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oaks

oaks Sentence Examples

  • The species most liable to be struck are oaks, poplars and pear trees; beech trees are exceptionally safe.

  • This grows under oaks, in clusters - a most unusual character for the mushroom, and is said to be excellent for the table.

  • Among the most important trees of this area are the white and chestnut oaks, the black walnut, the yellow poplar, and the cherry, the southern portion of the state containing the largest reserve supply.

  • The higher regions produce cork trees, oaks, pines, chestnuts, &c., but the forests have been largely destroyed by speculators, who burned the trees for charcoal and potash, purchasing them on a large scale from the state.

  • East Orange has a fine water-works system, which it owns and operates; the water supply is obtained from artesian wells at White Oaks Ridge, in the township of Milburn (about 10 m.

  • the oaks of Perigord, Comtat-Venaissin and lower Dauphin.

  • Among deciduous trees the state is noted for its sugar maples; birch and beech are common on the hills, and oaks, elm, hickory, ash, poplar, basswood, willow, chestnut and butternut on the less elevated areas.

  • The oaks are widely distributed over the temperate parts of Europe, Asia, North Africa and North America.

  • Robur, one of the most valued of the genus, and the most celebrated in history and myth, may be taken as a type of the oaks with sinuated leaves.

  • Many of the ancient oaks that remain in England may date from Saxon times, and some perhaps from an earlier period; the growth of trees after the trunk has become hollow is extremely slow, and the age of such venerable giants only matter of vague surmise.

  • The younger oaks are employed by the carpenter, wheelwright, wagon-builder and for innumerable purposes by the country artisan.

  • The most durable of fences are those formed of small oaks, split lengthwise by the wedge into thin boards.

  • before the young oaks are planted, and are gradually thinned out as the latter increase in size.

  • The distance between the oaks depends upon the growth intended before thinning the young wood; usually they are placed from 8 to 12 ft.

  • Where artificial copsewood is the object, hazel, hornbeam and other bushes may be planted between the oaks; but, when large timber is required, the trees are best without undergrowth.

  • According to Neubauer, the bark of young oaks contains from 7 to Io% of this principle; in old trees the proportion is much less.

  • On rich loams and the alluvial soils of river-valleys, when well drained, the tree attains a large size, often rivalling the giant oaks of Europe; trunks of 3 or 4 ft.

  • Both these oaks grow well in British plantations, where their bright autumn foliage, though seldom so decided in tint as in their native woods, gives them a certain picturesque value.

  • The cut-leaved oaks are represented in eastern Asia by several species, of which Q.

  • The chestnut oaks of America represent a section distinguished by the merely serrated leaves, with parallel veins running to the end of the serratures.

  • Evergreen oaks with entire leaves are represented in North America by Q.

  • The live oak is one of the most valuable timber trees of the genus, the wood being extremely durable, both exposed to air and under water; heavy and closegrained, it is perhaps the best of the American oaks for shipbuilding, and is invaluable for water-wheels and mill-work.

  • In America several oaks exist with narrow lanceolate leaves, from which characteristic they are known as "willow oaks."

  • Some oaks are of indirect importance from products formed by their insect enemies.

  • High districts covered with oaks and chestnuts succeed to this almost tropical vegetation; a little higher up and we reach the elevated regions of the Pollino and the Sila, covered with firs and pines, and affording rich pastures even in the midst of summer, when heavy dews and light frosts succeed each other in July and August, and snow begins to appear at the end of September or early in October.

  • There is a small government house, standing in beautiful grounds, adjoining Albert Park, with plantations of oaks and pines.

  • evergreen oaks (Q.

  • There were oaks, beeches (scarcely distinguishable from existing species), birches, planes and willows (one closely related to the living Salix candida), laurels, represented by Sassafras and Cinnamomum, magnolias and tulip trees (Liriodendron), myrtles, Liquidambar, Diospyros and ivy.

  • Torreya, now confined to North America and Japan, still lingered,- as did Ocotea, now profusely developed in the tropics, but in north temperate regions only existing in the Canaries: the evergreen oaks, so characteristic of the Miocene, were reduced to the existing Quercus hex.

  • The Atlantic flora has also numerous oaks and maples, signalized by their autumnal coloration.

  • Evergreen oaks and Conifers form the forests.

  • In Malaya and eastward the forests are rich in arborescent figs, laurels, myrtles, nutmegs, oaks and bamboos.

  • Bengal has no Cycas, oaks or nutmegs.

  • The so-called oaks of Australia are Casuarma, which also occurs in New Caledonia, but is wanting in New Zealand.

  • The city's park system includes the Western Promenade, on Bramhall Hill; the Eastern Promenade, on Munjoy Hill; Fort Allen Park, at the south extremity of the latter promenade; Fort Sumner, another small park farther west, on the same hill; Lincoln Park, containing 2 acres of beautiful grounds near the centre of the city; Deering's Oaks (made famous by Longfellow), the principal park (50 acres) on the peninsula, with many fine old trees, pleasant drives, and an artificial pond used for boating; and Monument Square and Boothby Square.

  • The crater is densely overgrown with oaks and beeches which harbour wild boars and wolves.

  • He took part in the siege of Yorktown, the battle of Fair Oaks, the seven days' battle before Richmond, and the battles of Antietam, Fredericksburg, where he was wounded, and Chancellorsville, where his brigade was reduced in numbers to less than a regiment, and General Meagher resigned his commission.

  • Farther south is the forest of Darnaway, famous for its oaks, in which stands the earl of Moray's mansion of Darnaway Castle.

  • The beautiful live oaks and magnolias grow only in the south of the state; the holly in the lowlands; and the finest species of pecan, in the Delta.

  • In the Piedmont Plateau Region oaks, hickories and elms are the most common.

  • In the Mountain Region at the bases of the mountains are oaks, hickories, chestnuts and white poplars: above these are hemlocks, beeches, birches, elms, ashes, maples and limes; and still higher up are spruce, white pine and balsam; and all but a comparatively few of the higher mountains are forest-clad to their summits.

  • The chief trees belong to the orders of Terebinthaceae, Sapindaceae, Meliaceae, Clusiaceae, Dipterocarpaceae, Ternstroemiaceae, Leguminosae, laurels, oaks and figs, with Dilleniaceae, Sapotaceae and nutmegs.

  • A distinct connexion between the flora of the peninsula and Ceylon and that of eastern tropical Africa is observable not only in the great similarity of many of the more truly tropical forms, and the identity of families and genera found in both regions, but in a more remarkable manner in the likeness of the mountain flora of this part of Africa to that of the peninsula, in which several species occur believed to be identical with Abyssinian forms. This connexion is further established by the absence from both areas of oaks, conifers and cycads, which, as regards the first two families, is a remarkable feature of the flora of the peninsula and Ceylon, as the mountains rise to elevations in which both of them are abundant to the north and east.

  • The site is now covered with valonia oaks, and has been much plundered, e.g by Mahommed IV., who took columns to adorn his new Valideh mosque in Stambul; but the circuit of the old walls can be traced, and in several places they are fairly well preserved.

  • Some of the woods are noted for their fine oaks, those at Kedleston, 3 m.

  • below the city, on the 15th of May 1862, was increased by the battle of Fair Oaks and the Seven Days, after which the Army of the Potomac retreated.

  • As a picturesque tree, for park and ornamental plantation, it is among the best of the conifers, its colour and form contrasting yet harmonizing with the olive green and rounded outline of oaks and beeches, or with the red trunk and glaucous foliage of the pine.

  • The south-western shore is generally low, with sand hills covered with shrivelled pines and bur oaks.

  • Monroe lies in a level valley, and has broad streets shaded by live oaks.

  • 15), and especially for oaks, which are coupled with the cedars of Lebanon (Isa.

  • The oaks for which the country was once famous still distinguish it in places.

  • On drier and higher soils are the persimmon, sassafras, red maple, elm, black haw, hawthorn, various oaks (in all 10 species occur), hickories and splendid forests of longleaf and loblolly yellow pine.

  • For building and miscellaneous purposes, in addition to the rare woods above named, there are cedars (used in great quantities for cigar boxes); the pine, found only in the W., where it gives its name to the Isle of Pines and the province of Pinar del Rio; various palms; oaks of varying hardness and colour, &c. The number of alimentary plants is extremely great.

  • among the ranges of northern Bosnia, the sunnier slopes are overgrown by oaks, the shadier by beeches.

  • Pine forests surround the town, and oaks and elms of more than a century's growth shade its streets.

  • Both these series contain numerous plant remains, evergreen oaks, magnolias, aralias, &c., and seams of lignite (coal), which is burnt; but in neither occur the marine beds of the United States.

  • The forest scenery much resembles that of England, with fine oaks and greensward.

  • A considerable quantity of timber is grown on the high lands, and the rich valley pastures support large herds of cattle, while the abundance of oaks and chestnuts favours the rearing of swine.

  • 1-3): fire seizes the cedars of Lebanon and the oaks of Bashan.3 (2) The difficult passage about the shepherds follows.

  • " The cedars of Lebanon, the oaks of Bashan, the forest of Jordan represent the national might of the heathen kingdoms " (Wellh., Die Kl.

  • Of the Eliot oaks, made famous by Longfellow's sonnet, one was cut down in 1842, the other still stands.

  • Oaks and wild prunus, wild vines and sumachs, various kinds of maple, the dOdan (Enkianthus Japonicus Hook.)a wonderful bush which in autumn develops a hue of ruddy redbirches and other trees, all add multitudinous colors to the brilliancy of a spectacle which is further enriched by masses of feathery bamboo.

  • He commanded in the battle of Fair Oaks (May 31, 1862), and was so severely wounded as to be incapacitated for several months.

  • is a zone of dwarf hard-leaved oaks, amongst which occur the Oriental forms Fontanesia phillyraeoides, Acer syriacum and the beautiful redstemmed Arbutus Andrachne.

  • (3) Into the alpine region (6200 to 10,400 ft.) penetrate a few very stunted oaks (Quercus subalpina), the junipers already mentioned and a barberry (Berberis cretica), which sometimes spreads into close thickets.

  • Lot preferred the fertile land lying east of the Jordan, whilst Abram, after receiving another promise from Yahweh, moved down to the oaks of Mamre in Hebron and built an altar.

  • Firs and pines cover the mountain heights; and below these, but still at an elevation of eight or nine thousand feet, is a zone of vegetation, consisting principally of oaks and rhododendrons.

  • In 1662, as appears by a map still extant, there were i 50 houses within the wall, forming five streets and as many lanes; and the upland districts around were one dense forest of giant oaks and sycamores, yielding an unfailing supply of timber to the woodmen of Carrickfergus.

  • Some of the mountains are almost entirely composed of naked calcareous rock, but most of them wereformerly covered to their summits with forests of oaks, chestnuts, or pine trees, now destroyed to provide fuel.

  • The name was first given in 1834 to a plant-louse which was observed to "dry up the leaves" of oaks in Provence.

  • There have been several instances of this being done in the fiery pits in the Barnsley district, notably at the great explosion at the Oaks colliery in 1866, when 360 lives were lost.

  • Loblolly pine, cypress, oaks, hickory, ash, pecan, maple, beech and a few other deciduous trees are interspersed among both the long-leaf and the short-leaf pines, and the proportion of deciduous trees increases to the westward.

  • The former forests of the state were of two general classes: on the bottom lands along the rivers grew cottonwood, willow, honey-locust, coffee trees, black ash, and elm; on the less heavily wooded uplands were oaks (white, red, yellow and bur), hickory (bitternut and pignut), white and green ash, butternut, ironwood and hackberry.

  • Red cedar (Cedrilla) abounds in the riverine flats, but the quality is poor and commercially valueless; and oaks are plentiful, but the wood is coarse.

  • It has many handsome buildings, and its residential streets are shaded with live-oaks, water oaks and bitter-orange trees.

  • - From Winchester, in Hampshire, to Canterbury, in Kent, runs a road or way which can still be traced, now on the present made roads, now as a lane, bridle path, or cart track, now only by a line of ancient yews, hollies or oaks which once bordered it.

  • Fine oaks and beeches are numerous, and yew trees of great size and age are seen in some Kentish churchyards, as at Stansted, while the fine oak at Headcorn is also famous.

  • In the temperate uplands of the interior, as about Luang Prabang, Himalayan and Japanese species occur - oaks, pines, chestnuts, peach and great apple trees, raspberries, honeysuckle, vines, saxifrages, Cichoraceae, anemones and Violaceae; there are many valuable timber trees - teak, sappan, eagle-wood, wood-oil (Hopea), and other Dlpterocarpaceae, Cedrelaceae, Pterocarpaceae, Xylia, ironwood and other dye-woods and resinous trees, these last forming in many districts a large proportion of the more open forests, with an undergrowth of bamboo.

  • The course of the battle of Seven Pines or Fair Oaks bore some resemblance to that of Shiloh; a sharp attack found the Unionists unprepared, and only after severe losses and many partial defeats could McClellan check the rebel advance.

  • The Federal Army of the Potomac, advancing from the sea and the river Pamunkey over the Chickahominy on Richmond, had come to a standstill after the battle of Seven Pines (or Fair Oaks), and General Robert Lee, who succeeded Joseph Johnston in command of the Confederates, initiated the series of counter attacks upon it which constitute the "Seven Days."

  • Lee's right wing had in the meantime demonstrated against the main body of the Federals about Fair Oaks, on the south bank of the river.

  • Smith near Fair Oaks.

  • On this day Magruder with two divisions attacked superior forces about Fair Oaks and was repulsed, and again attacked at Savage Station with like results.

  • The streets are lined with magnificent oaks, while many of the houses with heavy, thatched gables date from the 17th century.

  • Oaks are to be found over a wide area and at lower elevations of the sub-tropical zone as well.

  • Oaks are everywhere common and the " ocote " pine on the Gulf coast is found as far down as 6300 ft.

  • The most common families on the eastern slopes, where the precipitation is heavy, are the magnolias, crotons, mimosas, acacias, myrtles, oaks, plane-trees and bamboos.

  • The Coast Range is heavily forested in the north, where rainfall is abundant in all seasons; but its lower ranges and valleys have a scanty tree growth in the south, where the rainfall is very light: here grow redwoods (Sequoia semperzirens) and live oaks (Quercus agrifolia).

  • In the Alleghanian Transition zone the chestnut, walnut, oaks and hickories of the South are interspersed among the beech, birch, hemlock and sugar maple of the North.

  • The first blow towards its gradual contraction was struck when Napoleon ordered 22,000 oaks to be cut down in it to build the celebrated Boulogne flotilla for the invasion of England.

  • Broad Street is the principal thoroughfare of Augusta, and Greene Street, with a park in the centre and flanking rows of oaks and elms, is the finest residential street.

  • Beyond these lie the fine Slottskog Park, planted with oaks, and picturesquely broken by rocky hills commanding views of the busy river and the city.

  • Pines of three species, junipers, larches, oaks, maples, willows and the Thuja Orientalis have been identified.

  • It is far more durable than any of the oaks of that region, is heavy and close-grained, and much stronger, as well as more lasting, than that of the pines and firs of Canada.

  • A further supply of eggs was secretly obtained by a Dutch physician Pompe van Meedervoort in 1863, and, as it was now known that the worm was an oak-feeder, and would thrive on the leaves of European oaks, great results were anticipated from the cultivation of the yama-mai.

  • Among trees, stunted pines, dwarf oaks, poplars, willows and the cypress are fairly plentiful.

  • high; the trunks of some of the oaks are from 6 to 8 ft.

  • Near it is the noble chase with its ancient oaks, the remains of the Caledonian Forest, where are still preserved some of the aboriginal breed of wild cattle.

  • A few oaks and red beeches occur, while chestnut trees grow anywhere between 1000 and 5300 ft.

  • General Johnston was wounded he was elected bishop of Coventry and Lichfield, or Chester at the battle of Fair Oaks (Seven Pines) on the 31st of May 1862, as the see was often called, taking at his consecration the new and General Robert E.

  • oaks and beeches; farther in- Waldeck land, and especially east of the Reuss-Greiz Elbe, coniferous trees are the Reuss-Schleiz most prevalent, praticularly Schaumburg-Lippe .

  • The mountain forests consist chiefly of firs, Free Towns pines and larches, but contain Lbeck also silver firs, beeches and Bremen oaks.

  • Here they are chiefly composed of oaks and chestnuts.

  • On the lower slopes the forest is composed in great part of the long-leaved Pinus liophyllo, accompanied by deciduous oaks and a variety of other trees and shrubs.

  • On the boundary mountains the trees are mainly coniferous; in the interior oaks, elms, beeches and ashes are conspicuous.

  • 3 Trees are exceedingly scarce in the country; and the pine-woods on the western tributaries of the Sangarius and the valonia oaks in parts of the Banaz Ova and a few other districts form exceptions.

  • He was also with McClellan at the battle of Fair Oaks, and was personally engaged in the sanguinary battle at Gaines Mill on the 27th of June.

  • In respect to positive affinities, Sir Joseph Hooker pointed out some relations with the flora of tropical Africa as evidenced by the prevalence of such genera as Grewia and Impatiens, and the absence, common to both countries, of oaks and pines which abound in the Malayan archipelago.

  • Valuable trees are of great variety: cottonwood, poplar, catalpa, red cedar, sweet-gum, birch-eye, sassafras, persimmon, ash, elm, sycamore, maple, a variety of pines, pecan, locust, dogwood, hickory, various oaks, beech, walnut and cypress are all abundant.

  • The chamiso and the manzanita, with a variety of shrubby oaks and thorny plants, often grow together in a dense and sometimes quite impenetrable undergrowth, forming what is known as " chaparral "; if the chamiso occurs alone the thicket is a " chamisal."

  • Oaks are abundant; they are especially characteristic of the Great Valley, where they grow in magnificent groves.

  • The ridges which ramify from the Paramera are covered with valuable forests of beeches, oaks and firs, presenting a striking contrast to the bare peaks of the Sierra de Gredos.

  • The Coastal Plain of Virginia is covered with pine forests which merge westward with the hard woods of the Piedmont Belt, where oaks formerly prevailed, but where a second growth of pine now constitutes part of the forest.

  • The timber area originally comprised three divisions: the mountain regions growing pine and hard woods and hemlock; the Piedmont region producing chiefly oaks with some pine; and the lands below the "Fall Line," which were forested with yellow pine.

  • of the present town, the first site of the burgh, is now marked by a few grassy mounds, and of the great Jedburgh forest, only the venerable oaks, the "Capon Tree" and the "King of the Woods" remain.

  • There are many fine tracts of forest, among which may be mentioned the famous convent-wood of Bussaco (q.v.); cork trees are extensively cultivated, Barbary oaks (Quercus ballota, Port.

  • above the river level, and has wide, well-paved streets shaded by oaks and elms. It is 659 the seat of the Indiana State Normal School (1870), which had in 1909 a library of about 50,000 volumes, 52 instructors and an average term enrolment of 988 students, and of the Rose Polytechnic Institute, which was founded in 1874 by Chauncey Rose (1794-1877), was opened in 1883, offers courses in mechanical, electrical, civil and chemical engineering and in architecture, and in 1909 had 22 instructors and 214 students.

  • 18 Oaks, juniper, pinon, cedars, yellow pine, fir and spruce grow on the mountains and over large areas of the plateau country.'

  • the Sereh disease of the sugar-cane, the slime fluxes of oaks and other trees, are not only very doubtful cases, in which other organisms such as yeasts and fungi play their parts, but it may be regarded as extremely improbable that the bacteria are the primary agents at all; they are doubtless saprophytic forms which have gained access to rotting tissues injured by other agents.

  • The original forest has been entirely removed, but a young growth of the same tree species, chiefly pitch pine with a variety of oaks, replaces it.

  • On the infertile Bagshot Beds the large area of the New Forest remains untilled under its ancient oaks.

  • There are two native oaks, Quercus pont'icus and Q.

  • Danish peat-mosses again show the existence of man at a time when the Scotch fir was abundant; at a later period the firs were succeeded by oaks, which have again been almost superseded by beeches, a succession of changes which indicate a considerable lapse of time.

  • On the slopes of mountain valleys grow cedars, dwarf maples and occasional oaks.

  • At the battle of Ball's Bluff (1861) he was severely wounded; he was again wounded at Fair Oaks (1862) and at Chancellorsville (1863), where he commanded a division.

  • A grant of oaks from Windsor forest for the repair of the bridge is recorded in 1262.

  • At Fair Oaks (Seven Pines) was fought on the 31st of May a bloody battle, ending the following day in a Confederate repulse.

  • Oaks, elms, firs, ashes and beeches are the principal forest trees.

  • Ash, oaks, black and sweet gums, chestnuts, hickories, hard maple, beech, walnut and short-leaf pine are noteworthy among the trees of the Carolinian area; the tupelo and bald cypress of the embayment region, and long-leaf and loblolly pines, pecans and live oaks of the uplands, among those characteristic of the Austro-riparian.

  • It is composed chiefly of oaks and alders and magnificent avenues of gigantic beech-trees.

  • Oaks, elms, hickory, honey-locusts, white ash, sycamore and willows, the rapid growing but miserable box-elder and cottonwood, are the most common trees.

  • He served in the Peninsular Campaign, and at the battle of Seven Pines (Fair Oaks) he was twice wounded, losing his right arm.

  • In March 1865 he was breveted major-general U.S.A. "for gallant and meritorious service in the battle of Ezra Church and during the campaign against Atlanta," and in 1893 received a Congressional medal of honour for bravery at Fair Oaks.

  • The principal races - the Derby and Oaks - are named after one of the earls of Derby and his seat, the Oaks, which is in the neighbourhood.

  • Oaks and beeches predominate in the north; pines, often of gigantic size, among the fantastic white or grey rocks of the wild south-western ridges.

  • Scarcely less conspicuous for some distance from the ocean are the magnolias, the live oaks draped with long gray moss, and the reedcovered marshes.

  • In most of the uplands of the Coastal Plain region the long-leaf pine is predominant, but large water-oaks and undergrowths of several other oaks and of hickories are not uncommon.

  • On the Piedmont Plateau and in some of the more hilly and heavy-soil sections below the Fall Line there is some short-leaf pine, but most of the trees in these sections are of the hardwood varieties: deciduous oaks are most common, but beech, birch, ash, maple, black walnut, chestnut, sycamore and tulip trees also abound.

  • In northern Croatia and Slavonia the mountains are far more fertile, being often densely wooded with oaks, beeches and pines.

  • A new town then began to spring up, settlers being attracted by the prospect of opening up a trade in the products of a vast forest of valonia oaks which grew near.

  • In the countries bordering the Mediterranean are groves of oranges and olive trees, evergreen oaks, cork trees and pines, intermixed with cypresses, myrtles, arbutus and fragrant tree-heaths.

  • Evergreen oaks, chestnuts and conifers are the prevailing trees.

  • The cork oaks of the southern provinces and of Catalonia are of immense value, but the groves have suffered greatly from the reckless way in which the produce is collected.

  • In the article Horseracing mention is made of some of the great horses of recent years; but the following list of the principal sires of earlier days indicates also how their progeny found a place among the winners of the three great races, the Derby (D), Oaks (0), and St Leger (L) Eclipse: Young Eclipse (D), Saltram (D), Sergeant (D), Annette (0).

  • Herod: Bridget (0), Faith (0), Maid of the Oaks (0), Phenomenon (L).

  • Queen Mary, who was by Gladiator out of a daughter of Plenipotentiary and Myrrha by Whalebone, when mated with Melbourne produced Blink Bonny (winner of the Derby and Oaks); when mated with Mango and Lanercost she produced Haricot, dam of Caller Ou (winner of the St Leger).

  • Manganese when mated with Rataplan threw Mandragora, dam of Apology, winner of the Oaks and St Leger, whose sire wasAdventurer, son of Newminster.

  • Both Eleanor and Blink Bonny won the Oaks as well as the Derby.

  • j Winner of the Oaks.

  • In fact, not a single Dicotyledon is common to these two closely allied divisions of the Cretaceous series; a circumstance not easy to explain, when we see how well the oaks and figs are represented in each.

  • Forest trees, especially oaks, are plentiful, and many of the species are identical with those found in Cretaceous deposits in more southern latitudes.

  • The most abundant species of this forest were the oaks and chestnuts, of which a dozen have been collected; laurels, Viburnum, ivy, several Aralias, Dewalquea, a Thuja and several Ferns may be added.

  • Evergreen oaks are a marked characteristic of the period, more than half the Swiss species being allied to living American forms. Fig-trees referred to 17 species occur, all with undivided leathery leaves; one is close to the banyan, another to the indiarubber-tree.

  • A markedly upland character is given to the flora of this valley through the abundance of pines (9 species) and oaks (16 species) which it contains; but this peculiarity is readily accounted for by the steep slopes of the Apennines, which everywhere surround and dominate the old lake-basin.

  • The rural countryside that surrounded the building rolled gracefully to trees that looked like Oaks, but it was winter and they still had their leaves.

  • In the words of the old English proverb, "From small acorns great oaks do grow."

  • In the words of the old English proverb, From small acorns great oaks do grow.

  • Even the independent assessor Mr Hill was in favor of the regime at High Oaks.

  • In native oaks in the USA, Phytophthora ramorum causes bark cankers.

  • chalked up seven Oaks winners to go alongside six winners of the 1000 Guineas.

  • The young oaks have features which suggest an origin in some form of long growing coppice.

  • What to see: hornbeam coppice woodland with mature oaks.

  • drover's path leads to open fields recently planted with new oaks, ashes and cherries.

  • galls found on oaks in the spring can be bright green but quickly become brown and very hard.

  • gnarled trunks of the oaks glared at him with furrowed wooden eyebrows.

  • gnarled dwarf oaks.

  • grove of fine old oaks, and abounds with deer.

  • Despite this, staff at Darley Oaks, which breeds guinea pigs for scientific research, have vowed to continue working as normal.

  • hedgerow oaks or ash.

  • hornbeam coppice woodland with mature oaks.

  • And two lectures spent a week of moss-draped live oaks.

  • Oaks are also an extremely long-lived species, with some recorded specimens being as much as 1000 years old.

  • mighty oaks Of all our native trees the oak is the species that sustains more wildlife than any other.

  • mossy green tree trunks And russet fallen leaves of the oaks, My heart is quiet.

  • pollarded oaks grow on the wood bank that forms the western boundary.

  • In Glen Affric a few sessile oaks can be found at the eastern end of the glen near Badger Falls.

  • mighty oaks Of all our native trees the oak is the species that sustains more wildlife than any other.

  • It whistled among the bare branches of the gnarled oaks in Nant-y-Garth and it sighed wearily around the herdsman's lonely cottage.

  • penlight flashlight to see our way back to the Oaks.

  • pollarded oaks, are badger sets marked by sandy entrances.

  • The heron rookery at nearby Smith Oaks offers intimate looks at nesting Roseate Spoonbill, Tricolored Heron and Snowy and Great Egrets.

  • Hazel is dominant with occasional oaks; there is a rich ground flora and the parasitic toothwort has also been recorded.

  • Here among the mossy green tree trunks And russet fallen leaves of the oaks, My heart is quiet.

  • To build a single large warship required 2,000 mature oaks.

  • Prohaska (83), the species most liable to be struck are oaks, poplars and pear trees; beech trees again are exceptionally safe.

  • This grows under oaks, in clusters - a most unusual character for the mushroom, and is said to be excellent for the table.

  • Among the most important trees of this area are the white and chestnut oaks, the black walnut, the yellow poplar, and the cherry, the southern portion of the state containing the largest reserve supply.

  • The higher regions produce cork trees, oaks, pines, chestnuts, &c., but the forests have been largely destroyed by speculators, who burned the trees for charcoal and potash, purchasing them on a large scale from the state.

  • East Orange has a fine water-works system, which it owns and operates; the water supply is obtained from artesian wells at White Oaks Ridge, in the township of Milburn (about 10 m.

  • the oaks of Perigord, Comtat-Venaissin and lower Dauphin.

  • Among deciduous trees the state is noted for its sugar maples; birch and beech are common on the hills, and oaks, elm, hickory, ash, poplar, basswood, willow, chestnut and butternut on the less elevated areas.

  • The oaks are widely distributed over the temperate parts of Europe, Asia, North Africa and North America.

  • Robur, one of the most valued of the genus, and the most celebrated in history and myth, may be taken as a type of the oaks with sinuated leaves.

  • exposed situations; to this peculiarity the picturesque aspect of ancient oaks is largely due.

  • Many of the ancient oaks that remain in England may date from Saxon times, and some perhaps from an earlier period; the growth of trees after the trunk has become hollow is extremely slow, and the age of such venerable giants only matter of vague surmise.

  • The Cowthorpe oak, standing (a ruin) near Wetherby in Yorkshire, at the same height measures 382 ft., and seems to have been of no smaller dimensions when described by Evelyn two centuries ago; like most of the giant oaks of Britain, it is of the pedunculate variety.

  • The younger oaks are employed by the carpenter, wheelwright, wagon-builder and for innumerable purposes by the country artisan.

  • The most durable of fences are those formed of small oaks, split lengthwise by the wedge into thin boards.

  • before the young oaks are planted, and are gradually thinned out as the latter increase in size.

  • The distance between the oaks depends upon the growth intended before thinning the young wood; usually they are placed from 8 to 12 ft.

  • Where artificial copsewood is the object, hazel, hornbeam and other bushes may be planted between the oaks; but, when large timber is required, the trees are best without undergrowth.

  • According to Neubauer, the bark of young oaks contains from 7 to Io% of this principle; in old trees the proportion is much less.

  • On rich loams and the alluvial soils of river-valleys, when well drained, the tree attains a large size, often rivalling the giant oaks of Europe; trunks of 3 or 4 ft.

  • Both these oaks grow well in British plantations, where their bright autumn foliage, though seldom so decided in tint as in their native woods, gives them a certain picturesque value.

  • The cut-leaved oaks are represented in eastern Asia by several species, of which Q.

  • The chestnut oaks of America represent a section distinguished by the merely serrated leaves, with parallel veins running to the end of the serratures.

  • Evergreen oaks with entire leaves are represented in North America by Q.

  • The live oak is one of the most valuable timber trees of the genus, the wood being extremely durable, both exposed to air and under water; heavy and closegrained, it is perhaps the best of the American oaks for shipbuilding, and is invaluable for water-wheels and mill-work.

  • In America several oaks exist with narrow lanceolate leaves, from which characteristic they are known as "willow oaks."

  • Some oaks are of indirect importance from products formed by their insect enemies.

  • High districts covered with oaks and chestnuts succeed to this almost tropical vegetation; a little higher up and we reach the elevated regions of the Pollino and the Sila, covered with firs and pines, and affording rich pastures even in the midst of summer, when heavy dews and light frosts succeed each other in July and August, and snow begins to appear at the end of September or early in October.

  • There is a small government house, standing in beautiful grounds, adjoining Albert Park, with plantations of oaks and pines.

  • This type of mycorhiza is found among the Poplars, Oaks ~nd Fir trees.

  • Among green plants the symbionts ~include Conifers, Orchids, Heaths, Oaks, Poplars and Beeches, though all do not derive equal advantages from the association.

  • evergreen oaks (Q.

  • There were oaks, beeches (scarcely distinguishable from existing species), birches, planes and willows (one closely related to the living Salix candida), laurels, represented by Sassafras and Cinnamomum, magnolias and tulip trees (Liriodendron), myrtles, Liquidambar, Diospyros and ivy.

  • Torreya, now confined to North America and Japan, still lingered,- as did Ocotea, now profusely developed in the tropics, but in north temperate regions only existing in the Canaries: the evergreen oaks, so characteristic of the Miocene, were reduced to the existing Quercus hex.

  • The Atlantic flora has also numerous oaks and maples, signalized by their autumnal coloration.

  • Evergreen oaks and Conifers form the forests.

  • In Malaya and eastward the forests are rich in arborescent figs, laurels, myrtles, nutmegs, oaks and bamboos.

  • Bengal has no Cycas, oaks or nutmegs.

  • The so-called oaks of Australia are Casuarma, which also occurs in New Caledonia, but is wanting in New Zealand.

  • The city's park system includes the Western Promenade, on Bramhall Hill; the Eastern Promenade, on Munjoy Hill; Fort Allen Park, at the south extremity of the latter promenade; Fort Sumner, another small park farther west, on the same hill; Lincoln Park, containing 2 acres of beautiful grounds near the centre of the city; Deering's Oaks (made famous by Longfellow), the principal park (50 acres) on the peninsula, with many fine old trees, pleasant drives, and an artificial pond used for boating; and Monument Square and Boothby Square.

  • The crater is densely overgrown with oaks and beeches which harbour wild boars and wolves.

  • He took part in the siege of Yorktown, the battle of Fair Oaks, the seven days' battle before Richmond, and the battles of Antietam, Fredericksburg, where he was wounded, and Chancellorsville, where his brigade was reduced in numbers to less than a regiment, and General Meagher resigned his commission.

  • Farther south is the forest of Darnaway, famous for its oaks, in which stands the earl of Moray's mansion of Darnaway Castle.

  • The beautiful live oaks and magnolias grow only in the south of the state; the holly in the lowlands; and the finest species of pecan, in the Delta.

  • In the Piedmont Plateau Region oaks, hickories and elms are the most common.

  • In the Mountain Region at the bases of the mountains are oaks, hickories, chestnuts and white poplars: above these are hemlocks, beeches, birches, elms, ashes, maples and limes; and still higher up are spruce, white pine and balsam; and all but a comparatively few of the higher mountains are forest-clad to their summits.

  • The chief trees belong to the orders of Terebinthaceae, Sapindaceae, Meliaceae, Clusiaceae, Dipterocarpaceae, Ternstroemiaceae, Leguminosae, laurels, oaks and figs, with Dilleniaceae, Sapotaceae and nutmegs.

  • A distinct connexion between the flora of the peninsula and Ceylon and that of eastern tropical Africa is observable not only in the great similarity of many of the more truly tropical forms, and the identity of families and genera found in both regions, but in a more remarkable manner in the likeness of the mountain flora of this part of Africa to that of the peninsula, in which several species occur believed to be identical with Abyssinian forms. This connexion is further established by the absence from both areas of oaks, conifers and cycads, which, as regards the first two families, is a remarkable feature of the flora of the peninsula and Ceylon, as the mountains rise to elevations in which both of them are abundant to the north and east.

  • The warm mountain slopes are covered with Pinus longifolia, or with oaks and rhododendron, and the forest is not commonly dense below 8000 f t., excepting in some of the more secluded valleys at a low elevation.

  • The site is now covered with valonia oaks, and has been much plundered, e.g by Mahommed IV., who took columns to adorn his new Valideh mosque in Stambul; but the circuit of the old walls can be traced, and in several places they are fairly well preserved.

  • Trees are generally absent, except for thickets of poplars, dwarf oaks and tamarisks along the course of the Kura, the delta of which is smothered under a jungle of reeds and rushes.

  • Some of the woods are noted for their fine oaks, those at Kedleston, 3 m.

  • below the city, on the 15th of May 1862, was increased by the battle of Fair Oaks and the Seven Days, after which the Army of the Potomac retreated.

  • As a picturesque tree, for park and ornamental plantation, it is among the best of the conifers, its colour and form contrasting yet harmonizing with the olive green and rounded outline of oaks and beeches, or with the red trunk and glaucous foliage of the pine.

  • The south-western shore is generally low, with sand hills covered with shrivelled pines and bur oaks.

  • Monroe lies in a level valley, and has broad streets shaded by live oaks.

  • 15), and especially for oaks, which are coupled with the cedars of Lebanon (Isa.

  • The oaks for which the country was once famous still distinguish it in places.

  • The most common species in the alluvial regions and, to a less degree, in the drier portions of the swamps and in the stream bottoms of the prairies are various oaks, black, sweet and tupelo gum, holly, cotton-wood, poplar, magnolia sweet bay, the tulip tree, catalpa, black walnut, pecans, hickories, ash, beech and short-leaf pine.

  • On drier and higher soils are the persimmon, sassafras, red maple, elm, black haw, hawthorn, various oaks (in all 10 species occur), hickories and splendid forests of longleaf and loblolly yellow pine.

  • For building and miscellaneous purposes, in addition to the rare woods above named, there are cedars (used in great quantities for cigar boxes); the pine, found only in the W., where it gives its name to the Isle of Pines and the province of Pinar del Rio; various palms; oaks of varying hardness and colour, &c. The number of alimentary plants is extremely great.

  • among the ranges of northern Bosnia, the sunnier slopes are overgrown by oaks, the shadier by beeches.

  • Pine forests surround the town, and oaks and elms of more than a century's growth shade its streets.

  • Both these series contain numerous plant remains, evergreen oaks, magnolias, aralias, &c., and seams of lignite (coal), which is burnt; but in neither occur the marine beds of the United States.

  • The forest scenery much resembles that of England, with fine oaks and greensward.

  • A considerable quantity of timber is grown on the high lands, and the rich valley pastures support large herds of cattle, while the abundance of oaks and chestnuts favours the rearing of swine.

  • The leaf is subjected to the smoke produced by burning in the green condition leafy branches of species of evergreen oaks (Quercus spp.).

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