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oberland

oberland

oberland Sentence Examples

  • Besides a railway line that joins the MontreuxBernese Oberland line at Chamby (5 m.

  • A considerable legend has attached itself to Nicholas through the persistent but mistaken identification of him with the mysterious "Friend of God from the Oberland," the "double" of Rulman Merswin, the Strassburg banker who was one of the leaders of the 14th-century German mystics known as the Friends of God.

  • In Merswin's Story of the First Four Years of a New Life, he writes: "Of all the wonderful works which God had wrought in me I was not allowed to tell a single word to anybody until the time when it should please God to reveal to a man in the Oberland to come to me.

  • Thus "the great unknown" from the Oberland is the ideal character, "who illustrates how God does his work for the world and for the church through a divinely trained and spiritually illuminated layman," just as William Langland in England about the same time drew the figure of Piers Plowman.

  • A third hypothesis is that advanced by Karl Rieder (Der Gottesfreund von Oberland, Innsbruck, 1905), who thinks that not even Merswin himself wrote any of the literature, but that his secretary and associate Nicholas of Lowen, head of the House of St John at Griinenworth, the retreat founded by Merswin for the circle, worked over all the writings which emanated from different members of the group but bore no author's names, and to glorify the founder of the house attached Merswin's name to some of them and out of his imagination created "the Friend of God from the Oberland," whom he named as the writer of the others.

  • The impression made by the red cliffs, fringed by a white beach and supporting the green Oberland, is commonly believed to have suggested the national colours, re.d, white and green, or, as the old Frisian rhyme goes: "Gron is dat Land, Rood is de Kant, Witt is de Sand, Dat is de Flagg vun't hillige Land."

  • The lower town of Unterland, on the spit, and the upper town, or Oberland, situated on the cliff above, are connected by a wooden stair and a lift.

  • Yet, as a matter of fact, several important mountain groups are situated on one or other side of the watershed of the Alps, and form almost independent ranges, being only connected with the main chain by a kind of peninsula: such are the Dauphine Alps, the Eastern and Western Graians, the entire Bernese Oberland, the Todi, Albula and Silvretta groups, the Ortler and Adamello ranges, and the Dolomites of south Tirol, not to speak of the lower Alps of the Vorarlberg, Bavaria and Salzburg.

  • Yet it is a curious fact that the three longest glaciers in the Alps (the Great Aletsch, 162 m., and the Unteraar and the Fiescher, each 10 m.) are all in the Bernese Oberland.

  • the Mont Genevre, that is most directly reached by the Col du Lautaret; and the Simplon, which is best gained by one of the lower passes over the western portion of the Bernese Oberland chain.

  • This range contains all the highest peaks in the Alps, save the Finsteraarhorn (14,026) in the Bernese Oberland.

  • Bernese Oberland (from the Lake of Geneva to the Furka, the Reuss Valley and the Lake of Lucerne).

  • Chief Peaks of the Bernese Oberland.

  • 10,516 Napf 4,629 Chief Passes of the Bernese Oberland.

  • In the early 19th century the Meyer family of Aarau conquered in person the Jungfrau (1811) and by deputy the Finsteraarhorn (1812), besides opening several glacier passes, their energy being entirely confined to the Bernese Oberland.

  • George, The Oberland and its Glaciers (1866); J.

  • Theobald, Naturbilder aus den rheitischen Alpen (1860), and Das Biindner Oberland (1861); F.

  • Three are usually distinguished: - (r) The Oberland or Highlands, which is that best known to travellers, for it includes.

  • the snowy Alps of the Bernese Oberland (culminating in the Finsteraarhorn, 14,026 ft., and the Jungfrau, 13,669 ft.), as well as the famous summer resorts of Grindelwald, Marren, Lauterbrunnen, Interlaken, Meiringen, Kandersteg, Adelboden, Thun and the fine pastoral valley of the Simme.

  • The Oberland and Mittelland form the "old" canton, the Jura having only been acquired in 1815, and differing from the rest of the canton by reason of its Frenchspeaking and Romanist inhabitants.

  • It is reckoned that there are 2430` "Alps" or mountain pastures in the canton, of which 1474 are in the Oberland, 627 in the Jura, and 280 in the Emme valley; they can maintain 95,478 cows and are of the estimated value of 462 million francs.

  • All these are in the Oberland where, too, is the so-called Jungfrau railway, which in 1906 attained a point (the Eismeer station) in the south wall of the Eiger (13,042 ft.) that was 10,371 ft.

  • But certain regions previously won were lost in 1798-Aargau (1415), Aigle and Grandson (1475), Vaud (1536), and the Pays d'En-Haut or Chateau d'Oex (1555) From 1798 to 1802 the Oberland formed a separate canton (capital, Thun) of the Helvetic Republic. (W.

  • It is pleasing to turn from these vehement struggles of thought to a tour which Hegel in company with three other tutors made through the Bernese Oberland in July and August 1796.

  • The old fortifications (Schanzen) have been converted into promenades, which command wonderful views of the snowy Alps of the Bernese Oberland.

  • The former portion is known as the Oberland and the latter as the Unterland.

  • Iron is mined in the Oberland, and large quantities of salt are yielded by the brine springs of Heinrichshall.

  • GRINDELWALD, a valley in the Bernese Oberland, and one of the chief resorts of tourists in Switzerland.

  • It is the capital of the Bernese Oberland, the snowy peaks of which are well seen from it.

  • From 1798 to 1802 Thun was the capital of the canton Oberland of the Helvetic Republic. (W.

  • art nouveau hotels in the whole of the Bernese Oberland.

  • Besides a railway line that joins the MontreuxBernese Oberland line at Chamby (5 m.

  • A considerable legend has attached itself to Nicholas through the persistent but mistaken identification of him with the mysterious "Friend of God from the Oberland," the "double" of Rulman Merswin, the Strassburg banker who was one of the leaders of the 14th-century German mystics known as the Friends of God.

  • In Merswin's Story of the First Four Years of a New Life, he writes: "Of all the wonderful works which God had wrought in me I was not allowed to tell a single word to anybody until the time when it should please God to reveal to a man in the Oberland to come to me.

  • Thus "the great unknown" from the Oberland is the ideal character, "who illustrates how God does his work for the world and for the church through a divinely trained and spiritually illuminated layman," just as William Langland in England about the same time drew the figure of Piers Plowman.

  • To rescue Merswin from the charge of deceit involved in this theory, Jundt puts forward the suggestion, more ingenious than convincing, that Merswin was a "double personality," who in his primary state wrote the books ascribed to him, and in his secondary state became "the Friend of God from the Oberland," writing the other treatises.

  • A third hypothesis is that advanced by Karl Rieder (Der Gottesfreund von Oberland, Innsbruck, 1905), who thinks that not even Merswin himself wrote any of the literature, but that his secretary and associate Nicholas of Lowen, head of the House of St John at Griinenworth, the retreat founded by Merswin for the circle, worked over all the writings which emanated from different members of the group but bore no author's names, and to glorify the founder of the house attached Merswin's name to some of them and out of his imagination created "the Friend of God from the Oberland," whom he named as the writer of the others.

  • The impression made by the red cliffs, fringed by a white beach and supporting the green Oberland, is commonly believed to have suggested the national colours, re.d, white and green, or, as the old Frisian rhyme goes: "Gron is dat Land, Rood is de Kant, Witt is de Sand, Dat is de Flagg vun't hillige Land."

  • The lower town of Unterland, on the spit, and the upper town, or Oberland, situated on the cliff above, are connected by a wooden stair and a lift.

  • It rises on the frontier between the cantons of Bern and of the Valais, and is reckoned among the peaks of the Bernese Oberland, two of which (the Finsteraarhorn, 14,026 ft., and the Aletschhorn, 13,721 ft.) surpass it in height.

  • Yet, as a matter of fact, several important mountain groups are situated on one or other side of the watershed of the Alps, and form almost independent ranges, being only connected with the main chain by a kind of peninsula: such are the Dauphine Alps, the Eastern and Western Graians, the entire Bernese Oberland, the Todi, Albula and Silvretta groups, the Ortler and Adamello ranges, and the Dolomites of south Tirol, not to speak of the lower Alps of the Vorarlberg, Bavaria and Salzburg.

  • Yet it is a curious fact that the three longest glaciers in the Alps (the Great Aletsch, 162 m., and the Unteraar and the Fiescher, each 10 m.) are all in the Bernese Oberland.

  • the Mont Genevre, that is most directly reached by the Col du Lautaret; and the Simplon, which is best gained by one of the lower passes over the western portion of the Bernese Oberland chain.

  • This range contains all the highest peaks in the Alps, save the Finsteraarhorn (14,026) in the Bernese Oberland.

  • Bernese Oberland (from the Lake of Geneva to the Furka, the Reuss Valley and the Lake of Lucerne).

  • Chief Peaks of the Bernese Oberland.

  • 10,516 Napf 4,629 Chief Passes of the Bernese Oberland.

  • In the early 19th century the Meyer family of Aarau conquered in person the Jungfrau (1811) and by deputy the Finsteraarhorn (1812), besides opening several glacier passes, their energy being entirely confined to the Bernese Oberland.

  • George, The Oberland and its Glaciers (1866); J.

  • Theobald, Naturbilder aus den rheitischen Alpen (1860), and Das Biindner Oberland (1861); F.

  • Three are usually distinguished: - (r) The Oberland or Highlands, which is that best known to travellers, for it includes.

  • the snowy Alps of the Bernese Oberland (culminating in the Finsteraarhorn, 14,026 ft., and the Jungfrau, 13,669 ft.), as well as the famous summer resorts of Grindelwald, Marren, Lauterbrunnen, Interlaken, Meiringen, Kandersteg, Adelboden, Thun and the fine pastoral valley of the Simme.

  • The Oberland and Mittelland form the "old" canton, the Jura having only been acquired in 1815, and differing from the rest of the canton by reason of its Frenchspeaking and Romanist inhabitants.

  • It is reckoned that there are 2430` "Alps" or mountain pastures in the canton, of which 1474 are in the Oberland, 627 in the Jura, and 280 in the Emme valley; they can maintain 95,478 cows and are of the estimated value of 462 million francs.

  • All these are in the Oberland where, too, is the so-called Jungfrau railway, which in 1906 attained a point (the Eismeer station) in the south wall of the Eiger (13,042 ft.) that was 10,371 ft.

  • But certain regions previously won were lost in 1798-Aargau (1415), Aigle and Grandson (1475), Vaud (1536), and the Pays d'En-Haut or Chateau d'Oex (1555) From 1798 to 1802 the Oberland formed a separate canton (capital, Thun) of the Helvetic Republic. (W.

  • It is pleasing to turn from these vehement struggles of thought to a tour which Hegel in company with three other tutors made through the Bernese Oberland in July and August 1796.

  • The old fortifications (Schanzen) have been converted into promenades, which command wonderful views of the snowy Alps of the Bernese Oberland.

  • The former portion is known as the Oberland and the latter as the Unterland.

  • Iron is mined in the Oberland, and large quantities of salt are yielded by the brine springs of Heinrichshall.

  • GRINDELWALD, a valley in the Bernese Oberland, and one of the chief resorts of tourists in Switzerland.

  • The well-known story of Tauler's conversion and discipline by "the Friend of God from the Oberland" (see Nicholas Of Basel) cannot be regarded as historical.

  • It is the capital of the Bernese Oberland, the snowy peaks of which are well seen from it.

  • From 1798 to 1802 Thun was the capital of the canton Oberland of the Helvetic Republic. (W.

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