Octahedron sentence example

octahedron
  • It has 6 octagonal faces (belonging to the original cube), and 8 triangular ones (belonging to the coaxial octahedron).

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  • See the notes for the net of a cube to see how to print this net and make your own cube octahedron.

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  • The 38-atom truncated octahedron is the most stable fcc cluster in the size range we consider.

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  • Lewis Simon's Gyroscope is a skeletal octahedron with a small hole in the center.

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  • This is one of the Platonic solids, and is treated in the article Polyhedron, as is also the derived Archimedean solid named the "truncated tetrahedron"; in addition, the regular tetrahedron has important crystallographic relations, being the hemihedral form of the regular octahedron and consequently a form of the cubic system.

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  • In crystallography the icosahedron is a possible form, but it has not been observed; it is closely simulated by a combination of the octahedron and pentagonal dodecahedron, which has twenty triangular faces, but only eight are equilateral, the remaining twelve being isosceles (see Crystallography).

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  • All these are strikingly alike in appearance and general characters, differing essentially only in chemical composition, and it would seem better to reserve the name cerargyrite for the whole group, using the names chlorargyrite (AgC1), embolite (Ag(Cl, Bl)), bromargyrite (AgBr) and iodembolite (Ag(C1, Br, I)) for the different isomorphous members of the group. They are cubic in crystallization, with the cube and the octahedron as prominent forms, but crystals are small and usually indistinct; there is no cleavage.

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  • Ladenburg's prism formula would give two enantiomorphic ortho-di-substitution derivatives; while forms in which the hydrogen atoms are placed at the corners of a regular octahedron would yield enantiomorphic tri-substitution derivatives.

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  • The octahedral formula discussed by Julius Thomsen (Ber., 1886, 19, p. 2 944) consists of the six carbon atoms placed at the corners of a regular octahedron, and connected together by the full lines as shown in (I); a plane projection gives a hexagon with diagonals (II).

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  • Two parallel triangular faces are removed from a cardboard model of a regular octahedron, and on the remaining six faces tetrahedra are then placed; the hydrogen atoms are at the free angles.

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  • The native metal crystallizes in the cubic system, the octahedron being the commonest form, but other and complex combinations have been observed.

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  • A yellowish octahedron found at De Beers weighed 4282 carats, and yielded a brilliant of 2882 carats.

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  • The crystals are sometimes polysynthetic, a large octahedron, e.g., being built up of small cubes.

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  • Cleavage is nearly always perfect, parallel to the octahedron.

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  • Nevertheless, holding that every dimension has a principle of its own, he rejected the derivation of the elemental solids - pyramid, octahedron, icosahedron and cube - from triangular surfaces, and in so far approximated to atomism.

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  • The equilateral triangle is the basis of the tetrahedron, octahedron and icosahedron.'

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  • The truncated octahedron is formed by truncating the vertices of an octahedron so as to leave the original faces hexagons; consequently it is bounded by 8 hexagonal and 6 square faces.

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  • Thus the faces of the cuboctahedron, the truncated cube, and truncated octahedron, correspond; likewise with the truncated dodecahedron, truncated icosahedron, and icosidodecahedron; and with the small and great rhombicosidodecahedra.

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  • Under certain conditions the voids adopt their equilibrium shape, a truncated octahedron.

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  • Fold a blow-up stellated octahedron from a single sheet of square paper.

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  • If the grooves be left out of account, the large faces which have replaced each tetrahedron corner then make up a figure which has the aspect of a simple octahedron.

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  • Devon, notably near Liskeard, where fine crystals have been found, with faces of the six-faced octahedron replacing the corners of the cube.

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  • Two such sets placed base to base form the octahedron, which consequently has 8 faces, 6 vertices and 12 edges.

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  • It is enclosed by 6 square and 8 triangular faces, the latter belonging to a coaxial octahedron.

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  • The snub cube is a 38-faced solid having at each corner 4 triangles and I square; 6 faces belong to a cube, 8 to the coaxial octahedron, and the remaining 24 to no regular solid.

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  • Since the tetrahedron is the hemihedral form of the octahedron, and the octahedron and cube are reciprocal, we may term these two latter solids " reciprocal holohedra " of the tetrahedron.

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  • Marsh also devised a form closely resembling that of Thomsen, inasmuch as the carbon atoms occupied the angles of a regular octahedron, and the diagonal linkages differed in nature from the peripheral, but differeng from Thomsen's since rupture of the diagonal and not peripheral bonds accompanied the reduction to hexamethylene.

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  • There is often a furrow running along the edges of the octahedron, or across the edges of the cube, and this indicates that the apparently simple crystal may really consist of eight individuals meeting at the centre; or, what comes to the same thing, of two individuals interpenetrating and projecting through each other.

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  • The Victoria, 180 carats, was cut from an octahedron weighing 4572 carats, and was sold to the nizam of Hyderabad for £400,000.

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  • The regular octahedron has for its faces equilateral triangles; it is the reciprocal of the cube.

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