Of-all sentence example

of-all
  • Maybe he meant he was sick of all the bickering with his family.
    0
    0
  • You want me to think of all this as ours, but how can I when you insist that the problems are all yours?
    0
    0
  • In spite of all the evidence, Yancey still came out as a responsible adult.
    0
    0
  • Worst of all was the façade of romantic interest.
    0
    0
  • What had she been thinking of all this time?
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Why did she need to prove to anyone, least of all herself, that she was right in breaking off the relationship?
    0
    0
  • I thought... of all people, he'd tell you his plans.
    0
    0
  • Still, his next words were the most gratifying of all.
    0
    0
  • A roll of the dice changed the lives of all of us and hundreds of others forever.
    0
    0
  • Thinking back, it was the pivotal point of all that followed.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Governments, thieves, scientists, treasurer hunters, historians and despots of all kinds would crave his skill.
    0
    0
  • What do you think of all this, Howie?
    0
    0
  • By the way, he thinks the world of all of you guys.
    0
    0
  • I knew from my in depth research, the number and location of all payphones bearing the area code and first two numbers dear Brenda provided me.
    0
    0
  • Think of all the children he could be saving.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • I couldn't block out of my mind, my wife's statement a few days ago; think of all the children who he could be saving.
    0
    0
  • I'm doing it because of what you said; think of all the children he could be saving.
    0
    0
  • After my tour was over, my diligence was truly rewarded in the kitchen of all places!
    0
    0
  • Earlier, my wife had taken care of all the logistics of our travels while I locked up the house and called Jackson to tell him we would be out of town for a couple of days, retrieving Howie from California.
    0
    0
  • I gave a lot of thought to that question because of all the fingers pointing at me.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • What is it, first of all?
    0
    0
  • It's out of all our hands.
    0
    0
  • In spite of all I said, his and Jen's baby has a lot better future than Billy Langstrom's.
    0
    0
  • He was getting tired of all this cloak-and dagger nonsense.
    0
    0
  • I officially reported that Westlake had disposed of all the bones.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Gabriel knew the secrets of all the brothers on the Council; there were things people told Death that they never revealed to anyone else.
    0
    0
  • It had been where Wynn, the father of all the Immortals on the Council, had lain for hundreds of years before being dragged out by Sasha, the son who betrayed them all to Darkyn.
    0
    0
  • She mourned the loss of all she'd ever learned or known.
    0
    0
  • He watched them, recalling a time he'd overseen the training of all Immortal warriors.
    0
    0
  • Gods help the girl, she trusted him of all people.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The worst thought of all was that Alex had been trying to help her.
    0
    0
  • Carmen and Alex knew they had the best deal of all.
    0
    0
  • Gabriel knew the secrets of all seven from interacting with them over the years.
    0
    0
  • He saw first of all that he'd chosen the right mentor.
    0
    0
  • It takes a lot to prepare yourself to die, Gabriel, which you of all people should appreciate.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • He swiped a badge to enter what she imagined was the Mecca of all science labs, with rows of stainless steel, machines, computers, and glass.
    0
    0
  • An easy food source following you around for the rest of all time?
    0
    0
  • She didn't understand why he'd chosen her of all people.
    0
    0
  • As the two stared each other down, she wasn.t sure who had the better chance of winning: Gabriel, an Immortal sworn to serve Death, or Darkyn, the leader of all the demons in Hell.
    0
    0
  • I am sorry for this of all things, Gabriel.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • He didn.t know what happened to Darkyn, but Death adopted him, raised him, and trained him to be the most ruthless of all assassins.
    0
    0
  • Darkyn, the most powerful of all demons, wouldn.t have returned from the pits of Hell, where the Dark One banished him to lead the army to the Immortals. front door and wipe out the Council.
    0
    0
  • That Rhyn of all his brothers would be granted such an honor as an Ancient.s mate made a mockery of everything.
    0
    0
  • They mature slowest of all Immortals, but when they hit certain points in angel years, they jump to the next human stage of maturity, Helga said.
    0
    0
  • He hated those words, because he was the biggest and strongest of all Death.s assassins.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The giants battled, and she couldn't help feeling awed by the prisoner's abilities as he met the blows of all three foes and remained standing.
    0
    0
  • How did a woman like this find her way to him of all men?
    0
    0
  • Emotions of all kinds played across her face as the night progressed.
    0
    0
  • She stared at it, as irritated by its unwitting acknowledgment of her housekeeping prowess as she was about having this of all creatures in her house.
    0
    0
  • His mind was, at least for the moment, clear of all thoughts except this beautiful petite woman.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Enforcement of all rules will apply appropriately by the Ouray County Sheriff, the Ouray Police or by any board member of the Ouray Ice Park, Inc.
    0
    0
  • In spite of all that had transpired, Dean couldn't think.
    0
    0
  • In spite of all his cleaning, Bird Song didn't seem to have the same shine as it did when Cynthia was in residence.
    0
    0
  • Since the first time I stepped inside I had a sense of all of the love and happiness and peace those walls have witnessed.
    0
    0
  • The thought of all he would have to face made him wish they could fast forward a few days.
    0
    0
  • He let go of all his worries and immersed himself fully in the moment.
    0
    0
  • A diamond is the hardest, most resilient, most beautiful gem of all.
    0
    0
  • If it comes to that no one will win, least of all Elisabeth.
    0
    0
  • I mean, you two, of all people.
    0
    0
  • Still, what was the most amazing of all was that she fulfilled his dreams as well.
    0
    0
  • Rhyn crept carefully through the demon scouts positioned throughout the forest surrounding the castle.  The demons wore the Dark One's uniform of all black with waterproof cloaks and hoods.  The demon side of him rendered his presence similar enough to a full-demon's that the others wouldn't be alarmed.  He sized up each demon he passed, until he found one who appeared to be his size.  The creature didn't hear his soft step, and the snapping of the demon's neck was the only other sound in the falling rain.
    0
    0
  • Toby closed his eyes, focusing hard on searching the memories of all the angels that came before him.
    0
    0
  • You have to be inventive, try to get into the criminal mind, think of all the angles....
    0
    0
  • According to Rita Angeltoni, the seat of all wisdom, this part of the flight's on time.
    0
    0
  • Yes, she would come by the station with the names of all Arthur's known friends, all the little fairies, as she called them, and the addresses of his favorite haunts.
    0
    0
  • Dean let him talk it out, half listening, half trying to make sense of all the details.
    0
    0
  • He wouldn't kiss her goodbye in front of all of the women.
    0
    0
  • In spite of all the guilt, shopping was relaxing and fruitful with a hefty budget.
    0
    0
  • Yet, of all the reasons she wanted a baby, feeling important wasn't even in the top 100.
    0
    0
  • He, of all people, should realize how quickly life can end and plans can change.
    0
    0
  • In spite of all her anxiety, Alex was right.
    0
    0
  • If her vision wasn't right, she wasn't sure what she'd do, for the lives of all three brothers would soon be suspended in time.
    0
    0
  • For the record, Darian, I hate you most of all.
    0
    0
  • The two people she wanted to see least of all.
    0
    0
  • I hear your blood is the sweetest of all.
    0
    0
  • The women were of all ages while the men were either young or elderly, their numbers gutted by war.
    0
    0
  • I alone know the locations of all our armies.
    0
    0
  • None of her men, not even Hilden, knew the locations of all their warriors.
    0
    0
  • With the air cleared of all the secrets, and both of them making a concentrated effort to get along, even the children appeared to be happier.
    0
    0
  • Carmen had accepted the full responsibility of all the animals, the children and the house.
    0
    0
  • After unloading the car, she made a list of all the supplies needed.
    0
    0
  • Think of all I've discovered since I arrived.
    0
    0
  • Trees of all kinds sprang from the earth in the strangest positions.
    0
    0
  • You of all people understand how things should work.
    0
    0
  • They were killed on date night, of all things, she murmured, following his gaze.
    0
    0
  • Many of the columns of the basilica have fallen, but the bases of all are in their original positions.
    0
    0
  • We have already mentioned the final conception in which Lotze's speculation culminates, that of a personal Deity, Himself the essence of all that merits existence for its own sake, who in the creation and government of a world has voluntarily chosen certain laws and forms through which His ends are to be realized.
    0
    0
  • But this idea involves the further conception of Leibnitz, that of a pre-established harmony, by which the Creator has taken care to arrange the life of each monad, so that it agrees with that of all others.
    0
    0
  • These natural philosophers suggested that equal volumes of all gaseous substances must contain, at the same temperature and pressure, the same number of molecules.
    0
    0
  • Having once formulated his idea, he made it more general in order to apply it to the history of all nations.
    0
    0
  • As deputy he had no vote, and he naturally took little share in the debates, but it was part of his duty to send written reports of the proceedings to his patron, since the government, with a well-grounded fear of all that might stir popular feeling, refused to allow any published reports.
    0
    0
  • But in 1570 the island was taken by the Turks; and Antonio Davila, the father of the historian, had to leave it, despoiled of all he possessed.
    0
    0
  • The church of All Saints is mentioned in Domesday, and tradition ascribes the building of its nave to King John, while the western side of the tower must be older still.
    0
    0
  • The story was unknown to Arthur Duck, fellow of All Souls, who wrote Chicheley's life in 1617.
    0
    0
  • The patent for it, dated 10th of May 1438, is for a warden and 20 scholars, to be called " the Warden and College of the souls of all the faithful departed," to study and pray " for the soul of King Henry VI.
    0
    0
  • In truth, not so large a proportion of the endowment of All Souls was derived from this source as was that of New College.
    0
    0
  • There is what looks like an excellent contemporary portrait in one of the windows of All Souls College, which is figured in the Victoria County History for Hampshire, ii.
    0
    0
  • On the 13th of October 1307 came the arrest of all the Knights Templar in France, the breaking of a storm conjured up by royal jealousy and greed.
    0
    0
  • It grows in short grass in the temperate regions of all parts of the world.
    0
    0
  • The true mushroom itself is to a great extent a dung-borne species, therefore mushroom-beds are always liable to an invasion from other dung-borne forms. The spores of all fungi are constantly floating about in the air, and when the spores of dung-infesting species alight on a mushroom-bed they find a nidus already prepared that exactly suits them; and if the spawn of the new-comer becomes more profuse than that of the mushroom the stranger takes up his position at the expense of the mushroom.
    0
    0
  • It is by many esteemed as the best of all the edible fungi found in Great Britain.
    0
    0
  • The total value of all clay products in West Virginia was $3,261,736 in 1908.
    0
    0
  • It is remarkable that he gives the same pecuniary bequests to Winchester and New Colleges as to his own college of Magdalen, but the latter he made residuary devisee of all his lands.
    0
    0
  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Orp to Ozo.
    0
    0
  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Gre to Gri.
    0
    0
  • He was bitterly denounced by slaveholders and also by such non-slaveholders as disapproved of all antislavery agitation, and in January 1827 he was assaulted and seriously injured by a slave-trader, Austin Woolfolk, whom he had severely criticized in his paper.
    0
    0
  • Rouvier was able to make a statement of the whole proceedings in the chamber, which received the assent of all parties.
    0
    0
  • It is estimated that Sardinia pays, in local and general, direct and indirect taxation of all kinds, 23,000,000 lire (920,000), a sum corresponding to 35.44 lire per head.
    0
    0
  • On the 17th of January he was named on the commission for law reform, of which Hale was the chief; and on the 17th of March 1653, he was pardoned of all delinquency and thus at last made capable of sitting in parliament.
    0
    0
  • Under Henry II., being involved in the disgrace of all the servants of Francis I., he was sent to Rome (1547), and he obtained eight votes in the conclave which followed the death of Pope Paul III.
    0
    0
  • Artisans came from a great distance to view and honour the image of the popular writer whose best efforts had been dedicated to the cause and the sufferings of the workers of the world; and literary men of all opinions gathered round the grave of one of their brethren whose writings were at once the delight of every boy and the instruction of every man who read them.
    0
    0
  • When that was found, the solution of one problem would immediately entail the solution of all others which belonged to the same series as itself.
    0
    0
  • The inquirer will find that the first thing to know is intellect, because on it depends the knowledge of all other things.
    0
    0
  • The God of Descartes is not merely the creator of the material universe; he is also the father of all truth in the intellectual world.
    0
    0
  • It seems impossible to deny that the tendency of his principles and his arguments is mainly in the line of a metaphysical absolute, as the necessary completion and foundation of all being and knowledge.
    0
    0
  • Through the truthfulness of that God as the author of all truth he derives a guarantee for our perceptions in so far as these are clear and distinct.
    0
    0
  • The disturbing conditions of will, life and organic forces are eliminated from the problem; he starts with the clear and distinct idea of extension, figured and moved, and thence by mathematical laws he gives a hypothetical explanation of all things.
    0
    0
  • Pascal and other members of Port Royal openly expressed their doubts about the place allowed to God in the system; the adherents of Gassendi met it by resuscitating atoms; and the Aristotelians maintained their substantial forms as of old; the Jesuits argued against the arguments for the being of God, and against the theory of innate ideas; whilst Pierre Daniel Huet (1630-1721), bishop of Avranches, once a Cartesian himself, made a vigorous onslaught on the contempt in which his former comrades held literature and history, and enlarged on the vanity of all human aspirations after rational truth.
    0
    0
  • In 1880 he was declared patron of all Roman Catholic educational establishments.
    0
    0
  • In the Summa Catholicae Fidei contra Gentiles he shows how a Christian theology is the sum and crown of all science.
    0
    0
  • Fortified by this exhaustive preparation, Aquinas began his Summa Theologiae, which he intended to be the sum of all known learning, arranged according to the best method, and subordinate to the dictates of the church.
    0
    0
  • The Spartans were successful but did not pursue their advantage, and soon afterwards the Athenians, seizing their opportunity, sallied forth again, and, after a victory under Myronides at Oenophyta, obtained the submission of all Boeotia, save Thebes, and of Phocis and Locris.
    0
    0
  • Rulers of this name are found at Rhodes as late as the 1st century B.C. The Prytaneum was regarded as the religious and political centre of the community and was thus the nucleus of all government, and the official "home" of the whole people.
    0
    0
  • In the spring of 323 he moved down to Babylon, receiving on the way embassies from lands as far as the confines of the known world, for the eyes of all nations were now turned with fear or wonder to the figure which had appeared with so superhuman an effect upon the world's stage.
    0
    0
  • He then makes his Persian expedition; the Indian campaign gives occasion for descriptions of all kinds of wonders.
    0
    0
  • He acted as regent in 1183, but he showed some incapacity in the struggle with Saladin, and was deprived of all right of succession.
    0
    0
  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Pos to Pre.
    0
    0
  • While the heroism of the Montenegrins has been lauded by writers of all countries, the Albanians - if we except Byron's eulogy of the Suloits - still remain unsung.
    0
    0
  • The tribes of northern Albania, or Ghegeria, may be classified in seven groups as follows: - (1) The Mirdites, who inhabit the alpine region around Orosh to the south-east of Scutari - the most important of all in respect of numbers (about 17,000) and political independence.
    0
    0
  • Her early years were clouded by the execution of the duc de Montmorency, her mother's only brother, for intriguing against Richelieu in 1631, and that of her mother's cousin the comte de Montmorency-Boutteville for duelling in 1635; but her parents made their peace with Richelieu, and being introduced into society in 1635 she soon became one of the stars of the Hotel Rambouillet, at that time the centre of all that was learned, witty and gay in France.
    0
    0
  • Archbishop Longley said in his opening address, however, that they had no desire to assume "the functions of a general synod of all the churches:in full communion with the Church of England," but merely to "discuss matters of practical interest, and pronounce what we deem expedient in resolutions which may serve as safe guides to future action."
    0
    0
  • In thus looking forward to a shaking of all nations Haggai agrees with earlier prophecies, especially Isa.
    0
    0
  • The object of all heating apparatus is the transference of heat from the fire to the various parts of the building it is intended to warm, and this transfer may be effected by radiation, by conduction or by convection.
    0
    0
  • The themes of all his more ambitious poems can be traced to Chaucerian sources.
    0
    0
  • Wesley and his helpers, finding the Anglican churches closed against them, took to preaching in the open air; and this method is still followed, more or less, in the aggressive evangelistic work of all the Methodist Churches.
    0
    0
  • The second method, which he calls the "Promptuarium Multiplicationis" on account of its being the most expeditious of all for the performance of multiplications, involves the use of a number of lamellae or little plates of metal disposed in a box.
    0
    0
  • Macdonald at Edinburgh in 1889, and that there is appended to this edition a complete catalogue of all Napier's writings, and their various editions and translations, English and foreign, all the works being carefully collated, and references being added to the various public libraries in which they are to be found.
    0
    0
  • These examples show that Napier was in possession of all the conventions and attributes that enable the decimal point to complete so symmetrically our system of notation, viz.
    0
    0
  • The parks are a fine feature of the city; by its charter a fixed percentage of all expenditures for public improvements must be used to purchase park land.
    0
    0
  • The ecclesiastical unit in episcopacy is a diocese, comprising many churches and ruled by a prelate; in congregationalism it is a single church, self-governed and entirely independent of all others; in Presbyterianism it is a presbytery or council composed of ministers and elders representing all the churches within a specified district.
    0
    0
  • The membership of a Presbyterian Church consists of all who are enrolled as communicants, together with their children.
    0
    0
  • The presbytery consists of all the ministers and a selection of the ruling elders from the congregations within a prescribed area.
    0
    0
  • It has oversight of all the congregations within its bounds; hears references from kirk-sessions or appeals from individual members; sanctions the formation of new congregations; superintends the education of students for the ministry; stimulates and guides pastoral and evangelistic work; and exercises discipline over all within its bounds, including the ministers.
    0
    0
  • He takes precedence, Primus inter pares, of all the members, and is recognized as the official head of the Church during his term of office.
    0
    0
  • The general assembly reviews all the work of the Church; settles controversies; makes administrative laws; directs and stimulates missionary and other spiritual work; appoints professors of theology; admits to the ministry applicants from other churches; hears and decides complaints, references and appeals which have come up through the inferior courts; and takes cognizance of all matters connected with the Church's interests or with the general welfare of the people.
    0
    0
  • In the large towns there were consistories composed of all the ministers and of delegates from the various parishes.
    0
    0
  • Then with the Restoration came Episcopacy, and the persecution of all who were not Episcopalians; and the dream and vision of a truly Reformed English Church practically passed away.
    0
    0
  • There were five presbyteries holding monthly meetings and annual visitations of all the congregations within their bounds, and coming together in general synod four times a year.
    0
    0
  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Gis to God.
    0
    0
  • Vultures and hawks are well represented, but perhaps the most numerous of all are the parrots, of which there are six or seven species.
    0
    0
  • In 1898 the list comprised only 1416 sailing vessels of all classes, from Io tons up, with a total tonnage of 118,894 tons, and 222 steamships, of 36,323 tons.
    0
    0
  • To the chamber of deputies exclusively belongs the initiation of all laws relating to the raising of money and the conscription of troops.
    0
    0
  • Each elects its governor, legislators and provincial functionaries of all classes, without the intervention of the federal government.
    0
    0
  • The armament included 394 guns of all calibres, 6 of which were of 250 millimetres, 4 of 240, and 12 of 200.
    0
    0
  • The state controls all ecclesiastical appointments, decides on the passing or rejection of all decrees of the Holy See, and provides an annual subsidy for maintenance of the churches and clergy.
    0
    0
  • Had the expenses of all the small towns and rural communities been included, the total would be in excess of $20 gold, or £4, per capita.
    0
    0
  • It was at his house, full of all the wondrous, half-forbidden novelties of the west, that Alexius, after the death of his first consort, Martha, met Matvyeev's favourite pupil, the beautiful Natalia Naruishkina, whom he married on the 21st of January 1672.
    0
    0
  • By the law of 1905 all the churches ceased to be recognized or supported by the state and became entirely separated therefrom, while the adherents of all creeds were permitted to form associations for public worship (associations cultuelles), upon which the expenses of maintenance were from that time to devolve.
    0
    0
  • The active army, then, at a given moment, say November 1, 1908, is composed of all the young men, not legally exempted, who have reached the age of twenty in the years 1906 and 1907.
    0
    0
  • It is at the disposal of the minister of war, who can decree the recall of all men discharged to the reserve the previous year and all those whose time of service has for any reason been shortened.
    0
    0
  • The law further provides for the re-engagement of men of all ranks, under conditions varying according to their rank.
    0
    0
  • The oversight of all the colonies and protectorates save Algeria and Tunisia is confided to a minister of the colonies (law of March 20, 1894)1 whose powers correspond to those exercised in France by the minister of the interior.
    0
    0
  • The colonial minister is assisted by a number of organizations of which the most important is the superior council of the colonies (created by decree in 1883), an advisory body which inclUdes the senators and deputies elected by the colonies, and delegates elected by the universal suffrage of all citizens in the colonies and protectorates which do not return members to parliament.
    0
    0
  • The councils general are elected by universal suffrage of all citizens and those who, though not citizens, have been granted the political franchise.
    0
    0
  • On the 28th of November Oates accused her of high treason, and the Commons passed an address for her removal and that of all the Roman Catholics from Whitehall.
    0
    0
  • The prince, after vainly endeavouring to obtain the recall of the generals, restored the constitution with the concurrence of all the Bulgarian political parties (September 18, 1883).
    0
    0
  • In Virgil, Juturna appears as the sister of Turnus (probably owing to the partial similarity of the names), on whom Jupiter, to console her for the loss of her chastity, bestowed immortality and the control of all the lakes and rivers of Latium.
    0
    0
  • On the accession of Mary he was deprived of all his offices, but in the succeeding reign was prominently employed in public affairs.
    0
    0
  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Bok to Bor.
    0
    0
  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Lao to Lav.
    0
    0
  • The cannon-bones are remarkably short and wide, and in this respect differ from those of all allied ruminants, except the Tibetan takin.
    0
    0
  • This phylogeny, the author thinks, is the most probable of all.
    0
    0
  • He was for nearly eighteen years the soul of the republican conspiracies, the prompter of revolutionary propaganda, the chief inspirer of intrigues concerted by discontented military men of all ranks.
    0
    0
  • The general position which He takes up, that "the Sabbath is made for man and not man for the Sabbath," 2 is only a special application of the wider principle that the law is not an end in itself but a help towards the realization in life of the great ideal of love to God and man, which is the sum of all true religion.
    0
    0
  • At the same time, there was a peculiar appropriateness in associating the Sabbath with the doctrine that Yahweh is the Creator of all things; for we see from Isa.
    0
    0
  • That this individual life of all of us is not something limited in its temporal expression to the life that now we experience, follows from the very fact that here nothing final or individual is found expressed (pp. 144-146).
    0
    0
  • The Great Barrier Reef forms the prominent feature off the north-east coast of Australia; its extent from north to south is 1200 m., and it is therefore the greatest of all coral reefs.
    0
    0
  • It is not to be supposed that this antarctic element, to which Professor Tate has applied the name Euronotian, entered a desert barren of all life.
    0
    0
  • The marsupials constitute two-thirds of all the Australian species of mammals.
    0
    0
  • Churches of all denominations are liberally supported throughout the states, and the residents of every settlement, however small, have their places of worship erected and maintained by their own contributions.
    0
    0
  • Magnetite, or magnetic iron, the richest of all iron ores, is found in abundance near Wallerawang in New South Wales.
    0
    0
  • The exports of breadstuffs - chiefly to the United Kingdom - exceed six millions per annum, butter two and a half millions, and minerals of all kinds, except gold, six millions.
    0
    0
  • Pottery, common to Malays and Papuans, the bows and arrows of the latter, and the elaborate canoes of all three races, are unknown to the Australians.
    0
    0
  • Stringent rules, too, governed the food of women and the youth of both sexes, and it was only after initiation that boys were allowed to eat of all the game the forest provided.
    0
    0
  • The main object of all such legislation is to secure the residence of the owners on the land.
    0
    0
  • In accordance with this general verdict of all the states, the colonial draft bill was submitted to the imperial government for legislation as an imperial act; and six delegates were sent to England to explain the measure and to pilot it through the cabinet and parliament.
    0
    0
  • The colonies were, however, to have other and bitter experiences of strikes before Labour recognized that of all means for settling industrial Australians in South America.
    0
    0
  • He eloquently and persistently advocated the principle of oneman one-vote as the bed-rock of all democratic reform.
    0
    0
  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Het to Hir.
    0
    0
  • In the course of a bloody insurrection in Catalonia, which ended in the bombardment of Barcelona, Ferdinand de Lesseps showed the most persistent bravery, rescuing from death, without distinction, the men belonging to the rival factions, and protecting and sending away not only the Frenchmen who were in danger, but foreigners of all nationalities.
    0
    0
  • It contains models of the principal dockyards and fortifications of the British empire, naval models of all dates, and numerous specimens of weapons of war from the remotest times to the present day.
    0
    0
  • Saxon was at this period the common title of all the north German tribes; there was but little difference between Frisians and Saxons either in race or language, and they were closely united for some four centuries in common resistance to the encroachments of the Frankish power.
    0
    0
  • The most powerful and flourishing of all were those of Flanders - Ghent, Bruges and Ypres.
    0
    0
  • Money had to be raised by taxation, and at a meeting of the states-general (March 20, 1569) the governor-general proposed (1) an immediate tax of 1% on all property, (2) a tax of 5% on all transfers of real estate, (3) a tax of io% on the sale of all articles of commerce, the last two taxes to be granted in perpetuity.
    0
    0
  • The eyes of all men turned to the prince of Orange.
    0
    0
  • William was still struggling to carry out that larger scheme of a union of all the seventeen provinces, which at the time of the " Pacification of Ghent " had seemed a possibility.
    0
    0
  • It is to this period that we must trace such designations of the god as "father of the gods," "chief of the gods," "creator of all things," and the like.
    0
    0
  • The liver being regarded as the seat of the blood, it was a natural and short step to identify the liver with the soul as well as with the seat of life, and therefore as the centre of all manifestations of vitality and activity.
    0
    0
  • The forests literally swarm with insects of all kinds, from cicadae to beautiful butterflies, and from stickand leaf-insects to endless.
    0
    0
  • Instead they used every endeavour to establish friendly relations with the rulers of all the neighbouring kingdoms, and before d'Alboquerque returned to India he despatched embassies to China, Siam, and several kingdoms of Sumatra, and sent a small fleet, with orders to assume a highly conciliatory attitude toward all natives, in search of the Moluccas.
    0
    0
  • Of 147,223 communicants of all churches in 1906, the largest number, 82,272, were Roman Catholics, 22,109 were Congregationalists, 17,471 Methodist Episcopalians, 8450 Baptists, 1501 Free Baptists and 5278 Protestant Episcopalians.
    0
    0
  • The Chi Tandui, also rising here, flows south-east to the Indian Ocean, and alone of all the rivers in this province is navigable.
    0
    0
  • Finding himself overruled by the war party in the cabinet, on the 1st of April 1861, Seward suggested a war of all America against most of Europe, with himself as the director of the enterprise.
    0
    0
  • He is the ground of all that is.
    0
    0
  • At the decisive battle of Naseby (the 14th of June 1645) he commanded the parliamentary right wing and routed the cavalry of Sir Marmaduke Lang exclusion from pardon of all the king's leading adherents, besides the indefinite establishment of Presbyterianism and the refusal of toleration to the Roman Catholics and members of the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • Cromwell's moderate counsels created distrust in his good faith amongst the soldiers, who accused him of "prostituting the liberties and persons of all the people at the foot of the king's interest."
    0
    0
  • Cromwell therefore did not hesitate to join the army in its opposition to the parliament, and supported the Remonstrance of the troops (loth of November 1648), which included the demand for the king's punishment as "the grand author of all our troubles," and justified the use of force by the army if other means failed.
    0
    0
  • He urged Fairfax to attack the Scots at once in their own country and to forestall their The invasion; but Fairfax refused and resigned, and battles of Cromwell was appointed by parliament, on the 26th Dunbar of June 1650, commander-in-chief of all the forces and of the Commonwealth.
    0
    0
  • The estates of only twenty-four leaders of the defeated cause were forfeited by Cromwell, and the national church was left untouched though deprived of all powers of interference with the civil government, the general assembly being dissolved in 1653.
    0
    0
  • Dunbar attested his constancy and gave proof that Cromwell was a master of the tactics of all arms. Preston was an example like Austerlitz of the two stages of a battle as defined by Napoleon, the first flottante, the second foudroyante.
    0
    0
  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Gem to Ges.
    0
    0
  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Spl to St.
    0
    0
  • He never lost an opportunity, whether in the pulpit or on the platform, of pressing on his hearers that the greatest future for Canada lay in unity with the rest of the British Empire; and his broad statesman-like judgment made him an authority which politicians of all parties were glad to consult.
    0
    0
  • According to Herodotus the Phocaeans were the first of all the Greeks to undertake distant voyages, and made known the coasts of the Adriatic, Tyrrhenia and Spain.
    0
    0
  • The church of All Saints (Decorated and Perpendicular) possesses some old brasses; it was restored in 1875.
    0
    0
  • In most mechanical systems the working stresses acting between the parts can be determined when the relative positions of all the parts are known; and the energy which a system possesses in virtue of the relative positions of its parts, or its configuration, is classified as "potential energy," to distinguish it from energy of motion which we shall presently consider.
    0
    0
  • Luther, in spite of his belief in the Real Presence, regarded it as the most harmful of all the medieval festivals and, though he fully realized its popularity, it was the first that he abolished.
    0
    0
  • Derrick cranes are made of all powers, from the timber I-ton hand derrick to the steel 150-ton derrick used in shipbuilding yards.
    0
    0
  • The gross revenue of all the states is estimated at 24 millions sterling.
    0
    0
  • It received from its estates, from tithes and other fixed dues, as well as from the sacrifices (a customary share) and other offerings of the faithful, vast amounts of all sorts of naturalia; besides money and permanent gifts.
    0
    0
  • In spite of all these demands, however, the temples became great granaries and store-houses; as they also were the city archives.
    0
    0
  • Ships, whose tonnage was estimated at the amount of grain they could carry, were continually hired for the transport of all kinds of goods.
    0
    0
  • The commonest of all penalties was a fine.
    0
    0
  • Primary batteries have, in the case of all large offices, been displaced by accumulators.
    0
    0
  • The absence of all mention of either Gauls or Romans seems to prove that this time was at least earlier than 400 B.C.; and the curse may have been composed long before it was written down.
    0
    0
  • There are still many magneto exchanges in existence, but when new exchanges are erected only the very smallest are equipped for magneto working, that system having succumbed to the common battery one in the case of all equipments of moderate and large dimensions.
    0
    0
  • Oliver Heaviside showed mathematically that uniformly-distributed inductance in a telephone line would diminish both attenuation and distortion, and that if the inductance were great enough and the insulation resistance not too high the circuit would be distortionless, while currents of all frequencies would be equally attenuated.
    0
    0
  • It would be an anachronism to think of Francis as a philanthropist or a "social worker" or a revivalist preacher, though he fulfilled the best functions of all these.
    0
    0
  • Sabatier's theory as to the nature of these documents was, in brief, that the Speculum perfectionis was the first of all the Lives of the saint, written in 1227 by Br.
    0
    0
  • He compiled the history and did an analysis of the writings of all the ecclesiastical writers of the first thirteen centuries.
    0
    0
  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under X to Yve.
    0
    0
  • In 1274 the council of Lyons imposed a tax of a tenth part of all church revenues during the six following years for the relief of the Holy Land.
    0
    0
  • The actual taxation to which this fragment refers was not the tenth collected by Boiamund but the tenth of all ecclesiastical property in England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland granted by Pope Nicholas IV.
    0
    0
  • Proceeding thence southwards, we find in succession the Monte Vettore (8128 ft.), the Pizzo di Sevo (7945 ft.), and the two great mountain masses of the Monte Corno, commonly called the Gran Sasso d'Italia, the most lofty of all the Apennines, attaining to a height of 9560 ft., and the Monte della Maiella, its highest summit measuring 9170 ft.
    0
    0
  • Great progress has been made in the manufacture of machinery; locomotives, railway carriages, electric tram-cars, &c., and machinery of all kinds, are now largely made in Italy itself, especially in the north and in the neighborhood of Naples.
    0
    0
  • All the members of the suppressed communities received full exercise of all the ordinary political and civil rights of laymen; and annuities were granted to all those who had taken permanent religious vows prior to the 18th of January 1864.
    0
    0
  • The judges of all kinds are very poorly paid.
    0
    0
  • In 1902 the special corps in Eritrea numbered about 4700 of all ranks, including nearly 4000 natives.
    0
    0
  • The arrangements thus established by Augustus continued almost unchanged till the time of Constantine, and formed the basis of all subsequent administrative divisions until the fall of the Western empire.
    0
    0
  • Within those precincts the bishops and the citizens were independent of all feudal masters but the emperor.
    0
    0
  • Burghers of all denominations are enrolled in one or other of the arts or gilds, and these trading companies furnish the material from which the government or signoria bf the city is composed.
    0
    0
  • Quarrelling with the Venetians In 1508, he combined the forces of all Europe by the league of Cambray against them; and, when he had succeeded in his first purpose of humbling them even to the dust, he turned round in 1510, uttered his famous resolve to expel the barbarians from Italy, and pitted the Spaniards against the French.
    0
    0
  • He there received the imperial crown, and summoned the Italian princes for a settlement of all disputed claims. Francesco Sforza, the last and childless heir of the ducal house, was left in Milan till his death, which happened in 1535.
    0
    0
  • The total gains of all his strenuous endeavours amounted to the acquisition of a few places on the borders of Montferrat.
    0
    0
  • Worst of all was the arrival of a small British force in Calabria under Sir John.
    0
    0
  • The pope, Pius VII., who had long been kept under restraint by Napoleon at Fontainebleau, returned to Rome in May 1814, and was recognized by the congress of Vienna (not without some demur on the part of Austria) as the sovereign of all the former possessions of the Holy See.
    0
    0
  • His political ideal was a federation of all the Italian states under the presidency of the pope, on a basis of Catholicism, but without a constitution.
    0
    0
  • In spite of all its inaccuracies and exaggerations the book served a useful purpose in reviving the self-respect of a despondent people.
    0
    0
  • There were now three main political tendencies, viz, the union of north Italy under Charles Albert and an alliance with the pope and Naples, a federation of the different states under their present rulers, and a united republic of all Italy.
    0
    0
  • He made desperate efforts to conciliate the population, and succeeded with a few of the nobles, who were led to believe in the possibility of an Italian confederation, including Lombardy and Venetia which would be united to Austria by a personal union alone; but the immense majority of all classes rejected these advances, and came to regard union with Piedmont with increasing favor.
    0
    0
  • The men of the Left believed themselves subtle enough to retain the confidence and esteem of all foreign powers while coquetting at home with elements which some of these powers had reason to regard with suspicion.
    0
    0
  • As in 1869-1870, it therefore became a matter of the highest importance for Austria to retain full disposal of all her troops by assuring herself against Italian aggression.
    0
    0
  • The main point of the treaty, however, lay in clause 17: His Majesty the king of kings of Ethiopia consents to make use of the government of His Majesty the king of Italy for the treatment of all questions concerning other powers and governments.
    0
    0
  • Firmness such as this secured for him the support of all constitutional elements, and after three years premiership his position was infinitely stronger than at the outset.
    0
    0
  • The new premiers first act was one which cannot be sufficiently praised: he suppressed all subsidies to journalists, and although this resulted in bitter attacks against him in the columns of the reptile press it commanded the approval of all right-thinking men..
    0
    0
  • Brahma (n.) is the designation generally applied to the Supreme Soul (paramatman), or impersonal, all-embracing divine essence, the original source and ultimate goal of all that exists; Brahma (m.), on the other hand, is only one of the three hypostases of that divinity whose creative activity he represents, as distinguished from its preservative and destructive aspects, ever apparent in life and nature, and represented by the gods Vishnu and Siva respectively.
    0
    0
  • The term is borrowed from Sight, of all the physical senses the one which most rapidly instructs the mind.
    0
    0
  • It ranks, up to our own day, as the last of the great philosophies, and the boldest of all.
    0
    0
  • In his Theodicy Leibnitz argues, like not a few predecessors, that this universe must be regarded as the best of all possible universes.
    0
    0
  • In " Some Reasons for Belief, " the author institutes a rapid destructive criticism of all possible philosophies.
    0
    0
  • Granted that, ideally, scientific knowledge ought to be able to demonstrate all truth, is it safe, or humane, for a being who is imperfectly started in the process of knowledge to fling away with scorn those unanalysed promptings and misgivings " Which, be they what they may, Are yet the fountain light of all our day, Are yet a master light of all our seeing.
    0
    0
  • Ardently devoted to the service of humanity, he projected a scheme for a general concourse of all the savants in Europe, and started in London a paper, Journal du Lycee de Londres, which was to be the organ of their views.
    0
    0
  • An anthropomorphic deity, Puluga, is the cause of all things, but it is not necessary to propitiate him.
    0
    0
  • If the three principal organ-systems of the medusa, namely mouth, tentacles and umbrella, be considered in the light of phylogeny, it is evident that the manubrium bearing the mouth must be the oldest, as representing a common property of all the Coelentera, even of the gastrula embryo of all Enterozoa.
    0
    0
  • These atoms, which are the seeds of all things, are, however, not eternal but created by God.
    0
    0
  • He may be said to furnish a further contribution to a metaphysical conception of evolution in his view of all finite individual things as the infinite variety to which the unlimited productive power of the universal substance gives birth.
    0
    0
  • He sought (L'Homme-machine) to connect man in his original condition with the lower animals, and emphasized (L'Homme-plante) the essential unity of plan of all living things.
    0
    0
  • On the contrary, the lower members of each tend to converge towards the lower members of all the others.
    0
    0
  • A closer scrutiny of the writers of all ages who preceded Charles Darwin, and, in particular, the light thrown back from Darwin on the earlier writings of Herbert Spencer, have made plain that without Darwin the world by this time might have come to a.
    0
    0
  • Such a condition has been termed, with regard to the group of animals or plants the organs of which are being studied, archecentric. The possession of the character in the archecentric condition in (say) two of the members of the group does not indicate that these two members are more nearly related to one another than they are to other members of the group; the archecentric condition is part of the common heritage of all the members of the group, and may be retained by any.
    0
    0
  • In England the dispute between Canterbury and York was settled by making them both primates, giving Canterbury the further honour of being primate of all England.
    0
    0
  • This was the centre of the life of the medieval city, the scene of all great public functions, such as the homage of the burghers to 1 Bavo, or Allowin (c. 589-c. 653), patron saint of Ghent, was a nobleman converted by St Amandus, the apostle of Flanders.
    0
    0
  • The inscriptions are at present scattered through a number of learned periodicals; a complete list of all those that can be approximately dated between the 3rd century B.C. and the 2nd century A.D.
    0
    0
  • A description of the contents of all these books in the canon is given in Rhys Davids's American Lectures, PP. 44-86.
    0
    0
  • All voyagers agree that for varied beauty of form and colour the Society Islands are unsurpassed in the Pacific. Innumerable rills gather in lovely streams, and, after heavy rains, torrents precipitate themselves in grand cascades from the mountain cliffs - a feature so striking as to have attracted the attention of all voyagers, from Wallis downwards.
    0
    0
  • In 1854 he produced Rioja, perhaps the most admired and the most admirable of all his works, and from 18J4 to 1856 he took an active part in the political campaign carried on in the journal El Padre Cobos.
    0
    0
  • In the library of All Souls at Oxford are preserved a large number of drawings by Wren, including the designs for almost all his chief works, and a fine series showing his various schemes for St Paul's Cathedral.
    0
    0
  • The belief was taught in the homogeneity of all living things, in the doctrine of original sin, in the transmigration of souls, in the view that the soul is entombed in the body (v13µa ojia), and that it may gradually attain perfection during connexion with a series of bodies.
    0
    0
  • A member of all the chief archaeological societies in Europe, he was given hon.
    0
    0
  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under O to Ogd.
    0
    0
  • The radial structure is characteristic of all root-steles, which have in essential points a remarkably uniform structure throughout the vascular plants, a fact no doubt largely dependent on the very uniform conditions under which they live.
    0
    0
  • The body thus formed ment of is called the embryo, and this develops into the adult Primary plant, not by continued growth of all its parts as in an animal, but by localization of the regions of cell-division and growth, such a localized region being called a growing-point.
    0
    0
  • The living elements die, and the walls of all the cells often become hardened, owing to the deposit in them of special substances.
    0
    0
  • All physiology, consequently, must be based upon the identity of the protoplasm of all living beings.
    0
    0
  • It is sometimes forgotten, when discussing questions of animal nutrition, that all the food materials of all living organisms are prepared originally from inorganic substances in exactly the same way, in exactly the same place, and by the same machinery, which is the chlorophyll apparatus of the vegetable kingdom.
    0
    0
  • The most conspicuous case, perhaps, of all these is the mistletoe, which flourishes luxuriantly upon the apple, the poplar and other trees.
    0
    0
  • The purposeful character of all these movements or changes of position indicates that they are of nervous origin.
    0
    0
  • Discolorations are among the commonest of all signs that a plant is sickly or diseased.
    0
    0
  • The criticisms were directed chiefly to the inclusion of sand dune plants among halophytes, to the exclusion of halophytes from xerophytes, to the inclusion of bog xerophytes among hydrophytes, to the inclusion of all conifers among xerophytes and of all deciduous trees among mesophytes, and to the group of mesophytes in general.
    0
    0
  • Strengthening tissue of all kinds (and sometimes even the phloem) is more or less rudimentary.
    0
    0
  • Upon our knowledge of its minute structure or cytology, combined with a study of its physiological activities, depends the ultimate solution of all the important problems of nutrition.
    0
    0
  • It is sufficient to note here that cells were first of all discovered in various vegetable tissues by Robert Hooke in 1665 (Micrographia); Malpighi and Grew (1674-1682) gave the first clear indications of the importance of cells in the building up of plant tissues, but it was not until the beginning of the 19th century that any insight into the real nature of the cell and its functions was obtained.
    0
    0
  • We know very little of the details of reduction in the lower plants, but it probably occurs at some stage in the life history of all plants in which sexual nuclear fusion takes place.
    0
    0
  • The Northmen of Denmark and Norway, whose piratical adventures were the terror of all the coasts of Europe, and who established themselves in Great Britain and Ireland, in France and The Sicily, were also geographical explorers in their rough but Nothmen.
    0
    0
  • Vegetation of all sorts acts in a similar way, either in forming soil and assisting in breaking up rocks, in filling up shallow lakes, and even, like the mangrove, in reclaiming wide stretches of land from the sea.
    0
    0
  • Plant life, utilizing solar light to combine the inorganic elements of water, soil and air into living substance, is the basis of all animal life.
    0
    0
  • The first requisites of all human beings are food and protection, in their search for which men are brought into intimate relations with the forms and productions of the earth's surface.
    0
    0
  • The salts of all the metals of this group usually crystallize well, the chlorides and nitrates dissolve readily in water, whilst the carbonates, phosphates and sulphates are either very sparingly soluble or are insoluble in water.
    0
    0
  • Those who were reconciled were deprived of all honourable employment, and were forbidden to use gold, silver, jewelry, silk or fine wool.
    0
    0
  • Meditating, it is probable, emigration upon his release, he turned his attention while in prison to colonial subjects, and acutely detected the main causes of the slow progress of the Australian colonies in the enormous size of the landed estates, the reckless manner in which land was given away, the absence of all systematic effort at colonization, and the consequent discouragement of immigration and dearth of labour.
    0
    0
  • One of the claims of the "free republic" was "the absolute and unconditional slavery of all Hottentots and Bushmen."
    0
    0
  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Sup to Szo.
    0
    0
  • This is a peculiar character of all birds.
    0
    0
  • Highly specialized air-sacs are characteristic of all birds.
    0
    0
  • Birds being of all animals most particularly adapted for extended and rapid locomotion, it became necessary for him to eliminate from his consideration those groups, be they small or large, which are of more or less universal occurrence, and to ground his results on what was at that time commonly known as the order Insessores or Passeres, comprehending the orders now differentiated as Passeriformes, Coraciiformes and Cuculiformes, in other words the mass of arboreal birds.
    0
    0
  • As a whole, Australia is rich in parrots, of which it has several very peculiar forms, but Picarians in old-fashioned parlance, of all sorts - certain kingfishers excepted - are few in number, and the pigeons are also comparatively scarce, no doubt because of the many arboreal predaceous marsupials.
    0
    0
  • Further on this subject we must not go; we can only state that Godman has shown good reason for declaring that the avifauna of all these islands is the effect of colonization extending over a long period of years, and going on now.
    0
    0
  • Thus charged on the silver bend, it makes bad armory and it is worthy of note that, although the grant of it is clearly to the duke and his heirs in fee simple, Howards of all branches descending from the duke bear it in their shields, even though all right to it has long passed from the house to the duke's heirs general, the Stourtons and Petres.
    0
    0
  • The victor of Flodden is the common ancestor of all living Howards that can show a descent from the main stock.
    0
    0
  • Roger Stafford, the impoverished heir male of the ancient Staffords, had been forced to surrender his barony to the king by a deed dated in the preceding year, a piece of injustice which is in the teeth of all modern conceptions of peerage law.
    0
    0
  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Cin to Cla.
    0
    0
  • Romans stands on an eminence on the right bank of the Isere, a fine stone result will be the inclusion of all Israel in the heritage of the messianic kingdom of Christ.
    0
    0
  • Like Anaximenes, he believed air to be the one source of all being, and all other substances to be derived from it by condensation and rarefaction.
    0
    0
  • All these writers, however, are entirely eclipsed by the commanding personality of the most famous of the Geonim, Seadiah ben Joseph (q.v.) of Sura, often called al-Fayyumi (of the Fayum in Egypt), one of the greatest representatives of Jewish learning of all times, who died in 942.
    0
    0
  • The greatest of all medieval Jewish scholars was Moses ben Maimon (Rambam), called Maimonides by Christians.
    0
    0
  • At any rate the work was immediately accepted by the kabbalists, and has formed the basis of all subsequent study of the subject.
    0
    0
  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Hep to Hes.
    0
    0
  • Below the bifurcation the river of Babylon was again divided into several streams, and indeed the most famous of all the ancient canals was the Arakhat (Archous of the Greeks and Serrat and Nil of the Arabs), which left that river just above Babylon and ran due east to the Tigris, irrigating all the central part of the Jezireh, and sending down a branch through Nippur and Erech to rejoin the Euphrates a little above the modern Nasrieh.
    0
    0
  • He is the god of fruitfulness, the giver of sunshine and rain, and thus the source of all prosperity.
    0
    0
  • The new creed, the new speech, the new social system, had taken such deep root that the descendants of the Scandinavian settlers were better fitted to be the armed missionaries of all these things than the neighbours from whom they had borrowed their new possessions.
    0
    0
  • He sets the Normans before us as a race specially marked by cunning, despising their own inheritance in the hope of winning a greater, eager after both gain and dominion, given to imitation of all kinds, holding a certain mean between lavishness and greediness - that is, perhaps uniting, as they certainly did, these two seemingly opposite qualities.
    0
    0
  • They were enduring of toil, hunger, and cold whenever fortune laid it on them, given to hunting and hawking, delighting in the pleasure of horses, and of all the weapons and garb of war.
    0
    0
  • On the other hand, none were less inclined to submit to encroachments on the part of the ecclesiastical power, the Conqueror himself least of all.
    0
    0
  • And yet, notwithstanding all this, and partly because of all this, real and distinct Norman influence has been far more extensive and far more abiding in England than it has been in Sicily.
    0
    0
  • We see indeed faint traces of distinction among the patricians themselves, which may lead us to guess that the equality of all patricians may have been won by struggles of unrecorded days, not unlike those which in recorded days brought about the equality of patrician and plebeian.
    0
    0
  • Admission to military command was won first, then admission to civil jurisdiction; a share in religious functions was won last of all.
    0
    0
  • But the result did not lead to the abolition of all distinctions between the orders.
    0
    0
  • This nobility consisted of all those who, as descendants of curule magistrates, had the jus imaginum - that is, who could point to forefathers ennobled by office.
    0
    0
  • The plebs, like the English commons, contained families differing widely in rank and social position, among them those families which, as soon as an artificial barrier broke down, joined with the patricians to form the new older settlement, a nobility which had once been the whole people, was gradually shorn of all exclusive privilege, and driven to share equal rights with a new people which had grown up around it.
    0
    0
  • The series of revolutions already spoken of first made descent from former councillors a necessary qualification for election to the council; then election was abolished, and the council consisted of all descendants of its existing members who had reached the age of twenty-five.
    0
    0
  • The nobility of France, keeping the most oppressive social and personal privileges, had been shorn of all political and even administrative power; the tyrants of the people were the slaves of the king.
    0
    0
  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under I to Iol.
    0
    0
  • Priscian the grammarian speaks of him as having attained the summit of honesty and of all sciences.
    0
    0
  • The fifth and last book takes up the question of man's free will and God's foreknowledge, and, by an exposition of the nature of God, attempts to show that these doctrines are not subversive of each other; and the conclusion is drawn that God remains a foreknowing spectator of all events, and the ever-present eternity of his vision agrees with the future quality of our actions, dispensing rewards to the good and punishments to the wicked.
    0
    0
  • Matter and force (or energy) are infinite; the conservation of force follows from the imperishability of matter, the ultimate basis of all science.
    0
    0
  • But in other parts of his works he suggests that mind and matter are two different aspects of that which is the basis of all things - a monism which is not necessarily materialistic, and which, in the absence of further explanation, constitutes a confession of failure.
    0
    0
  • The more celebrated and central thesis of the book - this finite universe, the best of all such that are possible - also restates positions of Augustine and Aquinas.
    0
    0
  • The list of his more noteworthy literary works is completed by the mention of the Histoire des membres de l'Academie frangaise, containing biographical notices of all the members of the Academy who died between 1700 and 1772, the year in which he himself became secretary.
    0
    0
  • The lord high almoner is an ecclesiastical officer, usually a bishop, who had the rights to the forfeiture of all deodands and the goods of a felo de se, for distribution among the poor.
    0
    0
  • He interpreted the Sermon on the Mount literally, denounced war and oaths, opposed the union of Church and State, and declared that the duty of all true Christians was to break away from the national Church and return to the simple teaching of Christ and His apostles.
    0
    0
  • At the head of the Church was a body of ten elders, elected by the synod; this synod consisted of all the ministers, and acted as the supreme legislative authority; and the bishops ruled in their respective dioceses, and had a share in the general oversight.
    0
    0
  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Fos to Fra.
    0
    0
  • Day and night, long processions of all classes and ages, headed by priests carrying crosses and banners, perambulated the streets in double file, reciting prayers and drawing the blood from their bodies with leathern thongs.
    0
    0
  • Ganglbauer (1892) divides the whole order into two sub-orders only, the Caraboidea (the Adephaga of Sharp and the older writers) and the Cantharidoidea (including all other beetles), since the larvae of Caraboidea have five-segmented, two-clawed legs, while those of all other beetles have legs with four segments and a single claw.
    0
    0
  • Kolbe, on the other hand, insists that the weevils are the most modified of all beetles, being highly specialized as regards their adult structure, and developing from legless maggots exceedingly different from the adult; he regards the Adephaga, with their active armoured larvae with two foot-claws, as the most primitive group of beetles, and there can be little doubt that the likeness between larvae and adult may safely be accepted as a primitive character among insects.
    0
    0
  • The Trichopterygidae, with their delicate narrow fringed wings, are the smallest of all beetles, while the Platypsyllidae consist of only a single species of curious form found on the beaver.
    0
    0
  • The Lymexylonidae, a small family of this group, characterized by its slender, undifferentiated feelers and feet, is believed by Lameere to comprise the most primitive of all living beetles, and Sharp lays stress on the undeveloped structure of the tribe generally.
    0
    0
  • Considerable diversity is to be noticed in details of structure within this group, and for an enumeration of all the various families which have been proposed and their distinguishing characters the reader is referred to one of the monographs mentioned below.
    0
    0
  • The most interesting of the Heteromera, and perhaps of all the Coleoptera, are some beetles which pass through two or more larval forms in the course of the life-history (hypermetamorphosis).
    0
    0
  • Further, his rule exemplifies what is characteristic of all the Greek tyrannies - the advantage which the ancient monarchy had over the republican form of government.
    0
    0
  • This council consists of all the ministers and of the heads of the principal administrations.
    0
    0
  • In 1896 the powers of the minister were extended at the expense of those of the under-secretary, who remained only at the head of the corps of gendarmes; but by a law of the 24th of September 1904 this was again reversed, and the under-secretary was again placed at the head of all the police with the title of undersecretary for the administration of the police.
    0
    0
  • The assembly of the mir consists of all the peasant householders of the village.'
    0
    0
  • The total grants from the state exchequer for education of all grades in all parts of the empire amounted in 1906 to £8,107,000.
    0
    0
  • The distribution of all these is, however, very unequal, and the five following subdivisions may be established: - (T) the tundras; (2) the forest region; (3) the middle region, comprising the surface available for agriculture and partly covered with f