Nicholas beside the stove at a small table where his tea was handed to him; Milka, the old gray borzoi bitch (daughter of the first Milka), with a quite gray face and large black eyes that seemed more prominent than ever, lay on the armchair beside him; Denisov, whose curly hair, mustache, and whiskers had turned half gray, sat beside countess Mary with his general's tunic unbuttoned; Pierre sat between his wife and the old countess.
  • I used to meet him at Mary Antonovna's," said the countess in an offended tone; and still more offended that they all remained silent, she went on: "Nowadays everyone finds fault.
  • Evidently some jolly excitement was going on there.
  • This meant two stockings, which by a secret process known only to herself Anna Makarovna used to knit at the same time on the same needles, and which, when they were ready, she always triumphantly drew, one out of the other, in the children's presence.
  • The conversation turned on the contemporary gossip about those in power, in which most people see the chief interest of home politics.
  • Denisov, dissatisfied with the government on account of his own disappointments in the service, heard with pleasure of the things done in Petersburg which seemed to him stupid, and made forcible and sharp comments on what Pierre told them.
  • Everybody sees that things are going so badly that they cannot be allowed to go on so and that it is the duty of all decent men to counteract it as far as they can.
  • The Tugendbund is an alliance of virtue: it is love, mutual help... it is what Christ preached on the Cross.
  • Every word of Pierre's burned into his heart, and with a nervous movement of his fingers he unconsciously broke the sealing wax and quill pens his hands came upon on his uncle's table.
  • The lad looked down and seemed now for the first time to notice what he had done to the things on the table.
  • The conversation at supper was not about politics or societies, but turned on the subject Nicholas liked best--recollections of 1812.
  • The family separated on the most friendly terms.
  • In the diary was set down everything in the children's lives that seemed noteworthy to their mother as showing their characters or suggesting general reflections on educational methods.
  • They all fell on me--Denisov and Natasha...
  • But they insisted on their own view: love of one's neighbor and Christianity--and all this in the presence of young Nicholas, who had gone into my study and broke all my things.
  • Well, I don't think you need reproach yourself on his account.
  • This evening he listened to Pierre in a sort of trance, and fancy--as we were going in to supper I looked and he had broken everything on my table to bits, and he told me of it himself at once!
  • Well, what business is it of mine what goes on there-- whether Arakcheev is bad, and all that?
  • A stern expression of the lofty, secret suffering of a soul burdened by the body appeared on her face.
  • This simultaneous discussion of many topics did not prevent a clear understanding but on the contrary was the surest sign that they fully understood one another.
  • In saying this Natasha was sincere in acknowledging Mary's superiority, but at the same time by saying it she made a demand on Pierre that he should, all the same, prefer her to Mary and to all other women, and that now, especially after having seen many women in Petersburg, he should tell her so afresh.
  • "Yes," Pierre replied, and went on with what was in his mind.
  • "Platon Karataev?" he repeated, and pondered, evidently sincerely trying to imagine Karataev's opinion on the subject.
  • On the contrary, now is the best of all.
  • "No, you go on, I was talking nonsense," said Natasha.
  • It was the sequel to his complacent reflections on his success in Petersburg.
  • Dessalles slept propped up on four pillows and his Roman nose emitted sounds of rhythmic snoring.
  • "No," answered Nicholas, and lay back on his pillow.
  • And the exile, separated from the beloved France so dear to his heart, died a lingering death on that rock and bequeathed his great deeds to posterity.
  • Thiers, a Bonapartist, says that Napoleon's power was based on his virtue and genius.
  • Why was Napoleon III a criminal when he was taken prisoner at Boulogne, and why, later on, were those criminals whom he arrested?
  • Recognizing the falsity of this view of history, another set of historians say that power rests on a conditional delegation of the will of the people to their rulers, and that historical leaders have power only conditionally on carrying out the program that the will of the people has by tacit agreement prescribed to them.
  • To this question historians reply that Louis XIV's activity, contrary to the program, reacted on Louis XVI.
  • But why did it not react on Louis XIV or on Louis XV--why should it react just on Louis XVI?
  • (With this method of observation it often happens that the observer, influenced by the direction he himself prefers, regards those as leaders who, owing to the people's change of direction, are no longer in front, but on one side, or even in the rear.)
  • If the animals in front are continually changing and the direction of the whole herd is constantly altered, this is because in order to follow a given direction the animals transfer their will to the animals that have attracted our attention, and to study the movements of the herd we must watch the movements of all the prominent animals moving on all sides of the herd.
  • On condition that that person expresses the will of the whole people.
  • On the other hand, even if we admitted that words could be the cause of events, history shows that the expression of the will of historical personages does not in most cases produce any effect, that is to say, their commands are often not executed, and sometimes the very opposite of what they order occurs.
  • Only the expression of the will of the Deity, not dependent on time, can relate to a whole series of events occurring over a period of years or centuries, and only the Deity, independent of everything, can by His sole will determine the direction of humanity's movement; but man acts in time and himself takes part in what occurs.
  • When, for instance, we say that Napoleon ordered armies to go to war, we combine in one simultaneous expression a whole series of consecutive commands dependent one on another.
  • Today he ordered such and such papers to be written to Vienna, to Berlin, and to Petersburg; tomorrow such and such decrees and orders to the army, the fleet, the commissariat, and so on and so on--millions of commands, which formed a whole series corresponding to a series of events which brought the French armies into Russia.
  • Amid a long series of unexecuted orders of Napoleon's one series, for the campaign of 1812, was carried out--not because those orders differed in any way from the other, unexecuted orders but because they coincided with the course of events that led the French army into Russia; just as in stencil work this or that figure comes out not because the color was laid on from this side or in that way, but because it was laid on from all sides over the figure cut in the stencil.
  • Every army is composed of lower grades of the service--the rank and file--of whom there are always the greatest number; of the next higher military rank--corporals and noncommissioned officers of whom there are fewer, and of still-higher officers of whom there are still fewer, and so on to the highest military command which is concentrated in one person.
  • A military organization may be quite correctly compared to a cone, of which the base with the largest diameter consists of the rank and file; the next higher and smaller section of the cone consists of the next higher grades of the army, and so on to the apex, the point of which will represent the commander-in-chief.
  • The man who worked most with his hands could not think so much about what he was doing, or reflect on or command what would result from the common activity; while the man who commanded more would evidently work less with his hands on account of his greater verbal activity.
  • To those on board the ship the movement of those waves will be the only perceptible motion.
  • A sinking man who clutches at another and drowns him; or a hungry mother exhausted by feeding her baby, who steals some food; or a man trained to discipline who on duty at the word of command kills a defenseless man-- seem less guilty, that is, less free and more subject to the law of necessity, to one who knows the circumstances in which these people were placed, and more free to one who does not know that the man was himself drowning, that the mother was hungry, that the soldier was in the ranks, and so on.
  • All cases without exception in which our conception of freedom and necessity is increased and diminished depend on three considerations:
  • The degree of our conception of freedom or inevitability depends in this respect on the greater or lesser lapse of time between the performance of the action and our judgment of it.
  • On these three considerations alone is based the conception of irresponsibility for crimes and the extenuating circumstances admitted by all legislative codes.
  • Thus our conception of free will and inevitability gradually diminishes or increases according to the greater or lesser connection with the external world, the greater or lesser remoteness of time, and the greater or lesser dependence on the causes in relation to which we contemplate a man's life.
  • If we examine a man little dependent on external conditions, whose action was performed very recently, and the causes of whose action are beyond our ken, we get the conception of a minimum of inevitability and a maximum of freedom.
  • To imagine it as free, it is necessary to imagine it in the present, on the boundary between the past and the future--that is, outside time, which is impossible.
  • We should in fact have reached those two fundamentals of which man's whole outlook on the universe is constructed--the incomprehensible essence of life, and the laws defining that essence.
  • And as the undefinable essence of the force moving the heavenly bodies, the undefinable essence of the forces of heat and electricity, or of chemical affinity, or of the vital force, forms the content of astronomy, physics, chemistry, botany, zoology, and so on, just in the same way does the force of free will form the content of history.
  • But just as the subject of every science is the manifestation of this unknown essence of life while that essence itself can only be the subject of metaphysics, even the manifestation of the force of free will in human beings in space, in time, and in dependence on cause forms the subject of history, while free will itself is the subject of metaphysics.
  • From the standpoint from which the science of history now regards its subject on the path it now follows, seeking the causes of events in man's freewill, a scientific enunciation of those laws is impossible, for however man's free will may be restricted, as soon as we recognize it as a force not subject to law, the existence of law becomes impossible.
  • History stands on the same path.
  • Theology stood on guard for the old views and accused the new of violating revelation.
  • But when truth conquered, theology established itself just as firmly on the new foundation.
  • Just as prolonged and stubborn is the struggle now proceeding between the old and the new conception of history, and theology in the same way stands on guard for the old view, and accuses the new view of subverting revelation.
  • In the one case as in the other, on both sides the struggle provokes passion and stifles truth.
  • On the one hand there is fear and regret for the loss of the whole edifice constructed through the ages, on the other is the passion for destruction.
  • On the one hand there is fear and regret for the loss of the whole edifice constructed through the ages, on the other is the passion for destruction.
  • As in the question of astronomy then, so in the question of history now, the whole difference of opinion is based on the recognition or nonrecognition of something absolute, serving as the measure of visible phenomena.
  • Galbi (ribs) and bibimbab (mixed vegetables on rice) are hearty Korean specialties.
  • Rice Time specializes in BBQ (called bulgogi) at your table, and the tofu soup is always on special.
  • The Syberg's on Gravois is the oldest of them, just a short distance west of the River Des Peres bike trail.
  • Louis, MO 63102(314) 621-9570www.joeybsonthelanding.com Syberg's on Gravois The Syberg's restaurants---there are three in St.
  • Louis, MO 63104(314) 776-7292www.hodaks.com Joey B's on the Landing This restaurant at Laclede's Landing is within walking distance of Jefferson National Expansion Memorial Park and the Gateway Arch.
  • Cunetto's, which is closed on Sundays, only takes reservations for lunch.
  • Sports fans can catch the Cardinals game on one of the big TVs, while music lovers check out the band in the Duck Room.
  • Louis would be complete without toasted ravioli on the Hill or thin-crust pizza at a corner pub---all washed down with a cold glass of beer.
  • Holbrook, NY 11741(631) 981-3029joespizzany.com Mamma Lombardi's On the other end of the spectrum, we have the upscale Italian restaurant.
  • Open for lunch and dinner, Sonoma will run you from $15 to $25, as of 2009, on average per person, including drinks and appetizers.
  • Brothers Ben and Rick Manusco say, "The original family spaghetti sauce still adorns all of our Italian specialties." Load on the carbs and pig out on finger-licking-good bar food like grand slam fries and potato boats.
  • Brothers Ben and Rick Manusco say, "The original family spaghetti sauce still adorns all of our Italian specialties." Load on the carbs and pig out on finger-licking-good bar food like grand slam fries and potato boats.
  • Athletes can relax and enjoy watching sports on more than 20 televisions.
  • Perfect for those on an Atkins diet, this restaurant does not have much in the way of vegetarian options.
  • The dinner menu has big and delicious steaks so you can re-up on your protein for tomorrow's adventure.
  • Parking is available on the street and in a nearby lot.
  • Popular outdoor activities in Batavia center on Letchworth State Park and the Salmon River.
  • Most breakfast dishes are served with a Flying Biscuit and potatoes or grits on the side.
  • Salads include traditional antipasto, as well as a tomato carpaccio on mesclun.
  • The menu features double cheeseburgers, quarter-pound burgers, regular burgers and cheeseburgers, grilled cheese, tuna on a bun, all beef franks and butterfly shrimp.
  • Massapequa is located on the southern shore of Long Island, right on Oyster Bay and the Great South Bay.
  • Massapequa is located on the southern shore of Long Island, right on Oyster Bay and the Great South Bay.
  • Other features include a garden patio and live Jazz on Thursday and Saturday nights.
  • Gondolier On Pearl Located on popular Pearl Street, the Gondolier On Pearl is the oldest family-run restaurant in town.
  • Gondolier On Pearl Located on popular Pearl Street, the Gondolier On Pearl is the oldest family-run restaurant in town.
  • Gondolier On Pearl Located on popular Pearl Street, the Gondolier On Pearl is the oldest family-run restaurant in town.
  • Hastings on Hudson, NY 10706(914) 478-2800harvest2000.com/hoh/
  • Briarcliff Manor, NY(914) 923-3100flamessteakhouse.com Harvest on Hudson This gorgeous Hastings farmhouse restaurant overlooks the Hudson River, surrounded by gardens and rolling farmlands.
  • Outdoor adventures abound in the Hudson Valley, from horseback riding, hiking, camping, skiing, snowshoeing, fishing to canoeing and kayaking on the Hudson River.
  • Piatti Restaurant2695 NE Village Lane (in University Village)Seattle, WA 98105(206) 524-9088www.piatti.com Marcello Ristorante Located on Roosevelt and run by the Magaletti family, Marcello's is open nightly for dinner.
  • Try the rigatoni for Piatti's take on an old classic.
  • Try "The Sinatra," made with dry salami, mozzarella, oregano and served on a hero, or partake of one of the salmon dishes, pairing the Pacific Northwest's most famous fish with the sensibilities of Italian sauce.
  • Enjoy happy hour every day starting at 4 p.m. to 6 p.m., and live music on Friday nights.
  • Business hours are on Tuesday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Wednesday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.; and on Thursday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.
  • Business hours are on Tuesday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Wednesday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.; and on Thursday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.
  • Patrons can choose to dine outside on the back porch, order carry out or pick up a frozen meal to go from the freezer case.
  • Guests are encouraged to come as they are during the restaurant's business hours on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday.
  • Playing the green on Capitol Hill's Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail, stomping through the bamboo Wilderness Forest or browsing the newest products at Bass Pro Shops Outdoor World store in Prattville, Alabama, can work up a big appetite.
  • Simsbury, CT 06070(860) 658-4001Littlecitypizzaco.com Resources Information on Simsbury
  • SImsbury, CT 06070(860) 658-5000harvestcafebakery.com Little City Pizza With polenta croutons on its salads and cheeses such as fontina and romano, Little City Pizza distinguishes itself with distinctive thin-crust pizza offerings.
  • Metro Bis Rated as one of America's best restaurants both by the Zagat Survey and The New York Times, Metro Bis is home to co-owner renowned chef Christopher Prosperi, who works with a seasonal menu focusing on ingredients from local farms.
  • Declared as one of the "Top 100 Best Places to Live" by Money magazine, Simsbury has all the charm of a New England town with a prospering community that thrives on its natural setting and cultural life.
  • The Brazilian Bull serves traditional, slow cooked meats on upright skewers, big salads and tasty pineapple and banana deserts.
  • Diners at the Brazilian Bull use a painted cylinder to control how much meat arrives at the table: green means more meat, please; red means enough for now; and the cylinder on the side means done for the night.
  • Vegetarians can feast on pumpkin and sage ravioli, Moroccan stew and the Lexx Mac and Cheese entrée.
  • Try one of the signature dishes---New England pot roast and herb-roasted chicken are on the list.
  • Falafel, black bean burgers and tempeh share equal ranking on the menu with chicken wings, locally raised beef and salmon.
  • A seafood buffet is served on Fridays during this time as well.
  • Pulaski, NY 13142 (315) 509-4281riverhouserestaurant.net Eddy's Place Stop at Eddy's Place, a restaurant located on Rome Road.
  • The Ramada prides itself on offering great customer service.
  • Look for such specials like Twin Tail Tuesday and Steak & Shrimp Nights on Wednesdays.
  • Located on Fire Island, Seaview was once dominated by a fish factory that, when it closed, was broken up into lots and sold to pioneering vacationers.
  • Carnivores can relax, however, because alongside the "carrot loaf" and "tofu in oriental orange sauce," meaty delights such as steaks, chicken and shrimp are also on the menu.
  • Stamford, Connecticut 06902(203) 324-9539‎www.labretagnerestaurant.com Lime Restaurant Lime Restaurant advertises itself as a "gourmet natural foods restaurant" with an emphasis on vegetarian cuisine.
  • If you are planning a visit to the 91-acre Bartlett Aboretum and Gardens or will be hiking on one of the many trails of Western Connecticut, the city of Stamford has a variety of restaurants worth trying.
  • Quincy Cellar10606 Route 20Ripley, NY 14775(716) 736-2021 quincycellars.com/ Resources Information on Ripley
  • For those who love dancing, come on Saturday nights in which invites bands ranging from reggae to country.
  • On Thursdays, DJ Dean leads Karaoke Night, while Friday nights features acoustic music along with open mike.
  • Whether you're a new resident or on vacation, here are some places to grab a quick bite or a romantic dinner.
  • Located on the "grape belt" of Chautauqua county, Ripley lies near Lake Erie in Western New York.
  • Kapaa, Kauai is a town located on the east coast of the Hawaiian Island Kauai.
  • The Windham Restaurant59 Range RoadWindham, New Hampshire 03087(603) 870-9270www.windhamrestaurant.com Windham House of Pizza Do wear your bike shorts to watch sports on the big screen TV, while eating pizza and submarine sandwiches.
  • In addition to southwestern style food like, burritos and fajitas, guests can choose to dine on steak, ribs, pasta or seafood.
  • Guests can enjoy lunch or brunch on the green house patio, designed to resemble an authentic green house or they can enjoy dinner on the balcony that overlooks the main room.
  • Guests can enjoy lunch or brunch on the green house patio, designed to resemble an authentic green house or they can enjoy dinner on the balcony that overlooks the main room.
  • Pork and beef are not included on the menu, while lamb and vegetarian dishes are plentiful.
  • Mati's Indian Express Mati's offers simple, inexpensive Indian cuisine, with great lunch specials and vegetarian and vegan selections, with the latter clearly marked on the menu.
  • If you are hiking around California's capital city and want to fuel up on some naan and tandoori chicken, you are in luck.
  • The market is also bustling on weekends, so if keeping your group together is a priority, it may be difficult here.
  • Monday through Saturday and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sundays.
  • Prices vary greatly, depending on the restaurant selected.
  • The restaurant boasts a large party room, used for bigger groups on the main floor and a recently-renovated River Club room upstairs, which can seat up to 180 guests.
  • Located on the banks of the Schuylkill River with a large area for outdoor dining on a multi-leveled deck, this dining locale is a part of a trendy, posh and business-laden neighborhood of Philadelphia.
  • Located on the banks of the Schuylkill River with a large area for outdoor dining on a multi-leveled deck, this dining locale is a part of a trendy, posh and business-laden neighborhood of Philadelphia.
  • On the general dining menu, guests may partake in a variety of Italian dishes, from ravioli, spaghetti lasagna, to seafood, chicken or sausage.
  • For private parties, meetings, birthdays or family events, the restaurant suggests on its Web site making a banquet reservation.
  • The restaurant can handle groups of 50 or more, and does so on a regular basis.
  • They also have 15 beers on tap, bottled beer and wine.
  • Perfect for those dining on a budget, Yesterdays serves everything from buffalo wings to escargot at a reasonable price.
  • Chateau Hathorn33 Hathorn RoadWarwick, NY 10990(845) 986-6099chateauhathorn.com/index.html Yesterdays Those looking to grab a burger or feast on king crab legs will adore Yesterdays restaurant on Main Street.
  • Chateau Hathorn33 Hathorn RoadWarwick, NY 10990(845) 986-6099chateauhathorn.com/index.html Yesterdays Those looking to grab a burger or feast on king crab legs will adore Yesterdays restaurant on Main Street.
  • Jacksonville, Florida has many different sushi restaurants that offer their own spins on traditional sushi rolls and offer cooked foods for those who enjoy fork-and-knife dishes.
  • Order tacos, tamales, chips at the counter and stock up on delicious sauces to compliment your meal.
  • Nuestra Cocina is slightly more affordable than Autentica and offers seven different takes on the traditionally Mexican margarita.
  • The steaks are grilled on an Alderwood fired rotisserie and Glacier BrewHouse boasts that they are the only restaurant in Anchorage with the Alderwood grill.
  • Anchorage, Alaska 99501(907) 258-2882sullivansteakhouse.com Club Paris Located on west 5th Avenue, Club Paris is housed in a building designed in the 1920s.
  • Service is efficient and knowledgeable. 2 Middle Neck Road Roslyn, NY 11576(516) 627-7270www.bryantandcooper.com Bistro Citron Bistro Citron is located on Main Street in the heart of Roslyn.
  • Bryant and Cooper Bryant and Cooper is the premier steakhouse on Long Island.
  • The village of Roslyn is located on the north shore of Long Island, in the northern part of the town of North Hempstead, in Nassau County.
  • Meals are priced so that even diners on modest budgets can enjoy a scrumptious meal.
  • Sunday through Thursday and 5 to 11 p.m. on Friday and Saturday.
  • After a salad or appetizer, guests can enjoy steak, ribs or lamb chops grilled over an open fire, cut thin in Brazilian tradition and served to diners on skewers for a unique steakhouse experience.
  • After a day of hiking at Cincinnati's Eden Park where visitors can enjoy spectacular views of the Ohio River or even ice skate on Mirror Lake in the winter, why not end the evening with a meal at one of Cincinnati's many steak restaurants.
  • Burlington, VT 05401(802) 864-9900www.buenoysano.com/ Shalimar of India For those vegan diners who crave more ethnically diverse cuisine, Shalimar of India provides a flavorful twist on the vegan dining experience.
  • Delivery and pick-up are available, so for those on the go, south-of-the-border vegan dining is made easy.
  • You can also cross cultural boundaries by trying the East/West Burrito filled with stir-fry vegetables, rice and tofu complete with home-made Asian plum sauce drizzled on top.
  • Burlington, VT 05401(802) 862-7616 Bueno Y Sano Although not a restaurant completely devoted to vegan dining, Bueno Y Sano, also conveniently located on College Street, makes vegan dining with your non-vegan friends a cinch.
  • Choose from a vegetable shepherd's pie, several Indian dishes, a turkey melt, or just load up on the greens at the salad bar.
  • Burlington offers plenty of vegan-friendly dining spots Stone Soup Stone Soup, on College Street, is definitely not a run-of-the-mill vegan restaurant.
  • Taj Tampa Indian Cuisine The Taj Tampa offers fresh takes on traditional Indian cuisine served in an environment that is casual and authentic.
  • And when you get hungry, you'll find some of the best Indian restaurants on the Gulf Coast.
  • A list of specialty sushi rolls are on the restaurant's website.
  • Kayaking and riverboat rides on the Mississippi River are just a stroll away, as are overlooks, green ways, parks and a river bluff hiking and biking trail. "Duck" amphibious vehicle tours are also available.
  • Dozier's Boat Dock and Resaurant Set on the banks of the Harpeth River, Dozier's is known for its catfish, simple seafood and all-American food like gourmet burgers and meal-size salads.
  • Travelers may run across it driving through the state and up into Kentucky for hiking or whitewater rafting adventures, or on their way to Big South Fork National Park for climbing and exploring.
  • On its menu you can find everything from homemade corned beef hash to chicken and biscuits and homemade turkey meatloaf and mashed potatoes.
  • Children will enjoy watching the waitresses dance on the counter and act crazy.
  • Chicago, IL 60657(773) 327-7800harrycaraystavern.com Ed Debevic's At this '50s-style diner, while families dine on malts, burgers and fries, be prepared for a different kind of service.
  • Besides offering other family favorites of pasta and pizzas, the tavern boasts a 10-foot HD television to watch sporting events on game days.
  • You can feed on rellenas, empanadas and chorizo soup while finishing it all off with delicious, sweet maduros and yucca.
  • The restaurant is run by the Capdevila family, who emigrated from Cuba to the United States in 1962 on the Freedom Flights to Miami, Florida.
  • The club resides on bot the State and National Registers of Historical Places.
  • Dance on the 3,000 square foot dance floor or the open air patio.
  • Bogie Nightclub The Bogie Nightclub is a dance complex focused on pounding music, laser lights, drink specials and more.
  • The city of Utica, New York offers outdoor enthusiasts great opportunities to see the sights and experience the history of the area while on the trails.
  • Breakfast is served six days a week with a brunch on Sunday.
  • Minneapolis, MN 55402(612) 349-57178thstreetgrill.com Basil's Restaurant Basil's Restaurant is located on the 3rd floor of The Marquette Hotel.
  • Downtown Minneapolis is located right on the Mississippi River front.
  • It has shows every night but Monday with two showings Wednesday and Friday and three on Saturday.
  • Specialty nights include trivia on Mondays, a jazz jam session on Tuesdays, live acoustic music Wednesdays (plus $2 beers) and a local music showcase on Thursdays.
  • Specialty nights include trivia on Mondays, a jazz jam session on Tuesdays, live acoustic music Wednesdays (plus $2 beers) and a local music showcase on Thursdays.
  • Specialty nights include trivia on Mondays, a jazz jam session on Tuesdays, live acoustic music Wednesdays (plus $2 beers) and a local music showcase on Thursdays.
  • Enjoy mojitos for $4 and margaritas for $2 on Thursdays.
  • Q Bar and Nightclub The Q Bar and Nightclub is a gay and lesbian friendly night spot with different parties going on each evening and theme events for holidays.
  • Hikers on the Cantwell Cliffs Loop may explore cliffs and caves.
  • Diners get a special treat on Friday and Saturday evenings as well, when the restaurant hosts live entertainment with a top-notch flamenco guitarist and beautiful female belly dancers.
  • Seattle sits on an isthmus between Puget Sound and Lake Washington in the western part of Washington state and is known for its bustling music scene, mountainous topography, mild oceanic climate and frequent rainfall.
  • Stumps is open four days a week and the weekend nightlife is energetic with live band karaoke on Fridays and live dance music on Saturdays.
  • Stumps is open four days a week and the weekend nightlife is energetic with live band karaoke on Fridays and live dance music on Saturdays.
  • On it, you will find dishes, such as fried chicken and waffles, fried fish, cornbread, and the family-style Southern Tailgate featuring fried chicken, pulled bbq pork, ribs and three side dishes.
  • Tampa sits along the channels off of Hillsborough Bay and features four public beaches, more than 20 miles of paths to walk, hike, or bike on, three public golf courses and 14 tennis courts.
  • Watch the game on satellite TV with a locally brewed beer or relax in the family Italian grotto atmosphere.
  • After a vigorous day on the water or trails, the Town of Canandaigua offers a nice array of dining options, allowing you to recharge before the next round of activities.
  • Canandaigua, New York, attracts outdoors enthusiasts seeking to hike the Manchester to Lyons trail or to canoe and kayak on the pristine waters of Lake Canandaigua.
  • Larger groups sit around these tables, or couples may enjoy a more intimate dinner at a smaller table on the side.
  • Comfortable dining areas built similar to a Japanese home using wood and stone décor feature large tables built around steel grills on which the food is made.
  • Enjoy the entertainment while the chef chops, slices, dices and cooks the food on a grill right in front of you.
  • Vegetarian dishes offered on the Tandoor menu include Daam Aloo Kashmiri, Mata Paneer and Daal Makhani.
  • Finger Lakes Premier Properties(888) 414-5253www.fingerlakespremierproperties.com Cobtree With properties settled on 18 acres of land near Lake Seneca, Cobtree offers brick cottages and cabins that are family-, pet- and handicap-friendly.
  • Schooners Restaurant407 Lakeshore DriveCanandaigua, NY 14424(585) 396-3360canandaiguarestaurants.com The Inn on the Lake The Inn on the Lake has a dining room that is open to the general public and has views of the lake.
  • Schooners Restaurant407 Lakeshore DriveCanandaigua, NY 14424(585) 396-3360canandaiguarestaurants.com The Inn on the Lake The Inn on the Lake has a dining room that is open to the general public and has views of the lake.
  • Canandaigua, NY 14424(585) 394-3710casa-de-pasta.com Lumberyard Grille The Lumberyard Grille is on the site of a lumber yard and hardware store that first opened in 1876 and is owned by a decedent of the original owner.
  • The restaurants in Canandaigua can be relaxed and casual or a bit more on the elegant side and there are enough of them so you can have a different dining experience each night.
  • Canandaigua is located on Lake Canandaigua in Ontario County in the Finger Lakes Region of New York state.
  • The Wild West does not take reservations but can be reached via telephone for information on the menu, special events, and hours of operation.
  • Late night on the weekends, the Cherokee Lanes features cosmic bowling.
  • A premier culinary destination in Santa Fe, the Anasazi Restaurant blends elegance and Southwestern charm, and serves breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, with an outstanding buffet brunch on Saturday and Sunday.
  • On site, the resort's flagship restaurant, Terra, serves up organic cuisine with excellent views.
  • The inn operates as a bed and breakfast but serves breakfast to the public on Sunday mornings.
  • Noels on the Water2264 Lakeshore RoadEssex, NY 12936(518) 963-7845 The Essex Inn The historic Essex Inn is on Lake Champlain.
  • Noels on the Water2264 Lakeshore RoadEssex, NY 12936(518) 963-7845 The Essex Inn The historic Essex Inn is on Lake Champlain.
  • The Old Dock House and MarinaLake Shore RoadEssex, NY 12936(518) 963-4232 Noels on the Water Noels on the Water sits on Lake Champlain and is known for its finely prepared seafood.
  • The Old Dock House and MarinaLake Shore RoadEssex, NY 12936(518) 963-4232 Noels on the Water Noels on the Water sits on Lake Champlain and is known for its finely prepared seafood.
  • The Old Dock House and MarinaLake Shore RoadEssex, NY 12936(518) 963-4232 Noels on the Water Noels on the Water sits on Lake Champlain and is known for its finely prepared seafood.
  • Seafood and steaks are on the menu for dinnertime, along with a variety of appetizers.
  • The restaurant is next to the Essex ferry dock and offers outdoor seating on Lake Champlain and boat slips.
  • The ghosts of Joseph and his wife have been seen, lights go off and on, and loud footsteps can be heard in the basement and upper floors.
  • Just a short time later, a house maid is rumored to have hanged herself on the upper floor.
  • Odd noises, moving objects and lights turning on and off also plague the building.
  • The building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and was one of 86 area buildings damaged in a fire in 1884.
  • SouthLas Vegas, NV 89109702-770-7000http://www.wynnlasvegas.com/#home Four Seasons The Four Seasons hotel is located on the 35th to 39th floors of the Mandalay Bay resort and casino.
  • Fountain shows featuring lights and music occur regularly throughout the day to entertain those passing by on the Las Vegas strip.
  • Arabic restaurants are common on the streets of Manchester.
  • Take it back to your table and a server will prepare the food on a sizzling hot plate.
  • When you're not enjoying Blauvelt's outdoor culture, take your tastebuds on their own adventure at one of Blauvelt's restaurants.
  • Tourists on a New York vacation often visit Blauvelt for its historical landmarks.
  • Blauvelt is a hamlet on the southern tip of New York state.
  • Café Agora stays open until 4 a.m. on the weekends.
  • It's not uncommon to hear patrons provide stories of him feeding them on visits.
  • The food is authentically Cuban, but you can find other famous Caribbean dishes like Jamaican jerk chicken on the menu.
  • Located on Piedmont Road, it is in walking distance from a Marta (Atlanta's subway system).
  • Hemlock Cannon Beach, Oregon 97110(503) 436-2439www.driftwoodcannonbeach.com Newmans at 988 Newmans at 988 serves classic French and Italian cuisine with an emphasis on food from the Piedmont and Genoa regions of Italy.
  • Kennedy liked the restaurant's famous chowder so much when he tasted it on a campaign stopover that he took two buckets with him on the campaign trail.
  • Kennedy liked the restaurant's famous chowder so much when he tasted it on a campaign stopover that he took two buckets with him on the campaign trail.
  • Mo's Restaurant Housed in a ramshackle little building on Hemlock Street, Mo's Restaurant has been a local institution for more than 50 years.
  • However, if you're hiking on a seaside cliff or body surfing in the chilly north Pacific, sooner of later you will get hungry.
  • Cannon Beach is a popular vacation destination on the Oregon coast.
  • Enjoy Guiness Stew or its Big Irish Breakfast for dinner, and choose traditional Fish and Chips on the kid's menu.
  • Main St., Ste. 100Carmel, IN 46032(317) 571-1116muldoons.net Mickey's Irish Pub An evening hot spot with live entertainment on weekends, Mickey's Irish Pub features traditional pub cuisine.
  • Muldoon's of Carmel is a neighborhood favorite, serving brunch on Sundays and featuring live entertainment on select nights.
  • Muldoon's of Carmel is a neighborhood favorite, serving brunch on Sundays and featuring live entertainment on select nights.
  • Boasting fresh ingredients, a 1950s-era décor and prompt service, Sassy's is a great option for those on the move seeking affordable prices.
  • Guests can dress casually and expect the typical New York City restaurant scenario of tables sitting right on top of each other.
  • For those who are on a slim budget, however, there are multiple options.
  • Long WharfBoston, Massachusetts 02109 (617) 742-5300 legalseafoods.com 29 Newbury Offering brunch on weekends, and lunch and dinner every day, 29 Newbury is both a casual café and contemporary, upscale restaurant.
  • Situated on the waterfront, Legal Sea Food offers outdoor dining (seasonal) and great indoor views of the Boston Harbor.
  • East Side Most of Portland lives on the East Side, and there are a few communities of Chinese, Korean and Japanese people.
  • Guests finish with an indulgent dessert, baked on premises by the resident pastry chef.
  • Guests dine under the stars on the outdoor deck, or they can request a quiet table inside or join the Captain's table under the skylight with a view of the lighted masts.
  • Permanently at dock on the Delaware River at Penn's Landing, Moshulu's heyday as a trading ship is far behind, but its rank as a fine restaurant has gained it AAA four-diamond rating.
  • Couples can go on an early morning road bike ride around the city's historic landmarks.
  • Order the fresh escarole and cannellini beans sautéed with garlic in extra virgin olive oil, and for dinner feast on the Gnocchi Gorgonzola, potato dumplings tossed with sun-dried tomatoes and spinach in a creamy Gorgonzola cheese sauce.
  • On Pasta Night (Mon. and Tues.) for a low price, enjoy your choice of pasta with coffee, tea, soda or a glass of house wine, salad or soup and cannoli, cheesecake or zeppole.
  • Pizza is available only at lunchtime, and appetizers such as the Italian minestrone and cold antipasto are only offered on the dinner menu.
  • The restaurant offers a three-course family-style dinner (Sun. to Fri.), and a Wine Watch on Wednesday when, for a few extra bucks, you can enjoy unlimited wine tasting after dinner.
  • Just an hour outside of New York City is Commack, a small community located on the north shore of Long Island, the one that borders on Long Island Sound.
  • Just an hour outside of New York City is Commack, a small community located on the north shore of Long Island, the one that borders on Long Island Sound.
  • Cecelia's, which is open every day, features live jazz on Thursday evenings and serves brunch on the weekends.
  • Cecelia's, which is open every day, features live jazz on Thursday evenings and serves brunch on the weekends.
  • Buffalo, New York 14213(718) 882-5539marcosbuffalo.com Cecelia's Ristorante & Martini Bar Cecelia is the name of the first special listed on the menu at Cecelia's Ristorante.
  • Vegetarian and seafood choices also appear on the menu in addition to meat dishes.
  • Pasta is included on every menu, but a variety of other main dishes and some interesting appetizers are also readily available at these establishments.
  • Guests can enjoy lunch on a scenic train ride to Bartlett or Conway or dinner on a longer ride on the Bartlett Valley Train through the Mount Washington Valley.
  • Guests can enjoy lunch on a scenic train ride to Bartlett or Conway or dinner on a longer ride on the Bartlett Valley Train through the Mount Washington Valley.
  • Guests can enjoy lunch on a scenic train ride to Bartlett or Conway or dinner on a longer ride on the Bartlett Valley Train through the Mount Washington Valley.
  • Be sure to sit in the main dining area on Salsa night so you can spot everyone from college students to octogenarians hitting the floor.
  • If you're looking to load up on some tasty carbs before a big day out in the City of Lakes, be sure to check out one of these local Italian favorites.
  • Featuring more than 100 items on the menu (including the chef special which changes daily), Jade Harbor also offers a family meal menu, where groups from four to 10 people can be accommodated with a selection of customer favorites for one set price.
  • End the meal on a sweet note with bunuelos, deep fried tortilla wedges soaked in honey with a dollop of whipped cream.
  • Located on Route 11, just east of Canton, Phoebe's features a full bar and dining area open for dinner seven days a week.
  • Save room for the homemade desserts or get some baked goods to take with you on the trail.
  • Or pick up some food to go, and create your own picnic on or off the trail.
  • As its name implies, this is a tavern and is popular during televised sporting events when hockey and football games are displayed on the bar's six televisions.
  • Casual sandwiches and subs are also available, perfect for taking on an Elmira hike or fishing adventure.
  • The city of Elmira is located on the southern edge of New York state and is just minutes from the border between New York and Pennsylvania.
  • The restaurant is located on an historic bank overlooking Storm King Mountain and serves French, Italian and Asian dishes.
  • The restaurant has a wine list and several European beers on tap.
  • Storm King State Park is on the river in Cornwall and offers hiking and deer hunting.
  • Cornwall, New York, approximately 50 miles from New York City, is a small city on the Hudson River.
  • The Watermark Restaurant Located on Chautauqua Lake, pull your boat up right on the dock and enjoy they casual food and beautiful views that Watermark offers.
  • The Watermark Restaurant Located on Chautauqua Lake, pull your boat up right on the dock and enjoy they casual food and beautiful views that Watermark offers.
  • Webb's Captain's Table Whether you choose a table in the main dining room at Webb's Captain Table or on the open deck upstairs, you will have gorgeous views of Chautauqua Lake.
  • Serevan 6 Autumn LaneAmenia, NY(845) 373-9800 serevan.com Red Devon Market Bar and Restaurant The Red Devon is on the south shore of Hunns Lake and uses products from local farms.
  • When guests are ready for the main entrees, a card is used to signal waiters to begin waiting on guests for their selection of 15 roasted meats.
  • In addition to these offerings, the Chama Guacha includes some authentic Brazilian dishes on the menu such as fried bananas and fried polenta.
  • The state has restaurants on every corner, some of them with authentic foreign offerings that keep guests coming back for more.
  • On the corner of Taft and Buckley Road in Liverpool, The Atrium serves gourmet, made-from-scratch meals with fresh and wholesome ingredients make meals at the Atrium special.
  • Restaurants on Buckley Road might be a bit out of the way, but savvy travelers know that sometimes the most fun can be found off of the beaten path.
  • You can avoid the traffic on the thruway by heading toward Syracuse, on Liverpool's Buckley Road.
  • You can avoid the traffic on the thruway by heading toward Syracuse, on Liverpool's Buckley Road.
  • In addition to the many steak and seafood offerings on the menu, live entertainment, full bar and sunset viewing areas are also offered at this Florida restaurant.
  • From Chinese cuisine, to restaurants serving breakfast all day, both visitors and residents will be able to find something to eat on nearly every corner.
  • Pearl River, New York 10965(845) 920-0886kumojapanesebistro.com/ Resources The Quinta Steakhouse Website Information on Pearl River
  • Quinta prides itself on serving the greatest Portuguese cuisine in the area.
  • He has also appeared on the Food Network's "Iron Chef America" in which he defeated Bobby Flay in the kitchen stadium.
  • LacroixRittenhouse Hotel210 West RittenhousePhiladelphia, PA 19103(215) 790-2533lacroixrestaurant.com Amada Amada is an authentic Andalusian tapas bar that brings you as close to traditional Spanish tapas as you can get on this side of the Atlantic.
  • Its desserts are known throughout the world for their stunning appearance and unmatchable taste, and Le Bar Lyonnais on the lower level is open for a before-dinner cocktail or simply for an elegant happy hour.
  • Sheridan RoadChicago, IL 60640(773) 878-7340 Jia's Restaurant Jia's Restaurant is on North Halsted Street in the Lincoln Park area in Chicago.
  • The specialty here is "pure vegetarian" southern Indian food with an emphasis on the use of rice, lentils, wheat and authentic spices.
  • The restaurant prides itself on serving USDA Choice steaks and fresh dishes of high quality.
  • Boise, Idaho's capital, is located on the Boise River, along which a 25 mile walking and biking path--the Greenbelt--stretches.
  • The menu features lamb, duck and locally-raised delmonico, which you can eat on the patio, weather permitting.
  • McMurphy's offers live music on most nights and has a long list of domestic and imported beers.
  • Called an "Italian Heaven" by customers on diningguide.com, Hollywood offers a casual atmosphere and a children's menu.
  • Sit on the deck enjoying a cocktail as you watch the boats pass by and enjoy a great meal at Pelican's Nest.
  • Just a quarter of a mile from Charlotte Beach, diners can dine on seafood, burgers or wings.
  • Rochester, New York(585) 271-2433cheeburger.com Pelican's Nest Restaurant Located on the Genesee River, guests to Pelican's Nest can arrive by car or boat with free boat slips available for diners.
  • Get your picture on their wall if you can finish their Famous Pounder, a 20-oz burger big enough to satisfy even the biggest appetites.
  • Start off with some Little Neck clams prepared three different ways and then move on to some homemade gnocci.
  • Dominic's at the Lake Dine on large portions of authentic Italian dishes at this popular Italian restaurant.
  • Enjoy some New Orleans tunes as you dine on crawfish etouffee and some Cajun battered pickles.
  • Ontario Beach Park, commonly called Charlotte Beach, is located in the Rochester, New York community of Charlotte on the banks of Lake Ontario.
  • This restaurant serves Dim Sum on Sundays. 2920 West Henrietta Road Rochester, NY 14623 (585) 424-4000www.shanghaichineseroc.com Chen Garden The Chen Garden restaurant describes itself as a Chinese restaurant with a modern twist on tradition.
  • This restaurant serves Dim Sum on Sundays. 2920 West Henrietta Road Rochester, NY 14623 (585) 424-4000www.shanghaichineseroc.com Chen Garden The Chen Garden restaurant describes itself as a Chinese restaurant with a modern twist on tradition.
  • Rodizio Steak House Rodizio's motto is "Feast your Fill from Milan to Brazil." With more than 17 different cuts of meat (with Italian spices) served on a skewer and sliced thinly by "Gauchos," your plate will be filled endlessly.
  • Pakoras, chicken makhani, tikka masala, seafood specialties and curries are all on the menu, as well as exotic cocktails.
  • Items on the menu include vegetable pakoras, tandoori keema naan, tandoori chicken tikka masala and curries.
  • T. the Bear's Place This club on the edge of small Franklin Square in Cambridge is 18-plus every night, with live music seven nights a week.
  • The city of Boston has decided to crack down on access to clubs for the under-21 crowd.
  • On-site dining options include Orchids at Palm Court, a fine dining restaurant with a seasonal menu, The Grille at Palm Court, which serves American cuisine for both breakfast and lunch, and PC Express, which serves on the go breakfasts.
  • Cincinnati, Ohio lies directly on the Ohio River and is surrounded by several recreation areas, including the Little Miami River Park and Burnet Woods Park.
  • Brooklyn, NY 11235(718) 891-3111primorski.net/ Ocean View Café With a menu based on Russian cuisine, the Ocean View Café features an extensive and varied menu, everything from smoked fish to eggplant caviar to blintzes.
  • It also serves a special banquet dinner on weekend evenings; it includes appetizers, hot dishes, drinks and dessert.
  • Photos of the restaurant's traditional Ukranian-style décor are available on its website, as are assorted reviews.
  • Because the Brighton Beach area of Brooklyn became the home of many Russian immigrants and has been called "Little Odessa," it's not surprising that many of its most popular restaurants serve dishes based on Russian cuisine.
  • Annapolis, MD 21401(410) 263-3382 Cantler's Riverside Inn It would be hard to imagine dining in Annapolis without crabs on the menu and at Cantler's, you won't forget the sea creatures.
  • While seafood such as salmon, grouper and mahi-mahi factor primely on the menu, chicken, pork and steak round out the offerings along with salads and appetizers.
  • The Chart House Dine on the fresh catch of the day while overlooking the beautiful waters of Annapolis.
  • On the adult menu, there are signature dishes such as Mandarin kung pao with pork.
  • Soups, appetizers and seafood dishes are on the menu.
  • Whether you're hiking in Cal Anderson Park, cheering on the Seattle Seahawks or biking through the mountain area, Capitol Hill in Seattle, Washington, offers an array of adventure and exploration opportunities.
  • Homemade specials and Italian specials are also featured on the menu, with specials changing daily.
  • Be forewarned that this restaurant is popular among residents as well as tourists, and lines can be encountered on weeknight evenings and all day on weekdays.
  • Be forewarned that this restaurant is popular among residents as well as tourists, and lines can be encountered on weeknight evenings and all day on weekdays.
  • Discount coupons for the Chinatown Restaurant can often be found in local magazines and newspapers, the California Entertainment coupon book and from employees standing on nearby street corners.
  • Visitors will find numerous restaurants offering authentic Chinese cuisine that will take you on a culinary adventure.
  • Aurora, Colorado (303) 340-8824‎hawaiianbarbecue.com Manny's Barbecue Sitting on the 16th Street Mall, Manny's Barbecue holds one of the top locations in the city.
  • Offering a variety of entrees served alongside rice and macaroni salad, L & L Hawaiian Barbecue is a great place to stop for a quick lunch on the go.
  • Burgers, salads, sandwiches and fish all appear on the menu at Famous Dave's.
  • Its location on East Colfax puts it within walking distance of many Downtown Denver attractions including the State Capitol Building.
  • Unwind watching one of the many sports games broadcast on Shaggy's televisions.14 Main StreetBemus Point, New York 14712(716) 386-2695seezurhhouse.com/shaggys.php
  • Their desserts are made on site and vary seasonally.
  • Choose from the fresh catches of the day, Italian specialties (gnocchi, cioppino, shrimp), meats (filet and prime rib), pastas and salads while enjoying your meal on their floating dock, patio or indoors.
  • Bemus Point, New York, offers boating on the shores of Lake Chautauqua, charter cruises, playgrounds, hiking and beach combing.
  • If you are in Alexandria on the third Saturday of a month, make reservations for the 2 p.m. traditional Story Tea Time.
  • Put on your evening wear for the Chef's Tasting Menu in the dining room.
  • Cafe on the Green Ristorante100 Aunt Hack RoadDanbury, CT 06811(203) 791-8946www.cafeonthegreenrestaurant.com Full Belly Deli If packing for a picnic or a boat trip in Danbury, the place to load up on lunch is the Full Belly Deli.
  • Cafe on the Green Ristorante100 Aunt Hack RoadDanbury, CT 06811(203) 791-8946www.cafeonthegreenrestaurant.com Full Belly Deli If packing for a picnic or a boat trip in Danbury, the place to load up on lunch is the Full Belly Deli.
  • Rosy Tomorrows15 Old Mill Plain RoadDanbury, CT 06811(203) 743-5845www.rosytomorrows.com Cafe on the Green Ristorante Located on one of the top public golf courses in the country, Cafe on the Green offers a beautiful setting to enjoy a delicious meal in.
  • Rosy Tomorrows15 Old Mill Plain RoadDanbury, CT 06811(203) 743-5845www.rosytomorrows.com Cafe on the Green Ristorante Located on one of the top public golf courses in the country, Cafe on the Green offers a beautiful setting to enjoy a delicious meal in.
  • Rosy Tomorrows15 Old Mill Plain RoadDanbury, CT 06811(203) 743-5845www.rosytomorrows.com Cafe on the Green Ristorante Located on one of the top public golf courses in the country, Cafe on the Green offers a beautiful setting to enjoy a delicious meal in.
  • The city has numerous parks and trails, some of which are on Candlewood Lake, the largest lake in Connecticut.
  • All sandwiches come on a flaky croissant or a foot-long French-style baguette.
  • Lee's Sandwiches Whatever time of day or night it is, you can always count on Lee's Sandwiches for a great, inexpensive meal.
  • Honolulu, Hawaii's capital, is on the island of Oahu.
  • Ichiban serves food hibachi style, where it is prepared on a steaming hot table skillet before you.
  • For those seeking international fare, China King, located just west of Main Street on Central Avenue, offers an inexpensive and freshly prepared Chinese buffet.
  • Other nearby restaurants in this area include the moderately priced local seafood restaurant Walleye Willies (also located on Lakeshore Drive).
  • Demetri's is located just a few blocks west of Main St. on Lakeshore Drive.
  • West of Main Street Demetri's On The Lake is a Dunkirk favorite for international cuisine in a charming lakefront atmosphere.
  • Also located on Lakeshore Drive East is Payne's Kettle and Keg, a local favorite ale house and tavern serving traditional pub fare.
  • It offers modestly priced seafood and steaks, which you can enjoy directly on the lake front.
  • The Beachhouse Grill is a seafood restaurant located just blocks off of Main Street on Lakeshore Drive.
  • East of Main Street East of Main Street dining options are located primarily on Lakeshore Drive East.
  • Also directly on Main is the Upper Crust Bake House, a locally owned bakery and deli.
  • For independently owned local flavor, De John's Italian restaurant is located on the twenty-sixth block of Main Street.
  • Most restaurants in Dunkirk are located either directly on or just off of Main Street.
  • During the summer, enjoy live musical entertainment on the Italian Fisherman's floating stage.
  • Dinner is labeled "steak on the lake" and the "thrill of the grill", with specialty salads and deserts filling out the menu.
  • Lunch at the Deli on the Dock where Mamma's Mussels, the catch-of-the-day sandwich and gourmet burgers satisfy active vacationers on the lake.
  • Lunch at the Deli on the Dock where Mamma's Mussels, the catch-of-the-day sandwich and gourmet burgers satisfy active vacationers on the lake.
  • Jamestown, NY 14701(716) 664-6204fentongrill.com Andriaccio's Restaurant Order a wrap, panini and salad to go as you head out for a day of adventure on Chautauqua Lake.
  • Portland, OR 97219(503) 653-8669tonyshookahlounge.com Lava Lounge Downtown Portland's Lava Lounge is a bargain for the hookah smoker on a budget.
  • With lots of Sublime on the stereo and an atmosphere that varies from mellow to frenzied, Tony's Smoke Shop is a good option for the 18-and-older crowd.
  • Portland, OR 97214(503) 230-4866 Tony's Smoke Shop & Hookah Lounge Tony's Smoke Shop & Hookah Lounge has three locations, all on the outskirts of Portland.
  • The Sultan Cafe has free Wi-Fi and is open till 1 a.m. on Fridays and Saturdays.
  • While Portland isn't a mecca for hookah, there are a handful of hookah bars that have made their mark on the rainy city.
  • Wolff's features 14 beers on tap from Germany, Brazil and the Czech Republic, including pilsners, wheat beers and lagers.
  • From 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. on Thursday, Wolff's holds an all-you-can-eat potato pancake special, served with sour cream or apple sauce.
  • Victor's 1959 Cafe was featured on the Food Network. 3756 Grand Ave S.
  • The wait is long on the weekends, so arrive early.
  • The food is fantastic and fairly inexpensive (breakfast is about $8), though the service can be slow, especially on weekends.
  • SEMinneapolis, Minnesota 55414 (612) 331-9991 The Bad Waitress Located on "Eat Street" in Minneapolis, The Bad Waitress is a trendy cafe that features diner food and breakfast all day.
  • It's best to park and walk--Al's is on the West side of 14th Avenue.413 14th Ave.
  • The best time to visit is during the week; expect a long wait on Saturday and Sunday morning.
  • Monday through Saturday and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Sunday.
  • If you don't mind getting a late start on a Saturday in Minneapolis, there are plenty of places to eat fantastic food before you hit the trail.
  • The menu features French Creole and Cajun cuisines and the bar features 22 different beers on tap.
  • Co.230 Ninth Avenue at 24th Street(212) 243-1105 Borgo Antico Borgo Antico focuses on revisited Italian cuisine prepared by Chef Ivan Beacco, who prepares his dishes with fresh ingredients.
  • Other catering menus focus on Filipino, Chinese, International and Hawaiian food.
  • When traveling to Houston to go canoeing in the Buffalo Bayou, power-walk through the 12-acres of Discovery Green or hike on the Memorial Drive trails, you will need a place to eat, eventually.
  • For your small plate try its gourmet twist on a grilled cheese sandwich ($10).
  • Meridith's American Bistro serves breakfast and lunch on Sunday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
  • Mainly a breakfast and lunch venue for tourists and local shoppers, the Bayou stays open until 7:30 p.m. on weekends.
  • Bayou On First The Bayou On First is in the famed Pike Place Market, and the menu is as ample as the restaurant is cozy.
  • Bayou On First The Bayou On First is in the famed Pike Place Market, and the menu is as ample as the restaurant is cozy.
  • The staff prides itself on the creative and unique presentation of dishes.
  • The restaurant also serves baked desserts all of which are cooked on the premises.
  • The restaurant boasts 14 beers on tap and 10 in-stock bottled beers daily.
  • Depending on season and availability, Joe's offers different varieties of its namesake such as Blue Crabs, Stone Crabs, Alaskan Snow Crab and Dungeness Crabs.
  • Joe's Crab Shack Perfect for meeting friends after work or just hanging out on the weekends, Joe's Crab Shack is a causal place that attracts a lively crowd looking for filling fare and good times.
  • New Brunswick, NJ 08901-1903(732) 296-9463catherinelombardi.com Surf and Italian Turf An Italian restaurant with an emphasis on seafood, dinners at Fresco can have the best of both worlds.
  • Individuals on a restricted diet who are considering visiting Pennsylvania will be pleased to learn that there are a variety of restaurants that specialize in kosher foods.
  • Patrons can also take advantage of the complimentary high-speed wireless Internet access available in the restaurant's four dining rooms or catch the latest game on two flat screen, cable-equipped television sets.
  • Gaucho Steakhouse39950 7 Mile RoadNorthville TWP, MI 48167(248) 380-7770gauchosteakhouse.com Burke's Waterfront Restaurant Located on beautiful Lake Cadillac, Burke's Waterfront Restaurant offers an authentic Brazilian dining experience.
  • Some of the standard sandwiches you will find here include BLTs, tuna salads and roast beef, all of which can be served on either a bagel or bread.
  • Best of all, Walter's Café and Bistro is open on weekends; diners can enjoy its food all week long.
  • For the older diners, there is a beer and wine menu, which includes non-alcoholic beers and several ales on tap.
  • For those whose tastes are simpler, the restaurant offers classic cold and hot sandwiches like tuna melt on rye, beef panini, turkey Cuban and grilled cheese as well as a variety of hamburgers.
  • It is not unusual, therefore, to see electric dishes like Vietnamese spring solls, baba ghanoush, Thai beef salad, chicken fajita, gnocchi a la vodka and grilled New York strip steak all on one menu.
  • After the day's activities, dine on a sumptuous meal at one of the many German restaurants in town.
  • The space hosts live entertainment on many weekends.
  • Burlington, VT 05401(802) 658-6276breakwatervt.com The Skinny Pancake The Skinny Pancake offers great views and a patio for a casual breakfast, lunch or dinner on Burlington's waterfront.
  • Watch ferry boats set off for the New York shore as you enjoy a meal on the Burlington waterfront.
  • Burlington, VT 05401(802) 657-3377maderasvt.com Breakwater Cafe & Grill For casual dining on the edge of Lake Champlain, Breakwater Cafe and Grill on the King Street Ferry Dock is the place to go.
  • Burlington, VT 05401(802) 657-3377maderasvt.com Breakwater Cafe & Grill For casual dining on the edge of Lake Champlain, Breakwater Cafe and Grill on the King Street Ferry Dock is the place to go.
  • Located on Burlington's waterfront, Madera's offers patio service in the spring and summer.
  • Whether you're in the mood for an elegant meal or a quick snack, you can get it on Burlington's waterfront.
  • When you want to kick back and enjoy a meal out on the town, the city offers many dining opportunities with lake views.
  • Located on the shore of Lake Champlain, the city of Burlington, Vt., has long been a destination for outdoor enthusiasts eager to explore the Green Mountains in Vermont or the Adirondacks in New York just a short ferry boat ride away.
  • The Dallas Voice said, "We have yet to find a dish that doesn't make us want to tap dance on the tabletop." An evening will set you back between $75-$150 per person; dress is upscale casual.
  • Nebraska Ave Tampa, FL 33603(813) 234-1000ellasfolkartcafe.com Luigi's Italian Restaurant Pizza and pasta aren't the only things on the menu at this local favorite.
  • Whether you're in the mood for steak in a fine dining environment, munching on down home American classics while surrounded by weird art, or just feel like pasta and a glass of red wine, your stomach will be satisfied with what Tampa Bay has to offer.
  • As one of the largest cities on Florida's West Coast, it also offers good places to eat.
  • Bistro Ole230 Main StreetAshbury Park, NJ(732) 897-0048bistroole.com Casa Solar You can find Casa Solar on Main street in Belmar.
  • They also do special events on holidays such as New Year's Eve.
  • There are also music nights on given Saturdays where guests can get a taste of traditional Spanish music.
  • Monmouth can be found in the east of New Jersey situated on the Atlantic ocean.
  • This establishment features foods which take a modern take on classic Italian cuisine.
  • The meals on the lunch menu are classic American sandwiches and appetizers, while the dinner menu includes more hearty, robust meals.
  • Appetizers, salads, and homemade desserts such as tiramisu and zabaglione are also available on the lunch or dinner menu.
  • House specialties include Chicken Scampi and Veal Saltimbocca as entrees, and pasta, burgers, steak, and seafood are also available on the extensive menu.
  • They're serving them right up on the West Coast daily.
  • Thrill-seeking tourists flock to Orange County not just for the theme parks, but also to explore the wilds of Casper's Wilderness Park, to surf the waves on Huntington Beach and to fish at Dana Wharf.
  • According to reviews on yelp.com, the food portion sizes are large and the breakfast menu is delicious.
  • Newport Beach, CA 92663(949) 675-8449newportbeachbrewingcompany.com The Cottage Restaurant Located on the Pacific Coast Highway a few blocks north of Laguna Beach's main beach, the Cottage Restaurant is open seven days a week, 365 days a year.
  • Due to the high volume of guests, reservations are recommended during weekdays and required on weekends.
  • Bikers can enjoy trips to the mountain trails or on the road and climbers may want to visit the Beach-Pirates Cove or Ortega Falls.
  • The food is on the pricey side, but the portions are huge and the quality is great, and the menu is flexible and constantly changing.
  • There are lots of trails, including those on Gasparilla Island and Cayo Costa that are popular with walkers, runners, and bikers.
  • Low on price, but high on spice, the restaurant offers dirty rice, crawfish casserole, and its state-fair-winning corn fritters.
  • Low on price, but high on spice, the restaurant offers dirty rice, crawfish casserole, and its state-fair-winning corn fritters.
  • The menu changes daily, but Yats serves up Louisiana cuisine, with a heavy emphasis on beans, rich flavorful sauces, and rice.
  • Yats on College This noisy Cajun restaurant bustles with activity, and is as much a destination as it is a restaurant.
  • Watch chicken roast on a large rotisserie before it's added to Cuban sandwiches like the Hot Acapulco (which pairs it with onion sauce, pinto beans, and cheddar cheese) and Mexican dishes like burritos and tortilla soup.
  • Enjoy an array of beers on tap, flat-screen televisions for watching the game and free Wi-Fi.
  • New on the North End scene in 2009, Ducali offers starters such as Nachos Italiano made from pizza dough chips, light fare like salads and panini, and vegetarian and meat-topped Neapolitan-style pizzas alike.
  • Non-food draws include a seasonal patio with views of the cityscape, live music on weekends, valet parking, the "Grape Room" (a dining area simulating a vineyard) and a fireplaced ballroom for special functions.
  • Fondue features on the dinner menu both as an entree (Gruyere cheese, white wine and shallots served with croutons) and as a dessert (dark Belgian chocolate served with an assortment of fruits).
  • Annapolis, Maryland, is located on the shores of the Chesapeake Bay, and the Severn River runs right through town.
  • While the pub will make reservations for those seeking special accommodations, a standard dinner service is strictly on a first come, first served basis.
  • Joe's also offers brunch on Saturdays and Sundays throughout the year.
  • On Sunday nights during the summer Cherry Street East serves up a complete turkey dinner, giving guests just another reason to be thankful.
  • Those who enjoy beer or wine with their meal are encouraged to bring their own, as none is available on the menu.
  • Dine on authentic Greek food in or around Jamesville tonight.
  • In addition to the food, clientele rave about this restaurant's take on the national Brazilian cocktail, the Caipirinha.
  • Vegetarians do not have to go hungry here either, as there are many items on the menu for them.
  • You can move on to a range of seafood favorites like the Camarao, shrimp sauteed with garlic, olive oil and lime juice.
  • Of course, the Mississippi River is a major attraction, with biking, hiking, kayaking and canoeing on and around Mud Island.
  • From walking on Beale Street, to cycling the city's more than 60 miles of bike routes, Memphis has plenty for the outdoor enthusiast to do.
  • Eat outside with your family and friends during the summer on the patio.
  • China Gourmet is open Sunday through Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. and from 4:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Saturday.
  • You will appreciate the wide variety on both the traditional and regular menus and the moderate prices.
  • Beth's Café has been featured on the Travel Channel, Evening Magazine and in Seattle Weekly.
  • Guests who like life on the lighter side can have yogurt and granola parfaits or the mini breakfast--hashbrowns, one egg and a slice of toast.
  • Beth's Cafe is famous for breakfast, on the healthful or not so healthful side, served any time.
  • On the weekends expect live musical entertainment.
  • Start with Louisiana-style crab claws or fried brie encrusted with nuts and move on to shrimp etoufee and fried catfish.
  • Avon PavilionOcean Avenue Boardwalk Avon-by-the-Sea, NJ 07717(732) 775-1043avonpavilion.com A Taste of The Big Easy Specializing in Cajun fare, Clementine's Cafe will give you a taste of New Orleans, right on the Jersey Shore.
  • Dining on the Boardwalk Family-owned and operated, Avon Pavilion offers a fun, casual atmosphere by day and a romantic, elegant ambiance by dinnertime.
  • Open daily, with dinner only on Saturday and Sunday.
  • Visitors can race the 2,000-foot course in their own kayak or can pay for a seat on the resident "funyaks." St.
  • A perfect place for a first date, dine on familiar Italian classics such as Chicken Fiorentina, Veal Sorrentino and Gnocchi Bolognese.
  • Stop by on Monday for all you can eat spaghetti, or try some of the other delicious dinner offerings served up.
  • Hours are Tuesday through Sunday from 7 am-10 pm, and they are closed on Monday.
  • There should be something on the buffet table here to please everyone; diners will find pizza, pasta, seafood, steaks, salads, soups and plenty of sweet treats.
  • Families can benefit from serious savings on Tuesdays, when children eat free.
  • There is an annual charity golf tournament put on by the restaurant to benefit Shriner's Hospital.
  • The menu items at this restaurant include clams on a half shell, Buffalo wings and steak.
  • Start with the grilled eggplant Siciliana appetizer, move on to the fresh baby spinach salad and then indulge on the gnocchi con funghi in a truffle-flavored cream sauce.
  • Start with the grilled eggplant Siciliana appetizer, move on to the fresh baby spinach salad and then indulge on the gnocchi con funghi in a truffle-flavored cream sauce.
  • On the lighter side of the menu you'll find blue cheese walnut salad with farm-fresh mixed greens.
  • Sogo248 US Hwy. 46Denville, NJ 07834(973) 784-4981sogo.cc Qdoba Mexican Grill Qdoba offers fresh ingredients in an eco-friendly atmosphere that will satisfy even the most discerning expert on Mexican cuisine.
  • Bunga Raya advertises many kinds of Southeast Asian cuisine, and it is not hard to find vegetarian dishes on the menu.
  • One popular dish is satay, or barbecued meat served on bamboo skewers and distinctively seasoned.
  • Set your expectations--go for some tasty food that will be easy on the pocketbook, not for high class.
  • All are on the west side of town outside the loop.
  • Some of the more distinctive dishes on the menu include escargot, grilled pizzas, and filet mignon.
  • It reopened in 2009, however, and the polka music is playing again on Friday and Saturday nights and Sunday afternoons (the dance hall also features ballroom dancing lessons on Thursdays).
  • It reopened in 2009, however, and the polka music is playing again on Friday and Saturday nights and Sunday afternoons (the dance hall also features ballroom dancing lessons on Thursdays).
  • The Bavarian Apple Cheesecake is can't-miss, having once been voted "Best Dessert on the Bay."1143 Central Ave.
  • Don't forget to try the desserts, brought around on a rolling cart.
  • Indoors you can choose to sit in the bierstube (pub) with its ten beers on draft (one of them seasonal) and 30 more bottled beers available (including non-alcohol and low-carb varieties).
  • It is closed on Sunday, and reservations are recommended.
  • Clarke's Landing Restaurant For fine dining in a casual atmosphere by the water's edge, drive nine minutes north of Lexington Park on Route 235 to Hollywood, Md.
  • Take a two-mile hike on an unimproved trail from the parking lot and spend the day hunting for fossils along the beach.
  • A better choice is Calvert Cliffs State Park on the Chesapeake Bay, about 30 minutes north along Route 4.
  • Downstairs, Sally O'Brien's Bar offers a full bar menu, a selection of live acts and DJ's, and big crowds. (For that reason, families with children should note the nightclub noise may go on pretty late at night.) Royal Hotel Arklow25 Main St.
  • On Sunday afternoons, visit the Ferrybank Carvery for a Sunday roast.
  • This port city is situated on the mighty Avoca River and known for its boat building and sea fishing.
  • Bandera, TX 78003(830) 796-4100texassquare.com Brick's River Cafe Located right on the Medina River, Brick's River Cafe is a moderately priced restaurant that's family owned and family friendly.
  • Texaritas Mesquite Grill Steakhouse Located in the center of town and in the Old Texas Square Hotel, the Texaritas Mesquite Grill Steakhouse lives up to its name by focusing on angus beef grilled over mesquite coals.
  • A different kind of riding--via mountain bike--or hiking is available on 40 miles of trails in the nearby Hill Country State Natural Area.
  • Again, if you're visiting on the weekends, expect a wait for dinner.605 N.
  • If you visit on the weekends, expect a long wait for dinner.640 N.
  • For example, if you travel on Seneca Street and head toward the pier, you will find a little spot called Freeway Park.
  • Consider getting that warm meal at Il Terrazzo Carmine on First Avenue South.
  • After spending some time on the chilly waters, however, you may find yourself in need of a hot meal.
  • If you find yourself out on the water at night, make sure to take a look back toward shore and see the twinkling lights of Seattle at night, which make for an impressive view.
  • Once featured on PBS's "Dining Out" with Jonathon Swift, Moro's is dimly lit; the perfect ambiance for a relaxing dinner with your loved one, although it also hosts private parties.
  • Open for both lunch and dinner, the dress code is business casual and there is live entertainment on the weekends, as well as an outside patio that opens depending on the weather.
  • Open for both lunch and dinner, the dress code is business casual and there is live entertainment on the weekends, as well as an outside patio that opens depending on the weather.
  • Portofino can provide you with not only a nourishing meal but also a lovely view of the Detroit River, as the restaurant is situated directly on the docks, complete with its own Portofino Friendship yacht that you can set sail on before or after dinner.
  • Portofino can provide you with not only a nourishing meal but also a lovely view of the Detroit River, as the restaurant is situated directly on the docks, complete with its own Portofino Friendship yacht that you can set sail on before or after dinner.
  • Located on the Detroit River, Wyandotte has been designated by the federal government as a Preserve American Community.
  • DearbornChicago, IL 60610(312) 832-7700 Rosebud Express Located on West Madison Street, Rosebud Express offers authentic Italian for those on the go.
  • DearbornChicago, IL 60610(312) 832-7700 Rosebud Express Located on West Madison Street, Rosebud Express offers authentic Italian for those on the go.
  • The area has a copious amount of activities, including boating, fishing and water-skiing on its two rivers, the grand Mississippi and the Rock, and West Lake outside of Davenport.
  • You can savor the fresh taste of the Southwest Chicken or Taco Salads, or chow down on a sandwich, such as the Girlie Cheezie, made with four types of cheese.
  • Beef is not the only thing on the menu for you to enjoy.
  • There are a variety of mild, hot or spicy dishes provided on the lunch and dinner buffet as well as vegetarian dishes.
  • Indulge in delicious Indian food on the lunch and dinner buffet, such as Tandoori Chicken (chicken marinated in a spicy yogurt), Pakora (batter-fried vegetables or meats) and Saags (spiced spinach).
  • If you are vegetarian, you will love the wide variety of vegetarian specialties on the menu.
  • During the off-season (May through September), the prices go down significantly, making it an enticing place for visitors to Anza-Borrego State Park who are on a budget.
  • The 21 rooms on the premises come equipped with cable color television, coffee making facilities, microwaves, fridges, and free high-speed Internet access.
  • The 12 rooms on the premises each come equipped with a refrigerator, air conditioning, color TV, and coffee making facilities.
  • Rib-eye, filet, t-bone and shell steak are some of the cuts of steak on the menu.
  • The beef on a stick and shrimp skewers are very tasty, and the lumpia are a favorite among local diners.21009 Great Mills Rd.
  • For some reason, the Latin American Restaurant is closed on Wednesdays.
  • Cuban sandwiches, spicy pork, rice and beans are all on the menu, offering an authentic taste of Havana's finest.
  • If you're feeling overwhelmed by the sheer quantity of items on the menu, try the Sicilian-style Stromboli.
  • Vegetarians and vegans will appreciate the fact that they are acknowledged on the Guido's menu, in addition to the typical carnivorous offerings.
  • On Sundays, there is an all-you-can-eat buffet, which is a good excuse for trying out the entire menu.
  • The Palms Restaurant101 West Nelson StreetLexington, VA 24450(540) 463-7911thepalmslexington.com Bistro on Main The Bistro on Main is a contemporary restaurant, serving a variety of dishes.
  • The Palms Restaurant101 West Nelson StreetLexington, VA 24450(540) 463-7911thepalmslexington.com Bistro on Main The Bistro on Main is a contemporary restaurant, serving a variety of dishes.
  • Move on to gourmet burgers, sandwiches, pasta or steak.
  • After an invigorating hike on the Woods Creek Trail or an exhilarating mountain bike run through the Blue Ridge Mountains, satisfy your appetite with delicious food and conversation at a Lexington restaurant.
  • Eatontown, New Jersey is a popular stopping point for visitors on their way to the New Jersey shore, which offers a range of activities for the active outdoor sports enthusiast, including swimming and fishing.
  • The restaurant also features a good selection of German and Austrian wines, along with lots of cold, German beer on tap.
  • Commercial BlvdFort Lauderdale, Florida(954)771-7342ambryrestaurant.com Old Vienna Restaurant Old Vienna Restaurant prides itself on using the freshest ingredients, and even the sauces are made from scratch in the restaurant's kitchen.
  • The restaurant opens at noon, four on weekends, and happy hour is from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. daily.
  • Lamb chops, veal shank, schweinebraten, spanferkel (roast suckling pig with dumpling), and leberkäse (veal loaf topped with egg, sauerkraut, and mashed potatoes) are just a few of the uncommon dishes on the menu at Old Heidelberg.
  • A larger variety of German dishes are on this menu than anywhere outside of Deutschland.
  • Old Heidelberg Restaurant, Lounge & Bar Old Heidelberg has a Bavarian kitsch atmosphere with steins on the ceiling and garden gnomes everywhere, but the authenticity of the menu is clear.
  • With the beautiful Atlantic Ocean and intricate canal system, boating, swimming and fishing are popular, and getting around by water is almost as easy as on land.
  • Cutillo's Restaurant is open for lunch and dinner Wednesday through Sunday, and for dinner only on Tuesdays.
  • Carne asada, fried shrimp, pizza, and fish tacos are also popular on the menu.
  • The booth seating, bar, and local news on the TV create a casual feel that brings in a number of local customers and tourists scoping out the area.
  • Travertine Grill Offering American cuisine, the Travertine Grill is one of the only full service restaurants right on the Salton Sea.
  • In the area, there are not too many restaurants directly on the lake, but there are a few notable ones in the more populated outskirts.
  • In addition to the regular menu, Gokul offers a vegan dinner buffet on first Mondays.
  • The winter soup and sandwich menu offers choices, like Eggplant Parmesan, made on olive bread, and Barbecue Tempah.
  • Vegan options can be found on their own menu page and, if you have something particular in mind, OR Smoothies will do its best to cater your request.
  • There is no microwave on the premises, and recipes are used with no MSG or refined cane sugar.
  • Angelo's diner, located on Main St., is a local tradition in existence since 1946.
  • The Roadhouse is a local favorite for steak on the lake.
  • The menu changes seasonally depending on what is available locally.
  • The Robata-Yaki plates and Nabemono or Hot Pots are outstanding dishes for travelers looking to warm up after a cold day on the Bay. 161 Steuart St.
  • If you want to show the world that you really are a star, head over on Wednesday, Friday or Saturday night for karaoke night.
  • Try Red Jacket, India Pale Ale, Ironclad Stout, City Mills Wheat or one of the many others on tap.
  • But many outdoor enthusiasts need to let off a little steam on vacation.
  • Chutney Masala 4 West Main StreetIrvington, NY 10533(914) 591-5500chutneymasalabistro.com Casual Dining With the emphasis on organic food, the Black Cat Cafe is a relaxed place to eat.
  • Located on the Hudson River, Irvington, New York is a small town with a lot to do.
  • The prices here are quite reasonable considering the quality of the food that is served. 59 Church St Canajoharie, NY 13317 (518) 673-2596 Resources Information on Dining in Montgomery County
  • ID 83854(208) 777-9388 Beverly's Located on top of the five star Coeur d'Alene Resort, Beverly's is one of North Idaho's top fine dining establishments.
  • Many North Idaho area restaurants capitalize on the availability of this meat by offering it on their menu.
  • Many North Idaho area restaurants capitalize on the availability of this meat by offering it on their menu.
  • A printable discount coupon is available on the website.1202 Rt. 55Lagrangeville, NY(845) 452-0110dailyplanetdiner.com The Villa Pasta & Grille A quarter-mile down Poughkeepsie is the Villa with a soft, classy ambience.
  • There is a full menu on their website, which is listed below. 1175 W.
  • The environment has a modern take on Japanese culture with bright colors and gorgeous lighting.
  • There is a full menu on their website, which is listed below. 1312 S.
  • Hiro's Specials consist of: Nigiri Sushi, which is a two-piece dinner of the freshest sushi, Salads, Sashimi, which is raw fish, and Maki Sushi, which are the rolls (Lobster Rolls, California Rolls, and so on).
  • Dancing and entertainment on Thursday and Friday night.
  • Sandwiches, subs and wraps are also included on the menu.
  • Pasta with fresh vegetables and seafood is on the menu, fresh fish with vegetables and rice and beef and pork dishes with roasted potatoes, vegetables and green chimicurri.
  • The Inn has discounts on meals between 3 and 6 p.m. from Monday through Saturday, as well as a Tuesday night dining special, when six of the Inn's entrees are $12 from 6 to 8 p.m.
  • Tampa, FL 33607(813) 874-1919restaurants-america.com/barlouie/ Mema's Alaskan Taco For a more laid-back dinner, think Mema's on 8th Avenue.
  • Bar Louie With roughly 50 beers on tap and giant plasma televisions on the wall, Bar Louie is a restaurant chain tailor-made for sports fans looking to catch their favorite game.
  • Bar Louie With roughly 50 beers on tap and giant plasma televisions on the wall, Bar Louie is a restaurant chain tailor-made for sports fans looking to catch their favorite game.
  • You can spend the day jet-skiing in Tampa Bay, catch an evening Devil Rays or Lightning game (depending on the season), and then head out for some of the city's nightlife in Hyde Park or the Channelside Complex.
  • A sparkling gem on the Gulf Coast of Florida, Tampa is a city known for its love of all things sports-related.
  • Perry's Steak House and Grille provides live piano music on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays.
  • This restaurant provides live musical entertainment on Thursday and Friday nights.
  • Armadillo eggs, fried pickles and seafood-stuffed jalapenos are just a few of the appetizers available on the menu.
  • Guests can also watch sailboats drifting by as they dine on smoked chicken, ribs and steak.
  • Saltgrass Steak House Saltgrass Steak House is located near Clear Lake Park, where visitors can enjoy fishing on the pier and children can engage in playground activities.
  • A fun, family-friendly atmosphere and affordable price tag make this restaurant a great place to take the kids for a night out on the town.
  • Residents of Bath and visitors alike enjoy gathering with friends and feasting on one of its signature sticky buns at this comfortable and homey restaurant.28 Liberty St.
  • This Midwestern city on the lake offers up some of the most authentic German cuisine in the country.
  • After a day of playing on Lake Erie, head into the city for a memorable meal.
  • Cleveland, Ohio, is a city filled with history, culture and excellent watersports on the Great Lakes.
  • Back in the day, the Church was a way-station on the Underground Railroad.
  • Insider tip: not on the menu, but always available and delicious-- the chicken nachos.
  • Syracuse, NY 13206(315) 218-0294 Alto Cinco Nestled on a hip street just east of Syracuse University's campus, Alto Cinco boasts a majority of vegetarian dishes--a rarity in Mexican cuisine.
  • If the college bar scene is for you, try Lynagh's on a Thursday or Friday night.
  • Come watch your favorite sports teams play on large high-definition televisions.
  • Team trivia is played on Tuesdays, and there is live music on Fridays.
  • Team trivia is played on Tuesdays, and there is live music on Fridays.
  • There are weekly happy-hour specials, and live bands play on the weekend.
  • Find printable coupons to Tandoori Chef on its website.260 Main St.
  • On the other hand, finding Middle Eastern cuisine in the Seattle area can be more of a challenge.
  • Miller's Tavern16 Beaver AveAnnandale, NJ 08801(908) 735-4730 Resources Information on Annandale
  • Then stroll over to the Rodin Museum, also conveniently located on the JFK Parkway.
  • Enjoy seeing hardwood forests and open fields on the ten mile hike and a wild garden.
  • There are educational tours on most of the islands, and Webb Memorial State Park is part of this group of sites to see.
  • Girl's Night Out offers special lessons for women on Wednesday nights.
  • Customers can enjoy watching sports on the four large screen TV the restaurant has.
  • They have a Hibachi menu that features special dishes prepared on the grills and run lunch specials daily.
  • The restaurant serves sushi, appetizers, and teppanyaki dinners cooked on grills.
  • Oleg's is open 9am-10pm on Tuesday-Saturday, and 8am-3pm on Sunday.11929 Mason Montgomery RoadCincinnati, OH 45249513-774-0700www.olegstavern.com Resources Cincinnati/Surrounding Area German Restaurants
  • Oleg's is open 9am-10pm on Tuesday-Saturday, and 8am-3pm on Sunday.11929 Mason Montgomery RoadCincinnati, OH 45249513-774-0700www.olegstavern.com Resources Cincinnati/Surrounding Area German Restaurants
  • The historical building boasts German style architectural elements including stained glass windows, heavy wood timber beam ceilings, large mahogany bar tops and several fireplaces, giving you a German feel on Cincinnati turf.
  • The building is modeled after the original Hofbrauhaus in Munich, Germany, and this traditional German restaurant and pub is one of the most happening places to be on the weekends.
  • Skipper's Dock restaurant is literally placed on a 600 foot dock so you do not have to stop enjoying the port just to eat.
  • Depending on the suites chosen, rooms have king-size beds, private balconies overlooking Lake Eden, heart-shaped whirlpools, a 7-foot champagne glass whirlpool and fireplaces.
  • An Intimate Couples Resort Cove Haven Resort is located on Pennsylvania's largest man-made lake, Lake Wallenpaupack.
  • Voted best steakhouse restaurant on Long Island, the atmosphere is casual and the portions are generous.
  • Sea Basin642 Route 25ARocky Point, NY 11778(631) 744-1643newsite.seabasin.com J&R's Steak House J&R's Steak House is an American restaurant with six locations on Long Island.
  • Specialties on the menu include deep fried pickled chips, collard greens, and ribs.
  • All of the meats on the menu are smoked on premises, sauces are made in house, and dishes are served in generous proportions.
  • All of the meats on the menu are smoked on premises, sauces are made in house, and dishes are served in generous proportions.
  • Known for its beaches, golf courses, and canoe or paddle boating on the Peconic River, Rocky Point attracts an array of active visitors seasonally.
  • Rocky Point, New York is a hamlet in Suffolk County, New York on Long Island's North Shore.
  • Diners will also enjoy the Touch of Venice's scenic grounds on grass that overlooks the bay, as well as its private dining facilities that can fit large parties.
  • The area is also renowned for its outdoor activities, where residents can hike, run, bike, and camp on the beach and at several area parks.
  • The restaurant does not have a full bar, but it offers Birch beer on tap.
  • Regular Cloverleaf guests can also join the Clover Club, which is a frequent customer card to attain discounts on dinner.
  • The tavern is also known for a great selection of wine offerings, specialty cocktails and the beer menu, which features 24 varieties on tap and 48 bottles of beer available.
  • Some featured entrees on the menu include: barbecue pork, barbecue beef ribs, New York strip steak, and mixed shish kabob, to name a few.
  • Flying Pig on Lexington Featuring a menu filled with fresh, organic food, this award-winning restaurant made Gourmet Magazine's Top 100 list for eat-local, farm-to-table restaurants.
  • On Friday nights the tapas bar stays open until 3 a.m.
  • Cozy up next to the poolside patio and enjoy enticing Spanish concoctions like paella negra with black squid ink, smoked Spanish mussels on crostini, or fresh tuna ceviche.
  • Dance 'til dawn as you sip on some of Tampa's best margaritas and mojitos.
  • For those on the run Bender's offers take out service as well.
  • A little bit off the beaten path in Aurora on the east side of Denver, Bender's Brat Haus serves lunch from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • Located at the Town Center at Aurora, Helga's Deli is near the crossing of Interstates 70 and 225 on the east side of Denver.14197 E.
  • The ambiance is sophisticated and comfortable and they are available for private parties and business meetings on Mondays.323 14th St.
  • The restaurant is open for lunch and dinner during the weekdays and dinner only on the weekend.
  • Going south will bring you to Great Sand Dunes National Park and Reserve and the San Juan Mountains for camping, hiking and even skiing on the dunes.
  • Seattle WA 98101(206) 256-1499lepichetseattle.com Flying Fish Flying Fish has a menu that changes depending on which fish is in season.
  • Open for lunch and dinner every day, Mela is a great place to eat after a morning walking the Freedom Trail or an afternoon on the Harbor Walk.
  • Vegetarian dishes are also on the menu, if you want to stay away from meat.
  • From visiting the 16 historical sites on the Freedom Trail to walking the Franklin Park pedestrian paths, Boston has walking and hiking opportunities for everyone.
  • Highway A1AMelbourne Beach, Florida 32951(321) 727-3133cafecoconutcove.com Heidi's Jazz Club Heidi's Jazz Club in Cocoa Beach is just a short drive from Melbourne Beach on the A1A highway.
  • You'll be greeted by warm and rustic charm of wood and servers dressed in traditional lederhosen ready to serve you one of many German beers on draft or a German wine.
  • After a day spent on the beaches surfing or a hike at the Sebastian Inlet State Recreation Area in Melbourne Beach, Florida, satisfy your hearty appetite for old world food at one of the German restaurants in the area.
  • From sunbathing on the area's award-winning beaches to boating, fishing and biking or jogging on the Pinellas Trail, the Clearwater area offers something for visitors of every age and interest to enjoy.
  • From sunbathing on the area's award-winning beaches to boating, fishing and biking or jogging on the Pinellas Trail, the Clearwater area offers something for visitors of every age and interest to enjoy.
  • The restaurant is open daily from 6:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. and stays open until 9 p.m. on weekends.
  • Restaurant 15 Main is closed on Monday and Tuesday.
  • Named "Best Chef" by the River Report 2 years in a row, Owner and Chef Peter Schott sources his ingredients from local growers and includes the names of the farms he works with on his menu.
  • Main Street Cafe40 Main StreetNarrowsburg, NY 12764Tel: (845) 252-7222http://www.mainstreetcafenarrowsburg.com Restaurant 15 Main Restaurant 15 Main in Narrowsburg, New York is on a corner of Main Street with a view of the Narrowsburg Bridge.
  • The restaurant is open every day from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m., and closes at 9 p.m. on weekends.
  • Note that Bistro 22 is closed on Sundays, as of November 2009.
  • They serve lunch until 4:30 and do not serve lunch on Sundays.
  • The Crab Cooker offers all types of seafood fare with an emphasis on freshness.
  • Chef Ranjana will instruct you on the history of Indian food along with the appropriate preparation techniques.
  • A treat for the taste buds and an entertaining night on the town, this restaurant is sure to become a fast favorite as you delight in rolling up your sleeves and demonstrating your culinary skills.
  • You and your friends can feast on French baguettes and wine while being trained in the techniques that have made French cooking famous.
  • Open 7 days a week from 11:30 AM to 9:30 PM, with closing extended to 10:30 PM on Friday and Saturday.
  • On their standard menu, the restaurant is pleased to feature a variety of sauteed and grilled steaks, marinated rack of lamb, chicken and seafood dishes, as well as Mexican dining standards such as burritos and enchiladas.
  • Open 7 days a week for lunch and dinner, with late night hours on the weekends.
  • From the many TVs tuned to a variety of sporting events to the American menu heavy on steak, chicken, ribs and seafood, the Upper Sports Deck meets every expectation, making it a restaurant for food lovers as well as sports lovers.
  • Open 7 days a week from 10:00 AM to 10:00 PM, with closing extended to 11:00 PM on Friday and Saturday.
  • Now with four locations, A G features a menu that is as long on Italian favorites like eggplant Parmesan, calamari and pasta as it is on their own signature pizza.
  • Now with four locations, A G features a menu that is as long on Italian favorites like eggplant Parmesan, calamari and pasta as it is on their own signature pizza.
  • There is a garden terrace where guests can dine on summer days, and a fireplace where visitors can gather to watch the snow fall in the distant mountains.
  • Embudo Station Embudo Station is a moderately priced, casual restaurant located on Highway 68 in northern New Mexico.
  • Embudo is a small historic town located on the banks of the Rio Grande between Espanola and Taos.
  • Locals love to eat McNally's signature sandwich, the "Schmitter," a decadent cousin of the Philly cheesesteak that includes steak, onions, melted cheese, grilled salami, tomatoes and a secret sauce served on a Kaiser roll.
  • There are plenty of steak alternatives on the menu, including fish and chicken, and a diverse wine and drink menu to satisfy everyone's palate.
  • The inn, located 15 minutes from the mainland on Chebeague Island, is famous for its traditional cookout: the Chebeague Island Inn Lobster Bake.
  • The Peaks Island House The Peaks Island House, located off Portland's coast on Peaks Island, features local fare in a beautiful seaside atmosphere.
  • The city of Portland on Maine's southern coast is a beautiful place to experience New England's unmistakable coastline and fresh Atlantic cuisine.
  • Lunch hours are from 11:30 to 2:30 on weekdays or for dinner starting at 5:30 every night except Sunday when they open at 4:30.
  • Diners feast on fresh, original American cuisine including pumpkin gnocchi appetizers and a cider braised monkfish entrée while enjoying the clean, refreshing atmosphere.
  • Located in the South End, Mistral offers a unique take on tradition Provençal classics.
  • Locke-Ober3 Winter PlaceBoston, MA 02108(617) 542-1340lockeober.com L'Espalier A gourmet French restaurant in Boston's Back Bay utilizing locally-grown produce and fresh seafood, L'Espalier serves lunches and dinners on a prix fixe basis.
  • The Locke-Ober focuses on fine American cuisine, reflecting fresh foods available from local suppliers.
  • Monday through Friday, noon on Saturday and 10 a.m. on Sunday.
  • Monday through Friday, noon on Saturday and 10 a.m. on Sunday.
  • Couple your meal with one of its many imported and domestic beer in bottles and on tap.
  • On the lighter side of the menu you have a portobello mushroom salad and the Chicken Michele.
  • Prices are based on the market value of fresh ingredients each day.
  • Chicago Line Cruises offers multiple launches daily on the beautiful Chicago River.
  • Maggiano's is a perfect choice for dinner or lunch after an architectural tour on the Chicago River.
  • Astor Street The Astor Hotel in downtown Milwaukee dates from 1920 and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
  • Find it on the harborside of the island near the Galveston retail zone.
  • Steaks on the dinner menu are right around $30 per plate, but you will not find steak on the lunch menu.
  • Steaks on the dinner menu are right around $30 per plate, but you will not find steak on the lunch menu.
  • Like so many restaurants on Seawall Boulevard, this steakhouse with the Texas trail-driver motif is right on the oceanfront.
  • Like so many restaurants on Seawall Boulevard, this steakhouse with the Texas trail-driver motif is right on the oceanfront.
  • This restaurant is located in the Athens on the Hudson Marina.
  • You can also go boating on the Hudson, birdwatching on the tidal preserve or fishing for trout in one of the many streams in the county.
  • You can also go boating on the Hudson, birdwatching on the tidal preserve or fishing for trout in one of the many streams in the county.
  • On the northern side of the city, there is the Hacienda del Sol Guest Ranch and Resort.
  • Keep your eyes open for deer and birds while you ride on through the canyon.
  • Stone AvenueTucson, AZ 85701(520) 884-5253casavicente.com Sur Real Latin American Cuisine Enjoy the sights and sounds of Box Canyon on the back of an all terrain vehicle.
  • The time of its transition varies, depending on the day.3884 Morse RoadColumbus, OH 43219(614) 428-8880kobeohio.com Sakura Diners at Sakura get an authentic taste of Japan in the heart of Ohio.
  • Visitors can feast on a variety of chicken, beef, or seafood selections prepared in traditional Japanese fashion that are sure to tickle any palate.
  • Visitors can feast on Japanese-style cuisine and enjoy a show put on by the highly trained chefs right at their table.
  • Visitors can feast on Japanese-style cuisine and enjoy a show put on by the highly trained chefs right at their table.
  • On the menu, you will find items like the Gateway Assorted Platter, a starter consisting of Samosa & vegetable pakodas.
  • The restaurant features a clay oven called a Tandoor, designed for cooking meats on skewers above coals and where they bake bread fresh daily along the inner walls.
  • Just about everything on the menu is Portuguese, from the aperitivos (appetizers) to the peixe (fish), mariscos (seafood) and carnes (meats).
  • Thursday also is a bargain night, with select menu items being offered for half price (look for "Dine on a Dime" specials).
  • In fact, On Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays, you can have just that, with the "Taste of Portugal" prix fixe dinner offered for only $19.99 (as of November 2009).
  • Tuesday through Friday) and a tapas menu (not available on Saturdays).
  • Portuguese specialties on the main menu include filet mignon Portuguese in a wine and garlic sauce, pork chops a fadista sauteed in garlic, bay leaves and wine, and Portuguese pork and clams (carne alentejana) cooked with garlic and cilantro.
  • Newark, NJ 07105(973) 589-8830adegagrill.com Europa South The Europa South offers both Portuguese and Spanish cuisine on the Jersey Shore in Point Pleasant Beach and features live entertainment on weekends and jazz on Thursday nights.
  • Newark, NJ 07105(973) 589-8830adegagrill.com Europa South The Europa South offers both Portuguese and Spanish cuisine on the Jersey Shore in Point Pleasant Beach and features live entertainment on weekends and jazz on Thursday nights.
  • Newark, NJ 07105(973) 589-8830adegagrill.com Europa South The Europa South offers both Portuguese and Spanish cuisine on the Jersey Shore in Point Pleasant Beach and features live entertainment on weekends and jazz on Thursday nights.
  • After a day on the water, wind down with a cocktail in the Captain's Lounge.
  • Snack on complimentary fresh baked bread and dipping sauce.
  • Situated on the sandy banks of Long Island Sound, Westbrook Connecticut offers outdoor enthusiasts sandy beaches and activities from sailing and kayaking to hiking and saltwater fishing.
  • Outdoor enthusiasts enjoy boating on nearby Lake Champlain and Lake George as well as skiing, snowboarding and snow tubing down West Mountain and Gore Mountain.
  • Grecian variations on conventional dishes are also available such as Yarithes Scorthates, a house innovation on a classic prawns entrée.
  • Grecian variations on conventional dishes are also available such as Yarithes Scorthates, a house innovation on a classic prawns entrée.
  • Bellingham, WA 98225(360) 676-1087Dirtydanharris.com Five Columns Restaurant Five Columns Restaurant focuses on traditional Greek cooking as well as American classics that grace steakhouse menus worldwide.
  • If you're hankering for a steak but don't want to miss out on the renowned seafood from local waters, Grilled Wild Sea Scallops can be added to any entrée.
  • In fact, you're better off visiting on a weekday, as it's one of the most popular dim sum places in town (for good reason), and tends to be packed on Saturdays and Sundays.
  • In fact, you're better off visiting on a weekday, as it's one of the most popular dim sum places in town (for good reason), and tends to be packed on Saturdays and Sundays.
  • Bellevue, WA 98052 (425) 562-1552sichuaneserestaurant.com Jade Garden Jade Garden, located in Seattle's bustling International District, offers an extensive dim sum menu every day, not just on weekends.
  • These authentic Chinese dishes include such items as the bizarrely named, yet tasty "ants on the tree" (bean thread noodles with ground pork in a spicy red sauce), bitter melon with jalapeno chili and kung pao yao hwa (pork kidney).
  • It's situated right on Lake Union, where you'll be able to watch other outdoor enthusiasts kayaking, canoeing and sailing as you dine.
  • The restaurant operates Sunday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. and from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays.2424 Wilson Blvd.
  • Be sure to have cash on hand, though, because credit cards are not accepted.
  • Right on the beach, The Windjammer serves beer, cocktails and traditional bar food, but it's famous for live music, volleyball tournaments and for hosting the annual Budweiser Bikini Bash.
  • The restaurants on Isle of Palms range from upscale establishments to beach-side bars, and you'll have your choice of fresh seafood and traditional Lowcountry favorites.
  • The casual restaurant has a rotating calendar of specials, including baked ziti on Tuesdays and a fish special on Fridays. 400 W.
  • The casual restaurant has a rotating calendar of specials, including baked ziti on Tuesdays and a fish special on Fridays. 400 W.
  • Lake Park is on the waterfront and covers 138 acres.
  • Milwaukee, Wisconsin, sits on the shores of Lake Michigan.
  • This is a family-friendly restaurant with everything on the lunch menu from the obligatory grilled cheese sandwich for the little ones to a local scallop taco for those craving truly local seafood.
  • Dependent on weather, outside seating is available.
  • Mackinac Island, MI 49757(800) 626-6304www.theislandhouse.com Grillhouse and Rock Bottom At the Grillhouse, you get to grill your choice of four steak cuts, chicken, tuna, shrimp and kabobs on their 8 foot by 10 foot grill.
  • Angry Bull Steak House5078 Lapeer RoadKimball, MI 48074(810) 966-9098angrybullsportsbar.com/ 1852 Grill Room The 1852 Grill Room is in the historic, circa 1852 Island House Hotel on Mackinac Island overlooking the Straits of Mackinac.
  • Steakhouses in Michigan are places to consider for a good meal after a day out on the water or hiking trails around the state.
  • Hibiscus martinis are a contemporary take on a classic cocktail, and the Pink Chihuahua margarita is made with prickly pear juice instead of lime.
  • Curra's Grill The menu at Curra's focuses on the regional cuisines of interior Mexico.
  • Marigold Kitchen also serves a special brunch menu on the weekends, with specialties including buckwheat banana pancakes, made-to-order omelets with Marigold potatoes, French toast and chile poached eggs.
  • Harvest Restaurant Harvest Restaurant is located on the Capitol Square in downtown Madison.
  • Tempura and teriyaki dinners are served on sizzling plates and the sushi bar serves 60 different varieties of maki, nigiri and sashimi.
  • The bar has more than 30 beers on tap and more than 30 big screen televisions broadcasting sports.
  • With an enormous retail district on West Henrietta Rd., many of these eateries are chains.
  • Henrietta, New York is home to a number of attractions for adventure seekers, including championship skiing at the tallest mountain between the Catskills and Rockies--Bristol Mountain, and sport fishing and water sports on Lake Ontario.
  • Sylvan Beach, NY 13157(315) 762-7777portobellatrattoria.net Captain John's Restaurant One of the finest restaurants on the beach, Captain John's is known for its generous portions of seafood and beef.
  • A seasonal beach town, Sylvan Beach comes alive between May and September, with an amusement park, plus a variety of boating and water sports and beach activities on the lake.
  • Sylvan Beach, NY sits on the Southeast shore of Oneida Lake.
  • Diners who eat the 80-ounce steak during their sitting have their names placed on plaque in the dining room.
  • The casual eatery's menu focuses on its selection of steaks, including a 24-ounce double-cut steak, 24-ounce t-bone, 32-ounce porterhouse and an 80-ounce steak.
  • Fred's Inn has an all-you-can-eat seafood buffet on Fridays, a Prime Rib buffet on Saturdays and champagne brunch on Sunday mornings, as of November 2009.
  • Fred's Inn has an all-you-can-eat seafood buffet on Fridays, a Prime Rib buffet on Saturdays and champagne brunch on Sunday mornings, as of November 2009.
  • Fred's Inn has an all-you-can-eat seafood buffet on Fridays, a Prime Rib buffet on Saturdays and champagne brunch on Sunday mornings, as of November 2009.
  • Bongiorno's Restaurant28 Dove StreetAlbany, NY 12210(518) 462-9176bongiornositalianrestaurant.com Café Madison Café Madison is an Italian bistro featuring pasta made on the premises.
  • Veal dishes are the specialty of the house, with 11 varieties on the menu.
  • The 1950's decor, including the large neon sign on the building's exterior, is accented by an extensive menu of fine Italian cuisine.
  • For dinner you might choose a decadent and authentic Foie Gras served with French bread, followed by Crevettes aux Lentilles, marinated black tiger prawns served on a bed of warm lentil salad.
  • For lunch, try the charcuterie plate of French duck and chicken pates with ham on a spring mix, or the Croque Brie Curry Monsieur sandwich made with Herbes de Provence ham, Brie, melted Gruyere and curry mayo sauce.
  • Consider swinging by Jester's Restaurant and Pub on your way into Chesterfield.
  • Lucile's Creole Cafe275 South Logan StreetDenver, CO 80209(303) 282-6258luciles.com/ The Mercury Cafe Although it is only open for breakfast on the weekends, if the timing is right, The Mercury Cafe is a treat.
  • On the lighter side, V8 juice, yogurt, and fresh fruit slices are also offered.
  • There is plenty of fun to be had in the city, such as riding on over 850 miles of off-road bike paths or tubing down Clear Creek River.
  • That's because Eli Cannon's Tap Room offers over two dozen beers on tap plus over ninety bottled brews.
  • Most of the best restaurants are located on Main Street downtown, so you won't have any trouble finding them after a long day of hiking at nearby Higby Mountain or Chauncey Peak.
  • Be prepared for a wait for a table on weekend nights when the Blue Lantern is most busy.6120 Seneca StElma, NY 14059716-652-2583bluelanterninelma.com
  • Owned by the same proprietor's they specialize in hot dogs, pita wraps and slow cooked roast beef served quickly for those on the go.
  • If you want to grab something on the go you can also swing by Milton's next door.
  • Hours vary depending on the season, so it's best to call ahead.
  • Steamed or broiled lobster, depending on the weight, ranges from $22.50 to $39.50.
  • Prices depend on the style of pizza and amount of toppings requested.
  • Having three locations along the 3-mile boardwalk, locals and frequent visitors know that they can always count on the great taste of the award-winning thin and crispy pizza.
  • New Delhi Indian Restaurant4004 Chestnut StreetPhiladelphia, PA 19104(215) 386-1941newdelhiweb.com The Taj Mahal The Taj Mahal focuses on providing distinctive Indian cuisine without preservatives or MSG.
  • There are also numerous vegetarian options on the buffet.
  • Roti, naan and parathas also feature prominently on the menu.
  • Paul, MN 55102(612) 222-5670meritage-stpaul.com Salut Bar Americain The newest edition to Saint Paul's French cuisine scene, Salut Bar Americain is located on historic and bustling Grand Avenue.
  • Brasa Grill6507 W Waters AveTampa, FL 33634(813) 881-9121tampa.creativeloafing.com La Fogata Churrascaria La Fogata is an award-winning restaurant located on Beach Boulevard in Gulport, just southwest of Tampa.
  • Located on Waters Avenue in the Town and Country area of northwest Tampa, it is a quick drive from anywhere in the Bay area and family-owned and operated.
  • This is a carnivore's dream but vegetarians will find enough delicious meat free options on the salad bar.
  • As with most Brazilian establishments, the emphasis is on meat; it is perfectly grilled or roasted on a churrasco rotisserie.
  • As with most Brazilian establishments, the emphasis is on meat; it is perfectly grilled or roasted on a churrasco rotisserie.
  • They are well known for their club-like atmosphere on the bar side of the building and for their elegant catering that has made many weddings and parties so memorable.
  • Their enormous menu goes on and on with options so big, you'll leave with a take-out box.
  • Their enormous menu goes on and on with options so big, you'll leave with a take-out box.
  • Their large selection of fish from around the world can include Tuna, Salmon, Rainbow Trout, Snapper, Chillean Sea Bass, and more, on any given night.
  • In the southwest tip of Tennessee, on the Chickasaw Bluffs, the city overlooks the Mississippi River.
  • To round out the menu, there are also hot hero sandwiches and burgers on offer.
  • The crusts on the pizza are the stuff of legend: crispy and fluffy, loaded with classic toppings, like spinach, broccoli and fresh mozzarella.
  • Spaghetti with meatballs is a wonderful entree if you need refueling after a few hours boating on the Mississippi River.
  • For lunch, with dozens of items on the menu, particular local favorites are the mushroom risotto or the smoked trout insalate (salad).
  • Vescio's Originalé is a perfect place for a hearty Italian meal after a day out on one of Minneapolis' many bike tracks.
  • All of the bread and pasta is homemade on the premises, and sausages and sauces are made from family recipes.
  • Minneapolis, Minnesota is located on the banks of the Mississippi River and has more than 20 lakes, making it a mecca for water sports enthusiasts.
  • The owners are dedicated to supporting local artists, as original artwork hangs on the restaurant's walls.
  • The Curry Pot6940 Lee HighwayChattanooga, TN 37405(423) 648-5069currypotcuisine.com Mojo Burrito Mojo Burrito is an inexpensive, locally owned Mexican restaurant focusing on fresh ingredients and a casual atmosphere.
  • The restaurant is open for lunch and dinner Monday through Saturday and for lunch on Sunday.
  • This is a convenient place to visit to stock up on sweets to tuck into your pack before you head out for the mountains.
  • The restaurant is open for both lunch and dinner and is conveniently located on Wadsworth Blvd. in Arvada, so you can stop by on your way either up to the mountains or coming back down from a day on the trails or slopes.
  • The restaurant is open for both lunch and dinner and is conveniently located on Wadsworth Blvd. in Arvada, so you can stop by on your way either up to the mountains or coming back down from a day on the trails or slopes.
  • The restaurant is open for both lunch and dinner and is conveniently located on Wadsworth Blvd. in Arvada, so you can stop by on your way either up to the mountains or coming back down from a day on the trails or slopes.
  • With its inexpensive prices and fast service, it is a quick and easy stop on your way down the Wharf.
  • San Francisco, CA 94133(415) 775-5600www.tarantinosrestaurant.com Alioto's Alioto's is one of the oldest restaurants on the Wharf.
  • Seafood tops the list of foods on the menus, as do baked goods and famous chocolates.
  • There are 18 beers on tap and vegetarian options are limited.
  • Chef Robert invites you to dine on fresh ingredients and relax in a contemporary and casual atmosphere.
  • Watch sports on flat-screen televisions and choose from 17 ice-cold beers on tap.
  • Watch sports on flat-screen televisions and choose from 17 ice-cold beers on tap.
  • Try the Corned Beef Sloppy Joe--thinly sliced lean corned beef and Swiss cheese, served triple-decker style on fresh rye topped with Russian dressing and cole slaw for only $5.
  • Low prices, big portions and home cooking are on the menu.
  • The only vegetarian option on the dinner menu is the salad bar ($12.95 as an entrée).
  • It invites you to try anything on the menu but recommends the Charro Platter ($13.95), Enchilada Platter ($12.95) and the Tacos al Pastor ($2.50 each).
  • Davenport Park sits on 20 acres overlooking the Long Island Sound and offers hiking trails and open areas for sunbathing, Frisbee and picnics.
  • When this happens, stop into the town and refuel on the delicious food served at one of the plentiful restaurants.
  • Winter Park, Colo., located along Highway 40, is one of the easier ski resorts to drive to from the Front Range and is usually frequented by weekend warriors trying to get as much snow time in before heading back to work on Monday.
  • The restaurant also offers numerous specials, especially on Friday night with the restaurant's Friday Fish Fry.
  • The restaurant is open for breakfast, lunch and dinner, focusing on fresh meat, fish and vegetables.
  • The menu only features dinner selections that change, depending on the season.
  • While not advertised as such, Vegetarian Paradise is a fully vegan menu with absolutely no meat, dairy or eggs anywhere on the menu.
  • Brattleboro, VT 05301(802) 254-3999thirtynine-main.com The Twilight Tea Lounge The Twilight Tea Lounge is a charming tea house right on Main Street in Brattleboro.
  • Not the selection of vegan dishes is not the widest, the ones on the menu will definitely satisfy even the harshest of critics.
  • Thirty Nine Main Thirty Nine Main is a vegan-friendly restaurant on Main Street in the heart of Brattleboro.
  • Naperville, IL (630) 305-9800mycurryleaf.com The Indian Harvest Nestled in the corner of the Cross Creek Shopping Center on Royal Saint George Dr. is Indian Harvest, a popular Indian restaurant of the Chicago suburbs.
  • Closed on Mondays, Curry Leaf operates every other day of the week.1904 Brookdale Rd.
  • Don't miss the special deals provided on carryout orders on Tuesdays and Wednesdays.
  • Don't miss the special deals provided on carryout orders on Tuesdays and Wednesdays.
  • Lunch is available Monday through Friday, brunch on Sunday, and dinner every day of the week.
  • Leona's start you with a roll of seasoned bread and butter, tries to fill you up on appetizers, and then hits you with the main course.
  • Chicago is known for Italian food; there is even a community on the near West side called "Little Italy." Italian food is known for its hearty portions; you will almost always come back home with leftovers.
  • There is one item on the menu, however, that is quite unique and is this restaurant's claim to local fame: German pizza.
  • If you visit on a Sunday, you can enjoy a Swiss-style buffet called "Bernerplatte." The restaurant itself is charming and very colorful, filled with an amazing variety of antiques (both Swiss and West Virginian--possibly purchased new by Mailloux).
  • Although an entire pit-roasted deer will probably not be on the menu, should you visit the Helvetia Hutte, you can enjoy authentic Swiss/German fare including sauerbraten, bratwurst made on site, hot applesauce and home-brewed beer.
  • Although an entire pit-roasted deer will probably not be on the menu, should you visit the Helvetia Hutte, you can enjoy authentic Swiss/German fare including sauerbraten, bratwurst made on site, hot applesauce and home-brewed beer.
  • On the show "Bizarre Foods," host Andrew Zimmerman visited this Swiss/German restaurant owned by Eleanor F.
  • After a day in (or under) the great outdoors, you're sure to work up a heart appetite, so what better to fill up on than some good, hearty German food.
  • There are only two Brazilian restaurants on the islands.
  • Saturday and Sunday. 931 Nicolett MallMinneapolis MN 55402(612) 904-1000the-local.com Wilde Roast Café Access the Internet with the free Wi-Fi while enjoying the fine comfort food featured on the menu at Wilde Roast Café.
  • Mary Church on the west side of downtown Minneapolis.
  • Minneapolis, MN 55406(612) 722-7234theriverview.net The Local Towering ceilings, an 80-foot bar and interesting rooms like the Kissing Room make this a great restaurant to join colleagues for a bite to eat or to grab a drink while catching up on email.
  • Monday through Friday and at 7 a.m. on Saturday and Sunday. 3745 42nd Ave.
  • Open from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. except on weekends when they extend up to 12:30 a.m., Fratello's Pizzeria is a lovely and fun stopover for all food lovers.
  • We're Big on Hospitality," you can get a glimpse of what the townspeople are all about.
  • Locals and visitors alike are talking about this warm, vibrant restaurant that concentrates on salads, sandwiches, and classic French dishes.
  • La Puerta Azul specializes in innovative Mexican cuisine, with food that has a twist on typical Mexican dishes.
  • The restaurant is also popular for its simple but stylish Sunday brunch, which you can eat indoors in front of a roaring fire or, on warmer days, on the pretty patio.
  • The restaurant is also popular for its simple but stylish Sunday brunch, which you can eat indoors in front of a roaring fire or, on warmer days, on the pretty patio.
  • Enjoy 21 miles of hiking and biking on the Harlem Valley Rail Trail.
  • Enjoy your meals while viewing shows on four flat-screen TVs and enjoy your drinks at the 47-foot bar.
  • They don't have a beer or liquor license, so they operate on a relaxed BYOB policy.
  • Raj Palace Indian Restaurant If you like Indian cuisine, you won't want to miss visiting Raj Palace on your next trip to Delran.
  • Situated right on the confluence of the Delaware River and Rancocas Creek, Delran is a prime spot in New Jersey for enjoying water sports, particularly rafting and canoeing.
  • Dress for the restaurant is on the dressy end of casual.
  • Emilitsa547 Congress StreetPortland Maine 04101(207) 221-0245emilitsa.com Street and Company Located on a cobblestone street in the Old Port, Street and Company is right in the heart of Portland.
  • The restaurant is on the outskirts of Portland's historic Old Port, where you can find many art galleries, boutiques and cafes.
  • Acropolis795 Forest Ave, Portland, ME 04102(207) 879-2400‎ Emilitsa Emilitsa is located on Congress St. in the Portland Arts District.
  • Acropolis Located on Forest Avenue, Acropolis is an excellent option for cheaply priced Greek food.
  • Open daily from 6 AM to 2 PM, with extended hours for dinner service on Fridays.
  • Garramone's Restaurant11770 O'Brien Rd Forestport, NY 13338 (315) 392-2052 Caspers Nestled away on route 28 is Caspers, a diner serving only breakfast and lunch that has a cozy Adirondack atmosphere.
  • With a menu as heavy on steaks, poultry and seafood as it is on pizza and classic pasta dishes, Garramone's is sure to have something for every palate.
  • With a menu as heavy on steaks, poultry and seafood as it is on pizza and classic pasta dishes, Garramone's is sure to have something for every palate.
  • The Terrace and Dining Room are on the grounds of the Mid Pines Inn, a Georgian-style hotel built in 1921.
  • The menu, which changes with the seasons, focus on fresh, local and organic food items.
  • After working up an appetite rooting for your favorite team, hiking park trails or kayaking on the Trinity River, take some time to experience a classic Texas steak house.
  • Come on a night when the BrewHaHa in the rathskeller is featuring one of its live comedy nights because City Steam Brewery Cafe is not only the largest cafe in Hartford, it's also the most fun.942 Main St.
  • Converted into a microbrewery and restaurant, it has seating on nine floors, and is all brick walls and hardwood.
  • The sandwiches are amazing, too, as all the bread is hand-baked on the premises so it arrives at your table warm and soft.
  • The pub offers live Celtic music on many nights and specials on St.
  • The pub offers live Celtic music on many nights and specials on St.
  • It was the first fine dining restaurant on the south side of Columbus.
  • Only open on Thursday, Friday and Saturday evenings, for all-out quaintness alone, you should eat at the Tollgate Hill Inn and Restaurant.
  • Decorated in a classic white tablecloth style, the restaurant itself is divided in half, with the dining room on one side and a small bar on the other.
  • Decorated in a classic white tablecloth style, the restaurant itself is divided in half, with the dining room on one side and a small bar on the other.
  • Along with serving food after 5 p.m. during the week and after 11 a.m. on the weekends, it also hosts live music at night.
  • For outdoor enthusiasts, this is good news because keeping healthy on a plant-based diet is key, instead of a meaty diet that can be very weighty for the active traveler.
  • On Sundays, the chef cooks various specialties such as sauerbraten and beef rouladen that include bread, salad and choice of potato.
  • Menu favorites include the cold fleischsalat sandwich, hot reuben, Hildegard sandwich with three types of German meats on dark bread and the schnitzel platters.
  • Menu items include schnitzels with a range of sauces, sausages, homemade spaetzle, potato and cucumber salads and imported Paulaner beer on tap.
  • In addition, Huntsville is recognized for its space industry, as a team of German rocket scientists emigrated here and left an indelible mark on the city's history.
  • Meals are served buffet-style with fried chicken, pork chops and ham served only on certain days of the week.
  • Chicken, ribs, pork, turkey and sausage are also on the menu.
  • Nearly every cut of fresh USDA Choice steaks is featured on the menu.
  • On Saturdays, patrons can order Long Island Ice Tea, Sex on the Beach or draft beer for $3.
  • On Saturdays, patrons can order Long Island Ice Tea, Sex on the Beach or draft beer for $3.
  • The complex specializes in appetizers, sandwiches and burgers, as well as offering discounted drink specials on each night.
  • Patrons will find bars on the first and second levels.