Of-an sentence example

of-an
  • I didn't have much of an idea about the cost of raising children then, either.
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  • She counted the seconds in tense silence, waiting for the sound of an explosion, but the only sound was a car approaching from below.
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  • Like an Avon notice on a doorknob, the tracks in the mud were proof of an unobserved visit.
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  • She stammered, trying to think of an excuse why she couldn't go.
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  • Sarah's expression went from surprise to joy in the blink of an eye.
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  • What kind of an evening did he have planned?
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  • Was it because of an ongoing investigation?
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  • It reminded her of an Arkansas weather joke she once heard.
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  • The building she had spent more than a month trying to get into and now was the site of an open house.
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  • I knew I'd have to talk to you about it sooner or later, but I didn't want to hold the financial burden of an unplanned pregnancy over your head like a club.
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  • Well-worn furniture populated the homey main room, some no doubt the envy of an antique shop.
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  • Our spectacular triumph was the return of an infant from a small Texas hospital.
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  • I told him I had no idea how you accomplished what you did but you were a crystal ball of an asset to us.
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  • The perpetrator proved to be a thirteen year old girl, scarcely known to the victim, jealous of an older boy's changing affections.
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  • Howie stayed with him through most of an uneventful meal before waking back to the present.
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  • Successes were limited for the week with one found child, accidently trapped in a locked room of an empty house and one spousal abduction, in the face of a restraining order.
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  • On the record, tell the public this; you've been led to believe the psychic tipster is a woman of an age able to collect social security.
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  • We adults passed banalities back and forth while Howie opened wine, of an obvious expensive vintage us Gustefsons only admired.
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  • This killer left the scene of an aborted breaking where he was seeking more information on the tipster after he was wounded.
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  • Then, she heard the cry of an infant in the background.
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  • While taking care of an infant?
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  • I'd passed over the story of an abandoned infant in a Logan Airport rest room.
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  • In the distance, she heard the familiar, unmistakable sound of an explosion.
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  • Jule drew a deep breath and faced the small, grandfatherly man with eyes the color of an Irish meadow.
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  • She started to hand him what looked like an intricate carving in the side of an orange.
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  • She looked down, both thrilled by the idea of an eternity with the man who made her feel whole and horrified at what her father told her.
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  • "You'll need the help of an Original Being or two for that," Jule said.
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  • "Who the hell put a pool here?" he demanded, pulling his right foot out of the shallow end of an in-ground pool.
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  • Either they were all huge enough to come straight out of an action movie, or her drugs had not yet worn off.
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  • In the words of an Oracle I once knew, get used to it.
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  • The thought of an eternity with someone incapable of caring for her was a nightmare beyond those she had already lived.
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  • She was in the middle of an unfamiliar, tall hallway.
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  • Deidre asked, her new instincts warning her of an attempt at deception.
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  • Deidre had no idea what to say and even less of an idea what exactly happened when the deal was over.
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  • My old man beat me like a tom-tom at an Indian dance and he didn't need that much of an excuse.
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  • Then she added, "Even though I don't have a flick of an idea what you're talking about."
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  • While the theft of the bone cast a pall on the upcoming activity, the anticipation of an outing in the mountains helped brighten their mood.
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  • They crossed Canyon Creek and the site of an avalanche a few years earlier, now evidenced by the rubble of broken, twisted trees and displaced earth.
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  • The only sound in the apartment was the quiet whir of an electric clock.
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  • She may be using you, but I have no doubt I'd rather be in your position right now than Mr. Fitzgerald's—the wrath of an angry woman is something to behold!
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  • Nobody would believe a kid against the word of an adult.
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  • "The wrath of an angry woman is something to behold," Dean muttered.
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  • "Immortal Law states that the mate of an immortal or deity is beyond –" "Immortal Law!" the first one laughed again.
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  • Right now, she felt like she was on the verge of an important breakthrough with Gabriel.
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  • It was less an instinct and more of an absence of something.
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  • Carmen saw Alex's truck parked in the drive of an old vacant house where she had admired some healthy quince bushes.
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  • Tests gave no indication of an underlying cause.
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  • It would help to think of him as Alex, instead of an empty shell.
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  • There are no locks on the doors or windows, and only one route of egress in the case of an emergency.
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  • "Son, bring him here," Andre said with the gruffness of an older brother.
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  • The power of an Ancient is beyond anything humans can understand.
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  • Deidre turned to see the blonde woman standing in front of an open wardrobe.
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  • Gabriel's lover and master, the deity Death, materialized beside him at the Oracle's altar in the center of an ancient fortress in the Sanctuary.
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  • He wasn't really sure Rhyn would consider being sentenced to eternity with a mate much of an improvement over Hell.
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  • In the darkness, he wasn't reminded of an ache he'd killed long ago, that which reminded him he once knew what it was to feel the warmth of the sun on his human skin.
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  • In the distance, she saw the blue of an ocean meet the horizon.
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  • He'd gone from being tormented by his own mother to the affection of an abusive father who regretted ever having him.
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  • With his small frame and bright eyes, he'd always reminded her of an elf of some sort.
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  • They stood in front of an airy, light tent resembling a silk sheet suspended in midair over a table.
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  • Her gaze was immediately riveted to that of an alien unlike those of Romas's clan.
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  • The pictographs said nothing of an earthquake!
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  • They raced through the quaking halls toward the entrance, all while the strange roar of an ocean grew louder.
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  • It ought to be something of an annoyance to him if everybody keeps hounding him to do something he so obviously don't want to do.
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  • The new Beaumont hotel was all a glitter in preparation of an affair of some high social order and there was a general excitement everywhere.
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  • And yet, if Cynthia should be in need of an ultimate expression of his love, how would he respond?
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  • The only response was the echo of an unanswered ring.
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  • Claire Quincy turned and stared at him, as if waiting for the quid pro quo of an if-you-don't-tell, I-won't-tell agreement of some sort.
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  • He felt as if he had swallowed the contents of an ashbin while embers still lived.
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  • She was dressed impeccably in Chanel, and definitely had the stringent experession of an ignored wife.
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  • It was evident that each and every item had been carefully chosen; clearly the home of an artist.
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  • To throw that away because of an accident of circumstance would be a tragedy.
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  • That may be your idea of an ideal relationship, but I had to get away from him if I was going to have a life of my own.
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  • "Put me down," she managed on the end of an agonized moan.
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  • They worked over Brutus for the better part of an hour and finally Alex leaned back and stretched.
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  • Hands over her ears, she took a deep breath and hurried up them, all but flinging herself into the arms of an awaiting rebel soldier.
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  • You've got the innards of an eighteen-year-old.
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  • "I'm saying, the mate of an Ancient or any Immortal is preordained.  No one can break that bond, not even Death," Toby answered.
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  • Raid is a bit of an overstatement.
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  • Kris looked at him, anger building.  The muscular half-demon was bleeding from a wound in his chest.  His dark eyes glowed like a demon's, though his face was still that of an Immortal.
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  • He meticulously kept his stats, listing his infrequent ups with the care of an accountant.
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  • Any suggestion of an open window shade or even a night-light was summarily dismissed.
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  • The level of activity at Norfolk Police Headquarters made Parkside's much smaller operation look like the front porch of an old folk home.
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  • They had vaguely remembered Jeffrey Byrne from his repeat trips, but Byrne hadn't made much of an impression on anyone.
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  • This is sort of an inventory of the stuff.
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  • News of the break-in on Collingswood Avenue had traveled with the speed of an Olympic sprinter through the Parkside, Pennsylvania police department.
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  • Occasionally a little breeze puffed in but it was more of an annoyance than a help, scattering papers and patience in a hot breath of sweat and exhaust.
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  • Jonathan was a prince to behold, suave beyond description, and with silver-tongued oratory, he calmed the fears of an entire city.
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  • He couldn't think of an appropriate comeback and found himself staring down at her drink.
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  • It was unreal rocketing down this mountain, in pursuit of an unknown someone, one minute, surely Jeffrey Byrne, the next minute someone else.
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  • Dean caught a flash of Burgess's smile in the light of an arriv­ing car.
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  • With the exception of an occasional remark or look, her daughters obeyed.
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  • Grabbing the worn roots of an old tree, she climbed out of the pool.
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  • His idea of an evening out was dinner and a dance.
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  • Unfortunately, she couldn't think of an explanation that would be true and make him feel better.
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  • It took her the better part of an hour to locate the cow, and if it hadn't been for the white form that raced out to meet them, she might have missed the cow in the hollow with her two calves.
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  • We're in the middle of an electrical storm.
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  • It had the stale smell of an abandoned building.
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  • For the better part of an hour they gazed down on the scene below and discussed her plans for the dude ranch.
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  • Each obelisk listed the members of an immortal household and their offspring.
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  • She glanced up, unhappy at how little of an effect her magic had on him.
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  • Darian looked around, expecting to see her again beneath the shade of an apple tree, as beautiful as she was deadly with the daggers she wore at her waist.
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  • She stepped into the cool night ahead of an occupied Sirian and threw her head back to see the half-moon.
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  • "You need more of an angle when you deflect," he told her.
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  • She withdrew the broken shaft of an arrow from a pocket and handed it to him.
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  • She had enraged two powerful men this day, and all within a span of an hour!
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  • The wall warlord had set up a small table in the mouth of an alley between two buildings and was surrounded by several men.
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  • In spite of an agonizing pulse, she responded flippantly.
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  • A hushed silence fell over the verandah and the strains of an old song filtered soft music through the air.
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  • He didn't know what lay inside the dome, but he saw how large of an area it incorporated.
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  • She'll need to see a doctor in a couple of days for follow up shots, and you need to watch the bite wounds for signs of an infection.
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  • Despite being over six feet tall, Charles was no more of an obstacle than Jessi's small body.
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  • That the godling with the hormones of a teen might have more of an interest in the girl never crossed Xander's mind.
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  • The next time he emerged, it was to catch the body of an Other that Darian flung over his head.
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  • He took a bite out of an ice cream bar he found in the refrigerator.
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  • He felt the cool power of an Oracle move through Jessi and into him.
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  • It also becomes clear that only where such mental life really appears need we assign an independent existence, but that the purposes of everyday life as well as those of science are equally served if we deprive the material things outside of us of an independence, and assign to them merely a connected existence through the universal substance by the action of which alone they can appear to us.
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  • After having preached the gospel in Wiirzburg, the whole party were put to death by the orders of an unjust judge named Gozbert.
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  • 28) which took the place of an older town called Ausona (id.
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  • Nothing was stated as to the probability of an increase in the stature of the French Congo animal as it grows older; but even if we allow another foot, its height would be considerably less than half that of a large Central African bull of the ordinary elephant.
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  • Throughout the divorce proceedings Warham's position was essentially that of an old and weary man.
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  • Rienzi's life and fate have formed the subject of a famous novel by Bulwer Lytton, of an opera by Wagner and of a tragedy by Julius Mosen.
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  • On Castle Hill, in the vicinity, are the remains of an earthwork, said to have been raised by Edward the Elder in 924.
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  • His grandfather, Gregorio Brunacci, of an ancient family of Pisa, had changed his name in order to become heir to a certain marchese di Consalvi.
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  • The story that Pyrrhus attempted to frighten Fabricius by the sight of an elephant is probably a fiction.
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  • During his tenancy of office the system adopted at Shanghai was applied to the other treaty ports, so that when on Mr Lay's resignation Mr Hart was appointed inspector-general of foreign customs, he found himself at the head of an organization which collected a revenue of upwards of eight million taels per annum at fourteen treaty ports.
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  • The story of Ishtar's descent is told to illustrate the possibility of an escape from Irkalla, while the other myth is intended to reconcile the existei:ce of two rulers of Irkalla - a goddess and a god.
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  • In both novels I pointed out the dangers and pains of an ill-assorted marriage.
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  • She has all the abandon of an Italian improvisatore, the simplicity of a Bernardin de St Pierre without his mawkishness, the sentimentality of a Rousseau without his egotism, the rhythmic eloquence of a Chateaubriand without his grandiloquence.
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  • This has come down to us through a Latin version of an Arabic manuscript; it cannot, however, have been written by Archimedes in its present form, as his name is quoted in it more than once.
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  • Many species of Thysanoptera are known to be habitually parthenogenetic. The eggs are laid on the food-plant, those females possessed of an ovipositor cutting through the epidermis and placing their eggs singly within the plant-tissues; a single female may take five or six weeks to deposit all her eggs.
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  • There are even records of an Anaphothrips, when cut off from its normal vegetable foodsupply, becoming cannibalistic and feeding on its own species.
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  • Rattazzi, frightened at the prospect of an attack upon Rome, proclaimed a state of siege in Sicily, sent the fleet to Messina, and instructed Cialdini to oppose Garibaldi.
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  • Taking i volt equal 1/300 of an electrostatic unit, we find M =0.000265.
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  • It is a clear case of an ancient frontier laid out in American fashion.
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  • He may veto a bill, or in case of an appropriation bill, the separate items, but this veto may be overridden by a simple majority of the total membership of each house.
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  • Worship of an emperor during his lifetime, except as the worship of his genius, was, save in the cases of Caligula and Domitian, confined to the provinces.
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  • The most significant was the liberation, at the moment of kindling the funeral pyre, of an eagle which was supposed to bear the emperor's soul to heaven.
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  • And this is when he is carried out of himself, when the discordant qualities of his genius are, so to say, fused together by the electric spark of an immediate inspiration.
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  • At length the turning point in his career came in the shape of an invitation for him and his father to accompany Captain Cook in his third voyage round the world.
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  • The best testimony for the behaviour of Orleans during this summer is the testimony of an English lady, Mrs Grace Dalrymple Elliott, who shared his heart with the comtesse de Buffon, and from which it is absolutely certain that at the time of the riot of the 12th of July he was on a fishing excursion, and was rudely treated by the king on the next day when going to offer him his services.
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  • At an early date Hastings was placed in charge of an aurang or factory in the interior, where his duties would be to superintend the weaving of silk and cotton goods under a system of money advances.
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  • When at Falta he had married Mrs Buchanan, the widow of an officer.
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  • The Bhonsla Mahratta raja of Nagpur, whose dominions bordered on Bengal, was won over by the diplomacy of an emissary of Hastings.
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  • He founded the Madrasa or college for Mahommedan education at Calcutta, primarily out of his own funds; and he projected the foundation of an Indian institute in England.
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  • Cochin-China consists chiefly of an immense plain, flat and monotonous, traversed by the Mekong and extending from Ha-Tien in the west to Baria in the east, and from Bien-Hoa in the north-east to the southern point of the peninsula of Ca-Mau in the south-west.
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  • It began to be recognized also that stereotyped punishments, such as belong to penal codes, fail to take due account of the particular condition of an offence and the character and circumstances of the offender.
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  • In the old town of Bridlington the church of St Mary and St Nicholas consists of the fine Decorated and Perpendicular nave, with Early English portions, of the priory church of an Augustinian foundation of the time of Henry I.
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  • At the general elections of 1881 after the fall of the Ferry cabinet he was returned to the chamber on a programme which included the separation of Church and State, a policy of decentralization, and the imposition of an income-tax.
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  • It was founded (perhaps on the site of an early Sicanian settlement) by colonists from Gela about 582 B.C., and, though the lastest city of importance founded by the Greeks in Sicily, soon acquired a position second to that of Syracuse alone, owing to its favourable situation for trade with Carthage and to the fertility of its territory.
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  • With a power of 460 the scale was a quarter of an inch for every second.
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  • The plane surfaces and XX are composed of a bronze of very close texture, which appears capable of receiving a finish having almost the truth and polish of an optical surface.
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  • The consecrated wafer shared by Lohengrin and the swan on their voyage is one of the more obvious means taken by the poet to give the tale the character of an allegory of the .relations between Christ, the Church and the human soul.
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  • The minority, among whom were prominent Ca" "pals Rauscher and Schwarzenberg, Hefele, bishop of Rotterdam (the historian of the councils) Cardinal Mathieu, Mgr Dupanloup, Mgr Maret, &c., &c., did not pretend to deny the papal infallibility; they pleaded the inopportuneness of the definition and brought forward difficulties mainly of an historical order, in particular the famous condemn ion of Pope Honorius by the 6th ecumenical council of Const: ntinople in 680.
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  • He was, too, ever the friend of religious freedom and of an enlightened policy in all trade questions.
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  • Eastward of the present city, amongst the mounds and ruins of the old town, in a dilapidated chamber adjoining a bluedomed building over the grave of an imamzadeh, is the tomb of the astronomer-poet Omar Khayyam, an unsightly heap of plaster without inscription, and probably fictitious.
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  • One of these breeds is the Paraguay cat, which when adult weighs only about three pounds, and is not more than a quarter the size of an ordinary cat.
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  • He was, according to his enemies, the son of an apothecary, his father being in fact a doctor of medicine of respectable family, who kept a small drug store as part of the necessary outfit of a country practitioner.
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  • In pure algebra Descartes expounded and illustrated the general methods of solving equations up to those of the fourth degree (and believed that his method could go beyond), stated the law which connects the positive and negative roots of an equation with the changes of sign in the consecutive terms, and introduced the method of indeterminate coefficients for the solution of equations.'
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  • We have therefore the idea of an infinite, perfect and all-powerful being - an idea which cannot be the creation of ourselves, and must be given by some being who really possesses all that we in idea attribute to him.
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  • To attach a clear and definite meaning to the Cartesian doctrine of God, to show how much of it comes from the Christian theology and how much from the logic of idealism, how far the conception of a personal being as creator and preserver mingles with the pantheistic conception of an infinite and perfect something which is all in all, would be to go beyond Descartes and to ask for a solution of difficulties of which he was 1 Ouvres, vi.
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  • Of the church in Ostia there is no authentic record before the 4th century A.D., though there are several Christian inscriptions of an earlier date; but the first bishop of Ostia of whom we have any certain knowledge dates from A.D.
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  • On the 16th of January 1547, he was crowned the first Russian tsar by the metropolitan of Moscow; on the 3rd of February in the same year he selected as his wife from among the virgins gathered from all parts of Russia for his inspection, Anastasia Zakharina-Koshkina, the scion of an ancient and noble family better known by its later name of Romanov.
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  • From the time of its foundation as a Greek colony to the present day it has always been a considerable emporium of commerce, and it was for two centuries and a half the capital of an empire.
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  • It was of the nature of a contract, entered into by mutual promise, the clasping of hands, and exchange of an agreement in writing (tabula hospitalis) or of a token (tessera or symbolum), and was rendered hereditary by the division of the tessera.
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  • Its most important industrial establishments are the mirror manufactory of St Gobain and the chemical works at Chauny, and the workshops and foundries of Guise, the property of an association of workpeople organized on socialistic lines and producing iron goods of various kinds.
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  • La Ferte-Milon has remains of an imposing ch�au of the 14th and 15th centuries with interesting fortifications.
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  • The ruined church at Longpont (13th century) is the relic of an important Cistercian abbey; Urcel and Mont-Notre-Dame have fine churches, the first entirely in the Romanesque style, the second dating from the 12th and 13th centuries, to which period the church at Braisne also belongs.
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  • He is described as of an athletic frame, though not taller than the common, and a white and ruddy complexion.
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  • There are two considerable fragments of an English alliterative romance on the subject written in the west midland dialect, and dating from the second half of the 14th century.
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  • The church of St Mary and St Modwen is classic in style, of the 18th century, but embodies some remains of an ancient Gothic building.
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  • Burton is the seat of an enormous brewing trade, representing nearly one-tenth of the total amount of this trade in the United Kingdom.
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  • The church, which contains numerous interesting monuments, possesses also the unusual feature of an apsidal Decorated chapel.
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  • Since the 5th century it has been the seat of an archbishop, who has now fifteen suffragans.
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  • The principal buildings are the town hall, the county buildings, the assembly rooms, occupying the site of an old Franciscan monastery, three hospitals, a convalescent home, the Smyllum orphanage and the Queen Victoria Jubilee fountain.
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  • About 1639 he entered upon the career of an itinerant preacher, and for preaching in various parts of Wales he was twice arrested in 1640; however, he was not punished and during the Civil War he preached in and around London.
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  • On the death of the amir Avicenna ceased to be vizier, and hid himself in the house of an apothecary, where, with intense assiduity, he continued the composition of his works.
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  • The fact that the kings were often absent from England, and that the justiciarship was held by great nobles or churchmen, made this office of an importance which at times threatened to overshadow that of the Crown.
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  • Instruction in the Albanian language is prohibited by the Turkish government for political reasons; a single exception has been made in the case of an American school for girls at Kortcha.
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  • "Cyclopean" structures were discovered by Hahn at Kretzunista, Arinista, and other sites in the district of Argyrokastro; the walls, partly "Cyclopean," of an ancient city (perhaps Bullis) are visible at Gradisti on the Viossa.
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  • At Khimara (anc. Chimaera) the remains of an old Greek city may still be seen; at Santi Quaranta (anc. Onchesmos) the walls and towers of a later town are in good preservation.
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  • In addition to this Bedouin organization there was the curious institution of an elective monarchy, some of whose kings are catalogued in Gen.
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  • In 1865 the synod of that province, in an urgent letter to the archbishop of Canterbury (Dr Longley), represented the unsettlement of members of the Canadian Church caused by recent legal decisions of the Privy Council, and their alarm lest the revived action of Convocation "should leave us governed by canons different from those in force in England and Ireland, and thus cause us to drift into the status of an independent branch of the Catholic Church."
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  • The loose soil on the banks of the river is every year carried away in great masses, and the channel has so widened as to render the recurrence of an overflow unlikely.
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  • In 1880 there was a memorable election riot under the guise of an anti-Chinese demonstration.
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  • Its bright red beak, the bare bluish skin surrounding its large grey eyes, and the tufts of elongated feathers springing vertically from its lores, give it a pleasing and animated expression; but its plumage generally is of an inconspicuous ochreous grey above and dull white beneath, - the feathers of the upper parts, which on the neck and throat are long and loose, being barred by fine zigzag markings of dark brown, while those of the lower parts are more or less striped.
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  • In 1526 he was sent out in command of an expedition fitted out for the purpose of determining by astronomical observations the exact line of demarcation, under the treaty of Tordesillas, between the colonizing spheres of Spain and Portugal, and of conveying settlers to the Moluccas.
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  • In 1573 Juan de Garay, at the head of an expedition despatched from Asuncion, founded the city of Santa Fe near the abandoned settlements of San Espiritu and Corpus Christi.
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  • Hitherto General Roca had been regarded only in his capacity as a soldier, and not from the point of view of an administrator.
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  • Embittered by his treatment in 1892, he openly preached the advisability of an armed rising to overthrow the existing administration.
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  • On the one hand it became necessary, in face of an inadequate harvest, to suspend in 1898 the application of the law on the import of corn.
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  • The sympathies of Dinarchus were in favour of an Athenian oligarchy under Macedonian control; but it should be remembered that he was not an Athenian citizen.
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  • (For the political history of Prince Alexander's reign, see Bulgaria.) Without any previous training in the art of government, the young prince from the outset found himself confronted with difficulties which would have tried the sagacity of an experienced ruler.
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  • Historically the battle is interesting because it was the last example of an encounter on a great scale between fleets of galleys and also because it was the last crusade.
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  • At Rome the hope of an alliance was encouraged, but on condition that Bocchus showed himself deserving of it.
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  • The excavations have laid bare several other buildings, including an altar, early propylaea, houses for the priests and remains of an earlier temple.
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  • The single species, which is a native of western and southern Australia, is about the size of an English squirrel, to which its long bushy tail gives it some resemblance; but it lives entirely on the ground, especially in sterile sandy districts, feeding on ants.
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  • A number of the principal inhabitants were carried captive to Babylon, and Jerusalem was reduced to the position of an insignificant town.
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  • Herod again raised the city to the position of an important capital, restoring the fortifications, and rebuilding the Temple from its foundations.
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  • After the second of these insurrections, Bethlen attempted a rapprochement with the court of Vienna on the basis of an alliance against the Turks and his own marriage with one of the Austrian archduchesses; but Ferdinand had no confidence in him and rejected his overtures.
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  • Holiness, " the perfect accordance of the will with the moral law," demands an endless progress; and " this endless progress is only possible on the supposition of an endless duration of the existence and personality of the same rational being (which is called the immortality of the soul)."
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  • Lastly positivism teaches a corporate instead of an individual immortality; man should desire to live on as a beneficent influence in the race.
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  • Crystals have the form of small, sharply defined cubes of an oliveor grass-green colour, and occur together in considerable numbers on the matrix of the specimens.
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  • The latter was begun by Henry of Guise in 1578, in place of an older château burnt by Louis XI.
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  • It rises in an imposing manner from the sea, on a gentle slope in the form of an amphitheatre.
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  • It consists in the main of an Archean block or " coign,"which still occupies nearly the whole of the western half of the continent, outcrops in north-eastern Queensland, forms the foundation of southern New South Wales and eastern Victoria, and is exposed in western Victoria, in Tasmania, and in the western flank of the Southern Alps of New Zealand.
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  • The " flame tree " is a most conspicuous feature of an Illawarra landscape, the largest racemes of crimson red suggesting the name.
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  • On the Gascoyne river, too, were seen natives of an olive colour, quite good-looking; and in the neighbourhood of Sydney rock-carvings have been also found.
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  • The hair is long, black or very dark auburn, wavy and sometimes curly, but never woolly, and the men have luxuriant beards and whiskers, often of an auburn tint, while the whole body inclines to hairiness.
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  • The Australians believed in spirits, generally of an evil nature, and had vague notions of an after-life.
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  • Eventually the difficulty was overcome by the device of an educational test based on the provisions of an act in operation in Natal.
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  • This conference adopted an address to the queen expressing its loyalty and attachment, and submitting certain resolutions which affirmed the desirability of an early union, under the crown, of the Australasian colonies, on principles just to all, and provided that the remoter Australasian colonies should be entitled to admission upon terms to be afterwards agreed upon, and that steps should be taken for the appointment of delegates to a national Australasian convention, to consider and report upon an adequate scheme for a federal convention.
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  • When the excitement consequent on the gold finds had subsided, there was a considerable reaction against the claims of Labour, and this was greatly helped by the congested state of the labour market; but the principle of an eight-hours day made progress, and was conceded in several trades.
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  • He crossed the Tigris, destroyed the towns and spoiled the tombs of Arbela; but when Artabanus advanced at the head of an army, he retired to Carrhae.
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  • On the 8th of December 1864, in the full vigour of his intellectual powers, he died of an attack of fever, ending in suffusion on the lungs.
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  • The result, was in Helmholtz's words, to establish beyond doubt that ordinary light consists of electrical vibrations in an all-pervading ether which possesses the properties of an insulator and of a magnetic medium.
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  • The moon-god is par excellence the god of nomadic peoples, their guide and protector at night when, during a great part of the year, they undertake their wanderings, just as the sun-god is the chief god of an agricultural people.
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  • To his translation (1530) of a Latin Chronicle and Description of Turkey, by a Transylvanian captive, which had been prefaced by Luther, he added an appendix holding up the Turks as in many respects an example to Christians, and presenting in lieu of the restrictions of Lutheran, Zwinglian and Anabaptist sects, the vision of an invisible spiritual church, universal in its scope.
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  • The highest mountain is believed to be Gunong Tahan, which forms part of an isolated range on the eastern side, between Pahang and Kelantan, and is estimated at about 8000 ft.
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  • So far as is known, the Malay Peninsula consists of an axial zone of crystalline rocks, flanked on each side by an incomplete band of sedimentary deposits.
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  • St Albans was also the headquarters of an attempted Fenian invasion of Canada in 1870.
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  • Friedrich Schlegel's wife, Dorothea, was the author of an unfinished romance, Florentin (1801), a Sammlung romantischer Dichtungen des Mittelalters (2 vols., 1804), a version of Lother and Mauler (1805), and a translation of Madame de Stael's.
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  • In both sacraments the death-bed baptism of an earlier age seems to survive, and they both fulfil a deep-seated need of the human spirit.
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  • The kasbah was begun in 1516 on the site of an older building, and served as the palace of the deys until the French conquest.
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  • In the town are scanty remains of an amphitheatre and theatre: near the church of La Trinita, higher up, are remains of a large reservoir.
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  • There are also traces of an aqueduct.
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  • In 1644 he had remonstrated at the removal by Crawford of an anabaptist lieutenant-colonel."
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  • Meanwhile all hopes of an accommodation with Charles were dispelled by his flight on the 11th of November from Hampton Court to Carisbroke Castle in the Isle of Wight, his Flight object being to negotiate independently with the Scots, the parliament and the army.
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  • Shortly afterwards he fell ill of an intermittent fever, but seemed to recover.
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  • From the surface to 500 fathoms the general form of the isothermals remains the same, except that instead of an equatorial maximum belt there is a focus of maximum temperature off the eastern coast of the United States.
    0
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  • The isothermals of mean surface temperature in the South Atlantic are in the lower latitudes of an cn- shape, temperatures being higher on the American than on the African side.
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  • The `EAXnvucwv OEpairEvruo lraen,uhTwv (De Curandis Graecorum Affectionibus) - written before 438 - is of an historical and apologetic character, very largely indebted to Clement of Alexandria and Eusebius; it aims at showing the advantages of Christianity as compared with " the moribund but still militant " Hellenism of the day, and deals with the assaults of pagan adversaries.
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  • The city has a public library (1905), and is the seat of an Institute of Telegraphy (founded in 1874; chartered in 1900) and of Valparaiso University (1873; formerly known as the Valparaiso Normal Training School).
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  • At Dijon his compositions attracted the attention of an inspector, who had him placed (1814) in the normal school, Paris.
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  • He early discovered his vocation as a preacher of indulgences; he combined the elocutionary gifts of a revivalist orator with the shrewdness of an auctioneer.
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  • Again, where a person has received money under circumstances which disentitle him to retain it, such as receiving payment of an account twice over, it can generally be recovered as a debt.
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  • In order to see whether the heat came out of the chips he compared the capacity for heat of the chips abraded by the boring bar with that of an equal quantity of the metal cut from the block by a fine saw, and obtained the same result in the two cases, from which he concluded that "the heat produced could not possibly have been furnished at the expense of the latent heat of the metallic chips."
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  • Hence he inferred that the amount of heat given up to the condenser of an engine when the engine is doing work must be less than when the same amount of steam is blown through the engine without doing any work.
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  • Thus the principle of Carnot involves the conclusion that a greater proportion of the heat possessed by a body at a high temperature can be converted into work than in the case of an equal quantity of heat possessed by a body at a low temperature, so that the availability of heat increases with the temperature.
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  • We have seen that the efficiency of an electromagnetic engine is greatest when the current is indefinitely small, and then the rate at which it works is also indefinitely small.
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  • He died on the 2nd of July 1816, having occupied his latter years in the composition and revision of an autobiography (published in 1817), which, with all its egotism and partiality, is a valuable work, and the chief authority for his life.
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  • Its contrasts are like those of an architectural scheme, not those of a landscape or a drama.
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  • Bach's conception of the function of an instrument is that it holds a regular part in a polyphonic scheme; and his blending of tones is like the blending of colours in a purely decorative design.
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  • When the trumpets take it up they make a remarkable change at its iith bar, for no other reason than that one of the notes, though perfectly within their scale, and, indeed, already produced by them in the very same bar, is so harmonized as to suggest the freedom of an instrument with a complete scale.
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  • The adult worm, which is of extremely minute size, the male being only Fi l sth and the female s of an inch in length inhabits the alimentary canal of man and many other carnivorous mammalia; the young bore their way into the tissues and become encysted in the muscles - within the muscle-bundles according to Leuckart, but in the connective tissue between them according to Chatin and others.
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  • After the second larval moult, he passes through a passive stage comparable to the pupa-stadium of an b insect, and during this stage, which occurs inside the root, the reproductive organs are perfected.
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  • During the excavations on Chatham Hill after 1758 a number of tumuli containing human remains, pottery, coins, &c., suggestive of an ancient settlement, were found.
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  • Sixty strokes of an ox-hide scourge were awarded for a brutal assault on a superior, both being amelu.
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  • The owner of an ox which gored a man on the street was only responsible for damages if the ox was known by him to be vicious, even if it caused death.
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  • In matters beyond the knowledge of men, as the guilt or innocence of an alleged wizard or a suspected wife, the ordeal by water was used.
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  • The authorship of an anonymous work, Squitinio della libertd Veneta, published at Mirandola in 1612, has been attributed to him.
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  • The receiving apparatus consisted of a multiplier, in the centre of which were pivoted one or two magnetic needles, which either indicated the message by the movement of an index or by striking two bells of different tone, or recorded it by making ink dots on a ribbon of paper.
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  • The electromotive force of each cell is i 07 volts and the resistance 3 ohms. The Fuller bichromate battery consists of an outer jar containing a solution of bichromate of potash and sulphuric acid, in which a plate of hard carbon is immersed; in the jar there is also a porous pot containing dilute sulphuric acid and a small quantity (2 oz.) of mercury, in which stands a stout zinc rod.
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  • The size of the accumulators employed varies from a cell capable of an output of 8 ampere-hours, to a size giving 750 ampere-hours.
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    0
  • In the earlier forms of instrument the record was made by embossing lines on a ribbon of paper by means of a sharp style fixed to one end of a lever, which carried at the other end the armature of an electromagnet.
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  • The arm which moves round over the segments rotates at the rate of three revolutions per second, and is kept in motion by means of an iron toothed wheel, the rim of which is set in close proximity to the poles of an electromagnet.
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  • The current then passes through the coils of an electromagnet, which releases the printing mechanism.
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  • Owing to the difficulty of maintaining perfect balance on duplexed cables, curb sending is not now used, but the signals are transmitted by means of an apparatus similar to the Wheatstone automatic transmitter used on land lines and differing from the latter only in regard to the alphabet employed; the signals from the transmitter actuate a relay having heavy armatures which in turn transmit the signals to the cable; this arrangement gives very firm signals, a point of great importance for good working.
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  • Visiting England in 1856, Field entered into an agreement with Bright and with John Watkins Brett, who with his brother Jacob had proposed the constructing of an Atlantic cable eleven years previously, with the object of forming a company for establishing and working electric telegraphic communication between Newfoundland and Ireland.
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  • He proposed that one ship should be provided with the means of making an interrupted current in a circuit formed partly of an insulated metallic wire connected with the sea at both ends by plates, and partly of the unlimited ocean.
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  • On one or more of the carriages of the trains were placed also insulated metallic sheets, which were in connexion through a telephone and the secondary circuit of an induction coil with the earth or rails.
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  • One of these was to be connected to the earth through a telephone receiver, and the other through the secondary circuit of an induction coil in the primary circuit of which was a key.
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    0
  • In circuit with this battery was placed the secondary circuit of an induction coil, the primary circuit of which contained a telephone transmitter or microphone interrupter.
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    0
  • But, as Branly showed, it is not universally true that the action of an electric wave is to reduce the resistance of a tube of powdered metal or cause the particles to cohere.
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  • ' For a more complete account of the nature of an electric wave the reader is referred to Hertz's Electric Waves, and to the article Electric Wave.
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  • This creates rapid variations in electric and magnetic force round the antenna and detaches energy from it in the form of an electric wave.
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  • At the next instant it is the seat of an electric current and is surrounded by closed lines of magnetic force.
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  • These spark balls are connected either to the secondary circuit of an induction coil I, or to that of an alternating current transformer having a secondary voltage of 20,000 to 100,000 volts.
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  • The lower ends of these wires are connected through the secondary coil of an oscillation transformer to an earth plate, or to a large conductor placed on or near the earth called a " balancing capacity."
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  • The transformer T has its secondary or high-pressure terminals connected to spark balls S1, which are also connected by a circuit consisting of a large glass plate condenser C, and the primary circuit of an air-core transformer called an oscillation transformer.
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  • Popoff employed an electromagnetic tapper, in fact the mechanism of an electric bell with the gong removed, for this purpose.
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  • Rutherford used this detector to make evident the passage of an electric or Hertzian wave for half a mile across Cambridge, England.
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  • Such an oscillation valve was first used by Fleming as a receiver for wireless telegraph purposes in 1904 as follows: - In between the receiving antenna and the earth is placed the primary coil of an oscillation transformer; the secondary circuit of this transformer contains a galvanometer in series with it, and the two together are joined between the external negative terminal of the carbon filament of the above-described lamp and the insulated platinum plate.
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  • His transmitter consists of a nearly closed oscillating circuit comprising a condenser or battery of Leyden jars, a spark gap, and the primary coil of an oscillation transformer consisting of one turn of thick wire wound on a wooden frame.
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  • The receiving arrangement consists of an antenna which is connected to earth through the primary coil of an oscillation transformer and a variable inductance.
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  • This receiver therefore, like the transmitter, consists of an open and a closed electric oscillation circuit inductively connected together; also the two circuits of the receiver must be syntonized or tuned both to each other and to those of the transmitter.'
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  • All of them make use of Marconi's antenna in some form both at the transmitting and at the receiving end, all of them make use of an earth connexion, or its equivalent in the form of a balancing capacity or large surface having capacity with respect to the earth, which merely means that they insert a condenser of large capacity in the earth connexion.
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  • In the same year numerous experiments were tried with the assistance of an Italian battleship, the " Carlo Alberto," lent by the Italian government, and messages were transmitted from Poldhu to Kronstadt, to Spezia, and also to Sydney in Nova Scotia.
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  • This helix is presented or held near to the antenna, and the length of it shortened until oscillations of the greatest intensity are produced in the helix as indicated by the use of an indicator of fluorescent paper.
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  • It is the see of a bishopric and headquarters of an important military district, having an arsenal and military barracks.
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  • The Triballi are described as a wild and warlike people (Isocrates, Panathenaicus, 227), and in Aristophanes (Birds, 1565-1693) a Triballian is introduced as a specimen of an uncivilized barbarian.
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  • The receiver was based on the change of friction produced by the passage of an electric current through the point of contact of certain substances in relative motion.
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  • He sometimes held the carbon powder against the diaphragm in a small tr ans' shallow cell (from a quarter to half an inch in diameter and about an eighth of an inch deep), and sometimes he used what he describes as a fluff, that is, a little brush of silk fibre with plumbago rubbed into it.
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  • In the specification of the patent applied for on the list of July 1877 he showed a sketch of an instrument which consisted of a diaphragm, with a small platinum patch in the centre for an electrode, against which a hard point, made of plumbago powder cemented together with india-rubber and vulcanized, was pressed by a long spring, the pressure of the carbon against the platinum disk being adjusted by a straining screw near the base of the spring.
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  • 7, the microphone, a battery and the primary of an induction coil in a local circuit, and putting the line in circuit with the secondary of the induction coil, which acted as the transmitter.
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  • Several single switchboards like that described may be employed, each devoted to a certain section of the subscribers, and placed in care of an operator.
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  • The conditions permit of the circulation of the alternating currents of low periodicity, which are used for operating the bells, but in respect of the battery the circuit is open until the subscriber lifts the receiver, when the hook switch, thus released, joins the transmitter with one winding of an induction coil in series across the circuit.
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  • The aspects which stand out most prominently in this history are: (a) The vacillation of successive governments due to the conflicting policies adopted from time to time to protect the telegraph revenues of the Post Office and to avoid the suppression of an enterprise which was becoming a public necessity and yielding substantial royalties to the PostmasterGeneral.
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  • Telephone subscribers may also obtain the services of an express messenger by telephoning to the nearest post office connected with the exchange.
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  • These words seem to contain the mere truth: Francis's peculiar religious genius was probably not adapted for the government of an enormous society spread over the world, as the Friars Minor had now become.
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  • According to this authority Jovinian in 388 was living at Rome the celibate life of an ascetic monk, possessed a good acquaintance with the Bible, and was the author of several minor works, but, undergoing an heretical change of view, afterwards became a self-indulgent Epicurean and unrefined sensualist.
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  • In a word, he is from first to last an undomesticated and savage animal rendered serviceable by stupidity alone, without much skill on his master's part, or any co-operation on his own, save that of an extreme passiveness.
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    0
  • All the other lakes of Central Italy, which are scattered through the volcanic districts west of the Apennines, are of an entirely difierent formation, and occupy deep cup-shaped hollows, which have undoubtedly at one time formed the craters of extinct volcanoes.
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  • The islands farther south in the Tyrrhenian Sea are of an entirely different character.
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    0
  • The chief minerals are sulphur, in the production of which Italy holds one of the first places, iron, zinc, lead; these, and, to a smaller extent, copper of an inferior quality, manganese and antimony, are successfully mined.
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    0
  • The senate consists of princes of the blood who have attained their majority, and of an unlimited number of senators above forty years of age, who are qualified under any one of twenty-one specified categoriesby having either held high office, or attained celebrity in science, literature, &c. In 1908 there were 318 senators exclusive of five members of the royal family.
    0
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  • In consequence of this change the number of local electors increased by more than onethird between 1887-1889; it decreased, however, as a result of an extraordinary revision of the registers in 1894.
    0
    0
  • In 890 they established themselves again at Ban, and ruled the Theme of Lombardy by means of an officer entitled Catapan.
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    0
  • But no sooner was he dead than the essential weakness of an artificial state, built up by cunning and perfidious policy, with the aid of bought troops, dignified by no dynastic title, and consolidated by no sense of loyalty, became apparent.
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    0
  • The necessities of war and foreign affairs soon placed Florence in the power of an oligarchy headed by the great Albizzi family.
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    0
  • At Palermo the Sicilians struggled hard to establish a republic in place of the odious government of an alien dynasty.
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    0
  • The result was the formation of an assembly at Modena which abolished feudal dues and customs, declared for manhood suffrage and established the Cispadane Republic (October 1796).
    0
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  • By complex and secret bargaining with the court of Madrid, Bonaparte procured the cession to France Napoleons of Louisiana, in North America, and Parma; while reorganthe duke of Parma (husband of an infanta of Spain) 1zat1o~ of was promoted by him to the duchy of Tuscany, now 1t8tV.
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  • Very many of them, distrusting both of these kings, sought to act independently in favor of an Italian republic. Lord William Bentinck with an AngloSicilian force landed at Leghorn on the 8th of March 1814, and issued a proclamation to the Italians bidding them rise against Napoleon in the interests of their own freedom.
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  • Not only did she govern Lombardy and Venetia directly, but Austrian princes ruled in Modena, Parma and Tuscany; Piacenza, Ferrara and Comacchio had Austrian garrisons; Prince Metternich, the Austrian chancellor, believed that he could always secure the election of an Austrophil pope, and Ferdinand of Naples, reinstated by an Austrian army, had bound himself, by a secret article of the treaty of June 12, 1815, not to introduce methods of government incompatible with those adopted in Austrias Italian possessions.
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  • Confalonieri, who was in favor of an Italian federation composed lEngelsm of northern Italy under the house of Savoy, central bardy.
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  • He made desperate efforts to conciliate the population, and succeeded with a few of the nobles, who were led to believe in the possibility of an Italian confederation, including Lombardy and Venetia which would be united to Austria by a personal union alone; but the immense majority of all classes rejected these advances, and came to regard union with Piedmont with increasing favor.
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  • Politically, its outcome was to prove the impossibility of allowing the continu1 of an independent Roman state in the heart of Italy.
    0
    0
  • Considerations such as these could not be expected to appeal to the nation at large, which hailed the advent of the Left as the dawn of an era of unlimited popular sovereignty, diminished administrative pressure, reduction of taxation and general prosperity.
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  • He not only re-established the Prussian legation to the Vatican, suppressed since 1874, and omitted from the imperial message to the Reichstag (17th November 1881) all reference to King Humberts visit to Vienna, but took occasion on the n9th of November to refer to Italy as a country tottering on the verge of revolution, and opened in the German semi-official press ~ campaign in favor of an international guarantee for the independence of the papacy.
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  • A revival of Irredentism in connection with the execution of an Austrian deserter named Oberdank, who after escaping into Italy endeavoured to return to Austria with explosive bombs in his possession, and the cordial references to France made by Depretis at Stradella (8th October 1882), prevented the French government from suspecting the existence of the alliance, or from ceasing to strive after a Franco-Italian understanding.
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  • This something more consisted, at least in part, of the arrangement, with the help of Austria and Germany, of an Anglo-Italian naval understanding having special reference to the Eastern question, but providing for common action by the British and Italian fleets in the Mediterranean in case of war.
    0
    0
  • The period between May 1881 and July 1887 occupied, in the region of foreign affairs, by the negotiation, conclusion and renewal of the triple alliance, by the Bulgarian crisis and by the dawn of an Italian colonial policy, was marked at home by urgent political and economic problems, and by the parliamentary phenomena known as trasformismo.
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  • The revolt of Arabi Pasha (September 1881) ~~ptIan had led to the meeting of an ambassadorial conference Quesnon.
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  • Angered by this step, Ras Alula took prisoners the members of an Italian exploring party commanded by Count Salimbeni, and held them as hostages for the evacuation of Wa.
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  • A few days later Signor Bonghi, one of the framers of the Law of Guarantees, published in the Nuova Antologia a plea for reconciliation on the basis of an amendment to the Law of Guarantees and recognition by the pope of the Italian title to Rome.
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  • After obtaining the establishment of an apostolic prefecture in Eritrea under the charge of Italian Franciscans, Baratieri expelled from the colony the French Lazarist missionaries for their alleged complicity in the Bath-Agos insurrection; and in March 1895 undertook the conquest of Tigr.
    0
    0
  • For a moment Baratieri thought of retreat, especially as the hope of creating a diversion from Zaila towards Harrar had failed in consequence of the British refusal to permit the landing of an Italian force without the consent of France.
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  • Shortly afterwards his term of office was brought to a close by the failure of an attempt to secure for Italy a coaling station at Sanmen and a sphere of influence in China; but his policy of active participation in Chinese affairs was continued in a modified form by his successor, the Marquis Visconti Venosta, who, entering the reconstructed Pelloux cabinet in May 1899, retained the portfolio of foreign affairs in the ensuing Saracco administration, and secured the despatch of an Italian expedition, 2000 strong, to aid in repressing the Chinese outbreak and in protecting Italian interests in the Far East (July 1900).
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  • The proceedings against him were revived, a committee of privileges deciding on the 19th of March 1679 that the dissolution of parliament was no abatement of an impeachment.
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    0
  • In 1691, desiring to compromise Halifax, he discredited himself by the patronage of an informer named Fuller, soon proved an impostor.
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    0
  • The necessity of an appeal to Rome was thus dispensed with, and this point was at once seen by the king, who, when Cranmer's opinion was reported to him, is said to have ordered him to be summoned in these terms: " I will speak to him.
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  • It will thus be seen that the term brahmanam applies not only to complete treatises of an exegetic nature, but also to single comments on particular texts or rites of which such a work would be made up.
    0
    0
  • The altar itself is constructed in the form of a bird, because Soma was supposed to have been brought down from heaven by the metre Gayatri which had assumed the form of an eagle.
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    0
  • In many regions-- Egypt, Babylonia, &c. - individual investigators of the great religions have thought they found traces of an early - one hesitates to write, of a " primitive " - monotheism.
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    0
  • Beginning with the certainties of everyday experience, it reaches theism at last by means of an analogical argument.
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  • Mill tried to reconcile criminal law and its punishments with his very hard type of determinism by saying that law was needed in order to weight the scale, and in order to hold out a prospect of penalties which might deter from crime and impel towards good citizenship, so Paley held that virtue was not merely obedience to God but obedience " for 1 Criticism of the scheme, from the point of view of an idealist theism, will be found in John Caird's Introduc to the Phil.
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  • Hegel's system is, in its own way, a great evolutionary philosophy of an ideal type.
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  • He also gives us " natural law " 2 - a Stoic inheritance, preserving the form of an idealist appeal to systematic requirements of reason, while practically limiting its assumptions to those of intuitionalism.
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  • In other words; whenever philosophy g teaches a doctrine of the Absolute, and regards such doctrine as valid and certain, we have the essence of an ontological or a priori argument.
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  • But the Christian bias is sure to make theologians, who borrow a doctrine of the Absolute, interpret it in a Christian sense; hence we may consider it something of an accident that even an Augustine fails exactly to put the argument in form.
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  • He is no intuitionalist; but he is a drily common-sense mind, piling up in heaps the ruinous fragments of an idealist system.
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  • Still it has a value for him if taken not as an argument, but rather as the expression of an immediate conviction; viz.
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  • Briefly, they are to be found in the conditions of the time; the increasing insularity of the English barons, now no longer the holders of estates in Normandy; the substitution of an unpopular for a popular king, an active spur to the rising forces of discontent; and the unprecedented demands for money - demands followed, not by honour, but by dishonour, to the arms of England abroad.
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  • Other creditors were also protected, and the property of an intestate must be distributed to his heirs under the supervision of the church.
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  • His advocacy of an American episcopate, in connexion with which he wrote the Answer to Dr Mayhew's Observations on the Charter and Conduct of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts (London 1764), raised considerable opposition in England and America.
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  • Two stages in the development of the otocyst can be recognized, the first that of an open pit FIG.
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  • (I) True fission or longitudinal division of an individual into two equal and similar daughter-individuals is not common but occurs in Gastroblasta, where it has been described in detail by Arnold Lang [30].
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  • - Diagrams of Medusa budding with the formation of an entocodon.
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  • 44, with solid Entoby concrescence to codon (Ge.) and formation of an ectotheca (ect.).
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  • The possession of an entocodon proves the medusa-nature of the bud,.
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  • In Ieptolinae the embryonic development culminates in a polyp, which is usually formed by fixation of a planula (parenchymula), rarely by fixation of an actinula.
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  • Huxley, the sporosac is the starting-point of an evolution leading up through the various types of gonophores to the free medusa as the culminating point of a phyletic series.
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  • This must not be taken to mean, however, that the medusa is derived from a sessile polyp; it must be regarded as a direct modification of the more ancient free actinula form, without primitively any intervening polyp-stage, such as has been introduced secondarily into the development of the Leptolinae and represents 'a revival, so to speak, of an ancestral form or larval stage, which has taken on a special role in the economy of the species.
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  • The envelope is double, consisting of an external chitinous stratified shell, and an internal thin elastic membrane.
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  • The body, representing the hydranth of an ordinary hydroid, has the aboral portion modified into a float, from which hangs down a proboscis bearing the mouth.
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  • - Diagrams to show the mode of formation of an Acrocyst and a Marsupium.
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  • - This order has been constituted for a peculiar group of palaeozoic fossils, which have been interpreted as the remains of the skeletons of Hydrozoa of an extinct type.
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  • A typical graptolite consists of an axis bearing a series of tooth-like projections, like a saw.
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  • Huxley, therefore, considered a hydroid colony, for example, as a single individual, and each separate polyp or medusa budded from it as having the value of an organ and not of an individual.
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  • Some authors prefer, on the other hand, to regard every appendage as a separate individual, or at least as a portion of an individual, of which other portions have been lost or obliterated.
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  • In conclusion, it is noteworthy that though resorting to utterly fanciful hypotheses respecting the order of the development of the world, Anaximander agrees with modern evolutionists in conceiving the heavenly bodies as arising out of an aggregation of diffused matter, and in assigning to organic life an origin in the inorganic materials of the primitive earth (pristine mud).
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  • Strato appears to reject Aristotle's idea of an original source of movement and life extraneous to the world in favour of an immanent principle.
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  • All things are said to be developed out of an original being, which is at once material (fire) and spiritual (the Deity), and in turn they will dissolve back into this primordial source.
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  • Their fundamental conception is that of Democritus; they seek to account for the formation of the cosmos, with its order and regularity, by setting out with the idea of an original (vertical) motion of the atoms, which somehow or other results in movements towards and from one another.
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  • Our world is but one of an infinite number of others, and all the harmonies and adaptations of the universe are regarded as a special case of the infinite possibilities of mechanical events.
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  • The common idea of the origin of things is that of an absolute creation of matter and mind alike.
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  • This matter is differentiated into particular things (which are not privations but perfections) through the addition of an individualizing principle (haecceitas) to the universal (quidditas).
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  • Bruno looked on our solar system as but one out of an infinite number of worlds.
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  • The influence of an advancing study of nature, which was stimulated if not guided by Bacon's writings, is seen in the more careful doctrines of materialism worked out almost simultaneously by Hobbes and Gassendi.
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  • Although Spinoza's theory attributes a mental side to all physical events, he rejects all teleological conceptions and explains the order of things as the result of an inherent necessity.
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  • It is the following out of an inherent tendency or impulse to a series of changes, all of which were virtually pre-existent, and this process cannot be interfered with from without.
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  • This conception of an immanent spontaneous evolution is applied alike both to nature and to mind and history.
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  • Rosenkranz, who in his work Hegel's Naturphilosophie seeks to develop Hegel's idea of an earthorganism in the light of modern science, recognizing in crystallization the morphological element.
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  • The growth of an organic being is simply a process of enlargement, as a particle of dry gelatine may be swelled up by the intussusception of water; its death is a shrinkage, such as the swelled jelly might undergo on desiccation.
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  • But Buffon further imagined that innumerable "molecules organiques " are dispersed throughout the world, and that alimentation consists in the appropriation by the parts of an.
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  • The observation of the existence of an analogy between the series of gradations presented by the species which compose any great group of animals or plants, and the series of embryonic conditions of the highest members of that group.
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  • 3 Leibnitz's doctrine of continuity necessarily led him in the same direction; and, of the infinite multitude of monads with which he peopled the world, each is supposed to be the focus of an endless process of evolution and involution.
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  • Notwithstanding the origin of organs, it still for a certain time, by reason of its want of an internal bony skeleton, remains worm and mollusk, and only later enters into the series of the Vertebrata, although traces of the vertebral column even in the earliest periods testify its claim to a place in that series."
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  • Lamarck introduced the conception of the action of an animal on itself as a factor in producing modification.
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  • Starting from the wellknown fact that the habitual use of a limb tends to develop the muscles of the limb, and to produce a greater and greater facility in using it, he made the general assumption that the effort of an animal to exert an organ in a given direction tends to develop the organ in that direction.
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  • Comparative anatomists have been learning to refrain from basing the diagnosis of a species, or the description of the condition of an organ, on the evidence of a single specimen.
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  • Those who work with living forms of which it is possible to obtain a large number of specimens, and those who make revisions of the provisional species of palaeontologists, are slowly coming to some such conception as that a species is the abstract central point around which a group of variations oscillate, and that the peripheral oscillations of one species may even overlap those of an allied species.
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  • When a series of the modifications of an anatomical structure has been sufficiently examined, it is frequently possible to decide that one particular condition is primitive, ancestral or central, and that the other conditions have been derived from it.
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  • Educated at the universities of Bonn and Heidelberg, he obtained a position in Florence through the influence of an Englishman, William Craufurd, but soon he entered the Prussian diplomatic service and was employed in Florence, in Constantinople and in Rome.
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  • He was now lord of an extensive territory, and the pope created him duke of Romagna.
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  • Leading examples may be found in the various prosecutions of St Athanasius, in whose case also there is the germ of an appeal, tanquam ab abusu.
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  • These courts consist of every parochial minister or professor of divinity of any university within the limits, and of an elder commissioned from every kirk session.
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  • During a large portion of his life he followed the profession of an apothecary.
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  • Naturally he felt that the prevalence of Christianity was incompatible with his ideal of Roman prosperity, and therefore that the policy of the Flavian emperors was the only logical solution of an important problem.
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  • With the accession of the Danish king Canute, the original raison d'être of the tax ceased to exist, but it continued to be levied, though for a different purpose, assuming now the character of an occasional war-tax.
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  • He sees no sign of an attack upon him or his gospel.
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  • The earliest record of an apothecary's shop in London was in 1345.
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  • In 105, Caepio suffered a crushing defeat from the Cimbri at Arausio (Orange) on the Rhone, which was looked upon as a punishment for his sacrilege; hence the proverb Aurum Tolosanum habet, of an act involving disastrous consequences.
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  • Nagel (Ber., 1898, 31, p. 2009), this oxide does not exist, the reaction leading to the formation of an hydroxide according to the equation: Mo 3 C1 4 (OH) 2 + 4KHO 3H 2 O = 3Mo(OH) 3 -l-4KBr+3H.
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  • Molybdenum trisulphide, MoS3, is obtained by saturating a solution of an alkaline molybdate with sulphuretted hydrogen and adding a mineral acid.
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  • It is situated at the mouth of an arm of Hauraki Gulf, and is only 6 m.
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  • The memorial is crowned by the figure of an angel in white marble, and on the wall of the well itself is the following inscription: Sacred to the perpetual Memory of a great company of Christian people, chiefly Women and Children, who near this spot were cruelly murdered by the followers of the rebel Nana Dhundu Pant, of Bithur, and cast, the dying with the dead, into the well below, on the xvth day of July, Mdccclvii.
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  • Yet the town is under no great industrial or other modernizing influence, and therefore stands in the position of an ancient shrine, drawing a pilgrimage of modern origin.
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  • The maiden name of the poet's mother was Mary Arden, and this name, that of an ancient county family, survives in the district north-west of Stratford, the Forest of Arden, though the true forest character is long lost.
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  • Thus he was in some cases, as in that of St James's, Piccadilly, content to make the exterior of an almost barnlike plainness.
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  • The Spermatophyta are thus land plants par excellence and have, with the few exceptions cited, lost all trace of an aquatic ancestry.
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  • The embryo consists of an axis bearing two or more cotyledons and ending below in a radicle; it lies in a generally copious food-storing tissue (endosperm) which is the remains of the female prothallus.
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  • The embryo consists of an axis bearing one (Monocotyledons) or two (Dicotyledons) cotyledons, which protect the stem bud (plumule) of the future plant, and ending below in a radicle.
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  • A, Cell (individual) of the unicellular Green Alga Pleurococcus, as an example of an undifferentiated autonomous assimilating cell.
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  • This is the case in the Fucaceae, and in a very marked degree in the Laminariaceae in question, where the assimilative frond is borne at the end of an extremely long supporting and conducting stipe.
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  • The frondose (thalloid) Jungermanniales show no such differentiation of an assimilating tissue, though the upper cells of the thallus usually have more chlorophyll than the rest.
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  • They possess a delicate Laticiferous layer of protoplasm, with numerous small nuclei lining Tissue the walls, while the interior of the tube (corresponding with the cell-vacuole) contains a fluid called latex, consisting of an emulsion of fine granules and drops of very various substances suspended in a watery medium in which various other substances (salts, sugars, rubber-producers, tannins, alkaloids and various enzymes) are dissolved.
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  • Thus the structure of an old thickened root approximates to that of an old thickened stem, and so far as the vascular tissue is concerned can often only be distinguished from the latter by the position and orientation of the primary xylems. The cambium of the primary root, together with the tissues which it forms, is always directly continuous with that of the primary stem, just in the same way as the tissues of the primary stele.
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  • What little differentiation can be found to exist in the protoplasm of the simple unicellular organism shows the importance of an adequate water-supply, and indeed, the dependence of life upon it.
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  • These show that a definite intake of carbon dioxide is always accompanied by an exhalation of an equal volume of oxygen.
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  • The idea of an identity of protoplasm does not involve a denial of special powers developed in it in different situations, and the possession of such a power by the vegetable cell is not more striking than the location of the powers of co-ordination and thought in the protoplasm of cells of the human brain.
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  • It has been ascertained that in many cases this decomposition is effected by the secretion of an enzyme, which has been termed zymase.
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  • When these are excited by the settling of an insect on the leaf they slowly bend over and imprison the intruder, which is detained there meanwhile by a sticky excretion poured out by the glands.
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  • In both these cases the stimulation is followed, not only by movement, but by the secretion of an acid liquid containing a digestive juice, by virtue of which the insect is digested after being killed.
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  • Even the root tip, which shows a certain differentiation into root cap and root apex, cannot be said to be a definite sense organ in the same way as the sense organs of an animal.
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  • We do not find their behaviour like that of the motor mechanism of an animal.
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  • Cecidia or galls arise by the hypertrophy of the subepidermal cells of a leaf, cortex, &c., which has been pierced by theovipositor of an insect, and in which the egg is deposited.
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  • This latter fact is no doubt due to the production of an excess of plastic materials over and above what the tree requires for its immediate needs.
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  • For instance, the difference between the long-stalked and finely-cut leaves of Anemone attacked with rust and the normal leaves with broad segments, or between the urceolate leaves occasionally found on cabbages and the ordinary formin these cases undoubtedly pathological and teratological respectivelyis nothing like so great as between the upper and lower normalleaves of many Umhelliferae or the submerged and floating leaves of an aquatic Ranunculus or Cabomba.
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  • This sketch of an enormous subject shuws us that the pathology of plants is a special department of the study of variations which threaten injury to the plant, and passes imperceptibly into the study of variations in general.
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  • It is an integral part of an individual organization and as such the exercise of its functions must be governed by the organism as a whole.
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  • It may be in the form of an albumen crystal sometimes associated with a more or less spherical bodygloboid-composed of a combination of an organic substance with a double phosphate of magnesium and calcium.
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  • Broadly speaking, the American portion of the sub-region consists of an Atlantic and Pacific forest area and an intervening non-forest one, partly occupied by the Rocky Mountains, partly by intervening plains.
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  • Nor, with perhaps the interesting exception of Castanopsis chrysophylla, the solitary representative in the New World of an east Asiatic genus, which ranges from Oregon to California, has it any affinity with the Chino-Japanese sub-region.
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  • Palms are poorly represented in the sub-region and are of an Indo-Malayan type.
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  • Certain ancient stringed instruments were played with a plectrum or plucker made of the quill of a bird's feather, and the word has thus been used of a plectrum made of other material and differing in shape, and also of an analogous object for striking the strings in the harpsichord, spinet or virginal.
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  • The great geographical event of the century, as regards that continent, was the measurement of an arc of the So meridian.
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  • Academy as part of an investigation with the object of ascertaining the length of the degree near the equator and near the pole respectively so as to determine the figure of the earth.
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  • Taking the Atlantic as our simplest type, we may say that the surface of an ocean basin resembles that of a mighty trough or syncline, buckled up more or less centrally in a medial ridge, which is bounded by two long and deep marginal hollows, in the cores of which still deeper grooves sink to the profoundest depths.
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  • The highest point of an elevation is termed a " height," if it does not form an island or one of the minor forms.
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  • By a re-elevation of a peneplain the rivers of an old land surface may be restored to youthful activity, and resume their shaping action, deepening the old valleys and initiating new ones, starting afresh the whole course of the geographical cycle.
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  • The alkyl derivatives may be obtained by heating phenol with one molecular proportion of a caustic alkali and of an alkyl iodide.
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  • Hantzsch (Ber., 1901, 34, p. 3337) has shown that in the action of alcohols on diazonium salts an increase in the molecular weight of the alcohol and an accumulation of negative groups in the aromatic nucleus lead to a diminution in the yield of the ether produced and to the production of a secondary reaction, resulting in the formation of a certain amount of an aromatic hydrocarbon.
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  • Deputy in 1865, he was from 1868 to 1880 Obergespan (lord-lieutenant), in which capacity he gained the reputation of an excellent administrator.
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  • Here he was confronted by his first wife or victim, Anne Thorssen, whose claims he satisfied by the gift of a ship and promises of an annuity, and on his identity becoming known he was sent by the authorities to Copenhagen, where he arrived on the 30th of September.
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  • Wakefield was for a short time at Westminster School, and was brought up to his father's profession, which he relinquished on occasion of his elopement at the age of twenty with Miss Pattle, the orphan daughter of an Indian civil servant.
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  • In 1836 Wakefield published the first volume of an edition of Adam Smith, which he did not complete.
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  • The charge of perjury at once collapsed and was withdrawn on January 6th, the opening of the grave definitely putting an end to the story of an identity between the two men.
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  • The communication with the atrium is guarded by a valvula cardiaca dextra, which only in function represents the mammalian tricuspid; it consists of an oblique reduplication of the muscular fibres together with the endocardiac lining of the right ventricle, while the opposite wall is convex and forms neither a velum nor papillary muscles, nor chordae tendineae.
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  • The Suffolk Crag has yielded the unmistakable bones of an albatross, Diomedea.
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  • The Mowbray match had already brought to the Howards the representation of an elder line of the Fitzalan earls, who sat in the seats of their ancestors, the Aubignys and Warennes, great earls near akin to their sovereigns.
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  • He was the author of an important History of the Constituent Assembly (Paris, 2 vols., 1828-1829).
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  • Eger is the see of an archbishopric, and owing to its numerous ecclesiastical buildings has received the name of "the Hungarian Rome."
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  • But this very development of Mosaism implies the existence of an original nucleus or substratum, although the recovery of its precise extent is very difficult.
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  • They are not put forward as the result of an independent review of the evidence.
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  • Their long lists of the occurrences of words and forms fixed with accuracy the present (Masoretic) text, which they had produced, and were invaluable to subsequent lexicographers, while their system of vowel-points and accents not only gives us the pronunciation and manner of reading traditional about the 7th century A.D., but frequently serves also the purpose of an explanatory commentary.
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