Omniscience sentence example

omniscience
  • Is it really impossible to claim for man something between omniscience and universal nescience?
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  • In other words, they're denying the omniscience of God, that He knows everything.
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  • In some of the events he describes, Matthew assumes the omniscience of a fiction writer, narrating what he could not have known.
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  • He affirms the meeting in Christ of the two absolutely opposite principles of human ignorance and imperfection, and divine omniscience and perfection.
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  • Necessarily, a being is maximally excellent in all possible worlds only if it has omniscience, omnipotence, and moral perfection.
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  • Is a visually flawed one should the young writer authorial omniscience describing.
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  • Some people hang on every word Jakob writes, whereas some detest his apparent omniscience regarding the world wide web.
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  • Professional tradition and an astute perception on their part of the omniscience suggested by the terms, have left the medical men in Englishspeaking lands in undisturbed but illogical possession of the words physiology, physic and physician.
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  • This is the assumption of logical omniscience (discussed below ).
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  • The wheels symbolize divine omniscience and control, and the whole vision represents the coming of Yahweh to take up his abode among the exiles.
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  • Thiers sait tout, tranche tout, parle de tout," and this omniscience and "cocksureness" (to use the word of a prime minister of England contemporary with this prime minister of France) are perhaps the chief pervading features both of the statesman and the man of letters.
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  • According to Mr Gore this means that Christ, on his incarnation, became subject to all human limitations, and had, so far as his life on earth was concerned, stripped himself of all the attributes of the Godhead, including the Divine omniscience, the Divine nature being, as it were, hidden under the human.'
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  • Universal happiness would require omniscience to legislate for it and the " normal " or, as some would say, " perfect " man to desire it; neither of these conditions of its realization is at present in existence.
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  • Yet it may be doubted (1) whether the problem would ever have arisen at all except for the necessity of reconciling the theological and metaphysical hypotheses of the omniscience and omnipotence of God with the needs of a moral universe: and (2) whether it would retain its perennial interest if the incursions of modern scientific and psychological inquiry into the domain of human consciousness did not appear to come into conflict from time to time with the presuppositions of morality.
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  • It shows the influence of Arminian theology against Calvinism, which was vigorously upheld in the Quin-particular formula, put forward by the synod of Dort in 1619 to uphold the five points of Calvinism, after heated discussion, in which English delegates took part, of the problems of divine omniscience and human free-will.
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