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old-english

old-english

old-english Sentence Examples

  • This, except historically, is a misnomer, for, though descended from the old English Presbyterians, they retain nothing of their distinctive doctrine of polity - nothing of Presbyterianism, indeed, but the name.

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  • From this was imitated the Old-English fragment printed by Th.

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  • high, is employed instead of a jack, - recalling, in this respect, the old English form of the game already mentioned.

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  • The members accidentally discovered that the fear of it had a great influence over the lawless but superstitious blacks, and soon the club expanded into a great federation of regulators, absorbing numerous local bodies that had been formed in the absence of civil law and partaking of the nature of the old English neighbourhood police and the ante-bellum slave patrol.

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  • The Old-English laws point out ways by which the churl might rise to thegn's rank, and in the centuries during which the change went on we find mention - complaining mention - both in England and elsewhere, at the court of Charles the Simple and at the court of 'Ethelred, of the rise of new men to posts of authority.

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  • Gummere's Old English Ballads (Boston, 1894).

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  • Bulldog, bulldog (miniature), mastiff, Great Dane, Newfoundland (black, white and black, or other than black), St Bernard (rough and smooth), Old English sheepdog, collie (rough and smooth), Dalmatian, poodle, bull terrier, white English terrier, black and tan terrier, toy spaniel (King Charles or black and tan, Blenheim, ruby or red and tricolour), Japanese, Pekingese, Yorkshire terrier, Maltese, Italian greyhound, chowchow, black and tan terrier (miniature), Pomeranian, pug (fawn and black), Schipperke, Griffon Bruxellois, foreign dogs (bouledogues frangais, elk-hounds, Eskimos, Lhasa terriers, Samoyedes and any other varieties not mentioned under this heading).

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  • There is an old English translation by A.

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  • The Old English word is cweorn; it is a word common to Teutonic languages, cf.

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  • Conversely old English writers had no hesitation in translating as "earl" foreign titles which we now render "count."

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  • 28 (1893); Albert Hartshorne, Old English Glasses (London); E.

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  • The third division would consist of the collections of the so-called Pseudo-leges Canuti, the laws of Edward the Confessor, of Henry I., and the great compilation of the Quadripartitus, then of a number of short notices and extracts like the fragments on the "wedding of a wife," on oaths, on ordeals, on the king's peace, on rural customs (Rectitudines singularum personarum), the treatises on the reeve (gerefa) and on the judge (dema), formulae of oaths, notions as to wergeld, &c. A fourth group might be made of the charters, n as they are based on Old English private and public law and supply us with most important materials in regard to it.

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  • Looking somewhat deeper at the sources from which Old English law was derived, we shall have to modify our classification to some extent, as the external forms of publication, although important from the point of view of historical criticism, are not sufficient standards as to the juridical character of the various kinds of material.

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  • While it is impossible to give here anything like a complete or exact survey of the field - a task rendered almost impossible by the arbitrary manner in which paragraphs are divided, by the difficulty of making Old English enactments fit into modern rubrics, and by the necessity of counting several times certain paragraphs bearing on different subjects - a brief statistical analysis of the contents of royal codes and laws may be found instructive.

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  • Chadwick, Studies on Anglo-Saxon Institutions (1905); P. Vinogradoff, "Folcland" in the English Historical Review, 1893; "Romanistische Einflasse im Angelsachsischen Recht: Das Buchland" in the Mélanges Fitting, 1907; "The Transfer of Land in Old English Law" in the Harvard Law Review, 1907.

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  • A part of this poem, as is mentioned in the article C.Edmon, is extant only in an Old English translation.

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  • Somewhat curiously, but very naturally, Enoch the son of Cain is confused with the Enoch who was translated to heaven - an error which the author of the Old English Genesis avoids, though (according to the existing text) he confounds the names of Enoch and Enos.

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  • The suspicion of some earlier scholars that the Praefatio and the Versus might be a modern forgery is refuted by the occurrence of the word vitteas, which is the Old Saxon fittea, corresponding to the Old English fitt, which means a "canto" of a poem.

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  • BLACKBIRD (Turdus merula), the name commonly given to a well-known British bird of the Turdidae family, for which the ancient name was ousel, Anglo-Saxon Osle, equivalent of the German Amsel, a form of the word found in several old English books.

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  • This word is chiefly used alone as an archaism or in poetry or poetical language, but is more common in combination, as in "yule-tide," "yulelog," &c. The Old English word appears in various forms, e.g.

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  • The organization of the judiciary is similar to that under the old English system.

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  • In old English writings the terms pit-coal and sea-coal are commonly used.

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  • The French word, except in such phrases as Dieu merci, sans merci, is principally used in the sense of "thanks," and is seen in the old English expression "gramercy," i.e.

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  • By this act the old English Benedictine line was perpetuated; and in 1619 a number of English monks professed in Spain were aggregated by pontifical act to these representatives of the old English Benedictines, and thus was constituted the present English Benedictine congregation.

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  • It only occurs in Old English as a word borrowed from the Norse, the proper term in Old English being "theow" (peow); the Icel.

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  • - An old English translation of St Gregory's.

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  • The word in Old English was helig, and is common to other Teutonic languages; cf.

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  • It has been shown (31) that the old English mile, at least as far back as the 13th century, was of 10 and not 8 furlongs.

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  • It was therefore equal to 79,200 in., and divided decimally into 10 furlongs 100 chains, or 1000 fathoms. For the existence of this fathom (half the Belgic pertica) we have the proof of its half, or yard, needing to be suppressed by statute (9) in 1439, as "the yard and full hand," or about 40 in., -- evidently the yard of the most usual old English foot of 13.22, which would be 39.66.

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  • We can restore then the old English system of long measure from the buildings, the statute-prohibition, the surviving chain and furlong, and the old English mile shown by maps and itineraries, thus:

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  • Bury, of which the name is derived from the Anglo-Saxon burhg, birig or byrig (town, castle or fortified place), was the site of a Saxon station, and an old English castle stood in Castle Croft close to the town.

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  • It was in all probability the original from which all the above-mentioned Old English glosses were derived, though in several instances changes and modifications were introduced by successive scribes.

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  • It is evident that any Old English versions which might have survived the ravages of time would now be unintelligible, it was equally natural that as soon as French came to be looked upon as an alien tongue, the French versions hitherto in use would fail to fulfil their purpose, and that attempts should again be made to render the Bible into the only language intelligible to the greater part of the nation - into English.

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  • Gasquet, The Old English Bible and Other Essays (London, 1897), pp. 102 ff.

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  • Cook's " Introduction on Old English Translations of the Bible," in Biblical Quotations in Old English Prose-writers.

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  • There is a powerful lighthouse, and since its cession by Great Britain to Germany, the main island has been strongly fortified, the old English batteries being replaced by armoured turrets mounting guns of heavy calibre.

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  • In the title "hyrax" they have, for instance, usurped the Greek name for the shrew-mouse; while in the Bible they have been given the old English name for the rabbit.

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  • There is also an Old English use of the word "law" in a more or less sporting sense ("to give law" or "allow so much law"), meaning a start or fair allowance in time or distance.

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  • The words knight and knighthood are merely the modern forms of the Anglo-Saxon or Old English cniht and cnihthdd.

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  • de Montaiglon, or in the old English trans.

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  • Although a few assert that it is an old English one that has been discarded in favour of superior methods, there seems to be little or no evidence in support of this contention.

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  • The Old English form of the word is gagel.

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  • Sprung on the father's side from an old English race of country squires, and on his mother's side from a good West.

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  • "The noblest monument in the world relating to our old English history," as William Stukeley described it in 1746, it has been repeatedly described, discussed and reproduced, both in France and in England since 1730.

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  • A common mistake is to regard them as a black race, as indicated by the old English phrase "Black-aMoor," i.e.

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  • The old English wine gallon of 231 cub.

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  • (1904); Latest Literary Essays and Addresses (1891); The Old English Dramatists (1892); Conversations on some of the Old Poets (Philadelphia, David M`Kay; reprint of the volume published in 1843 and subsequently abandoned by its author, 18 93); The Power of Sound: a Rhymed Lecture (New York, privately printed, 1896); Lectures on English Poets (Cleveland, The Rowfant Club, 1899).

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  • 1000, which contains also the Old English poem of Judith, and is bound up with other MSS.

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  • The criticism of the Old English epic has therefore for nearly a century been justly regarded as indispensable to the investigation of Germanic antiquities.

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  • Now it is related in Beowulf that Hygelac met his death in fighting against the Franks and the Hetware (the Old English form of Attoarii).

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  • The forms of the Danish king's name given by the Frankish historians are corruptions of the name of which the primitive Germanic form was Hugilaikaz, and which by regular phonetic change became in Old English Hygelac, and in Old Norse Hugleikr.

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  • The Swedish princes Eadgils, son of Ohthere, and Onela, who are mentioned in Beowulf, are in the Icelandic Heimskringla called Adils son of Ottarr, and Ali; the correspondence of the names, according to the phonetic laws of Old English and Old Norse, being strictly normal.

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  • There are other points of contact between Beowulf on the one hand and the Scandinavian records on the other, confirming the conclusion that the Old English poem contains much of the historical tradition of the Gautar, the Danes and the Swedes, in its purest accessible form.

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  • The Danish king " Scyld Scefing," whose story is told in the opening lines of the poem, and his son Beowulf, are plainly identical with Sceldwea, son of Sceaf, and his son Beaw, who appear among the ancestors of Woden in the genealogy of the kings of Wessex given in the Old English Chronicle.

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  • In the schedules of boundaries appended to two Old English charters there occurs mention of pools called " Grendel's mere," one in Wiltshire and the other in Staffordshire.

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  • The form in -ow must have been poetical or literary, like the old English forms that survive in the language of the Bible.

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  • 2 " The old English balladist may stir Sir Philip Sidney's heart like a trumpet, and this is much; but Homer, but the few artists in the grand style, can do more - they can refine the raw natural man, they can transmute him " (On Translating Homer, p. 61).

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  • In the old English version of Baeda, ascribed to King Alfred, and certainly made by his command if not by himself, it is given in the text.

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  • It was formerly maintained by some scholars that the extant Old English verses are not Baeda's original, but a mere retranslation from his Latin prose version.

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  • But the form of the sentences in B eeda's prose shows a close adherence to the parallelistic structure of Old English verse, and the alliterating words in the poem are in nearly every case the most obvious and almost the inevitable equivalents of those used by Bwda.

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  • This passage, which begins in the middle of a sentence (two leaves of the MS. having been lost) is one of the finest in all Old English poetry.

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  • The first of these fragments includes the original of 28 lines of the interpolated passage of the Old English Genesis.

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  • The Old Saxon Biblical poetry belongs to the middle of the 9th century; the Old English translation of a portion of it is consequently later than this.

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  • The Exodus is a fine poem, strangely unlike anything else in Old English literature.

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  • Certain similarities between passages in Paradise Lost and parts of the translation from Old Saxon interpolated in the Old English Genesis have given occasion to the suggestion that some scholar may have talked to Milton about the poetry published by Junius in 1655, and that the poet may thus have gained some hints which he used in his great work.

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  • of the Old English version of Bada written Cedmon, Ceadmann) is not explicable by means of Old English; the statement that it means "boatman" is founded on the corrupt gloss liburnam, ced, where ced is an editorial misreading for ceol.

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  • The initial element Caed - or Cead (probably adopted from British names in which it represents catu, war) appears combined with an Old English terminal element in the name Caedbaed (cp., however, the Irish name Cathbad), and hypocoristic forms of names containing it were borne by the English saints Ceadda (commonly known as St Chad) and his brother Cedd, called Ceadwealla in one MS. of the Old English Martyrology.

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  • But these words are mere jargon, not belonging to any known or possible Old English dialect.

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  • His name is formed from a root div, meaning " bright," which appears in other Aryan languages as a formative part of divine names, such as the Sanskrit Dydus, " sky "; Latin Diovis, Jovis, Diespiter, divus; Old English Tiw; Norse Tyr.

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  • In 1839 he also published Eucharistica (from the old English divines), to which he wrote an introduction, Agathos and other Sunday Stories, and a volume of University Sermons, and in the following year Rocky Island and other Parables.

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  • Skeat has connected it with Old English lcietan, to let, which is very doubtful, though this is the origin of the use of the word in such expressions as "two-" "three-way leet," a place where cross-roads melt.

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  • Lord Palmerston never was a Whig, still less a Radical; he was a statesman of the old English aristocratic type, liberal in his sentiments, favourable to the march of progress, but entirely opposed to the claims of democratic government.

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  • From a very early period, as the Old English word bilbo, " a sword," attests, Bilbao was celebrated for the excellent quality of its steel blades; in modern times it.

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  • Anglo-Saxon Old English From Julius Riihlmann's Geschichte der Bogeninstrumente.

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  • The old English Rectitudines singularum personarum (r ith century) present other variations of the same customary arrangements.

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  • George Hickes gave him lessons in Old English.

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  • The Old English origins of the tenure are still apparent even at this time in the shape of some of its incidents, especially in the absence of feudal wardship and marriage.

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  • FOREST LAWS, the general term for the old English restriction laws, dealing with forests.

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  • He was elected king in the old English fashion by the surviving magnates, and crowned on Christmas Day 1066.

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  • He made a complete end of the old English system by which great earls ruled many shires: there were to be no Godwines or Leofrics under the Norman rule.

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  • But it is nevertheless a monumen.t of the permanence of the old English institutions, even after the ownership of four-fifths of the soil has been changed.

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  • Nor is it in the sphere of taxation alone that Williams organization of the realm stands on the old English customs. In the military sphere, though his normal army is the feudal force composed of the tenants-in-chief and the knights whom they have enfeoffed, he retains the power to call out the fyrd, the old national levee en masse, without regard to whether its members are freemen or villeins of some lord.

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  • Almost the first and quite the wisest of his inspirations was to wed a princess of the old English lineEdith,1 the niece of Edgar ~theling, the child of his sister Margaret of Scotland and Malcolm Canmore.

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  • It may be noted that he showed a special reverence for the old English royal saint, and christened his eldest son after him; wbile his second bore the name of Edmund, the East An.glian martyr.

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  • The reappearance of these old English names bears witness to the fact that the vernacular was reasserting itself.

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  • This was Edward, the son of John Baliol, an adventurous baron who collected all the disinherited Scots lords, the members of the old English faction who had been expelled by Bruce, and invaded the realm at their head.

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  • There are two old English translations: T.

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  • Bullen's Old English Plays and the Mermaid Series) should also be assigned to May.

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  • Sigurd II., Fafnis's Lay, Sigrdrifa's Lay) and Hamdismal, all continental, and all entirely consonant to the remains of Old English poetry in metre, feeling and treatment, one can see that it is with this school that the Icelandic " makers " are in sympathy, and that from it their verse naturally descends.

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  • liii.; also Cripps, Old English Plate.

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  • He could never co-operate with the Roman Catholic confederacy at Kilkenny, which was under old English influence, and by throwing in his lot with the Celts only widened the gulf between the two sections.

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  • The old English and the Arab superstitions about the language of beasts are examples of this opinion surviving among civilized races.

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  • Many of the dark-coloured horses of Europe have Barb or Arab blood in their veins, this being markedly the case with the Old English black or Shire horse, the skull of which shows a distinct depression in front of the eye-socket.

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  • The Shire horse owes its happily-chosen name to Arthur Young's remarks, in the description of his agricultural tours during the closing years of the 18th century, concerning the large Old English Black Horse, " the produce principally of the Shire counties in the heart of England."

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  • Under the various names of the War Horse, the Great Horse, the Old English Black Horse and the Shire Horse, the breed has for centuries been cultivated in the rich fen-lands of Lincolnshire and Cambridgeshire, and in many counties to the west.

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  • In the words of the old English proverb, "From small acorns great oaks do grow."

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  • In the words of the old English proverb, From small acorns great oaks do grow.

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  • decipher old English handwriting.

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  • Handwriting 1500 - 1700 An online course to help decipher old English handwriting 1500 - 1700 An online course to help decipher old English handwriting.

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  • Like modern German which comes from the same Germanic language family Old English is highly inflected.

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  • My specialty is the silkies, but we also raise light sussex, brown leghorns, standard cochins, frizzles, and old english.

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  • Our updated version includes lovage, an old English herb, with a flavor similar to celery.

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  • The roof had red pantiles except at the back, where some of the original old English plain tiles remained.

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  • perpetuatern café calling itself ' Ye olde tea shop ' is actually perpetuating the Old English ' th ' symbol.

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  • I joined the Department in 1990 after lecturing at Glasgow University where I taught Older and Modern Scots, Old English and Germanic philology.

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  • Rather than excise these disjunctions, we should investigate what they tell us about Old English poetics.

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  • She is lovely and has settled in very well with us and adores our two children and our old English sheepdog.

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  • shoppemodern café calling itself ' Ye olde tea shop ' is actually perpetuating the Old English ' th ' symbol.

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  • Corralejo's restaurants offer a wide choice, from good old English fish and chips to Mexican tacos or Indian curry.

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  • Owned by the vendor since 1994, this example is finished in Old English White with black upholstery.

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  • (A word found in Old English and Old Norwegian, from which come the Danish and Swedish words, and not in other Teutonic languages), originally a company of people, now mainly, except in figurative usages, of certain animals when gathered together for feeding or moving from place to place.

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  • high, is employed instead of a jack, - recalling, in this respect, the old English form of the game already mentioned.

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  • This, except historically, is a misnomer, for, though descended from the old English Presbyterians, they retain nothing of their distinctive doctrine of polity - nothing of Presbyterianism, indeed, but the name.

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  • The members accidentally discovered that the fear of it had a great influence over the lawless but superstitious blacks, and soon the club expanded into a great federation of regulators, absorbing numerous local bodies that had been formed in the absence of civil law and partaking of the nature of the old English neighbourhood police and the ante-bellum slave patrol.

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  • The term "leech," as an old English synonym for physician, is from.

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  • The Old-English laws point out ways by which the churl might rise to thegn's rank, and in the centuries during which the change went on we find mention - complaining mention - both in England and elsewhere, at the court of Charles the Simple and at the court of 'Ethelred, of the rise of new men to posts of authority.

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  • From this was imitated the Old-English fragment printed by Th.

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  • It was incorporated in 1878 to improve and promote the breeding of the Shire or old English race of cart-horses, and to effect the distribution of sound and healthy sires throughout the country.

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  • Gummere's Old English Ballads (Boston, 1894).

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  • Bulldog, bulldog (miniature), mastiff, Great Dane, Newfoundland (black, white and black, or other than black), St Bernard (rough and smooth), Old English sheepdog, collie (rough and smooth), Dalmatian, poodle, bull terrier, white English terrier, black and tan terrier, toy spaniel (King Charles or black and tan, Blenheim, ruby or red and tricolour), Japanese, Pekingese, Yorkshire terrier, Maltese, Italian greyhound, chowchow, black and tan terrier (miniature), Pomeranian, pug (fawn and black), Schipperke, Griffon Bruxellois, foreign dogs (bouledogues frangais, elk-hounds, Eskimos, Lhasa terriers, Samoyedes and any other varieties not mentioned under this heading).

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  • There is an old English translation by A.

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  • The Old English word is cweorn; it is a word common to Teutonic languages, cf.

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  • Conversely old English writers had no hesitation in translating as "earl" foreign titles which we now render "count."

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  • 28 (1893); Albert Hartshorne, Old English Glasses (London); E.

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  • The third division would consist of the collections of the so-called Pseudo-leges Canuti, the laws of Edward the Confessor, of Henry I., and the great compilation of the Quadripartitus, then of a number of short notices and extracts like the fragments on the "wedding of a wife," on oaths, on ordeals, on the king's peace, on rural customs (Rectitudines singularum personarum), the treatises on the reeve (gerefa) and on the judge (dema), formulae of oaths, notions as to wergeld, &c. A fourth group might be made of the charters, n as they are based on Old English private and public law and supply us with most important materials in regard to it.

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  • Looking somewhat deeper at the sources from which Old English law was derived, we shall have to modify our classification to some extent, as the external forms of publication, although important from the point of view of historical criticism, are not sufficient standards as to the juridical character of the various kinds of material.

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  • While it is impossible to give here anything like a complete or exact survey of the field - a task rendered almost impossible by the arbitrary manner in which paragraphs are divided, by the difficulty of making Old English enactments fit into modern rubrics, and by the necessity of counting several times certain paragraphs bearing on different subjects - a brief statistical analysis of the contents of royal codes and laws may be found instructive.

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  • The Old English "books" are derived in a roundabout way from Roman models, and the tribal law of real property was deeply modified by the introduction of individualistic notions as to ownership, donations, wills, rights of women, &c. Yet in this respect also the Norman Conquest increased the store of Roman conceptions by breaking the national isolation of the English Church and opening the way for closer intercourse with France and Italy.

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  • Chadwick, Studies on Anglo-Saxon Institutions (1905); P. Vinogradoff, "Folcland" in the English Historical Review, 1893; "Romanistische Einflasse im Angelsachsischen Recht: Das Buchland" in the Mélanges Fitting, 1907; "The Transfer of Land in Old English Law" in the Harvard Law Review, 1907.

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  • A part of this poem, as is mentioned in the article C.Edmon, is extant only in an Old English translation.

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  • Somewhat curiously, but very naturally, Enoch the son of Cain is confused with the Enoch who was translated to heaven - an error which the author of the Old English Genesis avoids, though (according to the existing text) he confounds the names of Enoch and Enos.

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  • The suspicion of some earlier scholars that the Praefatio and the Versus might be a modern forgery is refuted by the occurrence of the word vitteas, which is the Old Saxon fittea, corresponding to the Old English fitt, which means a "canto" of a poem.

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  • BLACKBIRD (Turdus merula), the name commonly given to a well-known British bird of the Turdidae family, for which the ancient name was ousel, Anglo-Saxon Osle, equivalent of the German Amsel, a form of the word found in several old English books.

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  • This word is chiefly used alone as an archaism or in poetry or poetical language, but is more common in combination, as in "yule-tide," "yulelog," &c. The Old English word appears in various forms, e.g.

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  • The organization of the judiciary is similar to that under the old English system.

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  • In old English writings the terms pit-coal and sea-coal are commonly used.

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  • The French word, except in such phrases as Dieu merci, sans merci, is principally used in the sense of "thanks," and is seen in the old English expression "gramercy," i.e.

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  • By this act the old English Benedictine line was perpetuated; and in 1619 a number of English monks professed in Spain were aggregated by pontifical act to these representatives of the old English Benedictines, and thus was constituted the present English Benedictine congregation.

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  • It only occurs in Old English as a word borrowed from the Norse, the proper term in Old English being "theow" (peow); the Icel.

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  • - An old English translation of St Gregory's.

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  • The word in Old English was helig, and is common to other Teutonic languages; cf.

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  • The old English "Popinjay" and the old French Papegaut have almost passed out of use, but the German Papagei and generally to a large and very natural group of birds, which for more than a score of centuries have attracted attention, not only from their gaudy plumage, but, at first and chiefly, it would seem, from the readiness with which many of them learn to imitate the sounds they hear, repeating the words and even phrases of human speech with a fidelity that is often astonishing.

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  • It has been shown (31) that the old English mile, at least as far back as the 13th century, was of 10 and not 8 furlongs.

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  • It was therefore equal to 79,200 in., and divided decimally into 10 furlongs 100 chains, or 1000 fathoms. For the existence of this fathom (half the Belgic pertica) we have the proof of its half, or yard, needing to be suppressed by statute (9) in 1439, as "the yard and full hand," or about 40 in., -- evidently the yard of the most usual old English foot of 13.22, which would be 39.66.

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  • We can restore then the old English system of long measure from the buildings, the statute-prohibition, the surviving chain and furlong, and the old English mile shown by maps and itineraries, thus:

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  • Bury, of which the name is derived from the Anglo-Saxon burhg, birig or byrig (town, castle or fortified place), was the site of a Saxon station, and an old English castle stood in Castle Croft close to the town.

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  • It was in all probability the original from which all the above-mentioned Old English glosses were derived, though in several instances changes and modifications were introduced by successive scribes.

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  • Cook, Biblical Quotations in Old English Prose Writers, with an introduction on Old English Biblical Versions (London, 1898-1903), vol.i.pp.xxvi.

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  • It is evident that any Old English versions which might have survived the ravages of time would now be unintelligible, it was equally natural that as soon as French came to be looked upon as an alien tongue, the French versions hitherto in use would fail to fulfil their purpose, and that attempts should again be made to render the Bible into the only language intelligible to the greater part of the nation - into English.

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  • Gasquet, The Old English Bible and Other Essays (London, 1897), pp. 102 ff.

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  • Cook's " Introduction on Old English Translations of the Bible," in Biblical Quotations in Old English Prose-writers.

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  • There is a powerful lighthouse, and since its cession by Great Britain to Germany, the main island has been strongly fortified, the old English batteries being replaced by armoured turrets mounting guns of heavy calibre.

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  • In the title "hyrax" they have, for instance, usurped the Greek name for the shrew-mouse; while in the Bible they have been given the old English name for the rabbit.

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  • There is also an Old English use of the word "law" in a more or less sporting sense ("to give law" or "allow so much law"), meaning a start or fair allowance in time or distance.

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  • The words knight and knighthood are merely the modern forms of the Anglo-Saxon or Old English cniht and cnihthdd.

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  • de Montaiglon, or in the old English trans.

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  • Although a few assert that it is an old English one that has been discarded in favour of superior methods, there seems to be little or no evidence in support of this contention.

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  • The Old English form of the word is gagel.

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  • Sprung on the father's side from an old English race of country squires, and on his mother's side from a good West.

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  • "The noblest monument in the world relating to our old English history," as William Stukeley described it in 1746, it has been repeatedly described, discussed and reproduced, both in France and in England since 1730.

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  • A common mistake is to regard them as a black race, as indicated by the old English phrase "Black-aMoor," i.e.

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  • The old English wine gallon of 231 cub.

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  • (1904); Latest Literary Essays and Addresses (1891); The Old English Dramatists (1892); Conversations on some of the Old Poets (Philadelphia, David M`Kay; reprint of the volume published in 1843 and subsequently abandoned by its author, 18 93); The Power of Sound: a Rhymed Lecture (New York, privately printed, 1896); Lectures on English Poets (Cleveland, The Rowfant Club, 1899).

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  • 1000, which contains also the Old English poem of Judith, and is bound up with other MSS.

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  • The criticism of the Old English epic has therefore for nearly a century been justly regarded as indispensable to the investigation of Germanic antiquities.

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  • Now it is related in Beowulf that Hygelac met his death in fighting against the Franks and the Hetware (the Old English form of Attoarii).

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  • The forms of the Danish king's name given by the Frankish historians are corruptions of the name of which the primitive Germanic form was Hugilaikaz, and which by regular phonetic change became in Old English Hygelac, and in Old Norse Hugleikr.

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  • The Swedish princes Eadgils, son of Ohthere, and Onela, who are mentioned in Beowulf, are in the Icelandic Heimskringla called Adils son of Ottarr, and Ali; the correspondence of the names, according to the phonetic laws of Old English and Old Norse, being strictly normal.

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  • There are other points of contact between Beowulf on the one hand and the Scandinavian records on the other, confirming the conclusion that the Old English poem contains much of the historical tradition of the Gautar, the Danes and the Swedes, in its purest accessible form.

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  • The Danish king " Scyld Scefing," whose story is told in the opening lines of the poem, and his son Beowulf, are plainly identical with Sceldwea, son of Sceaf, and his son Beaw, who appear among the ancestors of Woden in the genealogy of the kings of Wessex given in the Old English Chronicle.

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  • In the schedules of boundaries appended to two Old English charters there occurs mention of pools called " Grendel's mere," one in Wiltshire and the other in Staffordshire.

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  • It does not indeed follow that the extant poem is of so early a date; but its syntax is remarkably archaic in comparision with that of the Old English poetry of the 8th century.

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  • The form in -ow must have been poetical or literary, like the old English forms that survive in the language of the Bible.

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  • 2 " The old English balladist may stir Sir Philip Sidney's heart like a trumpet, and this is much; but Homer, but the few artists in the grand style, can do more - they can refine the raw natural man, they can transmute him " (On Translating Homer, p. 61).

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  • In the old English version of Baeda, ascribed to King Alfred, and certainly made by his command if not by himself, it is given in the text.

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  • It was formerly maintained by some scholars that the extant Old English verses are not Baeda's original, but a mere retranslation from his Latin prose version.

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  • But the form of the sentences in B eeda's prose shows a close adherence to the parallelistic structure of Old English verse, and the alliterating words in the poem are in nearly every case the most obvious and almost the inevitable equivalents of those used by Bwda.

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  • This passage, which begins in the middle of a sentence (two leaves of the MS. having been lost) is one of the finest in all Old English poetry.

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  • The first of these fragments includes the original of 28 lines of the interpolated passage of the Old English Genesis.

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  • The Old Saxon Biblical poetry belongs to the middle of the 9th century; the Old English translation of a portion of it is consequently later than this.

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  • The Exodus is a fine poem, strangely unlike anything else in Old English literature.

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  • Certain similarities between passages in Paradise Lost and parts of the translation from Old Saxon interpolated in the Old English Genesis have given occasion to the suggestion that some scholar may have talked to Milton about the poetry published by Junius in 1655, and that the poet may thus have gained some hints which he used in his great work.

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  • of the Old English version of Bada written Cedmon, Ceadmann) is not explicable by means of Old English; the statement that it means "boatman" is founded on the corrupt gloss liburnam, ced, where ced is an editorial misreading for ceol.

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  • The initial element Caed - or Cead (probably adopted from British names in which it represents catu, war) appears combined with an Old English terminal element in the name Caedbaed (cp., however, the Irish name Cathbad), and hypocoristic forms of names containing it were borne by the English saints Ceadda (commonly known as St Chad) and his brother Cedd, called Ceadwealla in one MS. of the Old English Martyrology.

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  • But these words are mere jargon, not belonging to any known or possible Old English dialect.

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  • His name is formed from a root div, meaning " bright," which appears in other Aryan languages as a formative part of divine names, such as the Sanskrit Dydus, " sky "; Latin Diovis, Jovis, Diespiter, divus; Old English Tiw; Norse Tyr.

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  • In 1839 he also published Eucharistica (from the old English divines), to which he wrote an introduction, Agathos and other Sunday Stories, and a volume of University Sermons, and in the following year Rocky Island and other Parables.

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  • Skeat has connected it with Old English lcietan, to let, which is very doubtful, though this is the origin of the use of the word in such expressions as "two-" "three-way leet," a place where cross-roads melt.

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  • Lord Palmerston never was a Whig, still less a Radical; he was a statesman of the old English aristocratic type, liberal in his sentiments, favourable to the march of progress, but entirely opposed to the claims of democratic government.

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  • From a very early period, as the Old English word bilbo, " a sword," attests, Bilbao was celebrated for the excellent quality of its steel blades; in modern times it.

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  • Anglo-Saxon Old English From Julius Riihlmann's Geschichte der Bogeninstrumente.

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  • The old English Rectitudines singularum personarum (r ith century) present other variations of the same customary arrangements.

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  • George Hickes gave him lessons in Old English.

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  • The Old English origins of the tenure are still apparent even at this time in the shape of some of its incidents, especially in the absence of feudal wardship and marriage.

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  • FOREST LAWS, the general term for the old English restriction laws, dealing with forests.

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  • In the ceaseless strife between the old English kingdoms, therefore, it was the personality of the king which was the main factor in determining the hegemony of one state over another.

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  • He was elected king in the old English fashion by the surviving magnates, and crowned on Christmas Day 1066.

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  • He made a complete end of the old English system by which great earls ruled many shires: there were to be no Godwines or Leofrics under the Norman rule.

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  • But it is nevertheless a monumen.t of the permanence of the old English institutions, even after the ownership of four-fifths of the soil has been changed.

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  • Nor is it in the sphere of taxation alone that Williams organization of the realm stands on the old English customs. In the military sphere, though his normal army is the feudal force composed of the tenants-in-chief and the knights whom they have enfeoffed, he retains the power to call out the fyrd, the old national levee en masse, without regard to whether its members are freemen or villeins of some lord.

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  • Almost the first and quite the wisest of his inspirations was to wed a princess of the old English lineEdith,1 the niece of Edgar ~theling, the child of his sister Margaret of Scotland and Malcolm Canmore.

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  • It may be noted that he showed a special reverence for the old English royal saint, and christened his eldest son after him; wbile his second bore the name of Edmund, the East An.glian martyr.

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  • The reappearance of these old English names bears witness to the fact that the vernacular was reasserting itself.

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  • This was Edward, the son of John Baliol, an adventurous baron who collected all the disinherited Scots lords, the members of the old English faction who had been expelled by Bruce, and invaded the realm at their head.

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  • There are two old English translations: T.

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  • Bullen's Old English Plays and the Mermaid Series) should also be assigned to May.

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  • Sigurd II., Fafnis's Lay, Sigrdrifa's Lay) and Hamdismal, all continental, and all entirely consonant to the remains of Old English poetry in metre, feeling and treatment, one can see that it is with this school that the Icelandic " makers " are in sympathy, and that from it their verse naturally descends.

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  • But these " jigs," as the Elizabethans would have called them, dissatisfied the popular ear in one way: they were, like old English ballads, which they closely resembled, in rhyme, but void of alliteration, and accordingly they were modified and replaced by the " rimur," the staple literary product of the 15th century.

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  • liii.; also Cripps, Old English Plate.

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  • He could never co-operate with the Roman Catholic confederacy at Kilkenny, which was under old English influence, and by throwing in his lot with the Celts only widened the gulf between the two sections.

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  • The old English and the Arab superstitions about the language of beasts are examples of this opinion surviving among civilized races.

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  • Many of the dark-coloured horses of Europe have Barb or Arab blood in their veins, this being markedly the case with the Old English black or Shire horse, the skull of which shows a distinct depression in front of the eye-socket.

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  • The Shire horse owes its happily-chosen name to Arthur Young's remarks, in the description of his agricultural tours during the closing years of the 18th century, concerning the large Old English Black Horse, " the produce principally of the Shire counties in the heart of England."

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  • Under the various names of the War Horse, the Great Horse, the Old English Black Horse and the Shire Horse, the breed has for centuries been cultivated in the rich fen-lands of Lincolnshire and Cambridgeshire, and in many counties to the west.

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  • She is lovely and has settled in very well with us and adores our two children and our old english sheepdog.

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  • Corralejo 's restaurants offer a wide choice, from good old English fish and chips to Mexican tacos or Indian curry.

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  • Owned by the vendor since 1994, this example is finished in Old English White with black upholstery.

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  • Kat received her first tattoo on her ankle at age 14-an old English "J" that represented the love of her life at the time.

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  • Think wool-knit and old English cottage chic to get the right idea.

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  • A humble collared shirt and tie number will be transformed into a outfit that may include an Old English top hat and cape.

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  • It is thought that the name Shuck is a derivation of the Old English word Scucca, meaning demon or spirit, and that Barguest comes from the German term Bargiest, which translates as spirit of the graveyard.

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  • The common name 'dogwood' is a corruption of 'dagwood' , which comes from the Old English word 'dag', meaning dagger.

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  • The petals were formerly used to flavor dishes in old English cookery.

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  • The term stepfamily is preferred because the derivation of the prefix "step-" originates from the Old English word "steop-" which means "bereave."

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  • The word mumps comes from an old English dialect, meaning lumps or bumps within the cheeks.

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  • The word "mare" in Old English means "demon."

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  • Remember that just like the old English line dances, the name of a particular dance may change based on the time and place it is performed.

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  • It is also easier to select poems with language that is easy to pronounce and recognize than using complex sonnets or poems that use Old English.

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  • Sousho, is an extreme form of cursive, perhaps the equivalent of fanciful Old English lettering.

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  • Another choice for a chest tat can be lettering, whether it's Old English style or another font that you enjoy.

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  • USMC: Many Marines choose the classic Old English lettering of "USMC" as the basis for a tattoo.

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  • Old English lettering on his outer forearms: Although most of us don't read Old English anymore, the letters on his right arm mean "I love you", and the letters on his left stand for "Mother".

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  • You can work an Old English font into something with a design, however the lettering style is more popular as a standalone tat than with a design.

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  • So while athletes of traditional sports might have the traditional block letter, marching band students might have an old English style letter, and cheerleaders might have a cursive letter.

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  • Serve food that is characteristic of old English teas.

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  • At 14, Kat received her first tattoo -an Old English "J" on her ankle- possibly in tribute to a lost love.

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  • As far as free fonts, Old English may be the easiest font to find.

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  • Most computer users are familiar with the Old English font from Windows or Mac that involves hard letters with script edges.

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  • Word processors usually come with some type of Old English font, but not all of the Old English fonts need to look like that.

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  • Knowing the best sites to find Old English free fonts is a challenge.

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  • Visit 1001 Free Fonts to find 15 fonts that resemble Old English fonts.

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  • On this page, Clastonbury and Red Coat are typical Old English fonts that you can download, but don't forget to take a look at Shrewsbury and Boister as well.

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  • At Abstract Fonts you can pull up over 300 free fonts in Old English form.

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  • Fontspace is a great place to find free fonts, and old English seems to be a popular category.

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  • For some unique Old English fonts, try Urban Fonts.

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  • The Book of Blog has gathered some of the best Old English and script fonts in one place.

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  • Near the bottom is a list of fonts that resemble signatures of famous people during the Old English days.

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