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obscure

obscure

obscure Sentence Examples

  • Everything seemed dark, obscure and terrible.

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  • It was an obscure corner of the world.

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  • With obscure vision, the problem is often fatally compounded.

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  • Though these reasons were very insufficient and obscure, no one made any rejoinder.

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  • With all the obscure allusions, the play is difficult to understand without assistance.

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  • It was a way to obscure the sun or the moon.

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  • The exact plan of the whole is obscure, but the apartments evidently varied in size from mere closets to extensive courts.

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  • It was obscure terminology.

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  • There were obscure clear hard facts, which justified the decision.

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  • There are obscure passages in the system, but it is now rapidly becoming a major thoroughfare.

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  • In a time of rest, though he could never have been obscure, he would never have attained the highest power.

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  • The first obscure and conf used conception of law gradually becomes clearer and better defined.

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  • adequate and vivid) from obscure, fragmentary and incoherent conceptions.

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  • The Athenian tradition, which he follows in the main, would naturally seek to obscure their services.

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  • The idea of force is one of those obscure conceptions which originate in an obscure region, in the sense of muscular power.

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  • There's always eBay when you're looking for a deal or an obscure item.

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  • The various electrical phenomena of plants also are obscure.

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  • - We are now on safer ground though still obscure.

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  • There are numerous conflicting details which unite to prove that various sources have been used, and that the structure of the compilation is a very intricate one, the steps in its growth being extremely obscure.'

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  • MORIAH, an obscure place-name of ancient Palestine with apparently two distinct connotations.

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  • Its leaders were obscure and usually illiterate men, who delighted to propound their theories for the universal reformation of society and the state in rhetoric of which tile characteristic phrases were borrowed from the tribune of the Jacobi.

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  • If you truly do want a jewel on your ring, however, it is recommended that you create a diamond solitaire engagement ring because the single stone will obscure less of the band than a more elaborate setting.

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  • The history of Rhodes during the Persian wars is quite obscure.

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  • Besides the types forming this series, there are a number of others (Medulloseae and allied forms) which show numerous, often very complex, types of stelar structure, in some cases polystelic, whose origin and relationship with the simpler and better known types is frequently obscure.

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  • There is also a fragmentary Targum (Palestinian) the relation of which to the others is obscure.

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  • 2 - The course of events from the middle of the 6th century B.C. to the close of the Persian period is lamentably obscure, although much indirect evidence indicates that this age holds the key to the growth of written biblical history.

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  • The manor of Ealing early belonged to the see of London; but it is not mentioned in Domesday and its history is obscure.

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  • The question of who was responsible for Josh-the-skeleton coming to his untimely demise was even more obscure.

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  • The story of William's relations with King John is interesting, although the details are somewhat obscure.

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  • The early history of Jerusalem is very obscure.

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  • At some period between the time of the Maccabees and of Herod, a second or outer wall had been built outside and north of the first wall, but it is not possible to fix an accurate date to this line of defence, as the references to it in Josephus are obscure.

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  • The exact position of the native states of Bukhara and Khiva, which were later occupied by the Soviet Government, remained obscure.

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  • ARISTAEUS, a divinity whose worship was widely spread throughout ancient Greece, but concerning whom the myths are somewhat obscure.

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  • His image and name are often found on "votive hands," a kind of talisman adorned with emblems, the nature of which is obscure.

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  • There is also an early Arabic recension, but its relation to the Hebrew and to the Arabic 2 Maccabees is still obscure.

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  • The origin of the word is somewhat obscure.

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  • The circumstances of his disgrace are complicated and obscure.

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  • It is true that the situation in Israel or Samaria continues obscure, but a careful study of literary productions, evidently not earlier than the 7th century B.C., reveals a particular loftiness of conception and a tendency which finds its parallels in Hosea and approximates the peculiar characteristics of the Deuteronomic school of thought.

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  • Throughout the Persian supremacy Palestine was necessarily influenced by the course of events in Phoenicia and Egypt (with which intercourse was continual), and some light may thus be indirectly thrown on its otherwise obscure political history.

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  • A common ground for Judaism and Samaritanism is obvious, and it is in this obscure age that it is to be sought.

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  • In obscure circumstances the enthusiastic hopes have melted away, the Davidic scion has disappeared, and Jerusalem has been the victim of another disaster.

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  • There is little doubt that Josephus refers to the same events; but there is considerable confusion in his history of the Persian age, and when he places the schism and the foundation of the new Temple in the time of Alexander the Great (after the obscure disasters of the reign of Artaxerxes III.), it is usually supposed that he is a century too late.

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  • - The biblical history for the period in the books of Ezra and Nehemiah is exceptionally obscure, and it is doubtful how far the traditions can be trusted before we reach the reign of Artaxerxes (Ezra vii.

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  • As a part of the Persian Empire the community was obscure and unimportant.

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  • In June Crichton was once more in Venice, and while there wrote two Latin odes to his friends Lorenzo Massa and Giovanni Donati, but after this date the details of his life are obscure.

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  • The first influence of Boehme was in the direction of an obscure religious mysticism.

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  • The history of Indian civilization in Indo-China and the Archipelago is still obscure, in spite of the existence of gigantic ruins, but it would appear that in some parts at least twa periods must be distinguished, first the introduction of Hinduism (or mixed Hinduism and Buddhism), perhaps under Indian princes, and secondly a later and more purely ecclesiastical.

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  • Much of the life of Saul is obscure, and this too, it would seem, because tradition loved rather to speak of the founder of the ideal monarchy than of his less successful rival.

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  • The Appendix ascribes to David a song of triumph and some exceedingly obscure " last words " (xxii.

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  • are left untold, but the Chronicler omits the revolt of Absalom and 1 If Ewald's brilliant interpretation of an obscure word in 2 Sam.

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  • The biographical anecdotes relating to him during the next few years are obscure and mostly apocryphal.

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  • Up to this time the phenomenon of fermentation was considered strange and obscure.

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  • Its origin is obscure.

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  • The details of his final breach with the English king are somewhat obscure.

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  • The feud between these two princes originated probably in a dispute over the succession to the throne; its details, however, are obscure, and the only fact which can be ascertained with any certainty is that Duncan was slain by Macbeth in 1040.

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  • The details of the incident are, however, unfortunately very obscure.

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  • While, again, legitimately insisting upon personality as a fundamental constituent in any true theory of reality, the relation between human individualities and the divine Person is left vague and obscure; nor is it easy to see how the existence of several individualities - human or divine - in one cosmos is theoretically possible.

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  • As regards doctrine, the work is exhaustive; but it is diffuse, obscure, and occasionally selfcontradictory, as might be expected in a work which consists of a number of unconnected paragraphs of various authorship and date.

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  • They are divided into a number of classes (kings, hypostases, forms, &c.); the proper names by which they are invoked are many, and for the most part obscure, borrowed doubtless, to some extent, from the Parsee angelology.

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  • "If," to quote Dr Robertson, "by attempting to relate the various occurrences in the New World in a strict chronological order, the arrangement of events in his work had not been rendered so perplexed, disconnected and obscure that it is an unpleasant task to collect from different parts of his book and piece together the detached shreds of a story, he might justly have been ranked among the most eminent historians of his country."

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  • The story of his origin is very obscure.

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  • The Hexapoda, being aerial, terrestrial and fresh-water animals, are but occasionally preserved in stratified rocks, and our knowledge of extinct members of the class is therefore fragmentary, while the description, as insects, of various obscure fossils, which are perhaps not even Arthropods, has not tended to the advancement of this branch of zoology.

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  • To the Lias also can be traced back the Neuroptera, the Trichoptera, the orthorrhaphous Diptera and, according to the determination of certain obscure fossils, also the Hymenoptera (ants).

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  • The trade followed two routes: 1 How the name Palmyra arose is obscure.

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  • The early history of Phocis remains quite obscure.

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  • Under Elizabeth Margate was still an obscure fishing village employing about 20 small vessels ("boys") in the coasting and river trades, chiefly in the conveyance of grain, on which in 1791 it chiefly subsisted.

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  • Before the battle of Culdremne (561) a Druid made an airbe druad (fence of protection?) round one of the armies, but what is precisely meant by the phrase is obscure.

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  • From Egypt Hadrian returned through Syria to Europe (his movements are obscure), but was obliged to hurry back to Palestine (spring, 133) to give his personal attention (this is denied by some historians) to the revolt of the Jews, which had broken out (autumn, 131, or spring, 132) after he had left Syria.

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  • His taste, however, was curious; he preferred Cato the elder, Ennius and Caelius Antipater to Cicero, Virgil and Sallust, the obscure poet Antimachus to Homer and Plato.

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  • The two next clauses are obscure.

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  • I), be reverent in visiting the house of God (the temple and the connected buildings) 1 The clause is obscure; literally" he (or, one) rises at (?) the voice of the bird,"usually understood to refer to the old man's inability to sleep in the morning; but this is not a universal trait of old age, and besides, a reference to affairs in the house is to be expected; the Hebrew construction also is of doubtful correctness.

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  • There follows an obscure passage (v.

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  • The text of the obscure passage iv.

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  • The two personages - the "old and foolish king" and the "poor and wise youth" - have been supposed (by Winckler) to be Antiochus Epiphanes (175-164 B.C.) and Demetrius (162-150 B.C.), or (by Haupt) Antiochus and the impostor Alexander Balas (150-146 B.C.), or (by others) Demetrius and Alexander; in favour of Alexander as the "youth" it may be said that he was of obscure origin, was at first popular, and was later abandoned by his friends.

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  • appellative sense of the word, and many obscure points become clear if we remember that when a title becomes a proper name it may be appropriated by different peoples to quite distinct deities.

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  • Another far more obscure town in Gaul, near Reims, also bore the name.

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  • The Bohuns came into England at, or shortly after, the Norman Conquest; but their early history there is obscure.

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  • The statements are obscure, and elsewhere Hormah is the scene of a victory over the Canaanites by Israel (Num.

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  • In his letters to his friend Mathilde Wesendonck, it appears that while he was composing Tristan he already had the inspiration of working out the identification of Kundry, the messenger of the Grail, with the temptress who, under the spell of Klingsor, seduces the knights of the Grail; and he had, moreover, thought out the impressively obscure suggestion that she was Herodias, condemned like the wandering Jew to live till the Saviour's second coming.

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  • Under what circumstances, and by whose selection, the surname was attached to a king, is obscure.

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  • von Hauslab, director of the Austrian Surveys, in 1842, advised that the darkest tints should be allotted to the highlands, so that they might not obscure details in the densely peopled plains.

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  • When we contrast the expectations of the original writer and the actual events that followed, it would seem that the chief value of his work would consist in the light that it throws on this obscure and temporary revolution in the Messianic expectations of Judaism towards the close of the 2nd century.

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  • (d) Many passages which are obscure or wholly unintelligible in the Greek become clear on retranslation into Hebrew.

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  • Its signification is obscure; but it certainly contains the word ushtra, " camel."

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  • that their extent is limited, and their meaning, moreover, frequently dubious or obscure.

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  • On this point the Avesta is wholly silent: only one obscure passage (Yasna, 53, 9) seems to intimate that he found an ill reception in Rai.

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  • But when it is granted that the ancient Hebrews, like other primitive peoples, had their own mythical and traditional figures, the story of Cain becomes less obscure.

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  • Thus the whole method of measurement in geometry as described in the elementary textbooks and the older treatises is obscure to the last degree.

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  • The operations of the imperial police in regard to Mme de Stael are rather obscure.

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  • BALANOGLOSSUS, the general name given to certain peculiar, opaque, worm-like animals which live an obscure life under stones, and burrow in the sand from between tide-marks down to the abyssal regions of the sea.

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  • Again a disaster happened through some obscure cause, and seventy of the sons of Jeconiah were smitten (I Sam.

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  • The mission of Palladius (431-432), whom Zimmer has endeavoured to identify with Patrick, is obscure.

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  • The present article can only give a brief outline of a subject as intricate as it is vast, frequently also extremely obscure, and rendered still more obscure by the fact that those who have applied themselves to it have too often done so in anything but a scientific spirit.

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  • Basing their views on the synoptic Gospels, and tracing descent from the obscure sect of the Alogi, the Adoptianists under Theodotus of Byzantium tried to found a school at Rome c. 185, asserting that Jesus was a man, filled with the Holy Spirit's inspiration from his baptism, and so attaining such a perfection of holiness that he was adopted by God and exalted to divine dignity.

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  • The meaning of Itonia is obscure: Dummler connects it with iTEwves, the "willow-beds" on the banks of the river Coralios (the river stated that Athena was sometimes called or 'Aeon.

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  • The least wind raises clouds of fine dust, which fill the air, render it so opaque as to obscure the noonday sun, and make respiration difficult.

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  • The clearness, elegance and originality of his mode of presentation give lucidity to what is obscure, novelty to what is familiar, and simplicity to what is abstruse.

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  • There were arrangements for the brilliant illumination of the choir and its relief, which was sometimes sculptured on both sides and reversible, while the podia were intentionally more obscure.

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  • Of the measures which William took to consolidate his authority we have many details; but the chronological order of his proceedings is obscure.

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  • Though somewhat obscure they may be found in the ' Subsequently three other natives, after trial by the supreme court, were condemned and executed for their share in the Byrnetown murders.

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  • The origin of this god is obscure; perhaps it arose from a cult connected with a statue or a tomb of some satrap.

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  • The integration of the scattered tribes of Arabia in the 7th century by the stirring religious propaganda of Mahomet was accompanied by a meteoric rise in the intellectual powers of a hitherto obscure race.

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  • 1381), English rebel, a man of obscure origin, was a native either of Kent or of Essex.

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  • But, as applied to lower and more obscure forms of life, teleology presented alfnost insurmountable difficulties; and consequently, in place of exact experiment and demonstration, the most reckless though ingenious assumptions were made as to the utility of the parts and organs of lower animals.

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  • Hence many structures which are obvious to the eye, and serve as distinguishing marks of separate species, are really not themselves of value or use, but are the necessary concomitants of less obvious and even altogether obscure qualities, which are the real characters upon which selection is acting.

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  • Certain additional small groups should probably be recognized as independent lines of descent or phyla, but their relationships are obscure - they are the Mesozoa, the Polyzoa, the Acanthocephala and the Gastrotricha.

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  • But although the argument from gratings is instructive and convenient in some respects, its use has tended to obscure the essential unity of the principle of the limit of resolution whether applied to telescopes or microscopes.

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  • But this translation was not written all at once, and its history is obscure; we only know from the prologue to Ecclesiasticus that the Hagiographa, and doubtless therefore the Psalter, were read in Greek in Egypt about 130 B.C. or somewhat later.'

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  • But whatever the obscure expression n'i'#1 -1 52 may mean, r7?5 cannot here mean to " direct," for a choir with six " directors " would have been a veritable beargarden.

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  • The musical notes found in the titles of the psalms and occasionally also in the text (Selah, 1 Higgaion) are so obscure that it seems unnecessary to enter here upon the various conjectures that have been made about them.

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  • The importance of Fishguard is due to the local fisheries and the excellence of its harbour, and its early history is obscure.

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  • The lofty symbolism of his prose is frequently obscure, but his lyrical verses are distinguished for their rapturous ecstasy and beauty of expression.

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  • The publication of Ehrlich's chemical, or rather physical, theory of immunity has thrown much light upon this very intricate and obscure subject.

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  • in subacute and chronic Bright's disease, lead poisoning and other obscure conditions.

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  • Both honours were taken from it to be given to Santiago de Cuba; and for two centuries after this Baracoa remained an obscure village, with little commerce.

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  • After his death in 289 comes another miserable and obscure period of revolution and despotism, in which Greek life was dying out; and but for the brief intervention of Pyrrhus in 278 Syracuse, and indeed all Sicily, would have fallen a prey to the Carthaginians.

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  • It is important to remember that this obscure stream of tradition flowed on, only partially affected by the influx of Arabian, or even the early revival of purer classical learning.

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  • writers of this century need not be mentioned here; but the next, the 11th century, is given as the probable though uncertain date of a writer who had a great influence on European medicine, Mesua the younger of Damascus, whose personality is obscure, and of whose very existence some historians have doubted, thinking that the name was assumed by some medieval Latin writer.

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  • Sufferers from mental disease are still regarded too much as troublesome persons to be hidden away in humane keeping, rather than as cases of manifold and obscure disease, to be studied and treated by the undivided attention of physicians of the highest skill.

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  • Thus the defects, whether of this secretion or of that, and again of motor activity, the state of the valvular junctions, the volume of the cavities, and their position in the abdomen, may be ascertained, and dealt with as far as may be; so that, although the fluctuations of chemical digestion are still very obscure, the application of remedies after a mere traditional routine is no longer excusable.

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  • The Lucretian gens to which he belonged was one of the oldest of the great Roman houses, nor do we hear of the name, as we do of other great family names, as being diffused over other parts of Italy, or as designating men of obscure or servile origin.

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  • is obscure, but in 1326, on the outbreak of war with England, an assembly of prelates and barons met at Meaux.

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  • His sermons are very noble though written in a style which is over-compressed and often obscure.

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  • He could not avert the mistaken policy which led to the rout at Le Mans, and was finally shot in an obscure skirmish at Nouaille on the 4th of March 1794.

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  • - The history of the manufacture of glass in China is obscure, but the common opinion that it was learnt from the Europeans in the 17th century seems to be erroneous.

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  • Vocabularies, grammars and interlinear translations were compiled for the use of students as well as commentaries on the older texts and explanations of obscure words and phrases.

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  • The first forty-two years of his life are obscure; we learn from incidental remarks of his that he was a Sunnite, probably according to the IIanifite rite, well versed in all the branches of natural science, in medicine, mathematics, astronomy and astrology, in.

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  • The local names in Nastasen's inscription, describing his royal circuit, are in many cases obscure.

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  • nasu is obscure, cf.

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  • The fungoid diseases of tobacco are comparatively unimportant; there are, however, some diseases of obscure origin which at times cause considerable damage.

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  • The Old Testament references to Arabs were obscure.

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  • Indeed the prime value of the Shepherd is the light it casts on Christianity at Rome in the otherwise obscure period c. I10-140, when it had as yet hardly felt the influences converging on it from other centres of tradition and thought.

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  • His history is very obscure.

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  • This anomalous phenomenon is still obscure, for we do not yet know whether the second embryo is developed sexually or asexually from the first.

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  • The history of Christian Iconium is utterly obscure.

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  • The word Morashtite (Morashti) was therefore obscure to them; but this only gives greater weight to the traditional pronunciation with o in the first syllable, which is as old as the LXX., and goes against the view, taken by the Targum both on Micah and on Jeremiah, and followed by some moderns (including Cheyne, E.B., 3198), that Micah came from Mareshah.

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  • 15; the reference is, however, obscure and uncertain.

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  • BATARNAY 1438-1523), French statesman, was born of an old but obscure family in Dauphine, about the year 1438.

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  • The origins of this method of color-printing are obscure.

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  • The origin of the Iwakura-yaki is somewhat obscure, and its Iwakura history, at an early date, becomes confused with that of the Awata yaki, from which, indeed, it does not materially differ.

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  • The traditions are pale and obscure.

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  • Two obscure agents of the committee of public safety were in search of a marquise who had flown, but an unknown stranger was found in the house and arrested on suspicion.

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  • But the subject is now being vigorously studied, and, apart from its importance as a branch of descriptive chemistry, it is throwing light, and promises to throw more, on obscure parts of chemical theory.

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  • Nevertheless the exact nature of his projects remains obscure.

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  • His narrative of the years 353-378 (all that now remains) is honest and straightforward, but his diction is awkward and obscure.

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  • The Homeric poems (12th - 10th centuries) know of Dorians only in Crete, with the obscure epithet TpexaiKes, and no hint of their origin.

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  • His last years are obscure.

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  • Their relations to the surrounding beds are still obscure.

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  • His works cover nearly 40 volumes, often obscure, often tautological, and with no great distinction of style.

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  • Edward Purcell was an obscure Catholic journalist, to whom Manning, late in life, had entrusted, rather by way of charitable bequest, his private diaries and other confidential papers.

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  • The reasons which brought the revised creed into prominence at Chalcedon are still obscure.

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  • The history of the introduction of the creed into liturgies is still obscure.

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  • Under the new dynasty of Aletes, which reigned according to tradition from 10 74 to 747, Corinthian history continues obscure.

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  • According to one rather obscure narrative, Abram's sole heir was the servant, who was over his household, apparently a certain Eliezer of Damascus' (xv.

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  • 2), and knew of Abraham's miraculous escape from death (an obscure reference to some act of deliverance in Is.

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  • In Augustus' time Tegea was the only important town of Arcadia, but its history throughout the Roman and Byzantine periods is obscure; it ceased to exist as a Greek city after the Gothic invasion of 395.

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  • The relations between them are obscure; conflicts are referred to in Is.

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  • His cult is as celebrated as his history is obscure.

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  • 38 is very obscure, and the relation to Ezr.

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  • 3), and the obscure interval of twelve years in his work corresponds very closely to that which now separates the records of Ezra's labours.

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  • Mill has shown that in the North Sea off the Firth of Forth the average depth of visibility of a disk in the winter half-year was 4; fathoms and in the summer half-year 62 fathoms, and, although the greater frequency of rough weather in winter might tend to obscure the effect, individual observations made it plain that the angle of the sun was the main factor in increasing the depth to which the disk remained visible.

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  • How the name John arose is one of the obscure points.

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  • Their connexion with the later Lentuli (especially those of the Ciceronian period) is very obscure and difficult to establish.

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  • There is an obscure allusion to their destruction in an appendage to the oracles of Balaam (Num.

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  • 55), this obscure tribe had evidently an important part in shaping the religion of Israel.

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  • These poems are in a sense valuable as repertoires of antiquities; but their style is on the whole bad, and infinite patience is required to clear up their numerous and obscure allusions.

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  • These men did not merely collect works, but sought to arrange them, to subject the texts to criticism, and to explain any allusion or reference in them which at a later date might become obscure.

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  • Had the German princes not found it to their interests to enforce his principles, he might never have been more than the leader of an obscure mystic sect.

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  • Long before the Protestant revolt, simple, obscure people, under the influence of leaders whose names have been forgotten, lost confidence in the official clergy and their sacraments and formed secret organizations of which vague accounts are found in the reports of the 13th-century inquisitors, Rainerus Sacchoni, Bernard Gui, and the rest.

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  • 394) would explain the otherwise obscure circumstances that, according to Plutarch (Sol.

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  • The relation of the Ephetae to the court of the Areopagus is obscure; cf.

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  • The immediate subsequent events are obscure (see further Hezekiah).

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  • xxvi.) are not restricted to Philistines, and Phicol (ibid.) is too obscure to serve as evidence.

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  • But the Greenland colony was obscure, the country was believed to form part of Europe, and the records of the farther explorations were contained in sagas which were only rediscovered by modern scholarship. Throughout the middle ages, legendary tales of mythical lands lying in the western ocean - the Isle of St Brandan, of Brazil and Antilia - had been handed down.

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  • The history of the venture is very obscure, but Cabot is thought to have reached Newfoundland and the mainland.

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  • 2 The name is hopelessly obscure, and the identification with the mountain of the temple in Jerusalem rests upon a late view (2 Chron.

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  • xv.; Amalek was too small and obscure.

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  • For the rest of Henry's reign his career is obscure; perhaps he fled abroad on the enactment of the Six Articles.

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  • The situation was still obscure, details as to what had happened on the French left were wanting, and the direction of Blucher's retreat was by no means certain.

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  • Various etymologies of the name have been suggested: "without a lip" (a, xe7Xos), Achilles being regarded as a river-god, a stream which overflows its banks, or, referring to the story that, when Thetis laid him in the fire, one of his lips, which he had licked, was consumed (Tzetzes on Lycophron, 178); "restrainer of the people" (ExE -Xaos); "healer of sorrow" (ax�-X os); "the obscure" (connected with axXbs, "mist"); "snakeborn" (g xts), the snake being one of the chief forms taken by Thetis.

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    0
  • The history of the sects of the middle ages is obscure, because the earliest accounts of them come from those who were concerned in their suppression, and were therefore eager to lay upon each of them the worst enormities which could be attributed to any.

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    0
  • It is, however, by no means easy to determine their original tenets, as in the 13th and 14th centuries they were a body of obscure and unlettered peasants, hiding themselves in a corner, while in the 16th century they were absorbed into the general movement of the Reformation.

    0
    0
  • Still, a good deal of semi-congregationalism probably did exist in obscure circles which preluded the wider Reformation and were merged in it.

    0
    0
  • 5, and for the obscure 1H?

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  • The Spanish Jesuit Juan Maldonatus' Latin commentary, published 1596 (critical reprint, edited by Raich, 1874), a pathfinder on many obscure points, is still a model for tenacious penetration of Johannine ideas.

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    0
  • In spite of the many ruins of temples and inscriptions, the religion of the Sabaeans is obscure.

    0
    0
  • In the Great Plains region the geological structure is very simple, consisting of nearly horizontal strata of Cretaceous rock in the middle and western portions, and of Tertiary rock on the eastern border, but in the mountain region the rocks have been folded and faulted until the structure is intricate and obscure.

    0
    0
  • Ingot metal or mild steel was sometimes treacherous when first introduced, and accidents occurred, the causes of which were obscure.

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  • Despite his open protests and subterraneous counter-mining, war was actually declared against Sweden in 1675, and his subsequent policy seemed so obscure and hazardous to those who did not possess the clue to the perhaps purposely tangled skein, that the numerous enemies whom his arrogance and superciliousness had raised up against him, resolved to destroy him.

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  • This part of his career is obscure and without importance.

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  • PETER PAVLOVICH SHAFIROV, Baron (1670-1739), Russian statesman, one of the ablest coadjutors of Peter the Great, was of obscure, and in all probability of Jewish, extraction.

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  • The chronology of all these events, as narrated by himself, is somewhat obscure, but they seem to have occupied about three years.

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  • Here too arose the obscure triangular quarrel between Diderot, Rousseau and Frederick Melchior Grimm, which ended Rousseau's sojourn at the Hermitage.

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    0
  • The etymology of the word Tophet is obscure; it is possibly of Aramaic origin and means,"fire-place," cf.

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    0
  • The whole subject of the history of the zodiac is very obscure.

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  • Bruzen Lamartiniere states in his Dictionnaire Geographique that the Gauls and Bretons called it by a word signifying "the forest," which was turned into Latin as Arduenna silva, and he thinks it quite probable that the name was really derived from the Celtic word ardu (dark, obscure).

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  • The sense-development in this case is very obscure, and the name of the measure is found much earlier than "peck" as a variant form of "pick."

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  • The general view was, that the embryo originated in the ovule, which was in some obscure manner fertilized by the pollen.

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  • He wrote full biographies of two chroniclers of Louis XI., one very obscure, Jean Castel (in the Bibliotheque de l'Ecole des Charles, 1840), the other, Thomas Basin, bishop of Lisieux, who was, on the contrary, a remarkable politician, prelate and chronicler.

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  • The obscure town Libertum (inferred from the title Episcopus Libertinensis in connexion with the synod of Carthage, A.D.

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  • His prominent use of Roman law and the wide range of his observation have made his works as intelligible abroad as at home, and thereby much valuable information - for example, concerning the nature of British supremacy in India, and the position of native institutions there - has been made the property of the world of letters instead of the peculiar and obscure possession of a limited class of British public servants.

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  • It would seem, from a somewhat obscure passage in the chronicle compiled from older the progenitors of the Poles, originally established on the Danube, were driven from thence by the Romans to the still wilder wilderness of central Europe, settling finally among the virgin forests and impenetrable morasses of the basin of the upper waters of the Oder and the Vistula.

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    0
  • The origin of the Cossack state is still somewhat obscure, but the germs of it are visible as early as the beginning of the 16th century.

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    0
  • The origin of the liberum veto is obscure, but it was first employed by the deputy Wiadislaus Sicinski, who dissolved the diet of 1652 by means of it, and before the end of the 17th century it was used so frequently and recklessly that all business was frequently brought to a standstill.

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  • The origin of slaty cleavage is in some measure obscure.

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  • He also devoted much attention to the study of obscure morbid conditions like hysteria, especially in relation to hypnotism; indeed, it is in connexion with his investigation into the phenomena and results of the latter that his name is popularly known.

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  • In the course of 1496 John Albert with great difficulty collected an army of 80,000 men in Poland, but the crusade was deflected from its proper course by the sudden invasion of Galicia by the hospodar, who apparently - for the whole subject is still very obscure - had been misled by reports from Hungary that John Albert was bent upon placing his younger brother Sigismund on the throne of Moldavia.

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  • It remains rather obscure, though the type species originally " was discovered in great abundance in a roadside puddle subject to desiccation."

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  • 3), remarkable for seven pairs of long branchial leaves which fold over the hinder extremity of the animal, and the Sarsiellidae, still somewhat obscure, besides adding the Rutidermatidae, knowledge of which is based on skilful maceration of minute and long-dried specimens.

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  • The early history of this version is obscure, but it seems probable that there were two translations made in the 4th century: (I) by Mesrop with the help of Hrofanos (Rufinus?) based on a Greek text; (2) by Sahak, based on Syriac. After the council of Ephesus (A.

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  • Rendel Harris argued for the influence of Latin, and Chase for that of Syriac. While both threw valuable light on obscure points, it seems probable that they exaggerated the extent to which retranslation can be traced; that they ranked Codex Bezae somewhat too highly as the best witness to the " Western " text; and that some of their work was rendered defective by their failure to recognize quite clearly that the " Western " text is not a unity.

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  • So far the amount of possible latitude left is not so great as to obscure the main outline of the chronology.

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    0
  • One of the most obscure questions with which the ethnologist has to deal is that of the prehistoric remains which occur in different and widely separated parts of the oceanic region.

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    0
  • The reason for this punishment is not mentioned in Homer, and is obscure; according to some, he had revealed the designs of the gods to mortals, according to others, he was in the habit of attacking and murdering travellers.

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    0
  • That prophecy was generally given in visions, dreams and obscure sentences is true only of an early period.

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    0
  • The origin of the Round Table is obscure.

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    0
  • Lastly there are the few Pygopodidae of the Australian region, with still quite obscure relationship.

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    0
  • The traces of alternations of adaptations corresponding to these alternations of habitat are recorded both in palaeontology and anatomy, although often after the obscure analogy of the earlier and later writings of a palimpsest.

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  • Wherever this figure has not become quite obscure, it represents that divine power which, whether simply owing to a fall, or as the hero who makes war on, and is partly vanquished by darkness, descends into the darkness of the material world, and with whose descent begins the great drama of the world's development.

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  • Even the Persian myth is entirely obscure, and has hitherto defied interpretation.

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    0
  • The Gnostic ideas of salvation were in the later schools and sects transferred to these persons whom we must consider as rather obscure charlatans and miracle-mongers, just as in other cases they were transferred to the person of Christ.

    0
    0
  • The four leading Maya signs called kan, muluc, ix, cauac corresponded in their position to the four Aztec signs rabbit, reed, flint, house, but the meanings of the Maya signs are, unlike the Aztec, very obscure.

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  • and in Salvador, furnish important material for the investigation of the obscure problems of the Toltecs and Olmecs, and of the extension of Maya peoples on the Atlantic coast of the Mexican Gulf from Campeche as far as Tabasco and Vera Cruz.

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  • His biographers give almost no details as to his life, and its early part was probably very obscure.

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  • At one time he is said to have had in his pay fifty-three agents at foreign courts, besides eighteen persons whose functions were even more obscure.

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  • SIGYNNAE (I tyinvvai, 21 i'yuvvot), an obscure people of antiquity.

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  • This conception of a difference, of an internal structure in the absolute, finds other and not less obscure expressions in the mystical contributions of the Menschliche Freiheit and in the scholastic speculations of the Berlin lectures on mythology.

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  • There must be recognized in God as a completed actuality, a dim, obscure ground or basis, which can only be described as not yet being, but as containing in itself the impulse to externalization, to existence.

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  • His reputation does not seem justified; his works, as Plutarch says (De audiendis poetis, 16), have nothing poetical about them except the metre, and the style is bombastic and obscure; but they contain some interesting information as to ancient belief on the subjects treated.

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  • Protected on both sides by ranges of hills, the district was, until late years, the least known portion of the most obscure division of India, but recently it has been opened up by the Bengal-Nagpur railway, and has developed into a great grainproducing country.

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  • Before her relatives could be brought to countenance his pretensions, Kepler was obliged to undertake a journey to Wurttemberg to obtain documentary evidence of the somewhat obscure nobility of his family, and it was thus not until the 27th of April 1597 that the marriage was celebrated.

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  • 139; but other Arabian writers give other forms. Paton (Syria and Palestine, pp. 43, 123) identifies Lot-Lotan with Ruten, one of the Egyptian names for Palestine; its true meaning is obscure.

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  • Their pharmacological action is as obscure as their effects in certain diseased conditions are consistently brilliant and unexampled.

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  • In the autumn of 1 777 Mifflin was a leader in the obscure movement known as the Conway Cabal, the object of which was to replace Washington by General Horatio Gates.

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  • For this moment of homage to material elements ritually filled with divine potency may be so exaggerated as to obscure the rite's ancient significance as a communion of the faithful in mystic food.

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  • 29, 31 are obscure.

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  • Its early history is, however, entirely obscure.

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  • Its origin is obscure, and has been variously connected with a Saxon royal residence (King's town), a family of the name of Chenesi, and the word Caen, meaning wood, from the forest which originally covered the district and was still traceable in Tudor times.

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  • Plato's theory of the soul and its immortality was not the ordinary Greek view derived from Homer, who regarded the body as the self, the soul as a shade having a future state but an obscure existence, and stamped that view on the hearts of his countrymen, and affected Aristotle himself.

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  • The history of the dynasty of the Danishmand is still very obscure, notwithstanding the efforts of Mordtmann, Schlumberger, Karabacek, Sallet and others to fix some chronological details, and it is almost impossible to harmonize the different statements of the Armenian, Syriac, Greek and Western chronicles with those of the Arabic, Persian and Turkish.

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  • After him Kaikobad, son of his brother Faramarz, entered Konia as sultan in 1298, but his reign is so obscure that nothing can be said of it; some authors assert that he governed only ' See the details in Vincent of Beauvais, Speculum Historiale, bk.

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  • The relation between the divine mind and finite intelligence, at first thought as that of agent and recipient, is complicated and obscure when the necessity for explaining the permanence of real things comes forward.

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  • It appears no longer as the object of a special cult, but limited to the homage of certain sects, expressed by superstitious rites of obscure significance.

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  • Daub's Die dogmatische Theologie jetziger Zeit oder die Selbstsucht in der Wissenschaft des Glaubens (1833), and Vorlesungen ilber die Prolegomena zur Dogmatik (1839), are Hegelian in principle and obscure in language.

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  • The causes of their subsequent estrangement are obscure, but it was possibly due to the empress's lavish expenditure in charity and church building, which endeared her to ecclesiastics but was a serious drain on the imperial finances.

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  • Most critics recognize in the obscure word d'meseq or d'mesheq, Amos iii.

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  • But the beautiful currents, but in the higher region shown by the hydrogen photographs the distribution of the dark flocculi suggested the operation of definite forces, though their nature remained obscure until the spring of 1908.

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  • Probably the religious opinions of Irving, originally in some respects more catholic and truer to human nature than generally prevailed in ecclesiastical circles, had gained breadth and comprehensiveness from his intercourse with Coleridge, but gradually his chief interest in Coleridge's philosophy centred round that which was mystical and obscure, and to it in all likelihood may be traced his initiation into the doctrine of millenarianism.

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  • This action, at first sight somewhat obscure, is due to the extreme pupillary contraction which removes the mass of the iris from pressing upon the spaces of Fontana, through which the intraocular fluids normally make a very slow escape from the eye into its efferent lymphatics.

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  • The history of the islands before their discovery by Captain James Cook, in 1778, is obscure.'

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  • Maine de Biran's philosophical reputation has suffered from two causes - his obscure and laboured style, and the fact that only a few, and these the least characteristic, of his writings appeared during his lifetime.

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  • In connexion with this Biran treats most of the obscure problems which arise in dealing with conscious experience, such as the mode by which the organism is cognized, the mode by which the organism is distinguished from extra-organic things, and the nature of those general ideas by which the relations of things are known to us - cause, power, force, &c.

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  • Besides these five groups, an obscure road, called by the Saxons Akeman Street, gave alternative access from London through Alchester (outside of Bicester) to Bath, while another obscure road winds south from near Sheffield, past Derby and Birmingham, and connects the lower Severn with the Humber.

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  • - The history of Britain after the withdrawal of the Roman troops is extremely obscure, but there can be little doubt that for many years the inhabitants of the provinces were exposed to devastating raids by the Picts and Scots.

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  • The obscure section, xiii.

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  • To him, also, in his capacity of theologian, the whole of Europe submitted every obscure, delicate or controverted question, whether legal problem or case of conscience.

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  • The subsequent events are rather obscure.

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  • 20, &c., rendered by the Septuagint "Mesopotamia of Syria," is obscure.

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  • 1 If a forgery, why should this letter have been assigned to Macarius, a comparatively obscure person whose name is not even found in the menaea of the Eastern church ?

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  • The history of this revolt is still obscure.

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  • We are gradually approaching a solution of this obscure problem.

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  • Where much is still obscure, all that seems certain is that the antiquity of Phoenicia as a sea and trading power has been greatly exaggerated both in ancient and in modern times; the Minoan power of Cnossus preceded it by many centuries; the influence of Phoenicia in the Aegean cannot be carried back much earlier than the 12th century B.C., and, comparatively speaking, it was " foreign, late, sporadic."' A vivid description of the Phoenicians' trade at the time of Tyre's prosperity is given by Ezekiel (xxvii.

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  • (c. 535), after whom it passed "by an obscure transition" into a dynasty of eleven Gupta princes, known as "the later Guptas of Magadha," who seem for the most part to have been merely local rulers of Magadha.

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  • The origin of Christian missions in Crete is obscure.

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  • Round has done much to explain the introduction of the system into England,' its actual origin on the continent of Europe is still obscure in many of its most important details.

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    0
  • There are several obscure points as to the relation of the longer and shorter ceremonies, as well as the origin and original relation of their several parts.

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  • At almost every period there have been men of obscure and illegitimate birth who have been knighted.

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  • Sir Robert Knolles and Sir Thomas Dagworth) were of obscure birth, while on the French side even Du Guesclin had to wait long for his knighthood because he belonged only to the lesser nobility.

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  • For some obscure reason the Basidiomycetes do not readily form lichens, so that only a few forms are known in which the fungal element is a member of this family.

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  • A descent of Christ into Hades, implying an extension of the opportunity of grace such as is supposed to be taught in 1 Peter, is also discovered in the obscure statements in Rom.

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  • The revival was not a little due to the foundation in 18 22, by a few earnest but (as they called themselves) " humble and obscure " Catholics at Lyons, of a new voluntary society, called the Institution for the Propagation of the Faith.

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  • The league's relation to outlying dependencies is obscure; many of these were probably mere protectorates or "allied states" and secured no representation.

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  • The cause of their production is very obscure.

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  • The details of this contest are obscure.

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  • (A word of obscure origin; possibly derived from Dan.

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  • six or at most eight of those found in the list of Dionysius;2 and these for the most part among the more obscure and least known of the names given by him.

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  • The origin of the custom of a yearly commemoration of the Crucifixion is somewhat obscure.

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  • The origin of the ceremony of blessing the palms is more obscure.

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  • At this point his history again becomes obscure.

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  • The after history of these negotiations is obscure.

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  • Hume's eminence in the fields of philosophy and history must not be allowed to obscure his importance as a political economist.

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  • 21 the latter is associated with both Sihon and Balaam, and in some obscure manner Midian and Moab are connected in Num.

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  • But the obscure historical background of the references makes it uncertain whether the exclusiveness of orthodox Judaism (Neh.

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  • papyrifera of many botanists), the discrepancies in geography, ethnology and zoology, which have been so troublesome in the past, will disappear; other features, usually considered obscure, will become luminous; and the older and less distorted sagas, at least in their main incidents, will become vivid records of actual geographic exploration."

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  • The beginnings of Celtic monachism are obscure, but it seems to have been closely connected with the tribal system.'

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  • After the end of the Old Kingdom Thebes grew from an obscure provincial town to be the seat of a strong line of princes who contended for supremacy with Heracleopolis and eventually triumphed in the XIth Dynasty of Manetho.

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  • Most veins are usually easily traced, but in the case of succulent plants, as Hoya, agave, stonecrop and mesembryanthemum, the veins are obscure.

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  • The style is so enigmatical as to have procured for Lycophron, even among the ancients, the title of "obscure" (oKor€Lvos).

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  • The poem is evidently intended to display the writer's knowledge of obscure names and uncommon myths; it is full of unusual words of doubtful meaning gathered from the older poets, and many long-winded compounds coined by the author.

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  • But the phenomenon was not obscure.

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  • Although in many cases it is easy to explain the reasons why water artificially applied to land brings crops or increases their yield, the theory of our ordinary water-meadow irrigation is rather obscure.

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  • A few weeks after Johnson had, entered on these obscure labours, he published a work which at once placed him high among the writers of his age.

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  • The remaining history of the dynasty is obscure; according to Mr Vincent Smith, its last represei tative was Mahanandin (417 B.C.), after whose death the throne was usurped, under obscure circumstances, by Mahapadma Nanda, a man of low caste (Early Hist.

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  • 236 the Andhras were overthrown, and, after a confused and obscure period of about a century, Chandragupta I.

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  • This episode, derided at first at Rome as the act of an obscure Augustinian friar intent on scoring a point in a scholastic disputation, was in reality an event of vast significance, for it brought to the front, as the exponent of the national sentiment, one of the mightiest spirits whom Germany has produced.

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  • PIG (a word of obscure origin, connected with the Low Ger.

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  • The Clementine literature throws light upon a very obscure phase of Christian development, that of JudaeoChristianity, and proves that it embraced more intermediate types, between Ebionism proper and Catholicism, than has generally been realized.

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  • They looked on the German schoolmaster as the apostle of German culture, and they looked forward to the time when the feeling of a common Austrian nationality should obscure the national feeling of the Sla y s, and the Slavonic idioms should survive merely as the local dialects of the peasantry, the territories becoming merely the provinces of a united and centralized state.

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  • In 419 and 417 there is practically no fighting: the Mantinean War of 418 is a disconnected episode which did not lead to a resumption of hostilities: in 420 there are only obscure battles in Thrace: in 416 there is only the expedition to Melos; and finally from 421 to 413 there is official peace.

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  • Though a great student of Greek philosophy and science, he was unpractised in literature, and his style is very involved and obscure.

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  • (v.) The relation of the Jews to Hellenism in the first century and a half of Macedonian rule is very obscure, since the state- Jews.

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  • We are not at liberty, therefore, in every case where the connexion in the Koran is obscure, to say that it is really broken, and set it down as the clumsy patchwork of a later hand.

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    0
  • Even with regard to the Medina passages, however, a great deal remains uncertain, partly because the allusions to historical events and circumstances are generally rather obscure, partly because traditions about the occasion of the revelation of the various pieces are often fluctuating, and often rest on misunderstanding or arbitrary conjecture.

    0
    0
  • Much of it was obscure from the beginning, other sections were unintelligible apart from a knowledge of the circumstances of their origin.

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    0
  • The derivation of the name is obscure, but there is no reason to doubt that she was a genuine Greek deity.

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    0
  • A certain NitOcris of about the Vilith Dynasty and Scmiophris of the XIIth Dynasty are in the lists, but are quite obscure.

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  • We find such divine standards ~ often depicted on the earliest monuments, and among the symbols placed upon them may be detected the images of many deities destined to play an important part in the later national pantheon, such as the falcon Horus, the wolf Wepwawet (Ophois) ~ the goddess Neith, symbolized -~r~.by a shield transfixed with arrows, and the god Mm ~r, the nature of whose fetish is obscure.

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  • Of Osiris we can only state that he was originally local god of Busiris, whatever further characteristics he iitively possessed being quite obscure.

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  • Thus Ammon, originally the obscure local god of Thebes, was raised by the Theban monarchs of the XIIth and of the XVIIIth to XXIst Dynasties to a predominant position never equalled by any other divinity; and, by similar means, Suchos of the Fayum, IJbasti of Bubastis, and Neith of Sais, each enjoyed for a short space of time a consideration that no other cause would have secured to them.

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  • Among the former were the kher-heb, a learned man entrusted with the conduct of the ceremonies, and the divine fathers, whose functions are obscure.

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    0
  • Symbolical or imitative acts, accompanied by spoken formulae of set form and obscure content, accomplished, by some peculiar virtues of their own, results that were beyond the power of human hands and brain..

    0
    0
  • The meaning of many words may be still unknown, and many constructions are still obscure; but at least he can distinguish fairly between a correct text and a corrupt text.

    0
    0
  • Their connection with Semitic and Egyptian, therefore, remains at present an obscure though probable hypothesis.

    0
    0
  • The history of some of the alphabetic signs is still very obscure but a sufficient number of them have been explained to make it nearly certain that the values of all were obtained on the same principles.i Some of the ancient words from which the phonetic values were derived probably fell very early into disuse, and may, never be discoverable in the texts that have come down to us.

    0
    0
  • By the time of the XXVth Dynasty the cursive of the conservative Thebais had become very obscure.

    0
    0
  • Before that time, in spite of successive efforts to establish a chronology, the problem is very obscure.

    0
    0
  • Kheti or Achthos was apparently Hera cleo- a favorite name with the kings, but they are very period, obscure.

    0
    0
  • The history of the following period down to the rise of the New Empire is very obscure.

    0
    0
  • The process by which the first of these contributions was turned into coin is still obscure; it is clear that the corn when threshed was taken over by certain public officials who deducted the amount due to the state.

    0
    0
  • The process by which this state of affairs came about is somewhat obscure, owing to the want of good chronicles for the Turkish period of Egyptian history.

    0
    0
  • Its history, however, is obscure until, in 823, it appears as a lordship ruled by hereditary hypati or consuls.

    0
    0
  • Patients in whom, for purposes of diagnosis, it has been electrically excited, describe, as the initial effect of the stimulation, tingling and obscure but locally-limited sensations, referred to the part whose muscles a moment later are thrown into co-ordinate activity.

    0
    0
  • The early history of Drente is obscure.

    0
    0
  • The uses of atropine in cardiac affections are still obscure and dubious.

    0
    0
  • The finances also would need careful attention; but the subject is obscure, and we cannot accept Asser's description of Alfred's appropriation of his revenue as more than an ideal sketch.

    0
    0
  • The history of the church under Alfred is most obscure.

    0
    0
  • Previously it had been an obscure hamlet.

    0
    0
  • When carbon-assimilation is active, starch-granules crowd upon the surface of the pyrenoid and completely obscure it from view.

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    0
  • His mistakes as president have been so emphasized as to obscure the fact that he was a man of unimpeachable honesty, of the highest patriotism, and of considerable ability.

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    0
  • Whether he was with the army or was supposed to be living in the desert is left obscure.

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    0
  • His old age was spent in obscure poverty, his friends and associates having nearly all passed away before him.

    0
    0
  • Such, roughly speaking, were the divisions of the country which arose as results of the obscure wars of the 5th, 6th and 7th centuries.

    0
    0
  • The Irish church has paid more reverence to St Patricius than to Palladius (373-463), and the church of St Patricius, himself a figure as important as obscure, certainly abounded in bishops; according to Angus the Culdee there were 1071, but these cannot have been bishops with territorial sees, and the heads of monasteries were more potent personages.

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  • Certain obscure religious usages, as regards Lent, the Communion, the non-observance of Sunday, non-communicating at Easter, and the Forbidden Degrees in marriage, were brought into conformity with western Christendom.

    0
    0
  • With Anglo-Norman aid he repelled a Celtic rising - the right of the claimants to represent the blood of Lulach is exquisitely complex and obscure in this case - but in the end David annexed to the crown the great old sub-kingdom or province of Moray, and made grants therein to English, Norman and Scottish followers.

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  • With the tidings of this truce arrived, in April, a body of French knights who desired to enjoy fighting, and though dates are obscure they seem to have caused, by a raid in April, a retaliatory foray by the Percies in May or June.

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  • (The dates are obscure, but James was in the Tower by February-March 1405-1406.) His father's death followed (4th of April 1406).

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  • Home and Huntly, on the Scottish left, charged Edmund Howard's force; the Tynemouth men, under Dacre, did not support Howard, at first, but Dacre checked Home (whose later conduct is obscure) and drove off the Gordons.

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  • The truth of this matter is obscure; our early historians of this age, Protestants like Knox and Pitscottie, with Buchanan and the Catholic Lesley, are seldom to be trusted without documentary corroboration.

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  • Darnley betrayed some obscure accomplices.

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  • The origin of Pest proper is obscure, but the name, apparently derived from the old Slavonic pestj, a stove (like Ofen, the German name of Buda), seems to point to an early Slavonic settlement.

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  • 28-34, Nero and Antichrist are absolutely identical (mostly obscure reminiscences, Sib.

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  • Its origin is obscure, but in 741 it was sufficiently important for St Boniface to found a bishopric here, which was, however, after the martyrdom of the first bishop, Adolar, in 755, reabsorbed in that of Mainz.

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  • He arrived at his destination in safety; and the sympathies of the people, which had roused them to fire the cathedral and senate-house on the day of his exile, followed him to his obscure retreat.

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  • It has been conjectured that the "estuary" here mentioned refers to the Baltic, the existence of which as a separate sea was unknown to all ancient geographers; but the obscure manner in which it is indicated, as well as the inaccuracy of the statements concerning the place from whence the amber was actually derived, both point to the sort of hearsay accounts which Pytheas might readily have picked up on the shores of the German Ocean, without proceeding farther than the mouth of the Ems, Weser or Elbe, which last is supposed by Ukert to have been the limit of his voyage in this direction.

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  • The history of the name "Ionian" in this connexion is obscure, but it is probably due to ancient settlements of Ionian colonists on the coasts and islands.

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  • They did not hesitate, however, to alter St Mark's language where it seemed to them rough or obscure, for each of them had a distinctive style of his own, and St Luke was a literary artist of a high order.

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  • 17, 18), and doubtless continued to be practised some time after by the Jews, though on this point we have no definite information; Herod, who was a despot, and was not a Jew, cannot be taken as an illustration of Jewish custom; the obscure passage, Mal.

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  • The origin of the word missa, as applied to the Eucharist, is obscure.

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  • But his books and his lectures were alike obscure to the baron, who betook himself by Hegel's advice to simpler studies before he returned to the Hegelian system.

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  • In this obscure region it is rich in suggestions and rapprochements; but the ingenuity of these speculations attracts curiosity more than it satisfies scientific inquiry.

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  • Students began to flock to the small obscure university of Wittenberg, and the elector grew proud of the teacher who was making his university famous.

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  • The proceeding was strictly academic. The matter discussed, to judge by the writings of theologians, was somewhat obscure; and Luther offered his theses as an attempt to make it clearer.

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  • Biblical history itself recognizes in the times of Artaxerxes, Nehemiah and Ezra the commencement of a new era, and although only too much remains obscure we have in these centuries a series of vicissitudes which separate the old Palestine of Egyptian, Hittite, Babylonian and Assyrian supremacy from the land which was about to enter the circle of Greek and Roman civilization.

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  • To ignore or to obscure the features which are opposed to these ideas would be to ignore the witness of external evidence and to obscure the old Testament itself.

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  • There are numerous conflicting details which unite to prove that various sources have been used, and that the structure of the compilation is a very intricate one, the steps in its growth being extremely obscure.'

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  • As regards the situations which presuppose the ruin of Jerusalem and a return of exiles, the obscure events after the time of Zerubbabel cannot be left out of account.

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  • The early history of metal-working in Greece is extremely obscure, and archaeologists are divided in opinion even on so important a question as the relative use of bronze and iron in the Homeric age.

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  • The Latin translations of most of his works are barbarous and obscure.

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  • An obscure and distorted tradition of Zenobia as an Arab queen survived in the Arabian story of Zabba, daughter of `Amr b.

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  • For a city so notable Bamian has a very obscure history.

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  • The history of the Afghan countries under the Mongols is obscure; but that regime must have left its mark upon the country, if we judge from the occurrence of frequent Mongol names of places, and even of Mongol expressions adopted into familiar language.

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  • His hatred of system, incapacity for abstract thinking, and intense personality rendered it impossible for him to do more than utter the disjointed, oracular, obscure dicta which gained for him among his friends the name of "Magus of the North."

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  • The Romans at this time had no manuals of philosophy or any philosophical writings in Latin apart from the poem of Lucretius and some unskilful productions by obscure Epicureans.

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  • The most remarkable and at the same time the most obscure portion of the work is that in which the final return to God is handled.

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  • One may almost be tempted to say that these obscure decisions rendered unnecessary in England the work achieved with such a flourish of trumpets in France by the emancipating decree of the 4th of August 1789.

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  • No distinction is more vital in the logic of inference in general and of scientific inference in particular; and yet none has been so little understood, because, though analysis is the more usual order of discovery, synthesis is that of instruction, and therefore, by becoming more familiar, tends to replace and obscure the previous analysis.

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  • its use beyond the limits of experience was denied theoretical validity - was not unnaturally regarded as obscure.

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  • 3) Gaius, wounded by an obscure hand in Armenia, started reluctantly for home, only to die in Lycia.

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  • During the first Restoration, Caulaincourt lived in obscure retirement.

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  • Equally obscure is the relation between the Paphlagonians and the Eneti or Heneti (mentioned in connexion with them in the Homeric catalogue) who were supposed in antiquity to be the ancestors of the Veneti, who dwelt at the head of the Adriatic. But no trace is found in historical times of any tribe of that name in Asia Minor.

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  • An intelligent patron of literature and art, he attracted to his court the leading scholars in Germany; Goethe, Schiller and Herder were members of this illustrious band, and the little state, hitherto obscure, attracted the eyes of all Europe.'

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  • His open advocacy of Jansenist opinions, however, caused his superiors to relegate him to the most obscure houses of the order, and finally to keep him under surveillance at the abbey of St Germain-des-Pres at Paris.

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  • The cause of these changes is at present obscure, if not unknown, and it must be admitted that their sequence has been disputed by some excellent authorities, but the balance of evidence is certainly in favour of the above statement.

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  • 26 sqq.), and it was for some obscure offence at this place that both Aaron and Moses were prohibited from entering the Promised Land (Num.

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  • But the boundaries are not definite and the references to its territory are obscure.

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  • Here again, in some instances the pre-Christian elements so asserted themselves as to obscure the new and distinctive teaching.

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  • When the empire became Christian in the 4th century, the notion of a kingdom of Christ on earth to be introduced by a great struggle all but disappeared, remaining only as the faith of obscure groups.

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  • Speculation and hyperspiritualization were ever tending to obscure this fundamental religious fact: in the interest of a higher doctrine of God his true presence in Jesus was denied, and by exaggeration of Paul's doctrine of " Christ in us " the significance of the historic Jesus was given up. The Johannine writings, which presupposed the Pauline movement, are a protest against the hyperspiritualizing tendency.

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  • In a general survey of the life of this period, as it is revealed by the fossils, three outstanding facts are apparent: (I) the great divergence between the Cambrian fauna and that of the present day; (2) the Cambrian life assemblage differs in no marked manner from that of the succeeding Ordovician and Silurian periods; there is a certain family likeness which unites all of them; (3) the extraordinary complexity and diversity not only in the assemblage as a whole but within certain limited groups of organisms. Although in the Cambrian strata we have the oldest known fossiliferous rocks - if we leave out of account the very few and very obscure organic remains hitherto recorded from the pre-Cambrian - yet we appear to enter suddenly into the presence of a world richly peopled with a suite of organisms already far advanced in differentiation; the Cambrian fauna seems to be as far removed from what must have been the first forms of life, as the living forms of this remote period are distant from the creatures of to-day.

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  • This mysterious language, despite the existence of more than 6000 inscriptions, and the publication in 1892 of a book written in the language and handed down to us by the accident of its use to pack an Egyptian mummy, remains as obscure as ever, but apparently it underwent very great phonetic changes at an early period, so that the voiced mutes B, D, G disappeared.

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  • The origin of these two epidemics was obscure.

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  • The early events of his life are obscure; but about 1152 we find him engaged in a feud with 0 Ruairc, the lord of Breifne (Leitrim and Cavan).

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  • In the first case, against Colonel Mordaunt, who was supported by a combination of manufacturers, the decision was unfavourable to him, on the sole ground that the description of the machinery in the specification was obscure and indistinct.

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  • The plastic arts were left for Italy, where antique models were at hand, and the glory of its achievement in the 15th and 16th centuries was so great as to obscure in men's eyes what had been done before.

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    0
  • Khian, the powerful but obscure Hyksos king of Egypt, whose prenomen might be pronounced Sweserenre, is perhaps a possible prototype, for objects inscribed with his name have been found from Bagdad to Cnossus.

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  • The exact process of the evolution of the two deities and their advance in popular favour are still somewhat obscure.

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  • A special feature of the Sakti cult is the use of obscure Vedic mantras, often changed so as to be quite meaningless and on that very account deemed the more efficacious for the acquisition of superhuman powers; as well as of mystic letters and syllables called bija (germ), of magic circles (chakra) and diagrams (yantra), and of amulets of various materials inscribed with formulae of fancied mysterious import.

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  • A species certainly belonging to it was described by Lepekhin in 1780, but the obscure Gammarus esca, " food Gammarus" beloved of herrings, described by J.

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  • 845), an obscure nobleman who had married Procopia, the daughter of Nicephorus I., and been made master of the palace.

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  • His grand but obscure hexameters, after the example of Parmenides, delighted Lucretius.

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  • The condensation of the style and the peculiar vocabulary make the Exodus somewhat obscure in many places.

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  • The scanty and obscure references to finance, and to economic matters generally, in classical literature do not elucidate all the details of the system; but the analogies of other countries, e.g.

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  • 4, cp. nahash, " serpent") is obscure; see the commentaries.

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  • Into the obscure details of this unhappy campaign it is unnecessary to enter; one fact stands out clearly, that Essex endeavoured to carry out a treasonable design.

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  • 6 The mysterious crimes supposed to be concealed under the obscure details of this case have cast a shadow of vague suspicion on all who were concerned in it.

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  • It contains a brief and somewhat obscure outline of the first two parts in the Instauratio, and is of importance as affording us some insight into the gradual development of the system in Bacon's own mind.

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  • This can only be discovered by analysis, which will disclose the ultimate constituents (natural particles, not atoms) of bodies, and lead back the discussion to forms or simple natures, whereby alone can true light be thrown on these obscure questions.

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  • Some light is thrown upon the obscure history of the post-exile period by the references to the mixed marriages which aroused the reforming zeal of Ezra and culminated in the exclusion of Ammon and Moab from the religious community - on the ground of incidents which were ascribed to the time of the "exodus" (Deut.

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  • On Palm Sunday 1282, in a time of peace, David suddenly attacked and burnt Hawarden Castle, whereupon all Wales was up in arms. Edward, greatly angered and now bent on putting an end for ever to the independence of the Principality, hastened into Wales; but whilst the king was campaigning in Gwynedd, Prince Llewelyn himself was slain in an obscure skirmish on the 11th of December 1282 at Cefn-ybedd, near Builth on the Wye, whither he had gone to rouse the people of Brycheiniog.

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  • Having accomplished so much in so small a space of time, the two friends were next engaged upon a translation of the Old Testament, but owing to a quarrel, the cause of which remains obscure, this interesting literary partnership was brought to an abrupt ending about 1570.

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  • i in bit, but pronounced farther back; (2) the obscure sound=Eng.

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  • (2) Short a, e, o remain; short i became y; and u became y (with its obscure sound) in the penult, remaining in the ultima, though now written w.

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  • This has been since designated as polyzoism or panthelism or panvitalism, 2 and represents the obscure undifferentiated groundwork out of which Tylor's Animism arises.

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  • It must be remembered that the meaning of a rite is for the most part obscure to the participants, being overlaid by its traditional character, which but guarantees a general efficacy.

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  • But Herodotus and' Aeschylus were well aware that the religion of Greece had not been uniformly the same; and the gods whom they knew had been developed out of intercourse with other peoples and the succession of races in the obscure and distant past.

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  • Like all problems of origins, the question is necessarily extremely obscure, and cannot be definitely settled by historical evidence.

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  • But while we know who Mattioli was, and why he was imprisoned, a further question still remains for supporters of Dauger, because his identity and the reason for his incarceration are quite obscure.

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  • There are then no letters in existence from Saint-Mars to Louvois up to Louvois's letter of July 19, in which he first refers to Dauger; and for three months (from April 22 to July 1 9) there is a gap in the correspondence, so that the sequence is obscure.

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  • In the dim records of mythical times may be traced the obscure outlines of primitive society and of its fall.

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  • In both these poems, the language of which was so obscure that they required special commentaries, his model appears to have been Parthenius of Nicaea.

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  • 7), but after his defeat by Jehoash of Israel there is a gap and the situation is obscure.

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  • Towards the close of the 1st century of the Christian era the Hiung-nu empire broke up. Their subsequent history is obscure.

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  • The true character and origin of this enigmatical woman were, until quite recently, among the most obscure problems of Russian history.

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  • MORIAH, an obscure place-name of ancient Palestine with apparently two distinct connotations.

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  • The etymology of the word is equally obscure.

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  • Still more instructive for Schopenhauer was the imperfect and obscure Latin translation of the Upanishads which in 1801-1802 Anquetil Duperron had published from a Persian version of the Sanskrit original.

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  • The manuscript was read aloud and discussed at their meetings, and any points remaining obscure were referred to Spinoza for further explanation.

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  • On his death in 1066 a civil war broke out in which the leaders were two obscure princes named Eric. Probably the division of feeling between Vestergotland and Upland in the matter of religion was the real cause of this war, but nothing is known of the details, though we hear that both kings as well as the chief men of the land fell in it.

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  • The origin of the word is obscure, derived perhaps from an obsolete tribal name.

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  • The causes of this astonishing success, which, in the brief space of a single generation, raised a previously obscure and secluded tribe to the mastery of the whole Orient, can only be Arms and partially discerned from the evidence at our disposal.

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  • Morier says of Karim Khans family, it was a low branch of an obscure tribe in Kurdistan.

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  • He was accused of complicity in an obscure attempt (1857) against the life of Napoleon III., and condemned in his absence to deportation.

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  • He was an obscure republican student when the Spanish revolutionary movement of 1854 took place, and the young liberals and democrats of that epoch decided to hold a meeting in the largest theatre of the capital.

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  • The history of the country after the accession of Kambar is as obscure as during the Hindu dynasty.

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  • If any conjecture is warrantable on so obscure a subject, it is more likely that this temporary disgrace should have been inflicted on the poet by Domitian.

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  • In 1095 Portugal was an obscure border fief of the kingdom of Leon.

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  • But from these obscure beginnings Portugal rose in four centuries to be the greatest maritime, commercial and colonial power in Europe.

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  • The motives and course of this indecisive struggle are equally obscure.

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  • This accusation was not proved, but the history of the Tavora plot remains extremely obscure.

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  • His narrative is highly rhetorical, and as he at the same time attempts more than Tacitean brevity his narrative is often very obscure.

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  • His essay contains the solution of a great number of cases, including most of those afterwards solved by Laplace, but his methods of demonstration, though always correct, and often extremely elegant, are sometimes rendered obscure by his scrupulous avoidance of mathematical symbols.

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  • The Argument Has Already Been Applied By Dupre (Theorie Mecanique De La Chaleur, Paris, 1869, P. 328), But His Presentation Of It Is Rather Obscure.

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  • PETER LOMBARD (c. I Ioo - c. 1160), bishop of Paris, better known as Magister sententiarum, the son of obscure parents, was born about the beginning of the 12th century, at Novara (then reckoned as belonging to Lombardy).

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  • In recent years the relations of toxin and antitoxin, still obscure, have been the subject of much study and controversy.

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  • Nevertheless, the actual plan of campaign of the Bulgarians still remains obscure - all that is known being the fact that the first successes caused it to be abandoned.

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  • For some time obscure negotiations had been going on between King Nicholas and Essad, and the brave Hasan Riza Pasha, who had refused to surrender despite the shortage of food, had been assassinated.

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  • After some obscure adventures in Ireland, he landed at Whitesand Bay, near the Land's End, on the 7th of September, and was joined by a crowd of the country people, who had been recently in revolt against excessive taxation.

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  • The origin of the Nazarenes or Ebionites as a distinct sect is very obscure, but may be dated with much likelihood from the edict of Hadrian which in 135 finally scattered the old church of Jerusalem.

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  • The Atoms and Cosmology (adopted in part at least from the doctrines of Leucippus, though the relations between the two are hopelessly obscure).

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  • At the same time Democritus distinguished between obscure (UKOTG1j) cognition, resting on sensation alone, and genuine (yvrjoL), which is the result of inquiry by reason, and is concerned with atoms and void, the only real existences.

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  • After the death of Samo the history of Bohemia again becomes absolutely obscure for about 130 years.

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  • From the time of the introduction of Christianity into Bohemia the history of the country becomes less obscure.

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  • Charles also attempted to codify the obscure and contradictory laws of Bohemia; but this attempt failed through the resistance of the powerful nobility of the country.

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  • The royal decree was purposely worded in an obscure manner.

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  • The prominence thus given to the moral aspects of the history tends to obscure in some degree the true relations and real importance of the events narrated, but it does so in Livy to a far less extent than in some other writers.

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  • "Such things as are reported either before or at the foundation of the city, more beautiful and set out with poets' fables than grounded upon pure and faithful records, I mean neither to aver nor disprove" (Praef); and of the whole history previous to the sack of Rome by the Gauls (390 B.C.) he writes that it was obscure "both in regard of exceeding antiquity, and also for that in those days there were very few writings and monuments, the only faithful safeguard and true remembrancers of deeds past; and, besides, whatsoever was registered in the commentaries of the priests and in other public or private records, the same for the most part, when the city was burned, perished withal."

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  • The discovery (by Professor Helbig in 1886) of two sets of actual apparatus near Perugia and various representations on vases help to elucidate the somewhat obscure accounts of the method of playing the game contained in the scholia and certain ancient authors who, it must not be forgotten, wrote at a time when the game itself had become obsolete, and cannot therefore be looked to for a trustworthy description of it.

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  • He probably left France about 1314, and there are obscure traces of his presence in Germany, in Italy, and in England during the following seven years.

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  • His style, it is true, is involved and obscure, often rambling and incoherent.

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  • Its later history is obscure.

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  • It has been usual to make a distinction between court baron and court leet 1 as being separate courts, but in the early history of the court leet no such distinction 1 The history of the word "leet" is very obscure.

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  • Whether any of the obscure fossils generally referred to the Phyllopoda or Phyllocarida may have approximated to this hypothetical form it is impossible to say.

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  • One contemporary writer says that his hands and feet were cut off, and he was thrown into a valley where he died on the third day; but the manner of his death is obscure.

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  • The last well-marked lowering of the land took place in the Pleistocene period, when it was accompanied by glacial conditions, through which the greater part of northern England and the Midlands was covered by ice; a state of things which led directly and indirectly to the deposition of those extensive boulder clays, sands and gravels which obscure so much of the older surface of the country in all but the southern counties.

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  • The rainfall of England, being largely due to passing cyclones, can hardly be expected to show a very close relation to the physical features of the country, yet looked at in a general way the relation between prevailing winds and orographic structure is not obscure.

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  • But to push the equation of St Paul with Simon Magus further than we are forced to by the facts of the case is to lose sight of the real character of the Clementines as the counterblast of Jewish to Samaritan Gnosticism and to obscure the greatness of Simon of Gitta, who was really the father of all heresy, a character which has been erroneously attributed to Simon Magus.

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  • Berenice, daughter of Lagus, wife of an obscure Macedonian soldier and subsequently of Ptolemy Soter, with whose bride Eurydice she came to Egypt as a lady-in-waiting.

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  • Emerson's style is brilliant, epigrammatic, gem-like; clear in sentences, obscure in paragraphs.

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  • The origin and meaning of the word " Avesta " (or in its older form, Avistak) are alike obscure; it cannot be traced further back than the Sasanian period.

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  • The adoption by one language of words originally belonging to another, proving as it does the fact of intercourse between two races, and even to some extent indicating the results of such intercourse, affords a valuable clue through obscure regions of the history of civilization.

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  • Throughout his work he gives a prominent place to everything which illustrates human progress in moral and religious, as well as political conceptions, and specially to the rise and development of the idea of religious toleration, finding his authorities not only in the words and actions of men of mark, but in the writings of more or less obscure pamphleteers, whose essays indicate currents in the tide of public opinion.

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  • During the reign of Louis, Hincmar played an obscure part.

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  • In 1613 Donne contributed to the Lachrymae lachrymarum an obscure and frigid elegy on the death of the prince of Wales, and wrote his famous Marriage Song for St Valentine's Day to celebrate the nuptials of the elector palatine with the princess Elizabeth.

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  • Their obscure and knotty language only serves to give peculiar brilliancy to the not uncommon passages of noble perspicacity.

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  • His ability made it impossible that he should be obscure.

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  • In distinguishing philosophy from the sciences, it may not be amiss at the outset to guard against the possible misunderstanding that philosophy is concerned with a subject-matter different from, and in some obscure way transcending, the subject-matter of the sciences.

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  • Speaking of this transcendental consciousness, Kant goes so far as to say that it is not of the slightest consequence "whether the idea of it be clear or obscure (in empirical consciousness), no, not even whether it really exists or not.

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  • Owing to the paucity of Phoenician remains the topography of the town and its surroundings is still obscure.

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  • During the middle ages the doctrines of this obscure sect, which did not itself exist long, were revived in Europe by the Brethren and Sisters of the Free Spirit.

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  • Their origin, like that of the other groups, is obscure.

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  • Its introduction in the West is somewhat obscure.

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  • Ismail, recognizing in this obscure individual a capacity for hard work and a strong will, made him one of his ministers, to find, to his chagrin, that Riaz was also an honest man possessed of a remarkable independence of character.

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  • The nature of the compound is somewhat obscure.

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  • Each of these conflicting views is supported by strong evidence; and the whole controversy, too large and too obscure for discussion here, is considered under the heading Vlachs.

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  • When and how the art was introduced is obscure, but there are notices of it as early as the 11th century; and in 1250 Christoforo Briani attempted the imitation of agate and chalcedony.

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  • 1406), English prelate, was a man of obscure birth, little or nothing, moreover, being known of his early years.

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  • It is unfossiliferous except for a few obscure sheils obtained near the base.

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  • His devotion is expressed in shouts of "Labbeyka" (a word of obscure origin and meaning; he enters the great mosque, performs the tawaf and the sa'y 1 and then has his head shaved and resumes his common dress.

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  • He therefore leaves Mecca in pilgrim garb on the 8th of Dhu'l Hijja, called the day of tarwiya (an obscure and pre-Islamic name), and, strictly speaking, should spend the night at Mina.

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  • are more obscure.

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  • Pompey, now in his forty-fifth year, returned to Italy in 61 to 1 Their history and political character is obscure; they were at any rate connected with the knights (see Aerarium).

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  • The history of the Northumbrian kingdom is yet more obscure.

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  • The history of the century and a half that follows is very obscure; short-lived Saka dynasties succeeded one another until, about 388, the country was conquered by the Guptas of Magadha, who kept a precarious tenure of it till about 470, when their empire was destroyed by the White Huns, or Ephthalites, who, after breaking the power of Persia and assailing the Kushan kingdom of Kabul, poured into India, conquered Sind, and established their dominion as far south as the Nerbudda.

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  • His style is generally harsh, often pompous and extremely obscure, occasionally even journalistic in tone, but the author's foreign origin and his military life and training partially explain this.

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  • It would by contracting or dilating become more brisk, or faint, and by the loss of many Rays, in some cases very obscure and dark; but I could never see it changed in specie.

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  • The history of Chios is very obscure.

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  • To take the Echinoidea now living, and to divide them into Endocyclica and Exocyclica, Branchiate and Abranchiate, Gnathostomata and Atelostomata, is easy and convenient; or again to distinguish as Palechinoidea those pre-Jurassic genera which do not conform to the fixed type of twenty vertical columns found in the later Euechinoidea, is to express an interesting fact; but all such divisions obscure the true relationships, and the corresponding terms should be recognized as descriptive rather than classificatory.

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  • 28), as though special protective virtue resided in this important though obscure part of the structure.

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  • The gaps are neither broader nor more obscure than those which may be found in the contemporary annals of the other kingdoms of Europe.

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  • Its leaders were obscure and usually illiterate men, who delighted to propound their theories for the universal reformation of society and the state in rhetoric of which tile characteristic phrases were borrowed from the tribune of the Jacobi.

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  • The trials of Robert Watt and David D~wnie for high treason (August and September 1794) actually revealed a treasonable plot on the part of a few obscure individuals at Edinburgh, who were found in the possession of no less than fifty-seven pikes of home manufacture, wherewith to overthrow the British government.

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  • For some years an obscure quarrel had been conducted at Constantinople about the custody of the holy places at Jerusalem.

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  • Only a year or two before, an obscure dispute on the boundary of British Venezuela had brought the United States and Great Britain within sight of a quarrel.

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  • The early history of the college is obscure.

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  • The ten years that followed were passed in obscure industry.

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  • The common story that he was a candidate for Adam Smith's chair of moral philosophy at Glasgow, when Hume was rejected in favour of an obscure nobody (1751), can be shown to be wholly false.

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  • 3 The origin of the practice isyery obscure.

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  • We read, indeed, that on one occasion He fasted forty days and forty nights; but the expression, which is an obscure one, possibly means nothing more than that He endured the privations ordinarily involved in a stay in the wilderness.

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