This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

odour

Head Word icon
odour

odour Sentence Examples

  • A strange odour came up from the earth.

    155
    47
  • of lavender or rosemary, in order to destroy the noxious odour of the pyridine bases.

    43
    24
  • The odour is heavy and disagreeable, and the taste acrid and bitter.

    33
    23
  • The products obtained by the distillation of petroleum are not in a marketable condition, but require chemical treatment to remove acid and other bodies which impart a dark colour as well as an unpleasant odour to the liquid, and in the case of lamp-oils, reduce the power of rising in the wick by capillary attraction.

    27
    19
  • This balsam gives the tree a fragrant odour when the leaves are unfolding.

    22
    17
  • The savoury odour of the meat made me hungry long before the tables were set.

    16
    8
  • The wood has a pure bitter taste, and is without odour or aroma.

    14
    16
  • In the following year he discovered rhodium; and at about the same time Smithson Tennant added two more to the list - iridium and osmium; the former was so named from the changing tints of its oxides (ipcs, rainbow), and the latter from the odour of its oxide (ovµA, smell).

    11
    4
  • Castoreum is a substance contained in two pear-shaped pouches situated near the organs of reproduction, of a bitter taste and slightly foetid odour, at one time largely employed as a medicine, but now used only in perfumery.

    11
    4
  • Its only objection is the odour which the patient exhales.

    11
    4
  • It generally contains a large amount of uncombined alkali, and that, with its unpleasant odour of coco-nut oil, makes it a most undesirable soap for personal use.

    11
    12
  • The odour of cubebs is agreeable and aromatic; the taste, pungent, acrid, slightly bitter and persistent.

    10
    6
  • To illuminating oil or kerosene a series of tests is applied in order that the colour, odour, specific gravity and flash-point or fire-test may be recorded.

    9
    4
  • The pale clay-coloured gills, offensive odour, and clammy or even viscid top are decisive characters.

    9
    6
  • In a gas the state of things is very different; an odour is known to spread rapidly through great distances, even in the stillest air, and a gaseous poison or corrosive will attack not only those objects which are in contact with its source but also all those which can be reached by the motion of its molecules.

    8
    5
  • There was no odour of pine-needles.

    8
    11
  • The characteristic flavour and odour of wines and spirits is dependent on the proportion of higher alcohols, aldehydes and esters which may be produced.

    7
    4
  • An allied fungus peculiar to woods, with a less fleshy cap than the true mushroom, with hollow stem, and strong odour, has been described as a close ally of the pasture mushroom under the name of A.

    6
    11
  • I knew it, it was the odour that always precedes a thunderstorm, and a nameless fear clutched at my heart.

    6
    11
  • Surrounded by this odour of sanctity, which greatly edified the faithful, James lived at St Germain until his death on the 17th of September 1701.

    6
    13
  • Ammonia, recognizable by its odour and alkaline reaction, indicates ammoniacal salts or cyanides containing water.

    5
    2
  • It also possesses important shrines of its own which cause many pilgrims to linger there, and wealthy Indians not infrequently choose Bagdad as a suitable spot in which to end their days in the odour of sanctity.

    5
    2
  • Sheep and goats are very nearly related, but the former never have a beard on the chin of the males, which are devoid of a strong odour; and their horns are typically of a different type.

    5
    2
  • Some 200,000 pilgrims from the Shiite portions of Islam are said to journey annually to Kerbela, many of them carrying the bones of their relatives to be buried in its sacred soil, or bringing their sick and aged to die there in the odour of sanctity.

    5
    2
  • Disgusted by these reverses, draws from the in bad odour with the king, and with his soldiers Nether- mutinying for lack of pay, the governor-general lands.

    4
    6
  • The musky odour from which the animal takes its name does not appear to be due to the secretion of any gland.

    4
    14
  • Chlorine, bromine, and iodine, each recognizable by its colour and odour, result from decomposable haloids; iodine forms also a black sublimate.

    3
    2
  • Cyanogen and hydrocyanic acid, recognizable by their odour, indicate decomposable cyanides.

    3
    2
  • Of foxes certainly distinct specifically from the typical representative of the group, one of the best known is the Indian Vulpes bengalensis, a species much inferior in point of size to its European relative, and lacking the strong odour of the latter, from which it is also distinguished by the black tip to the tail and the pale-coloured backs of the ears.

    3
    2
  • That in this portion of their ritual, however, the Christians of that period were not universally conscious of its direct descent from Mosaic institutions may be inferred perhaps from the "benediction of the incense" used in the days of Charlemagne, which runs as follows: "May the Lord bless this incense to the extinction of every noxious smell, and kindle it to the odour of its sweetness."

    3
    2
  • Pure methyl alcohol is a colourless mobile liquid, boiling at 66°-67°, and having a specific gravity of 0 8142 at o° C. It has a burning taste, and generally a spirituous odour, but when absolutely pure it is said to be odourless.

    3
    2
  • Even his wit and knowledge of the world were spoiled, and his affected gaiety was touched with sadness, by the odour of falsehood which escaped through every pore of his body."

    3
    3
  • He then returned to Bavaria, and his absence bringing him into ill odour at Vienna, he complained of the incompetence of the council of commerce and dedicated a tract on trade (CommercienTractat) to the emperor Leopold.

    3
    3
  • The a-halogen compounds are obtained by heating styrolene chloride (or bromide) with lime or alcoholic potash; they are liquids which have a penetrating odour, and yield acetophenone when heated with water to 180°.

    2
    1
  • Podébrad, who had gained the throne of Bohemia with the aid of the Hussites and Utraquists, had long been in ill odour at Rome, and in 1465 Pope Paul II.

    2
    2
  • They are all, as found in commerce, of a pale yellow-green colour; they emit a peculiar aromatic odour, and have a slightly astringent bitter taste.

    2
    2
  • Nitrogen oxides, recognized by their odour and brown-red colour, result from the decomposition of nitrates.

    2
    2
  • Sulphuretted hydrogen, recognized by its odour, results from Sulphides containing water, and hydrosulphides.

    2
    2
  • Young foxes can be tamed to a certain extent, and do not then emit the well-known odour to any great degree unless excited.

    2
    2
  • The co-chlor compound results when, (3-phenyl-a-chlorlactic acid (from hypochlorous acid and cinnamic acid) is heated with water; it has a hyacinthine odour and yields phenylacetaldehyde when heated with water.

    2
    2
  • Though wild and untameable to a great degree if captured when fully grown, if taken young they are docile, and have frequently been made pets, not having the strong unpleasant odour of the smaller Mustelidae.

    2
    2
  • The musky odour from which it derives its name is due to the secretion of a large gland situated in the inguinal region, and present in both sexes.

    2
    4
  • When it has a very strong and penetrating odour, but when it is thoroughly purified from sulphuretted and phosphuretted hydrogen, which are invariably present with it in minute traces, this extremely pungent odour disappears, and the pure gas has a not unpleasant ethereal smell.

    2
    5
  • Here were great oaks and splendid evergreens with trunks like mossy pillars, from the branches of which hung garlands of ivy and mistletoe, and persimmon trees, the odour of which pervaded every nook and corner of the wood--an illusive, fragrant something that made the heart glad.

    2
    5
  • There was an odour of print and leather in the room which told me that it was full of books, and I stretched out my hand instinctively to find them.

    2
    5
  • Tetranitromethane, C(N02)4, obtained by adding nitroform to a hot mixture of nitric and sulphuric acids, is a crystalline solid which melts at 13° C. Chlorpicrin, CC1 3 NO 2, is a liquid of suffocating odour obtained by the action of nitric acid and chloride of lime on many organic compounds.

    2
    6
  • To what extent she now identifies objects by their odour is hard to determine.

    2
    6
  • It has a strong and characteristic odour, and a hot sweetish taste, is soluble in ten parts of water, and in all proportions in alcohol, and dissolves bromine, iodine, and, in small quantities, sulphur and phosphorus, also the volatile oils, most fatty and resinous substances, guncotton, caoutchouc and certain of the vegetable alkaloids.

    2
    9
  • The peculiar musky odour was perceived from a distance of a hundred yards; but according to Professor Nathoist there was no musky taste or smell in the flesh if the carcase were cleaned immediately the animals were killed.

    2
    14
  • He died there in the odour of sanctity on the 28th of May 852.

    2
    14
  • Oliveri, Gazz., 1886, 16, p. 493) It crystallizes in colourless needles which melt at 50° C. It possesses a disagreeable faecal odour, sublimes readily, and turns brown on exposure to air.

    1
    2
  • When reduced by sodium in boiling amyl alcohol solution it forms alicyclic tetrahydro-0naphthylamine, which has most of the properties of the aliphatic amines; it is strongly alkaline in reaction, has an ammoniacal odour and cannot be diazotized.

    1
    2
  • The odour of Siam benzoin is partly due to the presence of vanillin, and the substance contains as much as 38% of benzoic acid but no cinnamic acid.

    1
    3
  • All my early lessons have in them the breath of the woods--the fine, resinous odour of pine needles, blended with the perfume of wild grapes.

    1
    3
  • pubescens, Hook, is of a dark reddish colour, has an acrid taste and an odour resembling cedar-wood, and softens in the hand.

    1
    4
  • The transverse fracture has a resinous appearance with white streaks; the flavour is bitter and aromatic, and the odour characteristic. It consists of a mixture of resin, gum and essential oil, the resin being present to the extent of 25 to 40%, with 21to 8% of the oil, myrrhol, to which the odour is due.

    1
    4
  • I asked, and the next minute I recognized the odour of the mimosa blossoms.

    1
    4
  • Both have fleshy caps, whitish, moist and clammy to the touch; instead of a pleasant odour, they have a disagreeable one; the stems are ringless, or nearly so; and the gills, which are palish-clay-brown, distinctly touch and grow on to the solid or pithy stem.

    1
    5
  • When she is out walking she often stops suddenly, attracted by the odour of a bit of shrubbery.

    1
    5
  • It is found that transparent oils under the influence of light absorb oxygen, becoming deeper in colour and opalescent, while strong acidity and a penetrating odour are developed, these changes being due to the formation of various acid and phenylated compounds, which are also occasionally found in fresh oils.

    1
    14
  • 16); so the offerings sent by the Philippians to Paul when a prisoner at Rome are "an odour of a sweet smell, a sacrifice acceptable, well pleasing to God" (Phil.

    1
    15
  • in three days, has a strong ammoniacal odour, which rapidly disappears, and in consequence of the loss of ammonia the latex will not keep for longer than a day unchanged; hence when it has to be carried to a distance from the place of collection, 3% of ammonia solution is added.

    1
    18
  • The oil when brought to the surface has the appearance of a whitish-blue water, which gives out brilliant straw-coloured rays, and emits a strong pungent odour.

    0
    0
  • rend., 1903, 1 37, p. 547), burning with a characteristic blue flame and forming much sulphur dioxide, recognized by its pungent odour.

    0
    0
  • Sulphuretted hydrogen is a colourless gas possessing an extremely offensive odour.

    0
    0
  • It is a colourless gas which possesses a characteristic suffocating odour.

    0
    0
  • Their colour is usually some tone of yellow with dashes of red, brown and green, and they frequently emit a pungent odour.

    0
    0
  • The mono-nitro compounds are stable and distil without decomposition; they have a pale yellow colour and possess an agreeable odour.

    0
    0
  • It is a colourless oil boiling at 247° C., and having a spicy odour.

    0
    0
  • Fermentative changes are set up in it, characterized by the evolution of gas and the formation of products of suboxidation, some of which, being volatile, account for the characteristic odour.

    0
    0
  • Benzene is a colourless, limpid, highly refracting liquid, having a pleasing and characteristic odour.

    0
    0
  • It is a liquid, boiling at 139° and having a pleasant odour.

    0
    0
  • It contains a certain amount of unaltered caustic lime and slacked lime, along with sulphates and sulphides of lime, some of which have an evil odour.

    0
    0
  • The roots are dug up in Mexico throughout the year, and are suspended to dry in a net over the hearth of the Indians' huts, and hence acquire a smoky odour.

    0
    0
  • Pure ethyl alcohol is a colourless, mobile liquid of an agreeable odour.

    0
    0
  • It can be kept unaltered in dry air, but the smallest trace of moisture in the atmosphere leads to the evolution of minute quantities of acetylene and gives it a distinctive odour.

    0
    0
  • Pyrazine, C4H4N2, crystallizes from water in prisms, which have a heliotrope odour.

    0
    0
  • The milk of the cow, which may be taken as typical of all others, and is indeed by far the most important and valuable of all, is, when newly drawn, an opaque white fluid, with a yellowish tinge, soft, bland and sweetish to the taste, and possessed of a faintly animal odour.

    0
    0
  • This odour, according to Schreiner, is due to the presence of sulphuretted hydrogen, and disappears after a short exposure.

    0
    0
  • The paraquinones are generally crystalline solids of a yellowish colour, having a characteristic sharp odour and being volatile in steam.

    0
    0
  • The small greenish flowers are borne on branched panicles; and the male ones are characterized by having a disgusting odour.

    0
    0
  • It is of a pale brown colour, transparent, brittle, and in consequence of its agreeable odour is used for fumigation and in perfumery.

    0
    0
  • Although the more typical goats are markedly distinct from sheep, there is, both as regards wild and domesticated forms, an almost complete gradation from goats to sheep, so that it is exceedingly difficult to define either group. The position of the genus Capra (to all the members of which, as well as some allied species, the name "goat" in its wider sense is applicable) in the family Bovidae is indicated in the article Bovidae, and some of the distinctions between goats and sheep are mentioned in the article Sheep. Here then it will suffice to mention that goats are characterized by the strong and offensive odour of the males, which are furnished with a beard on the chin; while as a general rule glands are present between the middle toes of the fore feet only.

    0
    0
  • It is detected by heating with ordinary alcohol and sulphuric acid, which gives rise to acetic ester or ethyl acetate, recognized by its" fragrant odour; or by heating with arsenious oxide, which forms the pungent and poisonous cacodyl oxide.

    0
    0
  • There may be an odour of prussic acid, but this soon disappears.

    0
    0
  • Celtic altar-bell of hammered iron, known as the "Ronnell bell."' Such is the odour of sanctity of this venerable church that there is an old local saying that "to be thrice prayed for in the kirk of Birnie will either mend or end ye."

    0
    0
  • By dry distillation the bark yields an empyreumatic oil, called diogott in Russia, used in the preparation of Russia leather; to this oil the peculiar pleasant odour of the leather is due.

    0
    0
  • The whole tree, but especially the bark and leaves, has a very pleasant resinous odour, and from the young leaves and buds an essential oil is distilled with water.

    0
    0
  • Political topics were studiously avoided in general conversation, and books or newspapers in which the most keen-scented press-censor could detect the least odour of political or religious free-thinking were strictly prohibited.

    0
    0
  • It is a yellow oil which boils at 59° C. (12 mm.), and possesses a stupefying odour.

    0
    0
  • The peculiar odour evolved by many rodents is due to the secretions of special glands, which may open into the prepuce, as in Mus, Microtus and Cricetus, or into the rectum, as in Arctomys and Thryonomys, or into the passage common to both, as in the beaver, or into pouches opening near the vent, as in hares, agoutis and jerboas.

    0
    0
  • A typical resin is a transparent or translucent mass, with a vitreous fracture and a faintly yellow or brown colour, inodorous or having only a slight turpentine odour and taste.

    0
    0
  • A volatile product of offensive odour obtained in the carbonization of bones for the manufacture of animal charcoal.

    0
    0
  • In East and South Africa there is a genus of Mustelidae known as Ictonyx (Zorilla) which possesses a foetid odour and is warningly coloured with black and white bands after the manner of skunks.

    0
    0
  • moschatum (Musk Hyacinth), Io in., has peculiar livid greenishyellow flowers and a strong musky odour; M.

    0
    0
  • Castor oil is a viscid liquid, almost colourless when pure, possessing only a slight odour, and a mild yet highly nauseous and disagreeable taste.

    0
    0
  • Whether the strong odour of trimethylamine evolved by the spores of Tilletia attracts insects is not known.

    0
    0
  • The fruit-body before it ruptures may reach the size of a hen's egg and is white in colour; from this there grows out a hollow cylindrical structure which can be distinguished at the distance of several yards by its disgusting odour.

    0
    0
  • Diazobenzeneimide, Ca-1 5 N 3, is a yellowish oil of,stupefying odour.

    0
    0
  • odour.

    0
    0
  • The odour, however, even after dressing is rather pungent of musk, which is generally an objection.

    0
    0
  • If it were not for its disagreeable odour, skunk would be worth much more than the usual market value, as it is naturally the blackest fur, silky in appearance and most durable.

    0
    0
  • Russian dressing is seldom reliable; not only is there an unpleasant odour, but in damp weather the pelts often become clammy, which is due to the saline matter in the dressing mixture.

    0
    0
  • While the work is often cleverly done as to matching and manipulation of the pelt which is very soft, there are great objections in the odour and the brittleness or weakness of the fur.

    0
    0
  • Many possess a fragrant odour and are prepared in large quantities for use as artificial fruit essences.

    0
    0
  • Ethyl acetate (acetic ether), CH3.002C2H5, boils at 75° C. Isoamylisovalerate, C4H9 C02C5Hn, boils at 196° C. and has an odour of apples.

    0
    0
  • Ethyl butyrate, C3H7 C02C2H5, boils at 121° C. and has an odour of pineapple.

    0
    0
  • The prepared leaves have a faint odour and bitter taste; and to preserve their properties they must be kept excluded from light in stoppered bottles.

    0
    0
  • They are occasionally adulterated with the leaves of Inula Conyza, ploughman's spikenard, which may be distinguished by their greater roughness, their less divided margins, and their odour when rubbed; also with the leaves of Symphytum officinale, comfrey, and of Verbascum Thapsus, great mullein, which unlike those of the foxglove have woolly upper and under surfaces.

    0
    0
  • Newly pressed rape oil has a dark sherry colour with, at first, scarcely any perceptible smell; but after resting a short time the oil deposits an abundant mucilaginous slime, and by taking up oxygen it acquires a peculiar disagreeable odour and an acrid taste.

    0
    0
  • The essential oil of tea is of a citron yellow colour; it is lighter than water and possesses the distinctive odour of tea.

    0
    0
  • Isovaleric acid is an oily liquid having the odour of stale cheese and boiling at 174°; the salts are usually greasy to the touch.

    0
    0
  • This brochure brought him into bad odour at court, and he left the war office on half-pay, and was refused a command in the field at the outbreak of the Franco-German War.

    0
    0
  • The leaves are large, ovate-oblong in shape, and the flowers, which are arranged in panicles, have a greenish colour and a rather disagreeable odour.

    0
    0
  • Ceylon cinnamon of fine quality is a very thin smooth bark, with a light-yellowish brown colour, a highly fragrant odour, and a peculiarly sweet, warm and pleasing aromatic taste.

    0
    0
  • It is of a golden-yellow colour, with the peculiar odour of cinnamon and a very hot aromatic taste.

    0
    0
  • The lipad, owing to its heavy nauseous odour, is believed to keep off evil spirits.

    0
    0
  • It has a strong musky odour, exceedingly disagreeable to those unaccustomed to it, but "when properly diluted and combined with other scents it produces a very pleasing effect, and possesses a much more floral fragrance than musk, indeed it would be impossible to imitate some flowers without it."

    0
    0
  • When I feel pleased or pained, or when I use my senses to perceive a pressure, a temperature, a flavour, an odour, a colour, a sound, or when I am conscious of feeling and perceiving, I cannot resist the belief that something sensible is present; and this belief that something exists is already a judgment, a judgment of existence, and, so far as it is limited to sense without inference, a true judgment.

    0
    0
  • It is a colourless liquid with a sweetish burning taste and an agreeable odour.

    0
    0
  • Their presence is made known by a powerful disagreeable odour, which penetrates to a considerable distance.

    0
    0
  • Nor were the Jesuits in much better odour among other nations.

    0
    0
  • The odour of unsanctity clung around those relics of the pagan past.

    0
    0
  • It has an agreeable odour, and has been used medicinally.

    0
    0
  • The rhizome of Acorus Calamus is sometimes adulterated with that of Iris Pseudacorus, which, however, is distinguishable by its lack of odour, a stringent taste and dark colour.

    0
    0
  • during the whole time the flax is in steep. In a short time a brisk fermentation is set up, gases at first of pleasant odour, but subsequently becoming very repulsive, being evolved, and producing a frothy scum over the surface of the water.

    0
    0
  • The system possessed the advantages of rapidity, being completed in about ten hours, and freedom from any noxious odour; but it yielded only a harsh, ill-spinning fibre, and consequently failed to meet the sanguine expectations of its promoters.

    0
    0
  • When heated or rubbed it emits a peculiar disagreeable odour.

    0
    0
  • gariofilum), corrupted from the Latin Caryophyllum, and referring to the spicy odour of the flower, which seems to have been used in flavouring wine and other liquors to replace the more costly clove of India.

    0
    0
  • It crystallizes from water in large prisms which melt at 168-170° C., and on further heating gives an anhydride and finally chars, emitting a characteristic odour and forming pyroracemic and pyrotartaric acids.

    0
    0
  • To the unaided eye the disease is seen as purplish brown or blackish blotches of various sizes, at first on the tips and edges of the leaves, and ultimately upon the leaf-stalks and the larger stems. On gathering the foliage for examination, especially in humid weather, these dark blotches are seen to be putrid, and when the disease takes a bad form the dying leaves give out a highly offensive odour.

    0
    0
  • These roots are readily distinguished from those of true sarsaparilla by their loose cracked bark and by their odour and taste, recalling those of melilot.

    0
    0
  • When bruised the leaves give out an aromatic odour.

    0
    0
  • The leaves, which have a pungent aromatic odour, are said to yield a yellow dye.

    0
    0
  • A dark violet fluor-spar from Wolsendorf in Bavaria, evolves an odour of ozone when struck, and has been called antozonite.

    0
    0
  • C. Taylor (Ibis, 1864, p. 90), have a strong crow-like odour.

    0
    0
  • When transferred to the buyer's warehouses the bags are opened and each piece is examined by a public inspector in the presence of both buyer and seller, the quality of the opium being judged by appearance, odour, colour and weight.

    0
    0
  • Flour, potato-flour, ghee and ghoor (crude datesugar) are revealed by their odour and the consistence they impart.

    0
    0
  • The odour differs but slightly, except in oily specimens, from that of Turkey opium.

    0
    0
  • This manna occurs in the form of small, roundish, hard, dry tears, varying from the size of a mustard seed to that of a coriander, of a lightbrown colour, sweet taste, and senna-like odour.

    0
    0
  • The jackal, like the fox, has an offensive odour, due to the secretion of a gland at the base of the tail.

    0
    0
  • Pyridine is a colourless liquid of a distinctly unpleasant, penetrating odour.

    0
    0
  • The balsam fir and in the south the red cedar occur in scant quantities; more widely distributed, but growing only under marked local conditions, is the yellow or Alaska cedar, a very hard and durable wood of fine grain and pleasant odour.

    0
    0
  • Thymol has a strong odour of thyme and a pungent taste, and is freely soluble in alcohol, ether, chloroform or olive oil, but almost insoluble in cold water.

    0
    0
  • 400 in the odour of sanctity in a convent at Ribla on the Orontes, whence orthodoxy spread over mid-Syria.

    0
    0
  • The old sewers were found quite inadequate to carry off the large increase of water, and besides they all led directly into the bay, causing a terrible odour and rendering the water near the town unwholesome for bathing.

    0
    0
  • In office he continued to be insubordinate, and committed mistakes which got him into bad odour as untrustworthy.

    0
    0
  • He also noticed a strong garlic-like odour, which we now know to be due to ozone.

    0
    0
  • They possess an unpleasant odour, fume on exposure to air, show a neutral reaction, but combine with acids to form salts.

    0
    0
  • It is probable, however, that pure phosphorous oxide vapour is odourless, and the odour of phosphorus as ordinarily perceived is that of a mixture of the oxide with ozone.

    0
    0
  • It is a colourless mobile liquid, boiling at 125-1° and having a pungent, slightly aromatic odour.

    0
    0
  • Thiophosphoryl bromide, PSBr3, obtained after the manner of the corresponding chloride, forms yellow octahedra which melt at 38°, and have a penetrating, aromatic odour.

    0
    0
  • It crystallizes in white or pale fawn-coloured acicular prisms or silky needles, and is soluble in alcohol and ether, and in loo parts of cold and 3 of boiling water; it is without odour and has an astringent and an acid taste and reaction.

    0
    0
  • At best it has a rank fishy odour, and the darker the colour the more disagreeable the smell.

    0
    0
  • During the life of the whale the contents of these cavities are in a fluid condition, but no sooner is the "head matter" removed than the solid wax spermaceti separates in white crystalline flakes, leaving the oil a clear yellow fluid having a fishy odour.

    0
    0
  • long, and from 1 to 4 lines broad, and have two lateral furrows, a close fracture, a disagreeable rancid taste, and a faint, fishy odour, which last becomes more perceptible when the powder of, the drug is mixed with potash solution.

    0
    0
  • Other ingredients are a fixed oil, present to the extent of 30%, ergotinic acid, a glucoside, trimethylamine, which gives the drug its unpleasant odour, and sphacelinic acid, a non-nitrogenous resinoid body.

    0
    0
  • Although there may be a fringe of hair on the throat, the males have no beard on the chin; and they also lack the strong odour characteristic of goats.

    0
    0
  • It is a liquid with an odour like that of benzene.

    0
    0
  • It is a colourless liquid, possessing a peppermint odour and boiling at 155° C. Nitric acid oxidizes it to adipic acid.

    0
    0
  • It is a colourless liquid having a peppermint odour, and boiling at 178.5-179.5° C. Nitric acid oxidizes it to n-pimelic acid.

    0
    0
  • It is an oily liquid, with an odour resembling that of benzaldehyde.

    0
    0
  • Mayer (Ann., 18 93, 2 75, p. 363) obtained azelain ketone, C,H140, a liquid of peppermint odour.

    0
    0
  • It is a liquid which boils at 146.3-148° C. and possesses a strong camphor odour.

    0
    0
  • The latter was accompanied by the following formula: " Effeta, that is, be thou opened unto odour of sweetness.

    0
    0
  • The junipers, of which there are twenty-five or more species, are evergreen bushy shrubs or low columnar trees, with a more or less aromatic odour, inhabiting the whole of the cold and temperate northern hemisphere, but attaining their maximum development in the Mediterranean region, the North Atlantic islands, and the eastern United States.

    0
    0
  • Juniperus Sabina is the savin, abundant on the mountains of central Europe, an irregularly spreading muchbranched shrub with scale-like glandular leaves, and emitting a disagreeable odour when bruised.

    0
    0
  • The terpenes all possess a characteristic odour and are fairly stable to alkalis, but are easily decomposed by acids or by heating to a sufficiently high temperature.

    0
    0
  • Tilletia Tritici, bunt or stinking smut of wheat, is so-called because the bunted grain has a disagreeable odour of stale herrings.

    0
    0
  • Chian turpentine is a tenacious semi-fluid transparent body, yellow to dull brown in colour, with an agreeable resinous odour and little taste.

    0
    0
  • Oil of turpentine is a colourless liquid of oily consistence, with a strong characteristic odour and a hot disagreeable taste.

    0
    0
  • The exhausting pain, the serious haemorrhages, and the abdominal septicity associated with a repulsive odour and the absorption of toxic products, which are the chief and ultimately fatal symptoms of that disease, are all directly combated by the administration of oil of turpentine.

    0
    0
  • But it undoubtedly prolongs life, lessens suffering, and by checking the growth of bacteria upon the cancer reduces the fetid odour and the symptoms of septic intoxication.

    0
    0
  • Rosin is a brittle and friable resin, with a faint piny odour; the melting-point varies with different specimens, some being semi-fluid at the temperature of boiling water, while others do not melt till 220 or 250° F.

    0
    0
  • The lower members are colourless mobile liquids, readily soluble in water and exhibiting a characteristic odour and taste.

    0
    0
  • The evacuations possess a peculiarly offensive odour characteristic of the disease.

    0
    0
  • in height, and as it grows becoming branched, and furnished with alternate sessile leaves, which are stem-clasping, oblong, unequally-lobed, clothed with glandular clammy hairs, and of a dull grey-green, the whole plant having a powerful nauseous odour.

    0
    0
  • A violet odour and a fragrant oil were said to distil from her tomb; and when it was opened nine months afterwards the flesh was found uncorrupted.

    0
    0
  • When there is a man on one of them, if the beast is tired and urged to go on, he turns his head round, and discharges his saliva, which has an un pleasant odour, into the rider's face.

    0
    0
  • It liquefies when heated under pressure, and its melting point lies between 446° C. and 457° C. The vapour of arsenic is of a golden yellow colour, and has a garlic odour.

    0
    0
  • Arsenic compounds can be detected in the dry way by heating in a tube with a mixture of sodium carbonate and charcoal when a deposit of black amorphous arsenic is produced on the cool part of the tube, or by conversion of the compound into the trioxide and heating with dry sodium acetate when the offensive odour of the extremely poisonous cacodyl oxide is produced.

    0
    0
  • The liquid is spontaneously inflammable owing to the presence of free cacodyl, As2(CH3)4, which is also obtained by heating the oxide with zinc clippings in an atmosphere of carbon dioxide; it is a liquid of overpowering odour, and boils at 170° C. Cacodyl oxide boils at 150° C., and on exposure to air takes up oxygen and water and passes over into the crystalline cacodylic acid, thus: [(CH3)2As]2O + H2O + O2 = 2(CH3)2AsOOH.

    0
    0
  • In the worst cases the larvae even die after the cells are sealed over; a strong characteristic and offensive odour being developed in some phases of the disease, noticeable at times some distance away from the hive.

    0
    0
  • It possesses a somewhat pleasant vinous odour and a burning aromatic taste; it is a highly acrid poison.

    0
    0
  • Above 300° C. all oils and fats are decomposed; this is evidenced by the evolution of acrolein, which possesses the wellknown pungent odour of burning fat.

    0
    0
  • The essential, ethereal, or "volatile" oils constitute a very extensive class of bodies, which possess, in a concentrated form, the odour characteristic of the plants or vegetable substances from which they are obtained.

    0
    0
  • Formic ether gives a peach-like odour, and is used for flavouring fictitious rum.

    0
    0
  • It has an amorphous internal structure, a dull fracture; is of a yellow to yellowish-brown hue, the purer varieties being almost colourless, or possessing a greenish tinge, and has a somewhat bitter aromatic taste, and a balsamic odour, which is developed by heating.

    0
    0
  • In the Red Sea regions frankincense is valued not only for its sweet odour when burnt, but as a masticatory; and blazing lumps of it are not infrequently used for illumination instead of oil lamps.

    0
    0
  • Common frankincense is an ingredient in some ointments and plasters, and on account of its pleasant odour when burned has been used in incense as a substitute for olibanum.

    0
    0
  • Klei), commonly defined as a fine-grained, almost impalpable substance, very soft, more or less coherent when dry, plastic and retentive of water when wet; it has an "earthy" odour when breathed upon or moistened, and consists essentially of hydrous aluminium silicate with various impurities.

    0
    0
  • Their typical colour is blackishblue, owing to the abundance of sulphuretted hydrogen; when fresh they have a sulphurous odour, when weathered they are brown, as their iron is present as hydrous oxides (limonite, &c.).

    0
    0
  • It is of a dark brownish-green colour, and has a faint peculiar odour and but a slight taste.

    0
    0
  • It is brownishgreen, and otherwise resembles bhang, as in odour and taste.

    0
    0
  • odour devoid of their original magic, they still emit the quaintest odor.

    0
    0
  • odour could also sprinkle some baking soda in the bottom of the basket to absorb any lingering odors.

    0
    0
  • odour species has an unpleasant odor which is imparted to the nest.

    0
    0
  • odour only drawback is the foul odor meaning the dung can only be used on tracks in uninhabited areas!

    0
    0
  • odour alginate dressing had more episodes of adherence and had more wound odor due to its mode of action.

    0
    0
  • At Cochin Siqueira took on board certain adherents of Alphonso d'Alboquerque who were in bad odour with his rival d'Almeida, among them being Magellan, the future circumnavigator of the world, and Francisco Serrao, the first European who ever lived in the Spice Islands.

    0
    0
  • The whole plant emits a disagreeable odour.

    0
    0
  • The odour alone of guaco has been said to cause in snakes a state of stupor and torpidity; and Humboldt, who observed that the near approach of a rod steeped in guaco-juice was obnoxious to the venomous Coluber corallinus, was of opinion that inoculation with it imparts to the perspiration an odour which makes reptiles unwilling to bite.

    0
    0
  • Podébrad, who had gained the throne of Bohemia with the aid of the Hussites and Utraquists, had long been in ill odour at Rome, and in 1465 Pope Paul II.

    0
    0
  • 21, 22; compound creatures); (14) the hedgehog (pricks grapes upon its quills); (15) the fox (catches birds by simulating death); (16) the panther (spotted skin; enmity to the dragon; sleeps for three days after meals; allures its prey by sweet odour); (17) the sea-tortoise (or aspidochelone; mistaken by sailors for an island); (18) the partridge (hatches eggs of other birds); (19) the vulture (assisted in birth by a stone with loose kernel); (20) the ant-lion (able neither to take the one food nor to digest the other); (21) the weasel (conceives by the mouth and brings forth by the ear); (22) the unicorn (caught only by a virgin); (23) the beaver (gives up its testes when pursued); (24) the hyaena (a hermaphrodite); (25) the otter (enhydris; enters the crocodile's mouth to kill it); (26) the ichneumon (covers itself with mud to kill the dragon; another version of No.

    0
    0
  • Schonbein investigated ozone, a gas of peculiar odour (named from the Gr.

    0
    0
  • Tetranitromethane, C(N02)4, obtained by adding nitroform to a hot mixture of nitric and sulphuric acids, is a crystalline solid which melts at 13° C. Chlorpicrin, CC1 3 NO 2, is a liquid of suffocating odour obtained by the action of nitric acid and chloride of lime on many organic compounds.

    0
    0
  • It is a colourless oil boiling at 247° C., and having a spicy odour.

    0
    0
  • According to Plutarch, apart from its mystic virtues arising from the magical combination of 4 X 4, its sweet odour had a benign physiological effect on those who offered it.'

    0
    0
  • But evidently the idea that the odour of a burnt-offering (cf.

    0
    0
  • It is a clear, strongly refractive liquid, which has a pleasant odour; it boils at 144° and has a specific gravity of o 925 at o°.

    0
    0
  • The a-halogen compounds are obtained by heating styrolene chloride (or bromide) with lime or alcoholic potash; they are liquids which have a penetrating odour, and yield acetophenone when heated with water to 180°.

    0
    0
  • It is a liquid, boiling at 139° and having a pleasant odour.

    0
    0
  • They are voracious and omnivorous, devouring, or at least damaging, whatever comes in their way, for all the species emit a disagreeable odour, which they communicate to whatever article of food or clothing they may touch.

    0
    0
  • Oliveri, Gazz., 1886, 16, p. 493) It crystallizes in colourless needles which melt at 50° C. It possesses a disagreeable faecal odour, sublimes readily, and turns brown on exposure to air.

    0
    0
  • Pure methyl alcohol is a colourless mobile liquid, boiling at 66°-67°, and having a specific gravity of 0 8142 at o° C. It has a burning taste, and generally a spirituous odour, but when absolutely pure it is said to be odourless.

    0
    0
  • The milk of the cow, which may be taken as typical of all others, and is indeed by far the most important and valuable of all (see Dairy And Dairy Farming), is, when newly drawn, an opaque white fluid, with a yellowish tinge, soft, bland and sweetish to the taste, and possessed of a faintly animal odour.

    0
    0
  • I humbly pray from Thine immense goodness and clemency, through the Blood of Jesus Christ, that Thou wilt deign to accept this sacrifice in the odour of sweetness; and as Thou hast granted me to desire and to offer this, so wilt Thou bestow abundant grace to fulfil it."

    0
    0
  • It is a yellow oil which boils at 59° C. (12 mm.), and possesses a stupefying odour.

    0
    0
  • Who has proved that, when I scent an odour in my nostrils, I apprehend not odour but a sensation of odour; and so for the other senses?

    0
    0
  • I perceive pressure, heat, colour, sound, flavour, odour, in my five senses.

    0
    0
  • Ethyl acetate (acetic ether), CH3.002C2H5, boils at 75° C. Isoamylisovalerate, C4H9 C02C5Hn, boils at 196° C. and has an odour of apples.

    0
    0
  • Ethyl butyrate, C3H7 C02C2H5, boils at 121° C. and has an odour of pineapple.

    0
    0
  • Isovaleric acid is an oily liquid having the odour of stale cheese and boiling at 174°; the salts are usually greasy to the touch.

    0
    0
  • The bulb has a strong and characteristic odour and an acrid taste, and yields an offensively smelling oil, essence of garlic, identical with allyl sulphide (C 3 H 5) 2 S (see Hofmann and Cahours, Journ.

    0
    0
  • A large variety of fruit is produced, including the tamarind, mango, banana, pine-apple, guava, shaddock, fig, avocado-pear, litchi, custard-apple and the mabolo (Diospyros discolor), a fruit of exquisite flavour, but very disagreeable odour.

    0
    0
  • It crystallizes from water in large prisms which melt at 168-170° C., and on further heating gives an anhydride and finally chars, emitting a characteristic odour and forming pyroracemic and pyrotartaric acids.

    0
    0
  • It is a colourless mobile liquid, boiling at 125-1° and having a pungent, slightly aromatic odour.

    0
    0
  • Thiophosphoryl bromide, PSBr3, obtained after the manner of the corresponding chloride, forms yellow octahedra which melt at 38°, and have a penetrating, aromatic odour.

    0
    0
  • It is a colourless liquid, possessing a peppermint odour and boiling at 155° C. Nitric acid oxidizes it to adipic acid.

    0
    0
  • It is a colourless liquid having a peppermint odour, and boiling at 178.5-179.5° C. Nitric acid oxidizes it to n-pimelic acid.

    0
    0
  • It is a liquid which boils at 146.3-148° C. and possesses a strong camphor odour.

    0
    0
  • Rosin is a brittle and friable resin, with a faint piny odour; the melting-point varies with different specimens, some being semi-fluid at the temperature of boiling water, while others do not melt till 220 or 250° F.

    0
    0
  • It liquefies when heated under pressure, and its melting point lies between 446° C. and 457° C. The vapour of arsenic is of a golden yellow colour, and has a garlic odour.

    0
    0
  • The liquid is spontaneously inflammable owing to the presence of free cacodyl, As2(CH3)4, which is also obtained by heating the oxide with zinc clippings in an atmosphere of carbon dioxide; it is a liquid of overpowering odour, and boils at 170° C. Cacodyl oxide boils at 150° C., and on exposure to air takes up oxygen and water and passes over into the crystalline cacodylic acid, thus: [(CH3)2As]2O + H2O + O2 = 2(CH3)2AsOOH.

    0
    0
  • Above 300° C. all oils and fats are decomposed; this is evidenced by the evolution of acrolein, which possesses the wellknown pungent odour of burning fat.

    0
    0
  • Common Balm (Melissa) - M. officinalis is a well-known old garden plant, 2 to 3 feet high, emitting a grateful odour when bruised.

    0
    0
  • Europe. They have, when in bloom, a very offensive odour.

    0
    0
  • Foster as "an exceedingly charming plant," and fragrant, the odour not being unlike the Lily-of-the-Valley.

    0
    0
  • Humea - A very graceful halfhardy biennial, 3 to 8 feet high, H. elegans having large leaves with a strong odour, and forming, when in flower, an elegant feathery pyramid of reddish-brown blossoms.

    0
    0
  • Sellowi is a good dwarf plant; but the odour of these plants is unpleasant, and they are not worthy of much care.

    0
    0
  • America, E. repens having pretty rose-tinted flowers in small clusters, which exhale a rich odour, and appear in spring.

    0
    0
  • He says the leaves have a pleasant spicy odour when crushed.

    0
    0
  • S. terebinthinaceum has a strong turpentine odour.

    0
    0
  • Nepal. Another pretty plant is the Padua Rue (R. patavina), 4 to 6 inches high, with small golden-yellow flowers of the same odour as the common Rue, and the plant is about as hardy as R. albiflora.

    0
    0
  • Silvery Sage (Perowskia Atriplicifolia) - A beautiful silver-grey half-shrubby plant of the Sage order, with a pungent odour, growing 3 to 5 feet high, with blue and white flowers in July and August.

    0
    0
  • Sweet Cicely (Myrrhis) - M. odorata is a graceful native plant, with a peculiar but grateful odour and sweet-tasting stems, 2 to 3 feet high, with white flowers in early summer, in compound umbels.

    0
    0
  • Its stems and leaves give off a fragrant hay-like odour when dried; and in May the small white flowers, dotted over the tufts of whorled leaves, are pretty.

    0
    0
  • Their unpleasant odour unfits them for cutting.

    0
    0
  • Aloes also contain a trace of volatile oil, to which its odour is due.

    0
    1
  • It is a clear, strongly refractive liquid, which has a pleasant odour; it boils at 144° and has a specific gravity of o 925 at o°.

    0
    2
  • It is soluble in water and possesses an odour resembling that of acetic acid.

    0
    8
  • Many species produce gums and resins, their stems being encrusted with the exudations, and pungency and aromatic odour is an almost universal quality of the plants of desert regions.

    0
    10
  • Finally, retiring to a hermitage, he ends his days in the odour of sanctity.

    0
    12
Browse other sentences examples →