Often sentence example

often
  • Poor people are often sick.
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  • Oh, well, you know people often invent things.
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  • We choose it much more often than we should.
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  • People are often victims of their own natures.
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  • Some things never grew boring no matter how often they were repeated.
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  • The old horse panted a little, and had to stop often to get his breath.
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  • He was often making trouble among his neighbors.
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  • It is often still warm.
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  • Gabriel's visits weren't often, but Rhyn had grown to like him.
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  • How often had she heard how dangerous abandoned mines were?
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  • How can he remember well his ignorance--which his growth requires--who has so often to use his knowledge?
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  • An old peasant whom Prince Andrew in his childhood had often seen at the gate was sitting on a green garden seat, plaiting a bast shoe.
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  • These assumptions are often wrong.
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  • Often when he went his rounds I clung to his coat tails while he collected and punched the tickets.
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  • Maybe hearing Mary say it so often had burned it into his brain.
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  • She had always been a recluse at heart, often declining a social outing with her friends so that she could be alone with a book or her writing.
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  • Often, when he was a little lad, he took long walks among the trees with his mother.
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  • Fred O'Connor's usual behavior was often erratic.
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  • Consider the pan you most often cook in today.
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  • He danced with you that often and didn't tell you his name?
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  • When picking up her mail at the post office, she often talked to Adrena.
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  • Often times both are absent when love is involved.
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  • These countries, particularly in the Balkans, were often small and tended toward war.
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  • She wandered the mansion as she often did, restless and starving.
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  • Cynthia confessed they didn't attend as often as they should— as much as she did when her son was at home.
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  • Obviously it wasn't something he often did.
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  • Her father was hard to read and often unapproachable, but he cared for her in his own special way.
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  • But he was still headstrong and ill-tempered; and he was often in trouble with the other sailors.
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  • "He comes here often," Zamon muttered.
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  • She returned to this thought often as they traveled for two days.
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  • After meeting Princess Mary, though the course of his life went on externally as before, all his former amusements lost their charm for him and he often thought about her.
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  • They had given Martha a telephone card and asked she contact them as soon and as often as she could.
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  • He didn't have that position because he was a male, as her friends often thought.
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  • But there is any quantity of oatmeal, which we often cook for breakfast.
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  • If we keep cool and moist, and meet with no accidents, we often live for five years.
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  • Baby Claire was often in evidence in our work place, sleeping on mother's arm or in her file cabinet remodeled crib, or supping on Martha's breast.
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  • Knowledge often consists of the rolled-up conclusions from many pieces of data.
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  • With skin cancer, like all diseases, over time some people get better and some people get worse, and often we really don't know why.
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  • Sometimes countries simply nationalize industries, so that an enterprise once owned by a private company, often a foreign-based one, is taken over by the government or "the people."
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  • He left early each Friday afternoon, often returning late on Monday morning.
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  • If a man was obliged to go from one city to another, he often rode on horseback.
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  • In history he is often called the Grand Monarch.
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  • He was often sighted strutting down the roadside.
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  • His new schedule often sent him to bed early and kept him there until the last moment.
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  • Several days of festivity and merry-making followed, for such old friends did not often meet and there was much to be told and talked over between them, and many amusements to be enjoyed in this delightful country.
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  • On her walks at Lover's Lane near Evelyn's row house, she'd often seen couples entranced by the rhythmic movement of waves stand at a railing, the man's arms wrapped around the woman in front of him, his chin on her head.
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  • But they were too often successful.
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  • Deidre crossed to him, unafraid of the creature whose appearance often made grown Immortals quake and grovel.
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  • In rural areas, first responders were often neighbors, which was the fortunate case with them.
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  • They did talk, but often when she saw them they were silently enjoying each other's company.
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  • Hearing this, Dorothy and the Wizard exchanged startled glances, for they remembered how often Eureka had longed to eat a piglet.
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  • However, I often have thought that a second sentence should follow: "Also, those who do know history are doomed to repeat it."
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  • I should start charging you for taking the edge off as often as I do.
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  • Fred was referring to a coffee klatch of elderly town patriarchs whose words and advice on just about anything was often quoted in the local paper.
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  • But the fishes that swim in our brooks we can see, and often we catch them to eat.
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  • We often see other technologies race toward a point and then stop growing along that axis.
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  • "If only I had known," we often lament, in the widespread belief that to know everything would mean we would never make mistakes.
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  • A comfortable bed replaced the cot utilized in Peabody and absolute darkness proved more conducive to sleep than the leaked light that often snuck into our old quarters.
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  • He used to frown at her when she acted outside the Immortal Laws, unable to appreciate that a deity charged with managing a domain often had to take steps outside the rules to protect one's underworld.
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  • Alex always seemed to know the right thing to say in any moment, and his silence often felt awkward.
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  • I want to be happy and not worry about creatures trying to kill me or how often I'll be wandering into one of your massacres!
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  • The people of Antium were enemies of the Romans and had often been at war with them.
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  • Expropriation often is accompanied by infringements of the third ingredient, individual liberty, as well.
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  • The milkers would let me keep my hands on the cows while they milked, and I often got well switched by the cow for my curiosity.
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  • He was often woken from the crime scene by honking horns or outside noises.
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  • The stairs had become narrower and Zeb and the Wizard often had to help Jim pull the buggy from one step to another, or keep it from jamming against the rocky walls.
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  • Now we are certainly on the fuzzy edges, a place where words, often fuzzy in their meanings, begin to fail us.
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  • He'd often wondered if he had more family somewhere.
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  • They are still proud of their former Wizard, and often speak of you kindly.
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  • Often, a buying decision hinges on a piece of arcane information about a product that is difficult to locate.
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  • In discussing nutrition, not only is there little agreement on the nature of the solutions, there is often disagreement on the nature of the problems.
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  • In the fat years, agricultural prices are pushed downward by the abundance, often below the cost of harvesting and transporting the crops.
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  • After that journey to Ryazan he found the country dull; his former pursuits no longer interested him, and often when sitting alone in his study he got up, went to the mirror, and gazed a long time at his own face.
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  • After a casual pause, such as often occurs when receiving friends for the first time in one's own house, "Uncle," answering a thought that was in his visitors' minds, said:
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  • "I have come... simply... you know... come... it interests me," said Pierre, who had so often that day senselessly repeated that word "interesting."
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  • The officer of the Horse Guards went to a general with whom Ermolov was often to be found.
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  • Very often a wounded animal, hearing a rustle, rushes straight at the hunter's gun, runs forward and back again, and hastens its own end.
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  • I've pondered the events of those few months so often and so deeply I know if I don't at least commit the experience to paper I'll never move forward.
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  • She gasped, recognizing it as the one he wore often, the heirloom passed down through his ancestors.
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  • No, only often enough to keep things interesting.
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  • Does that happen often?
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  • He was often called the Ettrick Shepherd, because he was the keeper of sheep near the Ettrick Water.
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  • As often as he touched the charcoal to the smooth board, the picture grew.
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  • The second methodology error that futurists often commit is the exact opposite of the first.
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  • In reading my teacher's lips I was wholly dependent on my fingers: I had to use the sense of touch in catching the vibrations of the throat, the movements of the mouth and the expression of the face; and often this sense was at fault.
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  • Too often, I think, children are required to write before they have anything to say.
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  • The penny-post is, commonly, an institution through which you seriously offer a man that penny for his thoughts which is so often safely offered in jest.
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  • At dinner the prince usually spoke to the taciturn Michael Ivanovich more often than to anyone else.
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  • A pleasant humming and whistling of bullets were often heard.
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  • But, though she noticed it, she was herself in such high spirits at that moment, so far from sorrow, sadness, or self-reproach, that she purposely deceived herself as young people often do.
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  • Often, listening to the pilgrims' tales, she was so stimulated by their simple speech, mechanical to them but to her so full of deep meaning, that several times she was on the point of abandoning everything and running away from home.
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  • Then, unexpectedly, as often happens, the sound of the hunt suddenly approached, as if the hounds in full cry and Daniel ulyulyuing were just in front of them.
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  • Though she blamed herself for it, she could not refrain from grumbling at and worrying Sonya, often pulling her up without reason, addressing her stiffly as "my dear," and using the formal "you" instead of the intimate "thou" in speaking to her.
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  • And with the decision and tenderness that often come at the moment of awakening, she embraced her friend, but noticing Sonya's look of embarrassment, her own face expressed confusion and suspicion.
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  • That sincerity which often comes with waking showed her clearly what chiefly concerned her about her father's illness.
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  • And as often happens with old people, Kutuzov began looking about absent-mindedly as if forgetting all he wanted to say or do.
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  • But his brilliantly white, strong teeth which showed in two unbroken semicircles when he laughed--as he often did--were all sound and good, there was not a gray hair in his beard or on his head, and his whole body gave an impression of suppleness and especially of firmness and endurance.
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  • Its furry tail stood up firm and round as a plume, its bandy legs served it so well that it would often gracefully lift a hind leg and run very easily and quickly on three legs, as if disdaining to use all four.
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  • He often fell asleep unexpectedly in the daytime, but at night, lying on his bed without undressing, he generally remained awake thinking.
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  • I used them a lot over the years, not always to the FBI liking which didn't help my career but I found they often work.
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  • I just wish it could happen more often.
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  • Although nations create governments to establish such protections, history shows that all too often, governments fail to do so.
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  • Second, monarchs themselves often have only a financial risk in war.
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  • They may not bump into them very often in what we call "everyday life" but do know them well enough to friend them.
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  • Practically speaking, governments often act as if their first duty is to protect the government, not the people.
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  • She had a cradle, and I often spent an hour or more rocking her.
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  • My thoughts would often rise and beat up like birds against the wind, and I persisted in using my lips and voice.
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  • I often wonder how
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  • I have often been asked, "Do not people bore you?"
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  • We came home in horse cars because it was Sunday and steam cars do not go often on Sunday.
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  • I often think of the pleasant time we had all together in Boston last spring.
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  • We think of you so, so often! and our hearts go out to you in tenderest sympathy; and you know better than this poor letter can tell you how happy we always are to have you with us!
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  • When she is out walking she often stops suddenly, attracted by the odour of a bit of shrubbery.
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  • Often, however, her sober ideas are not to be laughed at, for her earnestness carries her listeners with her.
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  • She can make a great many combinations now, and often invents new ones herself.
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  • The philanthropist too often surrounds mankind with the remembrance of his own castoff griefs as an atmosphere, and calls it sympathy.
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  • Often seeing the success she had with young and old men and women Pierre could not understand why he did not love her.
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  • He understands the matter so well that Daniel and I are often quite astounded, said Simon, well knowing what would please his master.
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  • On the other hand, even if we admitted that words could be the cause of events, history shows that the expression of the will of historical personages does not in most cases produce any effect, that is to say, their commands are often not executed, and sometimes the very opposite of what they order occurs.
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  • Live entertainment is often scheduled to appear on the dining patio.
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  • They were so synchronized and fluid that Carmen asked Alex if they danced often.
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  • It was something she had been told often, but never expected to be asked.
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  • Well, he has a home office and he goes there pretty often, but I can't figure out what he's doing.
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  • We'll have to do this more often.
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  • He was no more expressive around Mary than anyone else, but he often asked her opinion on things.
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  • How often had he watched her sunbathing?
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  • Granted, what we accomplished was monumental, but coming across a similar situation and duplicating what we were able to do might not occur very often.
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  • The armory was not the collection of a wealthy connoisseur; this was the personal armory of a man accustomed to killing often.
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  • You finish your thoughts out loud pretty often.
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  • The Buen was nearly full, but as the season crept toward the Fourth of July and the heart of summer, finding a dinner seat anywhere in Ouray would often require patience.
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  • We made it look like he was drunk—which he often was.
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  • Preparing food wasn't something human-Deidre did often.
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  • I need to visit more often.
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  • The sound was rough, as if he didn't laugh often.
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  • There was little hibernation in the town often called the Switzerland of America.
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  • Dean often thought if Janet O'Brien were pushing a grocery cart containing all of her belongings, she wouldn't seem out of place.
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  • Often we're in wacky places, places like the house where I grew up or schools I attended when I was a kid.
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  • As much and as often as Annie wrote, the letters and numbers must have almost become a second language to her.
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  • You get into mixed rock and ice and there's often snow to clear away to get to a hard surface.
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  • More often than I care to admit.
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  • "At least then you may get a chance to see your son more often," Dean offered.
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  • Sometimes I fear my mind may be going as I often pretend my circumstances are far different than they truly are.
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  • He never allowed anyone but Sarah to see that side of him, and she often felt sorry for his inability to let the rest of the world in.
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  • He often thought, If Beethoven or Chopin had centuries to compose music, imagine the treasures we would have.
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  • One of his favorite memories was when he would do something un-gentlemanlike, which was often.
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  • Beauties like Gams don't come around very often.
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  • You don't see that too often in women her age.
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  • Do you do that often?
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  • I'm sure you don't have to deal with rejection very often.
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  • Jackson often joked that the day would come when she would spend more on a pair of shoes than he did on a car.
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  • Good. Maybe you won't do it too often.
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  • She lifted her lips to his ear, and through tears, whispered, "Promise you'll play for me often."
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  • When she finished, he stood, held her and repeated her words softly, "Promise you'll sing for me often."
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  • The two shared their music with each other often.
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  • He asked her to sing them often.
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  • It was obvious he was used to running things, but his help often became an attempt to take over the barn.
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  • The man in her dreams often started out as Josh, but always ended up being Alex.
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  • Do you do this often?
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  • And I haven't shown up on your doorstep so often because I want you out of my hair.
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  • "I know—six hours a day," she said before he chided her as he often did.
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  • He'd often wondered what it was that drew Tim to Lana and suspected it was nothing more than what drew him to other women.
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  • Years from now, when he was comfortably ensconced in his Ouray, Colorado bed and breakfast, he'd often look back on this day as the turning point in his life, but for now it was only the start of yet another five work days.
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  • How often was Byrne out of the office?
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  • Even though some of the destinations might have been more effi­ciently visited by plane, Byrne always took a company car, often resulting in very long workdays.
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  • Unfortunately, his efforts were all too often thwarted by a sympathetic judge or a system that could not find jail space for the numbers of criminals brought before it.
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  • Often it's a judgment thing—the court weighs all the facts and makes a determination.
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  • I'm used to planes being late more often than on time.
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  • Dean often wondered to himself why their romantic attraction to one another never grew to something permanent.
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  • He often does that when he's out of town even though he's always home before they get here.
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  • "One doesn't do it very often," came the reply.
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  • He wasn't in Scranton very often and the papers would pile up.
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  • He started changing his name as often as his shorts.
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  • Or because you and I went there so often.
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  • We didn't go there that often.
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  • Often they made fun of them.
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  • People would wonder how often she had slept here.
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  • The area he was watching was where she often saw deer in the early morning hours.
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  • She lay back on the bed, imagining the wedding as she had done so often before.
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  • She had said that often enough.
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  • In fact, his workday often began before he arrived at the clinic.
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  • She cried so often that when she finally went to bed, she was exhausted.
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  • As an only child growing up with aging parents and no relatives, life had often been lonely.
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  • He had always been hot headed, but never mean like he often was now.
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  • With a complexion like hers, he was often mistaken as her brother, a similarity they'd used in the past to keep people from finding out she was Damian's mate.
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  • How often do your duties place you in danger?
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  • It wasn't often that they had time to themselves.
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  • The animals are used to seeing us, and the horses often graze with them, so I don't think we will have any problems with the safari animals or the natural wildlife.
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  • She worked hard at taking care of her husband and children, yet how often had someone told her she was a good wife and mother - or even a nice person?
    1
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  • Did people often respond that way to Rob?
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  • Does he bring you up here often?
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  • "Not too often," she said, her face growing warm.
    1
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  • He often did that.
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  • It wasn't something she had often heard.
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  • She had told him often enough that he was the best looking man she had ever seen.
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  • Regardless, Clarissa's sugar coated barbs hit their mark all too often.
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  • They don't come out into the water very often when people are swimming.
    1
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  • How often did these storms strike?
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  • His mother spoke of a rich woman often, one who sent her on errands when his mother was not wanted at the whorehouse where she made what living was afforded a poor woman beyond the marriage age.
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  • With his extra sensitive senses, he often found himself lost in the feel or scent of things.
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  • He wears it often.
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  • She was a horrible liar, uncertain enough in her attempts that he assessed she didn't do it often.
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  • "When I was ten, I met Eden, the woman who often hired my mother for errands," he started.
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  • "How often do you … bite people?" she managed.
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  • In common with the okapi, giraffes have skin-covered horns on the head, but in these animals, which form the genus Giraffa, these appendages are present in both sexes; and there is often an unpaired one in advance of the pair on the forehead.
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  • c. tippelskirchi the frontal horn is often developed in the bulls, but the legs are frequently spotted to the fetlocks.
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  • In size the male African elephant often surpasses the Asiatic species, reaching nearly 12 ft.
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  • Landolt and others, made it at first appear that the change in weight, if there is any, consequent on a chemical change can rarely exceed one-millionth of the weight of the reacting substances, and that it must often be much less.
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  • One section of the law expresses the fact that the weights of two substances, not necessarily elements, that are equivalent in one reaction, are often found to be equivalent in a number of other reactions.
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  • On account of this difficulty, the atomic weights published by Dalton, and the more accurate ones of Berzelius, were not always identical with the values now accepted, but were often simple multiples or submultiples of these.
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  • He was no follower of their ideas, indeed often opposed to them; but he derived from Bacon an increasing stimulus towards the investigation of certain great problems of history and philosophy, while Grotius proved valuable in his study of philosophic jurisprudence.
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  • Vico has been generally described as a solitary soul, out of harmony with the spirit of his time and often directly opposed to it.
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  • The names of leading legislators, which we so often find recorded in the history of primitive peoples, are symbols and myths, merely serving to mark an historic period or epoch by some definite and personal denomination.
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  • It would have been well if Kossuth had had something more of Gdrgei's calculated ruthlessness, for, as has been truly said, the revolutionary power he had seized could only be held by revolutionary means; but he was by nature soft-hearted and always merciful; though often audacious, he lacked decision in dealing with men.
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  • They upheld the cause of the people against the moneyed interests, but the charge was often brought that they appealed to the baser passions.
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  • Though votes were often cast for ten names, there were but two real candidates before the convention, Grant and Blaine.
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  • Cold dry winds, often of great violence, occur in the Rhone valley (the Mistral), in Istria, and Dalmatia (the Bora), and in the western Caucasus.
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  • Elsewhere local surface currents are developed, either drifts due to the direct action of the winds, or streams produced by wind action heaping water up against the land; but these nowhere rise to the dignity of a distinct current system, although they are often sufficient to obliterate the feeble tidal action characteristic of the Mediterranean.
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  • GALVANIZED IRON, sheet iron having its surface covered with a thin coating of zinc. In spite of the name, galvanic action has often no part in the production of galvanized iron, which is prepared by dipping the iron, properly cleaned and pickled in acid, in a bath of molten zinc. The hotter the zinc the thinner the coating, but as a high temperature of the bath is attended with certain objections, it is a common practice to use a moderate temperature and clear off the excess of zinc by passing the plates between rollers.
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  • Frazer formerly held Virbius to be a wood and tree spirit, to whom horses, in which form tree spirits were often represented, were offered in sacrifice.
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  • across, also belongs to this group. It grows in the backwaters of the Amazon, often covering the surface for miles; the seeds are eaten under the name water maize.
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  • In her self-revelations she followed Rousseau, her first master in style, but while Rousseau in his Confessions darkened all the shadows, George Sand is the heroine of her story, often frail and faulty, but always a woman more sinned against than sinning.
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  • She endeavoured unsuccessfully to eke out her irregularly paid allowance by those expedients to which reduced gentlewomen are driven - fancywork and painting fans and snuff-boxes; she lived in a garret and was often unable to allow herself the luxury of a fire.
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  • It is by no means certain that he made the remark often attributed to him, "Let us enjoy the papacy since God has given it to us," but there is little doubt that he was by nature devoid of moral earnestness or deep religious feeling.
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  • The forewings have at least a single longitudinal nervure - often two - reaching from base to tip of the wing.
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  • Within the town the streets are often dark and narrow, and, apart from the cathedral and the hotel de ville, the architecture is of little interest.
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  • This method in one shape or another has been often employed.
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  • The potentials that have to be dealt with are often hundreds and sometimes thousands of volts, and insulation troubles are more serious than is generally appreciated.
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  • are often too rapid to be satisfactorily dealt with by an ordinary [[Table I]].
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  • Even on the quietest days irregular changes are always numerous and often large.
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  • At Sodankyla rain or snowfall was often unaccompanied by change of sign in the potential.
    1
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  • The name "firefly" is often applied also to luminous beetles of the family Lampyridae, to which the well-known glow-worm belongs.
    1
    0
  • In particular the remarkable frontier lines which bounded the Roman provinces of Upper (southern) Germany and Raetia, and which at their greatest development stretched from near Bonn on the Rhine to near Regensburg on the Danube, are often called the Limes Germanicus.
    1
    0
  • The beds made partly of old mushroom-bed dung often contain sufficient spawn to yield a crop, without the introduction of brick or cake spawn, but it is advisable to spawn them in the regular way.
    1
    0
  • In the Armenian and Coptic rites the vestment is often elaborately embroidered; in the other rites the only ornament is a cross high in the middle of the back, save in the case of bishops of the Orthodox Church, whose sticharia are ornamented with two vertical red stripes (7rorayof, " rivers").
    1
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  • alternate or opposite leaves, often with membranous united stipules.
    1
    0
  • He then abandoned himself to pleasure; he often visited London, and became an intimate friend of the prince of Wales (afterwards George IV.); he brought to Paris the "anglo-mania," as it was called, and made jockeys as fashionable as they were in England.
    1
    0
  • In English churches these stairs generally run up in a small turret in the wall at the west end of the chancel; often this also leads out on to the roof.
    1
    0
  • On the continent of Europe they often lead out of the interior of the church and are enclosed with tracery, as at Rouen or Strassburg.
    1
    0
  • The general construction of wooden screens is close panelling beneath, on which stands screen-work composed of slender turned balusters or regular wooden mullions, supporting tracery more or less rich with cornices, crestings, &c., and often painted in brilliant colours and gilded.
    1
    0
  • (a) As the Council expressly says, the infallibility of the pope is not other than that of the Church; this is a point which is too often forgotten or misunderstood.
    1
    0
  • South of Oristano and west of the districts last described, and traversed by the railway from Oristano to Cagliari, is the Campidano (often divided in ordinary nomenclature into the Campidano of Oristano and the Campidano of Cagliari), a low plain, the watershed of which, near S.
    1
    0
  • The lower districts are hot and often unhealthy in the summer, while the climate of the mountainous portion of the island is less oppressive, and would be still cooler if it possessed more forest.
    1
    0
  • The dialects differ very much in different parts of the island, so that those who speak one often cannot understand those who speak another, and use Italian as the medium of communication.
    1
    0
  • In the Barbargia the men have a white shirt, a black or red waistcoat and black or red coat, often with open sleeves; the cut and decorations of these vary considerably in the different districts.
    1
    0
  • But of course the 3 In actual life the Sabbath was often far from being the burden which the Rabbinical enactments would have led us to expect.
    1
    0
  • In all the upland valleys of the Abruzzi snow begins to fall early in November, and heavy storms occur often as late as May; whole communities are shut out for months from any intercourse with their neighbours, and some villages are so long buried in snow that regular passages are made between the different houses for the sake of communication among the inhabitants.
    1
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  • from the shore, and often even less, the scene changes.
    1
    0
  • The population of the town itself is distinguished from that of its commune, which often includes a considerable portion of the surrounding country.
    1
    0
  • Physical characteristics differ widely; but as a whole the Italian is somewhat short of stature, with dark or black hair and eyes, often good looking.
    1
    0
  • In the province of Naples, Caserta, &c., the method of fallows is widely adopted, the ground often being left in this state for fifteen or twenty years; and in some parts of Sicily there is a regular interchange of fallow and crop year by year.
    1
    0
  • Large landlords are usually represented by ministri, or factors, who direct agricultural operations and manage the estates, but the estate is often let to a middleman, or mercante di campagna.
    1
    0
  • The finest glass is made in Tuscany and Venetia; Venetian glass is often colored and of artistic form.
    1
    0
  • It often left them partially paralyzed, in wheelchairs or iron lungs (a term that's now all but forgotten and will likely send younger readers to Wikipedia).
    20
    19
  • In the future, massive new amounts of information will begin to resolve the debate, instead of just adding noise to it as too often occurs today.
    3
    2
  • They do this for a variety of reasons, not the least of which is that it often works.
    3
    2
  • Often everything in the room was arranged in object sentences.
    6
    5
  • I have often held in my hand a little model of the Plymouth Rock which a kind gentleman gave me at Pilgrim Hall, and I have fingered its curves, the split in the centre and the embossed figures "1620," and turned over in my mind all that I knew about the wonderful story of the Pilgrims.
    1
    0
  • I had a French grammar in raised print, and as I already knew some French, I often amused myself by composing in my head short exercises, using the new words as I came across them, and ignoring rules and other technicalities as much as possible.
    1
    0
  • He taught me Latin grammar principally; but he often helped me in arithmetic, which I found as troublesome as it was uninteresting.
    1
    0
  • He was always gentle and forbearing, no matter how dull I might be, and believe me, my stupidity would often have exhausted the patience of Job.
    1
    0
  • The words rush through my hand like hounds in pursuit of a hare which they often miss.
    1
    0
  • It happens too often that your trumpet call is unheeded.
    1
    0
  • But, with all my love for Shakespeare, it is often weary work to read all the meanings into his lines which critics and commentators have given them.
    1
    0
  • Sometimes a daring little fish slips between my fingers, and often a pond-lily presses shyly against my hand.
    1
    0
  • I had often read the story, but I had never felt the charm of Rip's slow, quaint, kind ways as I did in the play.
    1
    0
  • When I was a little older I felt the need of some means of communication with those around me, and I began to make simple signs which my parents and friends readily understood; but it often happened that I was unable to express my thoughts intelligibly, and at such times I would give way to my angry feelings utterly....
    1
    0
  • Often when I dream, thoughts pass through my mind like cowled shadows, silent and remote, and disappear.
    1
    0
  • Often the poor man is not so cold and hungry as he is dirty and ragged and gross.
    1
    0
  • Nay, I often did better than this.
    1
    0
  • To do things "railroad fashion" is now the byword; and it is worth the while to be warned so often and so sincerely by any power to get off its track.
    1
    0
  • Often in a snow-storm, even by day, one will come out upon a well-known road and yet find it impossible to tell which way leads to the village.
    1
    0
  • A walk through the woods thither was often my recreation.
    1
    0
  • I had often since seen its crumpled red velvety blossom supported by the stems of other plants without knowing it to be the same.
    1
    0
  • In previous years I had often gone prospecting over some bare hillside, where a pitch pine wood had formerly stood, and got out the fat pine roots.
    1
    0
  • In some places, within my own remembrance, the pines would scrape both sides of a chaise at once, and women and children who were compelled to go this way to Lincoln alone and on foot did it with fear, and often ran a good part of the distance.
    1
    0
  • When I crossed Flint's Pond, after it was covered with snow, though I had often paddled about and skated over it, it was so unexpectedly wide and so strange that I could think of nothing but Baffin's Bay.
    1
    0
  • I have noticed that a portion of Walden which in the state of water was green will often, when frozen, appear from the same point of view blue.
    1
    0
  • The town's poor seem to me often to live the most independent lives of any.
    1
    0
  • We are often reminded that if there were bestowed on us the wealth of Croesus, our aims must still be the same, and our means essentially the same.
    1
    0
  • Often, in the repose of my mid-day, there reaches my ears a confused tintinnabulum from without.
    1
    0
  • As often happens in early youth, especially to one who leads a lonely life, he felt an unaccountable tenderness for this young man and made up his mind that they would be friends.
    1
    0
  • As often happens, the horses of a convoy wagon became restive at the end of the bridge, and the whole crowd had to wait.
    1
    0
  • And, in fact, Bilibin's witticisms were hawked about in the Viennese drawing rooms and often had an influence on matters considered important.
    1
    0
  • "If only they would be quick!" thought Rostov, feeling that at last the time had come to experience the joy of an attack of which he had so often heard from his fellow hussars.
    1
    0
  • In that world, the handsome drunkard Number One of the second gun's crew was "uncle"; Tushin looked at him more often than at anyone else and took delight in his every movement.
    1
    0
  • The younger sisters also became affectionate to him, especially the youngest, the pretty one with the mole, who often made him feel confused by her smiles and her own confusion when meeting him.
    1
    0
  • When the little princess had grown accustomed to life at Bald Hills, she took a special fancy to Mademoiselle Bourienne, spent whole days with her, asked her to sleep in her room, and often talked with her about the old prince and criticized him.
    1
    0
  • She flushed, her beautiful eyes grew dim, red blotches came on her face, and it took on the unattractive martyrlike expression it so often wore, as she submitted herself to Mademoiselle Bourienne and Lise.
    1
    0
  • Mademoiselle Bourienne was often touched to tears as in imagination she told this story to him, her seducer.
    1
    0
  • Believe me in war the energy of young men often shows the way better than all the experience of old Cunctators.
    1
    0
  • Mademoiselle Bourienne, too, seemed passionately fond of the boy, and Princess Mary often deprived herself to give her friend the pleasure of dandling the little angel--as she called her nephew--and playing with him.
    1
    0
  • As often happens after long sleeplessness and long anxiety, he was seized by an unreasoning panic--it occurred to him that the child was dead.
    1
    0
  • Today he is cheerful and in good spirits, but that is the effect of your visit--he is not often like that.
    1
    0
  • His face twitched, as often happens to soldiers called before the ranks.
    1
    0
  • Often after collecting alms, and reckoning up twenty to thirty rubles received for the most part in promises from a dozen members, of whom half were as well able to pay as himself, Pierre remembered the masonic vow in which each Brother promised to devote all his belongings to his neighbor, and doubts on which he tried not to dwell arose in his soul.
    1
    0
  • Yes, you know between cousins intimacy often leads to love.
    1
    0
  • Often when all sitting together everyone kept silent.
    1
    0
  • Prince Andrew blushed, as he often did now--Natasha particularly liked it in him--and said that his son would not live with them.
    1
    0
  • While they drove past the garden the shadows of the bare trees often fell across the road and hid the brilliant moonlight, but as soon as they were past the fence, the snowy plain bathed in moonlight and motionless spread out before them glittering like diamonds and dappled with bluish shadows.
    1
    0
  • Anna Mikhaylovna, who often visited the Karagins, while playing cards with the mother made careful inquiries as to Julie's dowry (she was to have two estates in Penza and the Nizhegorod forests).
    1
    0
  • "I can always arrange so as not to see her often," thought Boris.
    1
    0
  • I would not be silly and afraid of things, I would simply embrace him, cling to him, and make him look at me with those searching inquiring eyes with which he has so often looked at me, and then I would make him laugh as he used to laugh.
    1
    0
  • She vividly pictured herself as Prince Andrew's wife, and the scenes of happiness with him she had so often repeated in her imagination, and at the same time, aglow with excitement, recalled every detail of yesterday's interview with Anatole.
    1
    0
  • A fourth while seemingly overwhelmed with work would often come accidentally under the Emperor's eye.
    1
    0
  • But while Nicholas was considering these questions and still could reach no clear solution of what puzzled him so, the wheel of fortune in the service, as often happens, turned in his favor.
    1
    0
  • In the morning, when he went to call at Rostopchin's he met there a courier fresh from the army, an acquaintance of his own, who often danced at Moscow balls.
    1
    0
  • First he rings his bell fearlessly, but when he gets into a tight place he runs away as quietly as he can, and often thinking to escape runs straight into his opponent's arms.
    1
    0
  • At first while they were still moving along the Kaluga road, Napoleon's armies made their presence known, but later when they reached the Smolensk road they ran holding the clapper of their bell tight--and often thinking they were escaping ran right into the Russians.
    1
    0
  • Terenty, when he had helped him undress and wished him good night, often lingered with his master's boots in his hands and clothes over his arm, to see whether he would not start a talk.
    1
    0
  • The death, sufferings, and last days of Prince Andrew had often occupied Pierre's thoughts and now recurred to him with fresh vividness.
    1
    0
  • He glanced once at the companion's face, saw her attentive and kindly gaze fixed on him, and, as often happens when one is talking, felt somehow that this companion in the black dress was a good, kind, excellent creature who would not hinder his conversing freely with Princess Mary.
    4
    3
  • He often surprised those he met by his significantly happy looks and smiles which seemed to express a secret understanding between him and them.
    1
    0
  • Often, speaking with vexation of some failure or irregularity, he would say: "What can one do with our Russian peasants?" and imagined that he could not bear them.
    1
    0
  • She could not find fault with Sonya in any way and tried to be fond of her, but often felt ill-will toward her which she could not overcome.
    1
    0
  • As she listened to it she saw before her his smooth handsome forehead, his mustache, and his whole face, as she had so often seen it in the stillness of the night when he slept.
    1
    0
  • Now her face and body were often all that one saw, and her soul was not visible at all.
    1
    0
  • It very often happened that in a moment of irritation husband and wife would have a dispute, but long afterwards Pierre to his surprise and delight would find in his wife's ideas and actions the very thought against which she had argued, but divested of everything superfluous that in the excitement of the dispute he had added when expressing his opinion.
    3
    2
  • During that fortnight of anxiety Natasha resorted to the baby for comfort so often, and fussed over him so much, that she overfed him and he fell ill.
    1
    0
  • As soon as historians of different nationalities and tendencies begin to describe the same event, the replies they give immediately lose all meaning, for this force is understood by them all not only differently but often in quite contradictory ways.
    1
    0
  • (With this method of observation it often happens that the observer, influenced by the direction he himself prefers, regards those as leaders who, owing to the people's change of direction, are no longer in front, but on one side, or even in the rear.)
    1
    0
  • An officer still less often acts directly himself, but commands still more frequently.
    1
    0
  • Our conception of the degree of freedom often varies according to differences in the point of view from which we regard the event, but every human action appears to us as a certain combination of freedom and inevitability.
    2
    1
  • These are often available at a lower price than you would have to pay even at a fast food establishment.
    2
    1
  • Seafood is caught in the morning and shipped or flown to the restaurants, often on the same day.
    1
    0
  • The meat and spices vary widely by region but often use beef, lamb, dill or oregano.
    1
    0
  • For options that comprise of an array of dishes that often make up a meal, media raciones are available.
    1
    0
  • Whether you want a snack with a cocktail or to sit down to a luxurious meal, the retaaurant's options are always delicious and often entertaining.
    1
    0
  • The costume of the women is different (often entirely so) in each village or district.
    0
    0
  • The houses are often of one storey only.
    0
    0
  • The mountain streams often contain small but good trout.
    0
    0
  • The trains are few and the speed on all these lines is moderate, but the gradients are often very heavy.
    0
    0
  • There is daily steam communication (often interrupted in bad weather) with Civitavecchia from Golfo degli Aranci (the mail route), and weekly steamers run from Cagliari to Naples, Genoa (via the east coast of the island), Palermo and Tunis, and from Porto Torres to Genoa (calling at Bastia in Corsica and Leghorn) and Leghorn direct.
    0
    0
  • A third chamber above the second does not often occur.
    0
    0
  • Thus, there may be a platform round the nuraghe, generally with two, three or four bastions, each often containing a chamber; or the main nuraghe may have additional chambers added to it.
    0
    0
  • FLOWERS Imitations of natural flowers are sometimes made for scientific purposes (as the collection of glass flowers at Harvard University, which illustrates the flora of the United States), but more often as articles of decoration and ornament.
    0
    0
  • The first consists of cutting up the various fabrics and materials employed into shapes suitable for forming the leaves, petals, &c.; this may be done by scissors, but more often stamps are employed which will cut through a dozen or more thicknesses at one blow.
    0
    0
  • It was for some while the frontier of the Roman territory and was often in the hands of Veii.
    0
    0
  • In the Spanish plains, however, the young are often produced in nests built in trees, or among tall bamboos in FIG.
    0
    0
  • If the king were a minor, the mayor of the palace supervised his education in the capacity of guardian (nutricius), and often also occupied himself with affairs of state.
    0
    0
  • He took part in the nomination of the counts and dukes; in the king's absence he presided over the royal tribunal; and he often commanded the armies.
    0
    0
  • When the guest parted from his host he was often presented with gifts (EEvta), and sometimes a die (avr pay aXos) was broken between them.
    0
    0
  • There is no proof that any direct emolument was ever attached to the office, while the expense and trouble entailed by it must often have been very great.
    0
    0
  • Maps of the 16th and 17th centuries often show Cambaluc in an imaginary region to the north of China, a part of the misconception that has prevailed regarding Cathay.
    0
    0
  • The name is often in popular literature written Cambalu, and is by Longfellow accented in verse Cambeilic. But this spelling originates in an accidental error in Ramusio's Italian version, which was the chief channel through which Marco Polo's book was popularly known.
    0
    0
  • de situ et mirabilibus Indiae), and the correspondence between Alexander and the king � of the Brahmins, Dindimus, both of which are often contained in MSS.
    0
    0
  • But with all these often opposed conditions, we find less variation than might be expected, the main and really important divergence being due to the necessity of transposition, which added a very high pitch to the primarily convenient low one.
    0
    0
  • The term tertia minore, or inferiore, is used by Praetorius to describe a low pitch, often preferred in England and the Netherlands, in Italy and in some parts of Germany.
    0
    0
  • But he is always ingenious, often witty, and nobody has carried farther than he the harmony of diction, sometimes marred by an affectation of symmetry and an excessive use of antithesis.
    0
    0
  • Two encyclopaedic treatises, dealing with philosophy, are often mentioned.
    0
    0
  • The fact that the kings were often absent from England, and that the justiciarship was held by great nobles or churchmen, made this office of an importance which at times threatened to overshadow that of the Crown.
    0
    0
  • The principal towns are Scutari (Albanian Shkoder, with the definite article Shkodr-a), the capital of the vilayet of that name, pop. 32,000; Prizren, 30,000; Iannina (often incorrectly written Ioannina), capital of the southern vilayet, 22,000; Jakova, 12,000; Dibra, 15,000; Prishtina, 11,000; Ipek (Sla y.
    0
    0
  • A single case of homicide often leads to a series of similar crimes or to protracted warfare between neighbouring families and communities; the murderer, as a rule, takes refuge in the mountains from the avenger of blood, or remains for years shut up in his house.
    0
    0
  • Notwithstanding their complete subjection, women are treated with a certain respect, and are often employed as intermediaries in the settlement of feuds; a woman may traverse a hostile district without fear of injury, and her bessa will protect the traveller or the stranger.
    0
    0
  • The tribe or mal (" mountain") is often composed of several clans (phis-i, phdrea)or baryaks (literally "standards") each under a chief or baryaktar (standard-bearer), who is, strictly speaking, a military leader; there are in each clan a certain number of elders or voivodes (Albanian kru-ye, pl.
    0
    0
  • The priests of the Greek Church, on whom the rural population depend for instruction, are often deplorably ignorant.
    0
    0
  • June is often wet, but most favourable for the springing crops; July and August are warm, but, excepting two or three days at a time, not uncomfortably so; while the autumn weeks of late August and September are very pleasant.
    0
    0
  • With closed stoves much less heat is wasted, and consequ;ntly less fuel is burned, than with open grates, but they often cause an unpleasant sensation of dryness in the air, and the products of combustion also escape to some extent, rendering this method of heating not only unpleasant but sometimes even dangerous.
    0
    0
  • 3) are often combined in one tank placed at a point above the level of circulation.
    0
    0
  • The tank is placed above the level of the topmost draw off, and often in a cupboard which it will warm sufficiently to permit of its being used as a linen airing closet.
    0
    0
  • It must be conceded as no small merit in Lydgate that, in an age of experiment he should have succeeded so often in hitting the right word.
    0
    0
  • It is propagated by offsets, which are often planted in September or October, but the principal crop should not be got in earlier than February or the beginning of March.
    0
    0
  • One is struck by the unanimity with which, working individually and often in lands far apart, Church.
    0
    0
  • During the reign of Edward, the title of superintendent was often adopted instead of bishop, and it will be recollected that John Knox was an honoured worker in England with the title of superintendent during this reign.
    0
    0
  • The Phddon was an immediate success, and besides being often reprinted in German was speedily translated into nearly all the European languages, including English.
    0
    0
  • It is followed by a cold south wind which often lowers the temperature 25°.
    0
    0
  • The timid viscacha (Lagostomus trichodactylus), living in colonies, often with the burrowing owl, and digging deep under ground like the American prairie dog, was almost the only quadruped to be seen upon these immense open plains.
    0
    0
  • The presidential election of 1874 resolved itself, as so often before, into a struggle between the provincials and the poytenos (Buenos Aires).
    0
    0
  • To the north as far as the rocky point of St Gildas, sheltering the mouth of the Loire, the shore, often occupied by salt marshes (marshes of Poitou and Brittany), is low-lying and hollowed by deep bays sheltered by large islands, those of Olron and Re lying opposite the ports of Rochefort and La Rochelle, while Noirmoutier closes the Bay of Bourgneuf.
    0
    0
  • All these affluents are on the right, and with the exception of the Arige, which descends from the eastern Pyrcnees, rise in the mountaitis of Auvergne and the southern Cvennes, their sources often lying close to those of the rivers of the Loire and Rhone basins.
    0
    0
  • Before I790 France was divided into thirty-three great and seven small military governments, often called provinces, which are, however, to be distinguished from the provinces formed under the feudal system.
    0
    0
  • Subdivisions may be, and often are, named according to the particular duties to which they are assigned, as la police politique, police des mceurs, police sanitaire, &c. The officers of the judicial police comprise the juge de paix (equivalent to the English police magistrate), the maire, the commissaire de police, the gendarmerie and, in rural districts, the gardes champtres and the gardes forestiers.
    0
    0
  • In the midst of Charles's debauched and licentious court, she lived neglected and retired, often deprived of her due allowance, having no ambitions and taking no part in English politics, but keeping up rather her interest in her native country.
    0
    0
  • For convenience the judge often sits at the royal courts of justice.
    0
    0
  • The climate of Caracas is often described as that of perpetual spring.
    0
    0
  • The pouch is often absent, and may open backwards.
    0
    0
  • The typical members of the group are the cuscuses (Phalanger), ranging from the Moluccas and Celebes to New Guinea, in which the males are often different in colour from the females.
    0
    0
  • The fact that parliament continued to meet fairly often so long as Morton lived, and was only summoned once by Henry VII.
    0
    0
  • 21); indeed, so long as the Hebrews were an agricultural people, in a land often ravaged by severe famines, the law of the Sabbatical year could not have been observed.
    0
    0
  • The winds are liable to little variation; they blow from the west, often with great violence, for nine months in the year, and at other times from the north; and they moderate the summer heats, which are chiefly felt during the months of July and August, when the hot winds blow from the coast of Anatolia.
    0
    0
  • The difference in level between the outcrop of the assumed eastern intake and of the wells is often so small, in comparison with their distance apart, that the friction would completely sop up the whole of the available hydrostatic head.
    0
    0
  • The sea produces three different seals, which often ascend rivers from the coast, and can live in lagoons of fresh water; many cetaceans, besides the " right whale " and sperm whale; and the dugong, found on the northern shores, which yields a valuable medicinal oil.
    0
    0
  • The manganese ores of the Bathurst district of New South Wales often contain a small percentage of cobalt - sufficient, indeed, to warrant further attempts to work them.
    0
    0
  • The hair is long, black or very dark auburn, wavy and sometimes curly, but never woolly, and the men have luxuriant beards and whiskers, often of an auburn tint, while the whole body inclines to hairiness.
    0
    0
  • Yet the Australian is capable of strong affections, and the blind (of whom there have always been a great number) are cared for, and are often the best fed in a tribe.
    0
    0
  • In New South Wales the body is often burned and the ashes buried.
    0
    0
  • Young children are often not buried for months, but are carried about by their mothers.
    0
    0
  • It contains few old buildings, though relics of antiquity are often found on the abandoned site of the old city.
    0
    0
  • He was often identified with Zeus, Apollo and Dionysus.
    0
    0
  • These rocks form the greater part of the central range, and they are often - especially the granite - decomposed and rotten to a considerable depth.
    0
    0
  • This, of course, means that a new station, where clearing, digging, and building are in progress, is often unhealthy for a time, and to this must be attributed the evil reputation which the peninsula formerly enjoyed.
    0
    0
  • Of the three sons of Count Franz, the eldest, Friedrich (1810-1881), entered the diplomatic service; after holding other posts he was in 1850 appointed president of the restored German Diet at Frankfort, where he represented the anti-Prussian policy of Schwarzenberg, and often came into conflict with Bismarck, who was Prussian envoy.
    0
    0
  • His high social position, his influence at court, his character, as well as his undoubted abilities and learning, not often in Austria found in a man of his rank, gave him great influence.
    0
    0
  • They often end in a cul-de-sac. The principal street is the rue de la Kasbah, which leads up to the citadel by 497 steps.
    0
    0
  • Although this idea had often been expressed by others, and by Seward himself in his speech of 1848, yet he was severely criticized, and four days later he sought to render this statement innocuous also.
    0
    0
  • The British oak is one of the largest trees of the genus, though old specimens are often more remarkable for the great size of the trunk and main boughs than for very lofty growth.
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  • The catkins appear soon after the young leaves, usually in England towards the end of May; the acorns, oblong in form, are in shallow cups with short, scarcely projecting scales; the fruit is shed the first autumn, often before the foliage changes.
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  • of furniture, and high prices are often given for the gnarled and knotted portions of slowly-grown trees, to be sawn into veneers.
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  • The leaves are large, often irregular in form, usually with a few deep lobes dilated at the end; they are of a bright light green on the upper surface, but whitish beneath; they turn to a violet tint in autumn.
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  • On rich loams and the alluvial soils of river-valleys, when well drained, the tree attains a large size, often rivalling the giant oaks of Europe; trunks of 3 or 4 ft.
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  • This tree acquires large dimensions, the trunk being often from 4 to 6 ft.
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  • coccinea, often confounded with the red oak, but with larger leaves, with long lobes ending in several acute points; they change to a brilliant scarlet with the first October frosts, giving one of the most striking of the various glowing tints that render the American forests so beautiful in autumn.
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  • The trunk, though often of considerable size, yields but an indifferent wood, employed for similar purposes to that of Q.
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  • rubra, and is often employed for building and for flour-barrels and cask-staves.
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  • Chinquapin or prinoides, a dwarf species, often only I ft.
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  • His mother was descended from a family named Styward in Norfolk, which was not, however, connected in any way, as has been often asserted, with the royal house of Stuart.
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  • The Royalist cavalry was disorganized by victory as often as by defeat, and illustrated on numerous fields the now discredited maxim that cavalry cannot charge twice in one day.
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  • Among agricultural tribes in Africa one day of the week, which varies from place to place, is often a rest-day, visiting the market being the only work allowed.
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  • From its source to the city of Kabul the course of the river is only 45 m., and this part of it is often exhausted in summer for purposes of irrigation.
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  • Virtue is often held up for admiration, and vice painted in revolting colours or derided.
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  • From the first, however, it had a military significance, and its usual Latin translation was miles, although minister was often used.
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  • The Hausa are often traders, traversing the country in large caravans.
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  • To make matters worse, the pen which records the motion of the plate is often connected with it by an extensive system of chains and levers.
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  • The story of Silenus was often the subject of Athenian satyric drama.
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  • Haydn finds the pianoforte so completely capable of expressing his meaning that he is at a loss to find independent material for any accompanying instruments; and the violoncello in his trios has, except perhaps in four passages in the whole collection of thirty-three works, not a note to play that is not already in the bass of the pianoforte; while the melodies of the violin are, more often than not, doubled in the treble.
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  • For example, it has often been said that the extent to which their orchestral viola parts double the basses is due, partly to bad traditions of Italian opera, and partly to the fact that viola players were, more often than not, simply persons who had failed to play the violin.
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  • This was in many cases true, and it is equally true that Mozart and Haydn often had no scruple in following the customs of very bad composers.
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  • Already Mozart divides his violas into two parts quite as often as he makes them play with the basses.
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  • This point is dwelt upon, because the speed limitations of the hand-crane are often overlooked by engineers.
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  • The type is often used in foundries, or to serve heavy hammers in a smithy, whence the name.
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  • In connexion with the stability of portable cranes, it may be mentioned that accidents more often arise from FIG.
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  • It is often very desirable to have the quay space as little obstructed by the cranes as possible, so as not to interfere with railway traffic; this has led to the introduction of cranes mounted on high trucks or gantries, sometimes also called " portal " cranes.
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  • The jibs of transporters are often made to slide forward, or lift up, so as to be out of the way when not in use.
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  • His master usually found him a slave-girl as wife (the children were then born slaves), often set him up in a house (with farm or business) and simply took an annual rent of him.
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  • A slave often ran away; if caught, the captor was bound to restore him to his master, and the Code fixes a reward of two shekels which the owner must pay the captor.
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  • The letters of Khammurabi often deal with claims to exemption.
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  • Despite the multitude of slaves, hired labour was often needed, especially at harvest.
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  • The debtor could also pledge his property, and in contracts often pledged a field, house or crop. The Code enacted, however, that the debtor should always take the crop himself and pay the creditor from it.
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  • Pledges were often made where the intrinsic value of the article was equivalent to the amount of the debt; but antichretic pledge was more common, where the profit of the pledge was a set-off against the interest of the debt.
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  • Personal guarantees were often given that the debtor would repay or the guarantor become liable himself.
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  • These children could be legitimized by their father's acknowledgment before witnesses, and were often adopted.
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  • Vestal virgins were not supposed to have children, yet they could and often did marry.
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  • She had no choice in these matters, which were often decided in her childhood.
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  • Slaves were often adopted and if they proved unfilial were reduced to slavery again.
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  • A craftsman often adopted a son to learn the craft.
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  • The Code does not say what would be the penalty of murder, but death is so often awarded where death is caused that we can hardly doubt that the murderer was put to death.
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  • The Liassic beds are often metamorphosed and the limestones contain garnet and wollastonite.
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  • Connexion is made into the office (or to the underground system, as is often the case) from the aerial wire by means of a copper conductor, insulated with gutta-percha, which passes through a " leading in " cup, whereby leakage is prevented between the wire and the pole.
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  • In many cases a still heavier type is used for the first mile or two from shore, and several intermediate types are often introduced, tapering gradually to the thin deep-water type.
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  • It differs from the open circuit in only requiring one battery (although, as in the figure, half of it is often placed at each end), in having the re circuit ceiving instrument between the line and the key, and in having the battery continuously to the line.
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  • Normally a switch attached to the key cuts the battery off, and connects the line direct through the receiving relay; this switch is turned to " send " when transmission commences, and is moved back to " receive " when it ceases: this movement is done quite mechanically by the telegraphist, and as it is practically never forgotten, automatic devices (which have often been suggested) to effect the turning are wholly unnecessary.
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  • It is dominated, on the seaward side, by four hills, and approached by a narrow entrance, with forts on either hand; a breakwater affords shelter on the east, and on the west is the Arsenal Basin, often regarded as the original harbour of the Carthaginians and Romans.
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  • Not to speak of insects which feed upon the pitcher itself, some drop their eggs into the putrescent mass, where their larvae find abundant nourishment, while birds often slit open the pitchers with their beaks and devour the maggots in their turn.
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  • In Venetia the lives of the small proprietors and of the salaried peasants are often extremely miserable.
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  • They act also as employment burcaux, and are often centres of political propaganda.
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  • Of the secondary and higher educatory methods, in the normal schools and licei the state provides for the payment of the staff and for scientific material, and often largely supports the ginnasi and technical schools, which should by law be supported by the communes.
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  • Libraries are numerous in Italy, those even of small cities being often rich in manuscripts and valuable works.
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  • But the laws have not been rigorously enforced of late years; and the ecclesiastical possessions seized by the state were thrown on the market simultaneously, and so realized very low prices, being often bought up by wealthy religious institutions.
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  • These establishments are, however, unsatisfactory, being mostly situated on small islands, where it is often difficult to find work for the coatti, who are free by day, being only confined at night.
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  • This shows that charges, often involving preliminary imprisonment, are brought against an excessive proportion of persons who either are not or cannot be proved to be guilty.
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  • The courts of appeal and cassation, too, often have more than they can do; in the year 1907 the court of cassation at Rome decided 948 appeals on points of law in civil cases, while no fewer than 460 remained to be decided.
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  • The army is always maintained at a low peace effective (about one-quarter of war establishment) and even this was reduced, by the absence of the recruits, until there were often only i~ rank and file with a company, whose war strength is about 230.
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  • Like all officers created to meet an emergency, the limitations to his power are illdefined, and he is often little better than an autocrat.
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  • His infernal cunning often defeated its own aims, checkmating him at the point of achievement by suggestions of duplicity or terror.
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  • Italy only too often became the theatre of desolating and distracting wars.
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  • Cavour had often declared tin the end the capital of Italy must be Rome, for it alone of abLcnLLp~, ass L~AS O~V.~La.5 ~jassL,asssassD U~ .JaLAISLAJ ~isLas blU
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  • Thayers Dawn of Italian Independence (Boston, 1893) is gushing and not always accurate; C. Cants Dell indipendenza italiana cronistoria (Naples, 1872-1877) is reactionary and often unreliable; V.
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  • the country districts, and to exclude from the franchise numbers of peasants and small proprietors who, though of more conservative temperament and of better economic position than the artizan population of the large towns, were often unable to fulfil the scholarship qualification.
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  • The agitation had begun some fifteen years before, and the men had at various times demanded better pay and shorter hours, often with success.
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  • LEECH, the common name of members of the Hirudinea, a division of Chaetopod worms. It is doubtful whether the medicinal leech, Hirudo medicinalis, which is rarer in England than on the continent of Europe, or the horse leech, Aulastoma gulo, often confused with it, has the best right to the original possession of this name.
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  • Worse men had been less detested, but Danby had none of the amiable virtues which often counteract the odium incurred by serious faults.
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  • The old court-house in which Abraham Lincoln often practised is still standing.
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  • From the archaic style in which these mythological tales are usually composed, as well as from the fact that not a few of them are found in Brahmanas of different schools and Vedas, though often with considerable variations, it seems pretty evident that the groundwork of them must go back to times preceding the composition or final redaction of the existing Brahmanas.
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  • Of a far more complicated nature than these offerings are the Soma-sacrifices, which, besides the simpler ceremonies of this class, such as the Agnishtoma or "Praise of Agni," also include great state functions, such as the Rajasuya or consecration of a king, and the Asvamedha or horse-sacrifice, which, in addition to the sacrificial rites, have a considerable amount of extraneous, often highly interesting, ceremonial connected with them, which makes them seem to partake largely of the nature of public festivals.
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  • But this theism is lifeless - a " pale and shallow deism, which India has often confessed with the lips, but which has never won the homage of her heart.'" The thought of India is upon the side of pantheism.
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  • True, Kant refers often to the ideal of a " perceptive " or " intuitive understanding," whose thought would produce the whole of knowledge out of its native contents.
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  • (2) Kant is often supposed to mean by a priori - see Hamilton's Reid, p. 762 - " innate " as opposed to " acquired from experience."
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  • Bradley's Logic: " If " or " As often as you have the cause working unimpeded, you get the effect."
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  • Aristotle has impressed the ordinary mind chiefly by his criticism of Plato's ideal theory; and therefore he is often ranked as the father of empiricists.
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  • Besides the stream of tendency which flowed from Kant in the direction of idealism, two other streams emerged from him, often but not always blending.
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  • He or she must not, as had been so often the case in the past, be forced to marry some royal favourite, or some one who had paid a sum of money for the privilege.
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  • The coasts of the Andamans are deeply indented, giving existence to a number of safe harbours and tidal creeks, which are often surrounded by mangrove swamps.
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  • It grows in small rings, which give it the appearance of growing in tufts, though it is really closely and evenly distributed over the whole scalp. The figures of the men are muscular and well-formed and generally pleasing; a straight, well-formed nose and jaw are by no means rare, and the young men are often distinctly good-looking.
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  • Marriages rarely produce more than three children and often none at all.
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  • Fresh-water forms, however, are also known, very few as regards species or genera, but often extremely abundant as individuals.
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  • In fresh-water Hydromedusae the life-cycle is usually secondarily simplified, but in marine forms the life-cycle may be extremely complicated, and a given species often passes in the course of its history through widely different forms adapted to different habitats and modes of life.
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  • The foot by which it is attached often sends out root-like processes - the hydrorhiza (c).
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  • Massive colonies may assume, ' various forms and are often branching or tree-like.
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  • Such are the " guard-polyps " (machopolyps) of Plumularidae, which are often regarded as individuals of the nature of dactylozoids, but from a study of the mode of budding in this hydroid family Driesch concluded that the guard-polyps were not true polyp-individuals, although each is enclosed in a small protecting cup of the perisarc, known as a nematophore.
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  • The sensory cells are slender epithelial cells, often with a cilium or stiff protoplasmic process, and should perhaps be regarded as the only ectoderm-cells which retain the primitive ciliation of the larval ectoderm, otherwise lost in all Hydrozoa.
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  • The sense-cells form, in the first place, a diffuse system of scattered sensory cells, as in the polyp, developed chiefly on the manubrium, the tentacles and the margin of the umbrella, where they form a sensory ciliated epithelium covering the nerve-centres; in the second place, the sense-cells are concentrated to form definite sense-organs, situated always at the margin of the umbrella, hence often termed " marginal bodies."
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  • We can distinguish (I) digestive endoderm, in the stomach, often with special glandular elements; (2) circu-, latory endoderm, in the radial and ring canals; (3) supporting endoderm in the axes of the tentacles and in the endodermlamella; the latter is primitively a double layer of cells, produced by concrescence OC-- = w.?"
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  • - Trophosome only known in one genus (Polycanna), and similar to the preceding; gonosome, free medusae with otocysts and with at least eight radial canals, often a hundred or more, simple or branched.
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  • When otocysts are present, they are at least eight in number, situated adradially, but are often very numerous.
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  • Eight very broad radial canals; ex-umbrella often provided with lateral outgrowths; tentacles differing in size, but in a single row.
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  • The mesogloea is greatly developed in them and they are often of very tough consistency.
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  • Aristotle's teleological conception of organic evolution often approaches modern mechanical conceptions.
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  • A form of apocentricity extremely common and often perplexing may be termed pseudocentric; in such a condition there is an apparent simplicity that tive anatomy.
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  • His image and name are often found on "votive hands," a kind of talisman adorned with emblems, the nature of which is obscure.
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  • But the same person was often official of both courts.
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  • On the European continent the courts Christian often carried.
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  • Disputed cases of contract were more often tried in the secular courts.
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  • catta, but the English name "lemur" is often taken to include all the members of the sub-order, although the aberrant forms are often conveniently termed "lemuroids."
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  • catta) often dwells among rocks.
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  • The registry of the citizens, the suppression of litigation, the elevation of public morals, the care of minors, the retrenchment of public expenses, the limitation of gladiatorial games and shows, the care of roads, the restoration of senatorial privileges, the appointment of none but worthy magistrates, even the regulation of street traffic, these and numberless other duties so completely absorbed his attention that, in spite of indifferent health, they often kept him at severe labour from early morning till long after midnight.
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  • His position, indeed, often necessitated his presence at games and shows, but on these occasions he occupied himself either in reading, in being read to, or in writing notes.
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  • The coasts are fairly indented, and, protected by these reefs, which often support a chain of green islets, afford many good harbours and safe anchorages.
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  • Charters granted to seaports often stipulated that the town should send so many herrings or other fish to the king annually during Lent.
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