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of-colour

of-colour Sentence Examples

  • Related to abnormalities of colour we may expect to find corresponding polarization effects.

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  • A very fine freshwater fish is the Murray cod, which sometimes weighs Too lb; and the golden perch, found in the same river, has rare beauty of colour.

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  • There is throughout his works more balancing of colour than fineness of tone.

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  • In 1834 he was appointed professor of physics, but in 5839 contracted an affection of the eyes while studying the phenomena of colour and vision, and, after much suffering, resigned.

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  • Polo, a late central Gothic building (1380-1400) which Ruskin describes as "of the finest kind and superb in its effect of colour when seen from the side.

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  • At the inception of the industry kerosene came into the market as a dark yellow or reddish-coloured liquid, and in the first instance, the removal of colour was attempted by treatment with soda lye and lime solution.

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  • 1 7, p. 1 347), who has also suggested the use of manganese carbonate instead of magnesite, since the change of colour enables one to follow the decomposi 411=ThEIZ P; FIG.

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  • The amino group is more powerful than the hydroxyl, and the substituted amino group more powerful still; the repeated substitution of hydroxyl groups sometimes causes an intensification and sometimes a diminution of colour.

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  • A theory of colour in opposition to the Witt theory was proposed by Henry Armstrong in 1888 and 1892.

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  • The theories of colour have also been investigated by Hantzsch, who first considered the nitro-phenols.

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  • The views as to the question of colour and constitution may be summarized as follows: - (i) The quinone theory (Armstrong, Gomberg, R.

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  • (3) If a colourless compound gives a coloured one on solution or by salt-formation, the production of colour may be explained as a particular form of ionization (Baeyer), or by a molecular rearrangement (Hantzsch).

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  • Amongst the breeds which are valued for the distribution of colour on the fur are the Himalayan and the Dutch.

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  • When the news of this reached Paris, it created a strong feeling against the planters; and on the motion of the Abbe Gregoire it was resolved by the assembly on the 15th of May 1791 " that the people of colour resident in the French colonies, born of free parents, were entitled to, as of right, and should be allowed, the enjoyment of all the privileges of French citizens, and among others those of being eligible to seats both in the parochial and colonial assemblies."

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  • In 1828 the free people of colour in the colonies were placed on a footing of legal equality with their fellow-citizens.

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  • Molluscs are extraordinarily numerous; and many, both of water and land, are rarities among their kind for size and richness of colour.

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  • The sexes are separate, and when mature are sometimes distinguished by small differences of colour in the genital region.

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  • Though, in the embroidery of vestments, many colours may be used, these five above named must severally give the dominant tone of colour on the occasions for which they are appointed.

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  • This plain diaphanous garment, without distinction of colour (white, red or yellow), and with perhaps only an embroidered hem at the top, was worn by the whole nation, princess and peasant, from the IVth to the XVIIIth Dynasties (Erman, Life in Ancient Egypt, p. 212).

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  • The oil separates from the fat-cells and is found lying free, while the sulphuretted hydrogen evolved as one of the products of putrefaction reacts upon the iron of the blood and throws down a precipitate of sulphide of iron, which in course of time imparts to the limb a range of colour commencing in green and terminating in black.

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  • They pass through a viscous stage in cooling from a state of fluidity; they develop effects of colour when the glass mixtures are fused with certain metallic oxides; they are, when cold, bad conductors both of electricity and heat, they are easily fractured by a blow or shock and show a conchoidal fracture; they are but slightly affected by ordinary solvents, but are readily attacked by hydrofluoric acid.

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  • Little is known about the actual cause of colour in glass beyond the fact that certain materials added to and melted with certain glass-mixtures will in favourable circumstances produce effects of colour.

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  • Touches of colour may be added to vessels in course of manufacture by means of seals of molten glass, applied like sealing-wax; or by causing vessels to wrap themselves round with threads or coils of coloured glass.

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  • Great variety of colour may be obtained by flashing one colour upon another, such as blue on green, and ruby on blue, green or yellow.

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  • In these every colour and every shade of colour seem to have been tried in groat variety of combination with effects more or less pleasing, but transparent violet or purple appears to have been the most common ground colour.

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  • The changeability of colour may remind us of the " calices versicolores " which Hadrian sent to Servianus.

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  • The two latter pictures were marked by the rhythm of line and luxury of colour which are among the most constant attributes of his art, and may be regarded as his first dreams of Oriental beauty, with which he afterwards showed so great a sympathy.

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  • By the end of August 1885, when a political crisis had supervened between Great Britain and Russia, under the orders of the Amir the Mosalla was destroyed; but four minars standing at the corners of the wide plinth still remain to attest to the glorious proportions of the ancient structure, and to exhibit samples of that decorative tilework, which for intricate beauty of design and exquisite taste in the blending of colour still appeals to the memory as unique.

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  • Its carpets have a great reputation in the Balkan Peninsula for their quaint designs, durability and freshness of colour.

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  • caniceps, but goes through no seasonal change of colour.

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  • (Among the councillors returned at the election of 1904 was Dr Abdurrahman, a Mahommedan and a graduate of Edinburgh, this being, it is believed, the first instance of the election of a man of colour to any European representative body in South Africa.) The municipality owns the water and lighting services.

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  • In some of the groups distinctions of colour are returned in general terms; in others, not at all.

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  • The people of colour in 1906 numbered 53,000, including 2300 Chinese and 6500 Maori half-castes.

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  • He began his labours with The Age of Casimir the Great (1848), and Boleslaw the Brave (1849), following these with Jadwiga and Jagiello, in three volumes (1855-1856) - a work which Spasovich, in his Russian History of Slavonic Literature, compares in vigour of style and fullness of colour with Macaulay's History of England and Thierry's Norman Conquest.

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  • The absence of colour changes in variable stars or in the appearance of new stars is further evidence of the same fact.

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  • Albinos seem to be rather common; and as in other fishes (for instance, the tench, carp, eel, flounder), the colour of most of these albinos is a bright orange or golden yellow; occasionally even this shade of colour is lost, the fish being more or less pure white or silvery.

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  • Meyer (Be y ., 1880, 1 3, p. 394), who found that the change of colour was accompanied by a change of vapour density.

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  • The average length is about 40 in., and the general tone of colour tawny mingled with black and white above and whitish below, the tail having a black tip and likewise a dark glandpatch near the root of the upper surface.

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  • There is, however, considerable local variation both in the matter of size and of colour from the typical coyote of Iowa, which measures about 50 in.

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  • Discharging " is the method generally used by the English, and results in a silk having brilliance and purity of colour.

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  • Caesar, moreover, says that the clans or kindreds to whom the lands were allotted changed their abodes also from year to year - a statement which gives a certain amount of colour to Strabo's description of the Germani as quasi-nomadic. Yet there is good reason for believing that this representation of early Teutonic life was by no means universally true.

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  • A moment's consideration, however, will show that, while an albino may be an individual in which one or more of the complementary bodies of pigmentation are absent, a pigmented animal is something more than an individual which carries all the factors necessary for the development of colour.

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  • The water of many of the springs contains sulphur, iron, alum and other materials in solution, which in places stain the pure white sinter with bright bands of colour.

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  • It clothes the chalk cuttings on some English railways with a sheet of colour in the blooming season.

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  • Among the enzymes already extracted from fungi are invertases (yeasts, moulds, &c.), which split cane-sugar and other complex sugars with hydrolysis into simpler sugars such as dextrose and levulose; diastases, which convert starches into sugars (Aspergillus, &c.); cytases, which dissolve cellulose similarly (Botrytis, &c.); peptases, using the term as a general one for all enzymes which convert proteids into peptones and other bodies (Penicillium, &c.); lipases, which break up fatty oils (Empusa, Phycomyces, &c.); oxydases, which bring about the oxidations and changes of colour observed in Boletus, and zymase, extracted by Buchner from yeast, which brings about the conversion of sugar into alcohol and carbondioxide.

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  • As regards density of colour the skunk or black marten has the blackest fur, and some cats of the domestic kind, specially reared for their fur, are nearly black.

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  • They have long been known as "sables," doubtless owing to the density of colour to which many of them attain, and they have always been held in the highest esteem by connoisseurs as possessing a combination of rare qualities.

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  • The Yakutsk, Okhotsk and Kamschatka sorts are good, the last being the largest and fullest furred, but of less density of colour than the others.

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  • A furrier or skin merchant must possess a good eye for colour to be successful, the difference in value on this subtle matter solely (in the rarer precious sorts, especially sables, natural black, silver and blue fox, sea otters, chinchillas, fine mink, &c.) being so considerable that not only a practised but an intuitive sense of colour is necessary to accurately determine the exact merits of every skin.

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  • The permanency of colour by which they are distinguished is attributed to the properties of the water of the Stour, which is impregnated with iron and fuller's earth.

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  • This change of colour is chiefly occasioned by the diminished circulation in the leaves, and the higher degree of oxidation to which their chlorophyll has been submitted.

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  • When chemically pure, which is rarely the case, blende is colourless and transparent; usually, however, the mineral is yellow, brown or black, and often opaque, the depth of colour and degree of transparency depending on the amount of iron present.

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  • In 1887 the town was made a commune on the French model, all citizens irrespective of colour being granted the franchise.

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  • When there has been much apparent movement, and brilliant changes of colour in the aurora, magnetic disturbance has nearly always accompanied it.

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  • Cultivated forms of this, with exquisite shades of colour and without any blotch at the base of the petals, are known as Shirley poppies.

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  • Many hybrid forms of varying shades of colour have been raised of late years.

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  • To the eye, however, members of this group present a greater variety of colour than those of any other - yellow, brown, olive, red, purple, violet and variations of all these being known.

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  • The spirit of beauty breathes in every line; a sense of music and of colour is everywhere abundant; the reader moves, as it were, under a canopy of apple-blossom, over a flower-starred turf, to the faint harmony of virginals.

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  • The play of colour is exquisite, the basalt combining every tint of warm red, brown and rich maroon; sea-weeds and lichens paint the cave green and gold; while the lime that has filtered through has crusted the pillars here and there a pure snow-white.

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  • The superior beauty of colour and durability of old specimens of lead is owing to the natural presence of a small proportion of silver.

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  • In 1754 Euler communicated to the Berlin Academy a further memoir, in - which, starting from the hypothesis that light consists of vibrations excited in an elastic fluid by luminous bodies, and that the difference of colour of light is due to the greater or less frequency of these vibrations in a given time, he deduced his previous results.

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  • A possible change of colour in the case of Sirius is noteworthy.

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  • The brighter stars show a marked variety of colour in their light, and with the aid of a telescope a still greater diversity is noticeable.

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  • Indeed, even prior to the definite establishment of the caste-system, the mingling of the lower race with the upper classes, especially with the aristocratic landowners and still more so with the yeomanry, had probably been going on to such an extent as to have resulted in two fairly well-defined intermediate types of colour between the priestly order and the servile race and to have facilitated the ultimate division into four" colours "(varna).

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  • But, on the other hand, the essentially human nature of these two gods 1 As in the case of Siva's traditional white complexion, it may not be without significance, from a racial point of view, that Vishnu, Rama and Krishna have various darker shades of colour attributed to them, viz.

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  • Amphioxus is a small fish-like creature attaining a maximum length of about 3 in., semitransparent in appearance, showing iridescent play of colour.

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  • The standard of colour required for certain quantities is maintained by the addition of color.

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  • "Pale," in the sense of colourless, whitish, of a shade of colour lighter than the normal, is derived through O.

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  • The doublings play a very important part in the appearance of the ultimate rove and yarn, for the chief reason for doubling threads or slivers is to minimize irregularities of thickness and of colour in the material.

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  • He investigated the optical constants of the eye, measured by his invention, the ophthalmometer, the radii of curvature of the crystalline lens for near and far vision, explained the mechanism of accommodation by which the eye can focus within certain limits, discussed the phenomena of colour vision, and gave a luminous account of the movements of the eyeballs so as to secure single vision with two eyes.

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  • It is this circumstance which gives rise to the phenomenon of colour.

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  • Such pairs of colour may be regarded as infinite in number; but there are three pairs which stand out prominently, and admit of easy expression for the ratio in which each contributes to the total action.

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  • He displays a fine sense of colour and tone, added to the qualities of life and vigour that he instils into his plastic work.

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  • The equality of all free Hottentots and other free persons of colour with the white colonists was decreed in that year (1820).

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  • This wealth of colour gives to the scenery of Portugal a quite distinctive character and is the one feature common to all its varieties.

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  • The earlier artists at Newlyn were said to have selected it as their centre, because a greyness in the atmosphere helped their depiction of subtleties in tone, part of their creed being subordination of colour to tone-gradation.

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  • From the lower part of a carpel are produced several laterally placed ovules, which become bright red or orange on ripening; the bright fleshy seeds, which in some species are as large as a goose's egg, and the tawny spreading carpels produce a pleasing combination of colour in the midst of the long dark-green fronds, which curve gracefully upwards and outwards from the summit of the columnar stem.

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  • Balcescu had undertaken the edition of the ancient Walachian chronicles, and had found in them admirable prose writers, that he ventured on a continuous history (1851-52) of the Rumanians under Michael the Brave, written not as a didactic treatise but as a poem in prose - full of colour and of energy.

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  • After a remark that microscopes seem as capable of improvement as telescopes, he adds: " I shall now proceed to acquaint you with another more notable difformity in its Rays, wherein the Origin of Colour is unfolded: Concerning which I shall lay down the Doctrine first, and then, for its examination, give you an instance or two of the Experiments, as a specimen of the rest.

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  • Whence it follows that all things to which men attribute reality, generation and destruction, being and not-being, change of place, alteration of colour are no more than empty words.

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  • Many mammals have a longer hairy coat in winter, which is shed as summer comes on; and some few, which inhabit countries covered in winter with snow, as the Arctic fox, variable hare and ermine, undergo a complete change of colour in the two seasons, being white in winter and grey or brown in summer.

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  • At the present day they are extremely bare, and in this respect almost repellent; but the lack of colour is compensated by the delicacy of the outlines, the minute articulation of the minor ridges and valleys, and the symmetrical grouping of the several mountains.

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  • In addition to the distribution of colour thereby produced, there is a marked difference in the form of the figure, according to the nature of the electricity originally communicated to the plate.

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  • Wollaston made the experiment in 1802, and perceived the spaces of colour to be interrupted by seven obscure gaps, which took the shape of lines owing to his use of rectangular slit.

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  • The phenomenon of colour may, however, be obtained with thick plates by superposing two of them in a suitable manner, the combination acting as a thicker or a thinner plate according as the planes of polarization of the quicker waves within them are parallel or crossed.

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  • Crossed, inclined and horizontal dispersion are characterized respectively by a distribution of colour that is symmetrical with respect to the centre alone, the plane of the optic axes, and the perpendicular plane.

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  • From 1855 to 1872 he published at intervals a series of valuable investigations connected with the " Perception of Colour " and " Colour-Blindness," for the earlier of which he received the Rumford medal from the Royal Society in 1860.

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  • Below the mosaics the walls and arches are covered with rare marbles, porphyries and alabaster from ancient columns sawn into slices and so arranged in broad bands as to produce a rich gamut of colour.

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  • There were in 1789 a number of mulattoes in Paris, who had come from San Domingo to assert the rights of the people of colour in that colony before the national assembly.

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  • The liquid boils at about 22° C. This change of colour is accompanied by a change in the vapour density, and is explained by the fact that nitrogen peroxide consists of a mixture of a colourless compound N204, and a redbrown gas N02, the latter increasing in amount at the expense of the former as the temperature is raised (G.

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  • Fashion has, moreover, set fictitious values upon slight shades of colour.

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  • The breadth of the Indian face is one centimetre more than that of the whites, and the half-breeds are nearer the Indian standard; this last is true also of colour in the skin, eyes and hair.

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  • There is a prejudice against the use of the binder in reaping barley, as it is impossible to secure uniformity of colour in the grain when the stalks are tightly tied in the sheaf, and the sun has not free access to those on the inside.

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  • What are called "feathered" flowers are those which have an even close feathering, forming an unbroken edging of colour all round, "flamed" flowers being those which have a beam or bold mark down the centre, not reaching to the bottom of the cup.

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  • Although the term sapphire is primarily applied to blue corundum, it is often used in a general sense so as to include all corundum of gem quality, regardless of colour.

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  • XXoopos, pale green), the botanical term for loss of colour in a plant-organ, a sign of disease; also in medicine, a form of anaemia (see BLOOD: Pathology).

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  • More adjectives appear, including adjectives of colour.

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