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oates

oates

oates Sentence Examples

  • That so clear-headed a man could have credited the lies of Oates and the other perjurers is beyond belief; and the manner in which he excited baseless alarms, and encouraged fanatic cruelty, for nothing but party advantage, is without excuse.

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  • In 1678 the murder of Sir Edmund Berry Godfrey was ascribed to her servants, and Titus Oates accused her of a design to poison the king.

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  • On the 28th of November Oates accused her of high treason, and the Commons passed an address for her removal and that of all the Roman Catholics from Whitehall.

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  • The Viscount Stafford was one of the "five Popish lords" committed to the Tower in 1678 as a result of the slanders of Titus Oates and he died by the axe in 1680 upon testimony which, as the diarist Evelyn protested, "should not be taken against the life of a dog."

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  • Meanwhile he had tried, he says, to conquer his inclination for the unprofitable trade of poetry, but in the panic caused by the revelations of Titus Oates, he found an opportunity for the exercise of his gift for rough satire.

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  • Titus Oates >>

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  • Dialogues is reprinted in the Quarterly Series (Burns & Oates).

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  • Charles might have been unable, in the frenzy of the popish plot of Titus Oates, to send forces from England, but as he chose the popular Protestant, the duke of Monmouth, to command them, he was allowed to despatch some regiments.

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  • Oates and P. O.

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  • Oates, feeling his strength exhausted, had the heroism to sacrifice himself rather than cause further delay, and he left the tent on March 17 in 79° 50 S.

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  • It stretched towards Oates Land sighted by the " Terra Nova " of Scott's expedition.

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  • OATES, TITUS (1649-1705), English conspirator, was the son of Samuel Oates (1610-1683), an Anabaptist preacher, chaplain to Pride, and afterwards rector of All Saints' Church, Hastings.

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  • Oates offered his help, and it was arranged that he should pretend to be a Roman Catholic so as the better to unearth the Jesuit.

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  • The whole story was written by Oates in Greek characters, copied into English by Tonge, and finally told to one of Charles II.'s confidential servants named Kirkby.

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  • Kirkby having given the king his information, Oates was sent for (13th August), and in a private interview gave details, in forty-three articles, of the plot and the persons who had engaged to assassinate Charles.

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  • Oates now (6th September) made an affidavit before Sir Edmond Berry Godfrey to an improved edition of his story, in eighty-one articles.

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  • Coleman in turn informed the duke, and he, since the immediate exposure of the plot was of the utmost consequence to him, induced Charles to compel Oates to appear (28th September) before the privy council.

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  • Here Oates delivered himself of a story the falsehood of which was so obvious that the king was able to expose him by a few simple questions.

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  • At this moment an accident most fortunate for Oates took place.

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  • The credit of Oates was thus, in the eyes of the people, re-established, and Coleman and others named were imprisoned.

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  • On the 21st of October parliament met, and, though Charles in his speech had barely alluded t o o the plot, all other business was put aside and Oates was called before the House.

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  • A new witness was wanted to support Oates's story, and in November a man named William Bedloe came forward.

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  • Not even so, however, did their witness agree together, so, as a bold stroke, Oates, with great circumstantiality, accused the queen before Charles of high treason.

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  • Charles both disbelieved and exposed him, whereupon Oates carried his tale before the House of Commons.

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  • It was not, however, until the 18th of July 1679 that the slaughter of Jesuits and other Roman Catholics upon Oates's testimony and that of his accomplices was to some extent checked.

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  • Sir Philip Lloyd proved Oates to have perjured himself in open court, and Wakeman was acquitted.

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  • On the 26th of June 1680, upon Oates's testimony, the duke of York was presented as a recusant at Westminster.

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  • But the panic had now worn itself out, and the importance of Oates rapidly declined; so much so that after the dissolution in 1682 he was no more heard of during Charles's reign, but enjoyed his pension of £600 or £900, it is uncertain which, in quiet.

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  • Shortly before the death of Charles, James brought, and won, a civil action against Oates, with damages of £ioo,000; in default of payment Oates was taken to prison; while there he was indicted for perjury, and was tried in May 1685, soon after the accession of James II.

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  • Oates was in prison for three and a half years.

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  • The matter was finally settled by Oates receiving a royal pardon, with a pension of boo a year.

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  • J/n==Authorities== - Oates's, Dangerfield's and Bedloe's Narratives; State Trials; Journals of Houses of Parliament; North's Examen; the various memoirs and diaries of the period; Fuller's Narrative; Dryden's Absalom and Achitophel; Burnet's History; Narcissus Luttrell's Relation.

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  • Lingard's History gives an exhaustive and trustworthy account of the Popish terror and its victims; and the chief incidents in Oates's career are graphically described by Macaulay.

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  • He carefully refrained from incurring suspicion and unpopularity by opposing the general outcry, and though he saw through the imposture from the beginning he made no attempt to moderate the popular frenzy or to save the life of any of the victims, his co-religionists, not even intervening in the case of Lord Stafford, and allowing Titus Oates to be lodged at Whitehall with a pension.

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  • Danby and those confined on account of participation in the popish plot were liberated, and Titus Oates thrown into prison.

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  • Many excellent persons, whose moral character from boyhood to old age has been free from any stain discernible to their fellow-creatures, have, in their autobiographies and diaries, applied to themselves, and doubtless with sincerity, epithets as severe as could be applied to Titus Oates or Mrs Brownrigg.

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  • Roman Catholicism was tolerated, or rather connived at; but its professors were subject to frequent alarms, and to great severities during the ascendancy of Titus Oates.

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  • shivery feeling at the thought of Oates: every female author I meet feels the same way.

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  • That so clear-headed a man could have credited the lies of Oates and the other perjurers is beyond belief; and the manner in which he excited baseless alarms, and encouraged fanatic cruelty, for nothing but party advantage, is without excuse.

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  • In 1678 the murder of Sir Edmund Berry Godfrey was ascribed to her servants, and Titus Oates accused her of a design to poison the king.

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  • On the 28th of November Oates accused her of high treason, and the Commons passed an address for her removal and that of all the Roman Catholics from Whitehall.

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  • Danby, while communicating the "Popish Plot" to the parliament, had from the first expressed his disbelief in the so-called revelations of Titus Oates, and his backwardness in the matter now furnished an additional charge of having "traitorously concealed the plot."

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  • The Viscount Stafford was one of the "five Popish lords" committed to the Tower in 1678 as a result of the slanders of Titus Oates and he died by the axe in 1680 upon testimony which, as the diarist Evelyn protested, "should not be taken against the life of a dog."

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  • Meanwhile he had tried, he says, to conquer his inclination for the unprofitable trade of poetry, but in the panic caused by the revelations of Titus Oates, he found an opportunity for the exercise of his gift for rough satire.

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  • Titus Oates >>

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  • When Titus Oates began his pretended revelations in 1678 Sacheverell was among those who most firmly believed in the existence of a Popish plot.

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  • Dialogues is reprinted in the Quarterly Series (Burns & Oates).

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  • Then in 1678, following the lead of Titus Oates, he gave an account of a supposed popish plot to the English government, and his version of the details of the murder of Sir E.

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  • Charles might have been unable, in the frenzy of the popish plot of Titus Oates, to send forces from England, but as he chose the popular Protestant, the duke of Monmouth, to command them, he was allowed to despatch some regiments.

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  • This was the time of Titus Oates and the popish plots, and some of Walker's writings made him suspect; however, no serious steps were taken against him, although Oxford booksellers were forbidden to sell his book, The benefits of our Saviour Jesus Christ to mankind, and he remained a Protestant, in name at least, until the accession of James II.

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  • Oates and P. O.

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  • Oates, feeling his strength exhausted, had the heroism to sacrifice himself rather than cause further delay, and he left the tent on March 17 in 79° 50 S.

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  • It stretched towards Oates Land sighted by the " Terra Nova " of Scott's expedition.

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  • 1 Five years later (1678) popular exasperation found a more savage outlet, and greedily swallowed the tales of Titus Oates about a mythical " popish plot."

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  • OATES, TITUS (1649-1705), English conspirator, was the son of Samuel Oates (1610-1683), an Anabaptist preacher, chaplain to Pride, and afterwards rector of All Saints' Church, Hastings.

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  • Oates offered his help, and it was arranged that he should pretend to be a Roman Catholic so as the better to unearth the Jesuit.

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    0
  • The whole story was written by Oates in Greek characters, copied into English by Tonge, and finally told to one of Charles II.'s confidential servants named Kirkby.

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  • Kirkby having given the king his information, Oates was sent for (13th August), and in a private interview gave details, in forty-three articles, of the plot and the persons who had engaged to assassinate Charles.

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  • Oates now (6th September) made an affidavit before Sir Edmond Berry Godfrey to an improved edition of his story, in eighty-one articles.

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  • Coleman in turn informed the duke, and he, since the immediate exposure of the plot was of the utmost consequence to him, induced Charles to compel Oates to appear (28th September) before the privy council.

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  • Here Oates delivered himself of a story the falsehood of which was so obvious that the king was able to expose him by a few simple questions.

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  • At this moment an accident most fortunate for Oates took place.

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  • The credit of Oates was thus, in the eyes of the people, re-established, and Coleman and others named were imprisoned.

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  • On the 21st of October parliament met, and, though Charles in his speech had barely alluded t o o the plot, all other business was put aside and Oates was called before the House.

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  • A new witness was wanted to support Oates's story, and in November a man named William Bedloe came forward.

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  • Not even so, however, did their witness agree together, so, as a bold stroke, Oates, with great circumstantiality, accused the queen before Charles of high treason.

    0
    0
  • Charles both disbelieved and exposed him, whereupon Oates carried his tale before the House of Commons.

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    0
  • It was not, however, until the 18th of July 1679 that the slaughter of Jesuits and other Roman Catholics upon Oates's testimony and that of his accomplices was to some extent checked.

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  • Sir Philip Lloyd proved Oates to have perjured himself in open court, and Wakeman was acquitted.

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  • On the 26th of June 1680, upon Oates's testimony, the duke of York was presented as a recusant at Westminster.

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  • But the panic had now worn itself out, and the importance of Oates rapidly declined; so much so that after the dissolution in 1682 he was no more heard of during Charles's reign, but enjoyed his pension of £600 or £900, it is uncertain which, in quiet.

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  • Shortly before the death of Charles, James brought, and won, a civil action against Oates, with damages of £ioo,000; in default of payment Oates was taken to prison; while there he was indicted for perjury, and was tried in May 1685, soon after the accession of James II.

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  • Oates was in prison for three and a half years.

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  • The matter was finally settled by Oates receiving a royal pardon, with a pension of boo a year.

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  • J/n==Authorities== - Oates's, Dangerfield's and Bedloe's Narratives; State Trials; Journals of Houses of Parliament; North's Examen; the various memoirs and diaries of the period; Fuller's Narrative; Dryden's Absalom and Achitophel; Burnet's History; Narcissus Luttrell's Relation.

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    0
  • Lingard's History gives an exhaustive and trustworthy account of the Popish terror and its victims; and the chief incidents in Oates's career are graphically described by Macaulay.

    0
    0
  • He carefully refrained from incurring suspicion and unpopularity by opposing the general outcry, and though he saw through the imposture from the beginning he made no attempt to moderate the popular frenzy or to save the life of any of the victims, his co-religionists, not even intervening in the case of Lord Stafford, and allowing Titus Oates to be lodged at Whitehall with a pension.

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  • Danby and those confined on account of participation in the popish plot were liberated, and Titus Oates thrown into prison.

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  • Many excellent persons, whose moral character from boyhood to old age has been free from any stain discernible to their fellow-creatures, have, in their autobiographies and diaries, applied to themselves, and doubtless with sincerity, epithets as severe as could be applied to Titus Oates or Mrs Brownrigg.

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  • Roman Catholicism was tolerated, or rather connived at; but its professors were subject to frequent alarms, and to great severities during the ascendancy of Titus Oates.

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  • I have always had a shivery feeling at the thought of Oates: every female author I meet feels the same way.

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  • Other artists featured on the show include Steely Dan, The Eagles and Hall and Oates.

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  • Hall and Oates walk the line between R&B and rock - they refer to their music as rock and soul.

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