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obstinacy

obstinacy

obstinacy Sentence Examples

  • The rejection of the Jews is their own fault, due to their obstinacy and legalism (ix.

    83
    44
  • Anne was a women of small ability, of dull mind, and of that kind of obstinacy which accompanies weakness of character.

    46
    34
  • Bogdanich is vindictive and you'll pay for your obstinacy, said Kirsten.

    40
    26
  • He was Puritan to the core, with a tenacious memory, a strength of will bordering upon obstinacy, and a want of sympathy with human nature.

    20
    14
  • He particularly resented the obstinacy of the Barcelonese, who compelled the members of his household to pay municipal taxes.

    19
    18
  • His wife, Maria Luisa of Parma, his first cousin, a thoroughly coarse and vicious woman, ruled him completely, though he was capable of obstinacy at times.

    15
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  • In 1771 he was sent as first Russian plenipotentiary to the peace-congress of Focshani; but he failed in his mission, owing partly to the obstinacy of the Turks, and partly (according to Panin) to his own outrageous insolence.

    14
    12
  • Yet through the obstinacy and selfishness of John the Good, France, in stress of suffering, was gradually realizing herself.

    13
    10
  • The patience of the ass, the high spirit of the horse, the obstinacy of the mule, have long been proverbial.

    12
    10
  • All that remained was to obtain the abdication of Benedict XIII., the successor of the Avignon pope Clement VII., but the combined efforts of the council and the emperor were powerless to overcome the obstinacy of the Aragonese pope.

    10
    7
  • He combined an obstinacy of will with a mastery of facts unsurpassed by any of his predecessors in the secretaryship. Events, it is true, were in his favour.

    10
    7
  • He commanded at Rochelle during the famous siege, and (if we may believe his brother) the failure of the defence and of the English attack on Rhe was mainly due to the alternate obstinacy of the townsfolk and the English commanders in refusing to listen to Soubise's advice.

    10
    9
  • The foolishness and obstinacy of the ass has caused the name to be transferred metaphorically to human beings; and the fifth proposition of Book i.

    9
    6
  • Goethe's dramas, on the other hand, have not, in the eyes of his nation, succeeded in holding their own beside Schiller's; but the reason is rather because Goethe, from what might be called a wilful obstinacy, refused to be bound by the conventions of the theatre, than because he was deficient in the cunning of the dramatist.

    8
    5
  • The dispute which led to the duel with Emile de Girardin was one of small moment, and might have been amicably arranged had it not been for some slight obstinacy on Carrel's part.

    8
    5
  • Choshu refused to give way, and suffered the consequences of his obstinacy in the destruction of his batteries and in the infliction of a heavy fine.

    8
    6
  • The soul is from the Lord, and is submitted in this life to the bondage of works (karma); " Mankind, in their obstinacy, keep binding themselves in the net of actions, and though they know and hear of the bliss of those who have faith in the Lord, they attempt not the only means of release.

    8
    6
  • The cold cynicism with which he acted towards de Witt is only matched by the heroic obstinacy with which he confronted Louis.

    8
    7
  • We marvel at the obstinacy with which he, with inadequate mathematical knowledge, opposed the Newtonian theory of light and colour; and at his championship of "Neptunism," the theory of aqueous origin, as opposed to "Vulcanism," that of igneous origin of the earth's crust.

    7
    4
  • On the 21st of July took place the first battle of Bull Run (q.v.) between McDowell and Beauregard, fought by the raw troops of both sides with an obstinacy that foreboded the desperate battles of subsequent campaigns.

    6
    5
  • He had no forensic eloquence; but the cold obstinacy with which he pressed his charges was more convincing than any rhetoric, and he seldom failed to secure a conviction.

    6
    5
  • Patriotism, insight, courage, statesmanship, energy, - these great qualities were indisputably his; but unfortunately they were vitiated by obstinacy, suspicion and a sulky craftiness, beneath which simmered a very volcano of revengeful cruelty.

    5
    2
  • Patriotism, insight, courage, statesmanship, energy, - these great qualities were indisputably his; but unfortunately they were vitiated by obstinacy, suspicion and a sulky craftiness, beneath which simmered a very volcano of revengeful cruelty.

    5
    2
  • The French general, however, hardly drew out far enough from the French right; otherwise the magnificent resolution he displayed and the admirable obstinacy with which his troops fought against ever-increasing odds are worthy of all praise.

    5
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  • Largely owing to his influence the Liberal party refused in 1878 to abandon its Free Trade policy, an obstinacy which led to its defeat in that year.

    5
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  • Next Spanish hides, with the tails still preserving their twist and the angle of elevation they had when the oxen that wore them were careering over the pampas of the Spanish Main--a type of all obstinacy, and evincing how almost hopeless and incurable are all constitutional vices.

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  • Two parties were contending in the state, and their obstinacy could not fail to produce a most direful collision.

    4
    8
  • The obstinacy of the resistance convinced Boleslaus that Pomerania must be christianized before it could be completely subdued; and this important work was partially accomplished by St Otto, bishop of Bamberg, an old friend of Boleslaus's father, who knew the Slavonic languages.

    3
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  • In the eyes of most men his martyrdom had put the king so much in the wrong that the obstinacy and provocative conduct which had brought it about passed out of memory.

    2
    3
  • But Pitts policy broke on the stubborn obstinacy of George III., who believed himself bound by his coronation oath to resist any concession to the enemies of the Established Church.

    2
    3
  • As a statesman, he certainly committed grave faults - through excess of diplomatic subtlety, lack of forethought, and sometimes even through ingenuousness; but it must with justice be admitted that, in spite of his reputation for pugnacity and obstinacy, he never failed, either by temperament or on principle, to exhaust every peaceful expedient in settling questions.

    2
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  • The campaign of Jena and the battle of Eylau followed; and Napoleon, though still intent on the Russian alliance, stirred up Poles, Turks and Persians to break the obstinacy of the tsar.

    2
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  • A resolution once arrived at he carried out with iron obstinacy."

    1
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  • The English fought out the losing game with a wonderful obstinacy.

    1
    0
  • It was assumed by deists in debating against the orthodox, that the flood of error in the hostile camp was due to the benevolent cunning or deliberate self-seeking of unscrupulous men, supported by the ignorant with the obstinacy of prejudice.

    1
    1
  • In France, where the disease was by far the most prevalent - owing in great part to the obstinacy with which the vine-growers at first refused to take any reasonable precautions against its spread - M.

    1
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  • She was punished for her obstinacy by being deprived of Norway, which she was compelled to surrender to Sweden by the terms of the treaty of Kiel (1814), on the 14th of January, receiving by way of compensation a sum of money and Swedish Pomerania, with Riigen, which were subsequently transferred to Prussia in exchange for the duchy of Lauenburg and 2,000,000 rix-dollars.

    1
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  • Some reckless enthusiasts for truth set four trustworthy hospital nurses to watch her; the Celtic obstinacy of the parents was roused, and in defence of their imposture they allowed death to take place in eight days.

    1
    2
  • She was punished for her obstinacy by being deprived of Norway, which she was compelled to surrender to Sweden by the terms of the treaty of Kiel (1814), on the 14th of January, receiving by way of compensation a sum of money and Swedish Pomerania, with Riigen, which were subsequently transferred to Prussia in exchange for the duchy of Lauenburg and 2,000,000 rix-dollars.

    1
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  • The distance of Constantinople from Vienna and the obstinacy of the sultan would probably have prevented a settlement, but the return of Napoleon rendered all such proposals almost absurd, and the scheme was dropped.

    1
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  • Unfortunately his firmness developed into obstinacy, and exhibited itself in continued confidence in officers who had proved to be failures, and in dislike of some of his ablest generals.

    1
    4
  • The main object of the Austrian chancellor probably was to let Napoleon once more show to the world his perverse obstinacy.

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  • In June 1648 Cromwell himself proceeded to invest Pembroke Castle, which resisted with great obstinacy.

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  • Against these difficulties he struggled with characteristic obstinacy.

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  • Peace negotiations had been in progress in London since Dec. 1912, but made little headway owing to Turkish obstinacy.

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  • The ordinary behaviour is evidently the result of a film of grease, which adheres with great obstinacy.

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  • His principal object was to establish the hereditary right of his dynasty to the Bohemian throne, and this object he pursued with characteristic obstinacy.

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  • Pomerania, protected on the south by virgin forests and almost impenetrable morasses, was in those days inhabited by a valiant and savage Slavonic race akin to the Wends, who clung to paganism with unconquerable obstinacy.

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  • mulish obstinacy, the bass-heavy clutter and intricate guitar designs backed up by drums which stomp and bray viciously.

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  • Oxfam warned that such obstinacy from the EU and the resultant standoff between major trading powers would ultimately harm developing countries.

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  • I urged him to throw away his mystics; but he adhered to them with the greater obstinacy.

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  • Of course, Bloom can also accomplish his goal by sheer obstinacy.

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  • The defendants cannot rely on their own obstinacy to assert that mediation had no reasonable prospect of success.

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  • The Fall had a mulish obstinacy, the bass-heavy clutter and intricate guitar designs backed up by drums which stomp and bray viciously.

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  • In one of the best examples I can recall of Brian's pig-headed obstinacy, he would not get off.

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  • All our errors in explaining the origin of human society arise from our obstinacy in believing that primitive man was entirely similar to ourselves, who are civilized, i.e.

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  • his arrogance and obstinacy, his perverse insistence upon the theoretical and disregard of the actual, made strife inevitableHe provoked disputes with the Italian states over ecclesiastical rights.

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  • contumacia, obstinacy; derived from the root tem-, as in temnere, to despise, or possibly from the root turn-, as in tumere, to swell, with anger, &c.), a stubborn refusal to obey authority, obstinate resistance; particularly, in law, the wilful contempt of the order or summons of a court (see Contempt Of Court).

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  • France next tried to bring violent pressure to bear to conquer the obstinacy of Benedict XIII.

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  • The main object of the Austrian chancellor probably was to let Napoleon once more show to the world his perverse obstinacy.

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  • Mingled with the religiosity of his nature there was much obstinacy and self-seeking; and when Kerbogha was finally repelled, he began to dispute the possession of Antioch with Bohemund, pleading in excuse his oath to Alexius.

    0
    0
  • He commanded at Rochelle during the famous siege, and (if we may believe his brother) the failure of the defence and of the English attack on Rhe was mainly due to the alternate obstinacy of the townsfolk and the English commanders in refusing to listen to Soubise's advice.

    0
    0
  • All that remained was to obtain the abdication of Benedict XIII., the successor of the Avignon pope Clement VII., but the combined efforts of the council and the emperor were powerless to overcome the obstinacy of the Aragonese pope.

    0
    0
  • In June 1648 Cromwell himself proceeded to invest Pembroke Castle, which resisted with great obstinacy.

    0
    0
  • Unfortunately his firmness developed into obstinacy, and exhibited itself in continued confidence in officers who had proved to be failures, and in dislike of some of his ablest generals.

    0
    0
  • He was Puritan to the core, with a tenacious memory, a strength of will bordering upon obstinacy, and a want of sympathy with human nature.

    0
    0
  • The cold cynicism with which he acted towards de Witt is only matched by the heroic obstinacy with which he confronted Louis.

    0
    0
  • Against these difficulties he struggled with characteristic obstinacy.

    0
    0
  • He became, and could not but become, a persecutor in and out of Spain; and his persecutions not only hardened the obstinacy of the Dutch, and helped to exasperate the English, but they provoked a revolt of the Moriscoes, which impoverished his kingdom.

    0
    0
  • In France, where the disease was by far the most prevalent - owing in great part to the obstinacy with which the vine-growers at first refused to take any reasonable precautions against its spread - M.

    0
    0
  • The French general, however, hardly drew out far enough from the French right; otherwise the magnificent resolution he displayed and the admirable obstinacy with which his troops fought against ever-increasing odds are worthy of all praise.

    0
    0
  • Peace negotiations had been in progress in London since Dec. 1912, but made little headway owing to Turkish obstinacy.

    0
    0
  • His wife, Maria Luisa of Parma, his first cousin, a thoroughly coarse and vicious woman, ruled him completely, though he was capable of obstinacy at times.

    0
    0
  • The distance of Constantinople from Vienna and the obstinacy of the sultan would probably have prevented a settlement, but the return of Napoleon rendered all such proposals almost absurd, and the scheme was dropped.

    0
    0
  • On the 21st of July took place the first battle of Bull Run (q.v.) between McDowell and Beauregard, fought by the raw troops of both sides with an obstinacy that foreboded the desperate battles of subsequent campaigns.

    0
    0
  • He particularly resented the obstinacy of the Barcelonese, who compelled the members of his household to pay municipal taxes.

    0
    0
  • Largely owing to his influence the Liberal party refused in 1878 to abandon its Free Trade policy, an obstinacy which led to its defeat in that year.

    0
    0
  • He combined an obstinacy of will with a mastery of facts unsurpassed by any of his predecessors in the secretaryship. Events, it is true, were in his favour.

    0
    0
  • There was no doubt about the obstinacy and persistency of both sections, and both were fighting, not only to persuade the public, but for the capture of the party and of its prime minister.

    0
    0
  • As a statesman, he certainly committed grave faults - through excess of diplomatic subtlety, lack of forethought, and sometimes even through ingenuousness; but it must with justice be admitted that, in spite of his reputation for pugnacity and obstinacy, he never failed, either by temperament or on principle, to exhaust every peaceful expedient in settling questions.

    0
    0
  • Sigismund never saw Sweden again, but he persistently refused to abandon his claims or recognise the new Swedish government; and this unfortunate obstinacy was to involve Poland in a whole series of unprofitable wars with Sweden.

    0
    0
  • The heroic obstinacy of the defence was equalled by the perseverance of the attack, and there was a vast expenditure, especially on the side of the Spaniards, of blood and treasure.

    0
    0
  • A resolution once arrived at he carried out with iron obstinacy."

    0
    0
  • The campaign of Jena and the battle of Eylau followed; and Napoleon, though still intent on the Russian alliance, stirred up Poles, Turks and Persians to break the obstinacy of the tsar.

    0
    0
  • Neddy, Jack, Dicky, &c.) for different varieties of the sub-genus Asinus, belonging to the horse tribe, and especially for the domestic ass; it differs from the' horse in its smaller size, long ears, the character of its tail, fur and markings, and its proverbial dulness and obstinacy.

    0
    0
  • The foolishness and obstinacy of the ass has caused the name to be transferred metaphorically to human beings; and the fifth proposition of Book i.

    0
    0
  • Goethe's dramas, on the other hand, have not, in the eyes of his nation, succeeded in holding their own beside Schiller's; but the reason is rather because Goethe, from what might be called a wilful obstinacy, refused to be bound by the conventions of the theatre, than because he was deficient in the cunning of the dramatist.

    0
    0
  • We marvel at the obstinacy with which he, with inadequate mathematical knowledge, opposed the Newtonian theory of light and colour; and at his championship of "Neptunism," the theory of aqueous origin, as opposed to "Vulcanism," that of igneous origin of the earth's crust.

    0
    0
  • Deposed and excommunicated by Bek, the prior secured the king's support; but the bishop, against whom other complaints were preferred, refused to give way, and by his obstinacy incurred the lasting enmity of Edward.

    0
    0
  • Anne was a women of small ability, of dull mind, and of that kind of obstinacy which accompanies weakness of character.

    0
    0
  • The dispute which led to the duel with Emile de Girardin was one of small moment, and might have been amicably arranged had it not been for some slight obstinacy on Carrel's part.

    0
    0
  • The ordinary behaviour is evidently the result of a film of grease, which adheres with great obstinacy.

    0
    0
  • It was assumed by deists in debating against the orthodox, that the flood of error in the hostile camp was due to the benevolent cunning or deliberate self-seeking of unscrupulous men, supported by the ignorant with the obstinacy of prejudice.

    0
    0
  • His principal object was to establish the hereditary right of his dynasty to the Bohemian throne, and this object he pursued with characteristic obstinacy.

    0
    0
  • The rejection of the Jews is their own fault, due to their obstinacy and legalism (ix.

    0
    0
  • Choshu refused to give way, and suffered the consequences of his obstinacy in the destruction of his batteries and in the infliction of a heavy fine.

    0
    0
  • Pomerania, protected on the south by virgin forests and almost impenetrable morasses, was in those days inhabited by a valiant and savage Slavonic race akin to the Wends, who clung to paganism with unconquerable obstinacy.

    0
    0
  • The obstinacy of the resistance convinced Boleslaus that Pomerania must be christianized before it could be completely subdued; and this important work was partially accomplished by St Otto, bishop of Bamberg, an old friend of Boleslaus's father, who knew the Slavonic languages.

    0
    0
  • Two parties were contending in the state, and their obstinacy could not fail to produce a most direful collision.

    0
    0
  • In the eyes of most men his martyrdom had put the king so much in the wrong that the obstinacy and provocative conduct which had brought it about passed out of memory.

    0
    0
  • The English fought out the losing game with a wonderful obstinacy.

    0
    0
  • But Pitts policy broke on the stubborn obstinacy of George III., who believed himself bound by his coronation oath to resist any concession to the enemies of the Established Church.

    0
    0
  • He had no forensic eloquence; but the cold obstinacy with which he pressed his charges was more convincing than any rhetoric, and he seldom failed to secure a conviction.

    0
    0
  • Some reckless enthusiasts for truth set four trustworthy hospital nurses to watch her; the Celtic obstinacy of the parents was roused, and in defence of their imposture they allowed death to take place in eight days.

    0
    0
  • He was successful in repelling the Egyptian attack at the battle of Ascalon (August 1099); but he failed, owing to Raymund's obstinacy and greed, to acquire the town of Ascalon after the battle.

    0
    0
  • In 1771 he was sent as first Russian plenipotentiary to the peace-congress of Focshani; but he failed in his mission, owing partly to the obstinacy of the Turks, and partly (according to Panin) to his own outrageous insolence.

    0
    0
  • Yet through the obstinacy and selfishness of John the Good, France, in stress of suffering, was gradually realizing herself.

    0
    0
  • The patience of the ass, the high spirit of the horse, the obstinacy of the mule, have long been proverbial.

    0
    0
  • The soul is from the Lord, and is submitted in this life to the bondage of works (karma); " Mankind, in their obstinacy, keep binding themselves in the net of actions, and though they know and hear of the bliss of those who have faith in the Lord, they attempt not the only means of release.

    0
    0
  • No, on my word it's not obstinacy!

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