How to use Oh in a sentence

oh
  • Oh, I forgot to ask.

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  • Oh, what a pretty sound it made!

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  • Oh, I don't know.

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  • Oh, but he must be.

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  • Oh! he muttered, looking down from the window at the stones of the pavement.

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  • Oh, I'd love to come here and fish sometime.

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  • Oh, what has happened?

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  • Oh, and they change color if they detect structural weakness in the material to which they are affixed.

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  • Oh, he told me part of his plans, all right.

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  • Oh. Well, why don't you go with me then?

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  • Oh, how you have...

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  • Oh, you little ones; be careful and don't talk to strangers!

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  • Oh, do you know?

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  • Oh, what's the use?

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  • Oh, he's not mean.

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  • Oh, I guess I am a little sleepy.

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  • Oh, I'm a Wizard; you may be sure of that.

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  • So when I knocked on the door of Jim's atelier and said, "Hey, I'm Byron Reese," he said, "Oh, Byron, come over here, I want you to meet this guy.

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  • Oh, it was all so interesting, so beautiful!

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  • Oh, how happy I am!

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  • Oh, you think Alex feels like you want his attention all the time?

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  • Oh, I was going to ask you.

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  • Oh, we disagree now and then, but we never come to blows.

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  • Oh God, I'm going crazy!

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  • Oh, and they are smart nails.

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  • Oh, the delight with which I gathered up the fruit in my pinafore, pressed my face against the smooth cheeks of the apples, still warm from the sun, and skipped back to the house!

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  • Oh, Carrie, how I should like to speak like other people!

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  • Oh, if only there were some one to help me!

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  • And oh, the housekeeping! to keep bright the devil's door-knobs, and scour his tubs this bright day!

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  • Oh, they swarm; the sun is too warm there; they are born too far into life for me.

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  • Oh dear, what am I thinking about?

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  • Oh! she heard as she left the room.

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  • Oh, how pleasant it was at home!...

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  • Oh, I was supposed to tell you about a party.

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  • Oh, and I found where I think the lab was.

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  • Oh, god, have I put him in danger?

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  • Oh, I have friends here.

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  • Oh yeah, I need to get some air.

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  • Oh, would that men would leave the city, its splendour and its tumult and its gold, and return to wood and field and simple, honest living!

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  • Oh, it was a lovely and delicate doll! but the little girl's brother, a tall lad, had taken the doll, and set it up in a high tree in the garden, and had run away.

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  • Oh, I do so hope and pray that I shall speak well some day!...

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  • Oh my! if they only realized their limitations, they would flee for their lives to the woods and fields.

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  • Oh, he was simply beautiful!

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  • We dined with the Rogers last Friday, and oh, they were so kind to us!

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  • Oh, that this toil might end and you would release me! thought he.

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  • Oh well, there are always others.

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  • Oh, and tell him I swear not to look at what other girl's he's been calling... cross my heart, like fun!

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  • Oh, I left the phone off the hook.

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  • I'm more used to country property where doors and windows are left open, making my life oh so easy.

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  • All I could think was once again, we were oh so close, but he'd alluded us.

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  • Oh, and the tropical storm will become a hurricane late Saturday night.

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  • Oh, and I look forward to kicking his ass.

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  • Oh, and bring your things.

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  • Oh, and not run me over?

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  • Oh, God, what's wrong now?

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  • You'd think after oh, a few thousand years, you'd remember, Jule.

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  • Oh, ye of little faith, he said into her mind.

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  • Oh, to have had this instinct years ago, when she met Wynn!

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  • Oh, shit was all Dean could think, but he willed the words to stay put.

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  • Oh, no you don't!

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  • Oh, I think you can trust her—on this business.

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  • Oh, I was supposed to tell you.

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  • Oh yes, he started that last night.

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  • Oh Alex, Mom and Dad would have loved this.

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  • Oh, do they have chitterlings and hog jowls there?

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  • Oh. You couldn't tell me?

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  • Oh, and stop calling me Doc.

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  • Oh, and I picked up someone else's soul last night, she said.

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  • Oh. How do people mess with you?

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  • Nope. Oh, but you might want to get some…Gabriel, what does he like?

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  • Oh no you don't!

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  • Oh, god, Ully, this smells like a skunk crawled into my clothes!

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  • Oh. You.ve got, um, work?

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  • Oh, God, Jade, what did you do?

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  • Oh. I think I.ve heard his name before.

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  • How did you tell your best friend that aliens were real and oh, by the way, I married one and am taking you with me to his planet, for your own good?

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  • I'm sure there will be someone-- oh, hell, don't look down!

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  • To her surprise, Evelyn stiffened and gave an oh-so-casual, "Oh?"

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  • Oh, and you may need one of these.

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  • Oh, I'm sure she was here!

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  • Oh, that's a shame!

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  • Oh, I knew he just thought that way because I was his kid, but I figured he was a pretty smart guy himself so he couldn't be all wrong.

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  • Oh, I guess I'm just being foolish like Claire says.

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  • The heat has been lowered now that the men have left and it is oh so cold as I lay huddled here beneath my thin blankets.

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  • Oh, he said he'd take care of everything.

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  • Oh, he just follows the code and transcribes the letters.

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  • Oh, they can't be serious!

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  • Oh, she empathizes with what they did.

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  • Oh, I'm right about it.

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  • Oh my, that feels wonderful.

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  • Claudia swallowed hard and whispered, "Oh yes."

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  • Jackson began to recount the whole story and with all the "Oh my Gods!" and "You're kiddings!"

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  • Oh, I guess he thinks she'll be more comfortable in it.

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  • Oh, I better get moving.

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  • Oh, Sweetie, I'm sorry, I forgot about breakfast.

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  • Oh jeez, I'm sorry.

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  • Oh, I moved it.

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  • Oh no, it's not that at all!

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  • Oh, it's beautiful, you can see forever!

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  • Oh, I don't think so.

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  • Oh, it's not done yet, maybe next time.

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  • Oh yeah, she's coming for dinner.

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  • Oh yeah, tenderloin will work.

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  • Sarah argued, Oh, come on.

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  • Oh no, I don't have anything prepared.

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  • Oh my gosh, it's so late.

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  • Oh, sorry, does this bother you?

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  • Oh my, what did you do?

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  • Oh, yes I do.

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  • Oh, my mistake, I thought you told me red.

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  • Oh no, really, all I have to do tonight is put the dishes back in the caterer's boxes.

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  • Oh yeah, I hate that, it hurts.

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  • Oh Jackson, it was wonderful.

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  • Oh, that will be nice.

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  • Oh, man, that's tough.

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  • Oh, I love presents.

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  • Oh my God, it's perfect.

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  • Oh God, no, I want you here with me, don't even think about leaving, please.

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  • Oh God, where is she now?

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  • Oh, Mr. Jackson, I hear you're not feeling well.

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  • Oh, I put that in the closet.

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  • Oh, I'm guest lecturing at Rhode Island School of Design.

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  • She chuckled, Oh, I'm sorry.

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  • Oh, is that tonight?

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  • Oh, Miss Sidwell, you have me quite smitten.

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  • Oh, we should get going then.

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  • Oh, it was wonderful.

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  • Jackson heard Elisabeth say, "Ouch. Oh no, I cut myself."

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  • Oh, no you don't, you give it up now.

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  • Oh girl, isn't the vamp sex the best?

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  • Oh, he'll be fine.

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  • Oh my, I guess I was pretty tired.

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  • Oh, that's so exciting!

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  • Oh my God, she's really on your lap?

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  • Oh, that is an understatement.

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  • Oh, it's beautiful, congratulations.

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  • Oh Jackson, I love you so.

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  • Oh, no you don't, missy.

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  • Oh, I love you so!

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  • Oh, he'll have a fit or two and try to hand down an edict.

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  • Oh, Jackson, that's perfect!

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  • Oh, so you are still naive enough to hope he'll stick around.

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  • Oh, for heaven's sake, Carmen, they're goats, not race horses.

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  • Oh Carmen, just because he's wealthy doesn't mean he's a preppie.

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  • Oh, I wouldn't take it personally.

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  • Oh yes, with all the emergency supplies they had gathered for this occasion.

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  • Oh, there are a lot more breeds.

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  • Oh, give it a rest, Alex.

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  • Oh, don't worry about it.

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  • Oh, let's not talk about this right now.

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  • Oh Josh, get real.

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  • Oh well, now she'll have plenty of reason to kill off the mice.

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  • Oh, spring, hurry up.

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  • Oh, and that reminds me.

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  • Oh, if I only had a camera.

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  • Oh, come on Katie.

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  • Oh Alex, I can't help but wonder if some day when I'm bloated and cranky, you'll wish you hadn't given up your freedom.

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  • Oh, yeah, that'll be fun.

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  • Oh, because you Immortal jackasses know it all, right?

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  • He was an angel, and he wasn't her real nephew.  Oh, and they were in Hell.

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  • Oh, he's a nice man too—he's in construction.

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  • Oh, like snooping—looking through my files.

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  • Oh, I guess I'd have gone back to being Mrs. Byrne—I'm too accommodating to have simply left him, and I do believe in my vows.

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  • Oh yes, that would make Lori a member of the Reynolds family too – technically.

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  • Oh, and Princess is seven months pregnant.

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  • Oh, I didn't know you were home yet.

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  • Oh, so you got around it on a technicality.

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  • Oh. I'm glad you're putting something in your stomach.

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  • Oh, about how my life is changing.

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  • Oh, and it's not dangerous riding on the road?

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  • Oh, is that the game we were playing?

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  • Oh, I never noticed.

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  • Oh, I believe your feelings for him are platonic.

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  • Oh, I've got the nerve.

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  • Oh, you cut me to the core.

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  • Oh, I almost forgot.

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  • Oh well, it would come some day, when the foal did something unusual.

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  • Oh yes, she had pneumonia.

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  • Oh yes you did.

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  • Oh, yes, I'll kill as many as I can.

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  • Oh, thank god, she said, sighing.

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  • Oh, and try to stay alive, she summarized.

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  • Oh. He's here, but … no one else is, Darian.

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  • Oh Alex, I love you so much.

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  • Oh, so he belongs to you.

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  • He paused and then added, "Oh, and my last name is Wilson."

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  • Oh, I'd better call Felipa and tell her we'll meet them at the barn instead.

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  • Oh, you're awake now.

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  • Oh, we would not get lost.

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  • Oh, this would be an excellent idea!

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  • Oh for …He has a lot of room to talk.

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  • Oh, how she would love to be taken in his arms.

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  • Oh. I suppose the atmosphere is a little depressing around here right now.

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  • Oh Dad, I'm not a little girl any more.

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  • Oh, I'll probably leave them up until the weather starts to get cold - unless someone objects, of course.

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  • Oh, I wouldn't worry.

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  • Oh, he was interested all right - interested in collecting the money offered to keep an eye on her.

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  • Oh, well enough, I suppose.

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  • Oh, you didn't have to do that.

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  • Oh, he doesn't give me a chance to get lonely.

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  • Oh, don't mind me.

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  • Oh, it feels so good.

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  • Oh well, it'll do for a few weeks.

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  • Oh, god, are you okay?

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  • Oh, so you brought her here?

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  • Oh. That's right you're a vampire.

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  • I mean, he's got an incredible body, but … Oh, you're talking about sleeping with a different woman every night.

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  • Oh, and tell Xander I'm not hitting on you.

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  • It's got like … oh, Ashley flushed.

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  • Oh, now you want something from me, after threatening to take off my head?

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  • Oh, yeah, I did.

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  • Oh, she hasn't told you?

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  • Oh, Brandon, is that why she hasn't dated since she took us in?

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  • Cadmium hydroxide, Cd(OH) 2, is obtained as a white precipitate by adding potassium hydroxide to a solution of any soluble cadmium salt.

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  • It is a yellow amorphous powder which is soluble in dilute alkalis, the solution on acidification giving an hydroxide, C1 4 Mo 3 (OH) 2, which is soluble in nitric acid, and does not give a reaction with silver nitrate.

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  • Fluorsulphonic acid, SO 2 F OH, is a mobile liquid obtained by the action of an excess of hydrofluoric acid on well-cooled sulphur trioxide.

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  • The acid is considered to possess the structure 0 2 S(SH) (OH), since sodium thiosulphate reacts with ethyl bromide to give sodium ethyl thiosulphate, which on treatment with barium chloride gives presumably barium ethyl thiosulphate.

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  • Berthelot, and many other chemists, from whose researches it results that glycerin is a trihydric alcohol indicated by the formula C 3 H 5 (OH) 3j the natural fats and oils, and the glycerides generally, being substances of the nature of compound esters formed from glycerin by the replacement of the hydrogen of the OH groups by the radicals of certain acids, called for that reason "fatty acids."

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  • These discoveries of Geoffroy and Scheele formed the basis of Chevreul's researches by which he established the constitution of oils and the true nature of soap. In the article Oils it is pointed out that all fatty oils and fats are mixtures of glycerides, that is, of bodies related to the alcohol glycerin C 3H5(OH)3 i and some fatty acid such as palmitic acid (C 16 H 31 0 2)H.

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  • But in this case the fatty acid unites with the alkali into its potash or soda salt, forming a soap C3H5(C16H3102)3+3NaOH =3NaC16H3102+C,H5(OH) 3 Palmitin.

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  • For instance, sulphuric acid is usually represented by the formula S0 2 (OH) 2, which indicates that it may be regarded as a compound of the group SO 2 with twice the group OH.

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  • Groups of two or more atoms like SO 2 and OH, which are capable of playing the part of elementary atoms (that is to say, which can be transferred from compound to compound), are termed compound radicals, the elementary atoms being simple radicals.

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  • By fusing two nuclei we obtain the formula of naphthalene, C 1 oH 8; by fusing three, the hydrocarbons anthracene and phenanthrene, C14H10; by fusing four, chrysene, C18H12, and possibly pyrene, C16H1n; by fusing five, picene, C22 H 14.

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  • More important are Kekule's observations that nitrous acid oxidizes pyrocatechol or [I.2]-dioxybenzene, and protocatechuic acid or [3.4]- dioxybenzoic acid to dioxytartaric acid, (C(OH) 2 COOH) 2 (Ann., 1883, 221, p. 230); and 0.

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  • Potassium chlorate and hydrochloric acid oxidize phenol, salicylic acid (o-oxybenzoic acid), and gallic acid ([2.3.4] trioxybenzoic acid) to tri chlorpyroracemic acid (isotrichlorglyceric acid), CC13 C(OH)2 C02H, a substance also obtained from trichloracetonitrile, CC1 3 CO CN, by hydrolysis.

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  • Kekule (Ann., 1883, 221, p. 230), however, reinvestigated this acid; he showed that it was dibasic and not tribasic; that it gave tartaric acid on reduction; and, finally, that it was dioxytartaric acid, HOOC C(OH) 2 C(OH) 2 COOH.

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  • Thus a double bond of oxygen, as in the carbonyl group CO, requires a larger volume than a single bond, as in the hydroxyl group - OH, being about 12.2 in the first case and 7.8 in the second.

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  • The thermal effect of the " alcohol " group C. OH may be determined by finding the heat of formation of the alcohol and subtracting the thermal effects of the remaining linkages in the molecule.

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  • The most important auxochromes are the hydroxyl (- OH) and amino.

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  • Isobutyl alcohol, (CH 3) 2 CH CH 2 OH, the butyl alcohol of fermentation, is a primary alcohol derived from isobutane.

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  • Thomas Moore, who warmly eulogizes Emmet, with whom he was a student at Trinity College, records that one day when he was playing on the piano the melody "Let Erin remember," Emmet started up exclaiming passionately, "Oh, that I were at the head of 20,000 men marching to that air!"

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  • The romance of his love affair with Sarah Curran - who afterwards married Robert Henry Sturgeon, an officer distinguished in the Peninsular War - has cast a glamour over the memory of Robert Emmet; and it inspired Thomas Moore's well-known songs, "She is far from the land where her young hero sleeps," and "Oh, breathe not his name"; it is also the subject of Washington Irving's "The Broken Heart."

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  • It combines with sulphuric acid to form nitro-sulphonic acid, SO 2 (OH) (N02).

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  • Soc., 188 9, 55, p. 760), or when benzsulphohydroxamic acid, C 6 H 5 SO 2 NH OH, is treated in the same manner (0.

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  • Oh the 1st of October 1801 an armistice was signed in London, and the Peace of Amiens followed, on the 27th of March 1802.

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  • In aqueous solutions, for instance, a few hydrogen (H) and hydroxyl (OH) ions derived from the water are always present, and will be liberated if the other ions require a higher decomposition voltage and the current be kept so small that hydrogen and hydroxyl ions can be formed fast enough to carry all the current across the junction between solution and electrode.

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  • In dilute solution such substances as hydrochloric acid and potash are almost completely dissociated, so that, instead of representing the reaction as HC1+KOH = KC1 d-H20, we must write The ions K and Cl suffer no change, but the hydrogen of the acid and the hydroxyl (OH) of the potash unite to form water, which is only very slightly dissociated.

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  • Kiliani in 1885-1887, who showed it to be CH 2 OH (CH OH) 4 CHO.

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  • These formulae are supported by many considerations, especially by the selective CH 2 OH CH20H CH OH CH OH C C H O

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  • It is decomposed, on dry distillation, into carbon dioxide and pyromellitic acid, C i oH 6 0 8 i when distilled with lime it gives carbon dioxide and benzene.

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  • Water when absolutely pure has no action on lead, but in the presence of air the lead is quickly attacked, with formation of the hydrate, Pb(OH) 2, which is appreciably soluble in water forming an alkaline liquid.

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  • The corresponding hydrate, Pb(OH)2, is obtained as a white crystalline precipitate by adding ammonia to a solution of lead nitrate or acetate.

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  • Plumbic acid, Pb0(OH) 21 is obtained as a bluish-black, lustrous body of electrolysing an alkaline solution of lead sodium tartrate.

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  • A basic chloride, Pb(OH)Cl, was introduced in 1849 by Pattinson as a substitute for white lead.

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  • Of greater practical importance is a basic carbonate, substantially 2PbCO 3 Pb(OH) 2, largely used as a white pigment under the name of "white lead."

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  • Pb(N03)OH, Pb30(OH)2(N03)2, Pb 3 02(OH)N03, &c., have been described.

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  • The crystals are very soluble in cold water, and if the salt is really pure a small proportion of water forms a clear solution; but on adding much water most of the salt is decomposed, with the formation of a precipitate of oxychloride, 2Sn(OH)Cl H20.

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  • How much of the hydrogen and oxygen are in the hydroxylic (OH) form cannot be absolutely stated, but from the study of the acetates at least three hydroxyl groups may be assumed.

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  • Triethyl silicol, (C2H5),Si OH, is a true alcohol, obtained by condensing zinc ethyl with silicic ester, the resulting substance of composition, (C2H5)3 SiOC2H51 with acetyl chloride yielding a chloro-compound (C2H5)3SiC1, which with aqueous ammonia yields the alcohol.

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  • The image of a source of strength p at S outside a sphere of radius a is a source of strength pa/f at H, where 'OS' =f, OH =a2/f, and a line sink reaching from the image H to the centre 0 of line strength - A la; this combination will be found to produce no flow across the surface of the sphere.

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  • Taking Ox along OS, the Stokes' function at P for the source S is p cos PSx, and of the source H and line sink OH is p(a/f) cos PHx and - (p/a) (PO - PH); so that = p (cos PSx+f cos PHx PO a PH), (q) and Ili = -p, a constant, over the surface of the sphere, so that there is no flow across.

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  • He prepared the cyanhydrins of glucose and fructose, hydrolysed them to the corresponding oxy-acids, from which the hydroxy groups were split out by reduction; it was found that glucose yielded normal heptylic acid and fructose methylbutylacetic acid; hence glucose is an aldehyde alcohol, CH 2 OH (CH OH) 4 CHO, whilst fructose is a ketone alcohol CH 2 OH (CH OH) 3 CO.

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  • Glyceric aldehyde, CH 2 OH CH(OH) CHO, was obtained pure by Wohlon oxidizing acrolein acetal, CH 2 CH(OC 2 H 5) 21 and hydrolysing.

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  • Arabinose being convertible into /-glucose and xylose into l-gulose, the alternative formulae to be considered are CH 2 (OH) - - - +COH CH 2 (OH) + + - COH.

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  • If the asymmetric system adjoining the COH group, which is that introduced in synthesizing the hexose from the pentose, be eliminated, the formulae at disposal for the two pentoses are CH 2 (OH) - - - COH CH 2 (OH)+-- COH.

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  • As a matter of fact, only arabinose gives an active product on oxidation; it is therefore to be supposed that arabinose is the - - - compound, and consequently CH 2 (OH) - - - + COH = /-glucose CH 2 (OH) + - - - COH = l-gulose.

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  • It follows from the manner in which l-idose is produced that its configuration is CH 2 (OH) + - - +COH.

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  • It can be shown that d-galactose is CH 2 (OH) + - + - COH, and hence d-talose is CH 2 (OH) + - + + COH.

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  • Other zinc minerals are willemite, Zn 2 SiO 4, hydrozincite or zinc bloom, ZnCO 3.2Zn(OH)2, zincite or red zinc ore, ZnO, and franklinite, 3(Fe,Zn)0 (Fe,Mn) 2 0 3 .

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  • Boiling water attacks it appreciably, but slightly, with evolution of hydrogen and formation of the hydroxide, Zn(OH) 2.

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  • Zinc hydroxide, Zn (OH) 2, is prepared as a gelatinous precipitate by adding a solution of any zinc salt to caustic potash.

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  • Zinc carbonate, ZnCO 3, occurs in nature as the mineral calamine (q.v.), but has never been prepared artificially, basic carbonates, ZnCO 3 .xZn(OH) 2, where x is variable, being obtained by precipitating a solution of the sulphate or chloride with sodium carbonate.

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  • The solution, if boiled, deposits its titanic oxide as a hydrate called metatitanic acid, TiO(OH) 21 because it differs in its properties from orthotitanic acid, Ti(OH) 4, obtained by decomposing a solution of the chloride in cold water with alkalis.

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  • According to the amount of water used, TiC1 3 OH, TiC1 2 (OH) 21 TiCI(OH) 3 or titanic acid is formed.

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  • When a concentrated solution of auric chloride is treated with caustic potash, a brown precipitate of auric hydrate, Au(OH) 3, is obtained, which, on heating, loses water to form auryl hydrate, AuO(OH), and auric oxide, Au 2 0 3.

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  • I a the basic tellurate montanite, Bi 2 (OH) 4 TeO 4; the silicates eulytite and agricolite, B14(S104) 3; and the uranyl arsenate walpurgite, Bi(U02)3(OH)24(As04)4.

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  • The hydrate, Bi(OH) 3 i is obtained as a white powder by adding potash to a solution of a bismuth salt.

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  • Another basic carbonate, 3(BiO) 2 CO 3.2Bi(OH)3.3H20, constitutes the mineral bismutite.

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  • The action of water on this solution produces a crystalline precipitate of basic nitrate, probably Bi(OH)2N03, though it varies with the amount of water employed.

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  • Water decomposes it, giving a basic salt, Bi 2 (SO 4)(OH) i which on heating gives (BiO) 2 SO 4.

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  • Caesium hydroxide, Cs(OH) 2, obtained by the decomposition of the sulphate with baryta water,is a greyish-white deliquescent solid,which melts at a red heat and absorbs carbon dioxide rapidly.

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  • The steady progress of the heretical movement in spite of all opposition was a cause of deep sorrow to Polycarp, so that in the last years of his life the words were constantly on his lips, "Oh good God, to what times hast thou spared me, that I must suffer such things!"

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  • Zirconium hydroxide, Zr(OH) 4, as thus obtained, is quite appreciably soluble in water and easily in mineral acids, with formation of zirconium salts, e.g.

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  • Pyrophosphoric acid, 'H' 4 P 2 0 7, is a tetrabasic acid which may be regarded as derived by eliminating a molecule of water between two molecules of ordinary phosphoric acid; its constitution may therefore be written (HO) 2 0P O PO(OH) 2.

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  • A basic nitrate, Ca(NO 3)2 Ca(OH) 2.3H 2 0, is obtained by dissolving calcium hydroxide in a solution of the normal nitrate.

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  • It is obtained by the dry distillation of nitrogenous vegetable and animal products; by the reduction of nitrous acid and nitrites with nascent hydrogen; and also by the decomposition of ammonium salts by alkaline hydroxides or by slaked lime, the salt most generally used being the chloride (sal-ammoniac, q.v.) thus 2NH 4 C1+Ca(OH) 2 =CaC1 2 +2H 2 O+2NH 3.

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  • The aqueous solution of ammonia is very basic in its reactions, and since it is a weak electrolyte, one must assume the solution to contain a certain amount of ammonium hydroxide NH 4 OH, although it is probably chiefly composed of a solution of ammonia in water.

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  • The olefines may be synthetically prepared by eliminating water from the alcohols of the general formula CnH2n+1 OH, using sulphuric acid or zinc chloride generally as the dehydrating agent, although phosphorus pentoxide, syrupy phosphoric acid and anhydrous oxalic acid may frequently be substituted.

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  • Quinhydrone, C 6 H40 2 -C 6 H 4 (OH) 2, is formed by the direct union of quinone and hydroquinone or by careful oxidation of hydroquinone with ferric chloride solution.

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  • It combines with aldehydes and ketones to form the nitriles of oxy-acids, for example, CH 3 CHO+HCN=CH 3 CH(OH)(CN).

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  • C3H5(OH) 3 -{-H2C204=C3H5(OH)2 Ocho+C02-f-H20 C 3 H 6 (OH) 2 0 CHO-}-H 2 0 = C3H6(OH)3+H2C02.

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  • The compounds containing this radical are treated under other headings; the hydride is better known as ethane, the alcohol, C 2 H 5 OH, is the ordinary alcohol of commerce, and the oxide (C 2 H 5) 2 O is ordinary ether.

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  • Chromous oxide, CrO, is unknown in the free state, but in the hydrated condition as Cr04H 2 0 or Cr(OH) 2 it may be prepared by precipitating chromous chloride by a solution of potassium hydroxide in air-free water.

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  • The violet form gives a purple solution, and all its chlorine is precipitated by silver nitrate, the aqueous solution containing four ions, probably Cr(OH 2) 6 and three chlorine ions.

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  • The constitution of the oxyazo compounds has attracted much attention, some chemists holding that they are true azophenols of the type R N 2 R l OH, while others look upon them as having a quinonoid structure, i.e.

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  • Duppa (Annalen, 1865, 136, p. 12) by acting with phosphorus pentachloride on oxyisobutyric ester (CH 3) 2 C(OH) 000C 2 H 5.

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  • Heated with anhydrous sodium acetate and acetic anhydride it gives cinnamic acid; with ethyl bromide and sodium it forms triphenyl-carbinol (C 6 H 5) 3 C OH; with dimethylaniline and anhydrous zinc chloride it forms leuco-malachite green C6H5CH[C6H4N(CH3)2]2; and with dimethylaniline and concentrated hydrochloric acid it gives dimethylaminobenzhydrol, C 6 H 5 CH(OH)C 6 H 4 N(CH 3) 2.

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  • Magnesium hydroxide Mg(OH) 2, occurs native as the minerals brucite and nemalite, and is prepared by precipitating solutions of magnesium salts by means of caustic soda or potash.

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  • Magnesia alba, a white bulky precipitate obtained by adding sodium carbonate to Epsom salts,is a mixture of Mg(CO 3 H) (OH) 2H 2 O,Mg(CO 3 H) (OH) and Mg(OH) 2.

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  • Tiffeneau, Comptes rendus, 1903, 1 37, p. 573), forming ortho-tolylcarbinol, CH3 C6H4 CH20H, and not benzylcarbinol, C 6 H 5 CH 2 CH 2 OH (cf.

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  • That orthoboric acid is a tribasic acid is shown by the formation of ethyl orthoborate on esterification, the vapour density of which corresponds to the molecular formula B(0C2H5)3; the molecular formula of the acid must consequently be B(OH) 3 or H 3 B0 3.

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  • Schmidt xanthosiderite, from 1'avOos (yellow) and otSnpos (iron), contains Fe 2 0(OH) 4, or Fe 2 0 3.2H 2 O; whilst the bog ore known as limnite, from At vn (marsh) has the formula Fe(OH) 3, or Fe203.3H20.

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  • Aluminium hydrate, Al(OH) 3, is obtained as a gelatinous white precipitate, soluble in potassium or sodium hydrate, but insoluble in ammonium chloride, by adding ammonia to a cold solution of an aluminium salt; from boiling solutions the precipitate is opaque.

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  • Aluminium sulphate Al(S04)3, occurs in the mineral kingdom as keramohalite, Al 2 (SO 4) 3.1811 2 0, found near volcanoes and in alum-shale; aluminite or websterite is a basic salt, Al 2 (SO 4) (OH)4.71120.

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  • It combines with acetoacetic ester to form the aromatic compound meta-oxyuvitic acid, C 6 11 2 CH 3 OH (Cooh) 2.

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  • A 2.6 naphthoquinone results on oxidizing 2.6 dihydroxynaphthalene with lead Or Hydroxynaphthalenes, C 1 oH 7 OH, the naphthalene homologues of the phenols.

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  • Concentrated hydrochloric acid decomposes it with formation of C6H 6 N OH HO'N'H chloranilines and elimination of nitrogen, whilst on boiling with sulphuric acid it is converted into aminophenols.

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  • And so, as a rule, from isomeric alcohols, those containing a group - CH 2.0H, yield by oxidation aldehydes and are distinguished by the name primary; whereas those containing CH OH, called secondary, produce ketones.

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  • Lanthanum hydroxide, La(OH) 3, is a white amorphous powder formed by precipitating lanthanum salts by potassium hydroxide.

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  • Potassium permanganate oxidizes it to f3-oxyisovaleric acid (CH 3) 2 C(OH) CH2.002H, whilst nitric acid gives, among other products, dinitropropane, (CH3)2C(N02)2.

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  • The hydroxide Be(OH)2 separates as a white bulky precipitate on adding a solution of an alkaline hydroxide to a soluble beryllium salt; and like those of aluminium and zinc, this hydroxide is soluble in excess of the alkaline hydroxide, but is reprecipitated on prolonged boiling.

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  • C(OH) 000H, whilst concentrated nitric acid converts it into dinitroisopropane.

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  • His successful diplomacy was rewarded, oh his return to Rome, with the title of cardinal priest of Sta Susanna (December 1446).

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  • Thallic hydroxide, TI(OH) 31 is obtained as a brown precipitate by adding a hot solution of thallous chloride in sodium carbonate to a solution of sodium hypochlorite.

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  • On drying it has the composition TIO(OH).

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  • It is made commercially by boiling benzotrichloride (obtained from toluene) with milk of lime, the calcium benzoate so obtained being then decomposed by hydrochloric acid 2C 6 H 5 CC1 3 +4Ca(OH) 2 = (C6H6000)2Ca-1-3CaC12+4H20.

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  • These salts are considered to be derived from the hypothetical base OH 3.

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  • Manganous hydroxide, Mn (OH) 2, is obtained as a white precipitate on adding a solution of a caustic alkali to a manganous salt.

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  • The first action of the lime is to convert the manganese chloride into manganous hydrate (Mn(OH) 2) and calcium chloride; then more lime is added which greatly promotes and hastens the oxidizing process.

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  • Anthragallol is synthetically prepared by the condensation of benAoic and gallic acids with sulphuric acid OH i [[Cooh + I 10h - 2h20+ Hooc /Oh]] or from pyrogallol and phthalic anhydride in the presence of sulphuric acid or zinc chloride.

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  • On oxidation it gives triphenylcarbinol, (C 6 H 5) 3 C OH, and reduction with hydriodic acid and red phosphorus gives benzene and toluene.

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  • The hydroxide, Ni(OH) 2, is obtained in the form of a greenish amorphous powder when nickel salts are precipitated by the caustic alkalis.

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  • Since w varies as p, it follows that OH is constant, and the tangent plane at J is therefore fixed in space.

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  • The fixed plane is parallel to the invariable plane at 0, and the line OH is called the invariable line.

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  • The invariable line OH describes another cone in the body, called the invariable cone.

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  • Other copper minerals are percylite (PbCuC1 2 (OH) 2), boleite (3PbCuC1 2 (OH) 2j AgCI), stromeyerite {(Cu, Ag) 2 S}, cubanite (CuS, Fe 2 S 3), stannite (Cu 2 S, FeSnS3), tennantite (3Cu 2 S, As2S3), emplectite (Cu 2 S, Bi 2 S 3), wolfsbergite (Cu 2 S, Sb2S3), famatinite (3Cu 2 S, Sb 2 S 5) and enargite (3Cu2S, As2S5).

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  • Cupric hydroxide, Cu(OH) 2, is obtained as a greenish-blue flocculent precipitate by mixing cold solutions of potash and a cupric salt.

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  • Cu(OH)2.3CuO,Cu(OH)2.6H20,6CuO H20,have been described.

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  • Several basic salts are known, some of which occur as minerals; of these, we may mention brochantite, CuS04, 3Cu (OH 2), langite, CuSO 4, 3Cu(OH) 2, H 2 O, lyellite (or devilline), warringtonite; woodwardite and enysite are hydrated copperaluminium sulphates, connellite is a basic copper chlorosulphate, and spangolite is a basic copper aluminium chlorosulphate.

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  • The mineral gerhardtite is the basic nitrate Cu2(OH)3N03.

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  • Of these we may notice libethenite, Cu 2 (OH)PO 4; chalcosiderite, a basic copper iron phosphate; torbernite, a copper uranyl phosphate; andrewsite, a hydrated copper iron phosphate; and henwoodite, a hydrated copper aluminium phosphate.

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  • By the condensation of ortho-aminophenols with phosgene or thiophosgene, oxy and thio-derivatives are obtained, the (OH) and (SH) groups being situated in the t t position, and these compounds on treatment with amines yield amino derivatives.

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  • Barium hydroxide, Ba(OH) 2, is a white powder that can be obtained by slaking the monoxide with the requisite quantity of water, but it is usually made on the large scale by heating heavy spar with small coal whereby a crude barium sulphide is obtained.

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  • This sulphide is then heated in a current of moist carbon dioxide, barium carbonate being formed, BaS+H 2 O+CO 2 =BaCO 3 +H 2 S, and finally the carbonate is decomposed by a current of superheated steam, BaC03+H20 = Ba(OH) 2 + C02, leavingaresidue of the hydroxide.

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  • A saturated solution of the hydroxide deposits on cooling a hydrated form Ba(OH) 2.8H 2 0, as colourless quadratic prisms, which on exposure to air lose seven molecules of water of crystallization.

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  • The iron must be in certain soluble conditions, however, and the soluble bicarbonate of the protoxide of chalybeate springs seems most favourable; the hydrocarbonate absorbed by the cells is oxidized, probably thus 2FeCO 3 1-30H 2 +O = Fee (OH)6+2C02.

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  • Mono-acetyl resorcin, C 6 H 4 (OH) O 000H 3, is used under the name of "euresol."

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  • Its chief constituent is mannite or manna sugar, a hexatomic alcohol, C6H8(OH)6, which likewise occurs, in much smaller quantity, in certain species of the brown seaweed, Fucus, and in plants of several widely separated natural orders.

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  • To these gestures let there be added the use of the interjectional cries, such as oh!

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  • Linoleic acid, C18H3202, found as glyceride in drying oils, and ricinoleic acid, C18H33(OH)02, found as glyceride in castor oil, closely resemble oleic acid.

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  • This permits the writing of cinchonine, for example, as C,H6N CioH15(OH)N, the hydroxy group being in the part CioH15(OH)N, about which the constitution is uncertain.

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  • It results in the alkaline fusion of many resins, and may be prepared by fusing ortho-phenolsulphonic acid, o-chlorphenol, o-bromphenol, and o-phenoldisulphonic acid with potash, or, better, by heating its methyl ether, guaiacol, C 6 H 4 (OH) (OCH 3), a constituent of beechwood tar, with hydriodic acid.

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  • On oxidation with nitric acid the primary compounds give monoalkyl phosphinic acids, R PO(OH) 2r the secondary yielding dialkyl phosphinic acids, R 2 PO(OH).

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  • Ammonia also reacts immediately, giving phosphorus diamide, P(OH)(NH2)2, and the corresponding ammonium salt.

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  • Hypophosphorous acid, HP(OH) 2, discovered by Dulong in 1816, and obtained crystalline by Thomson in 1874 (Ber., 7, P. 994), is prepared in the form of its barium salt by warming phosphorus with baryta water, removing the excess of baryta by carbon dioxide, and crystallizing the filtrate.

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  • Phosphorous acid, P(OH) 3, discovered by Davy in 1812, may be ' obtained by dissolving its anhydride, P 4 0 61 in cold water; by immersing sticks of phosphorus in a solution of copper sulphate contained in a well-closed flask, filtering from the copper sulphide and precipitating the sulphuric acid simultaneously formed by baryta water, and concentrating the solution in vacuo; or by passing chlorine into melted phosphorus covered with water, the first formed phosphorus trichloride being decomposed by the water into phosphorous and hydrochloric acids.

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  • Boulough (Comptes rendus, 1905, 141, p. 256), who acted with dry iodine on phosphorus dissolved in carbon disulphide; with alkalis it gives P 4 (OH).

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  • Where the nitrous fumes prevail and there is less water present, sulphur dioxide combines with nitrous acid and oxygen to form nitroso-sulphuric acid, a crystalline substance of the formula SO 2 (OH)(ONO).

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  • Campholic acid, C 1 oH 18 0 2, is tetramethyl-1.2.2.3-cyclo-pentane acid-3.

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  • Quin i c acid, C 6 H 7 (OH) 4 CO 2 H (tetra -oxy.cyclohexane carboxylic acid), is found in coffee beans and in quinia bark.

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  • Euterpene (trimethyl-i 4.4-cyclo-heptadiene 1.5), C 1 oH 1 s is prepared from dihydroeucarveol.

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  • This "passivity" may be brought about by immersion in other solutions, especially by those containing such oxidizing anions as NO' 3, C10' 3, less strongly by the anions SO" 4, CN', CNS', C2H30'2, OH', while Cl', Br' practically inhibit passivity; H' is the only cation which has any effect, and this tends to exclude passivity.

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  • Ferrous hydrate, Fe(OH)2, when prepared from a pure ferrous salt and caustic soda or potash free from air, is a white powder which may be preserved in an atmosphere of hydrogen.

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  • It dissolves in acids to form a mixture of a ferrous and ferric salt,' and if an alkali is added to the solution a black precipitate is obtained which dries to a dark brown mass of the composition Fe(OH)2Fe203; this substance is attracted by a magnet, and thus may be separated from the admixed ferric oxide.

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  • Basic salts have been prepared, and several occur in the mineral kingdom; dufrenite is Fee(OH)3P04.