Oak sentence example

oak
  • Jim pointed at the old Oak tree.
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  • The most impressive piece was a massive oak table.
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  • The leaves of the big oak tree were like silver filigree and the white cross beneath it looked iridescent.
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  • She lifted the hair off her neck and sighed as she paused in the shade of a huge oak tree.
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  • A long oak table graced the center of the room, its ten carved chairs at attention.
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  • Even the scent of the room was a dark mix of oak and amber.
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  • Through her tears the old Oak tree stood tall, the flowers at its base waving softly in the breeze.
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  • The tanning, currying and finishing of leather, an industry largely dependent on the plentiful supply of oak and hemlock bark for tanning, is centralized in the northern and eastern parts of the state, near the forests.
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  • In England it is most abundant on the apple-tree, but rarely found on the oak.
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  • The celebrated Newland oak in Gloucestershire, known for centuries as "the great oak," was by the latest measurement 472 ft.
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  • The wood of the British oak, when grown in perfection, is.
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  • The oak of Britain is still in demand for the construction of merchant shipping, though teak has become in some measure its substitute, and foreign oak of various quality and origin largely takes.
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  • Oak was formerly largely used by wood-carvers, and is still in some demand for those artists, being harder and more durable than lime and other woods that yield more readily to the sculptor's tool.
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  • Oak was thus applied at a very early date; the shrine of Edward the Confessor, still existing in the abbey at Westminster, sound after the lapse of Boo years, is of dark-coloured oak-wood.
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  • The oak grows most luxuriantly on deep strong clays, calcareous marl or stiff loam, but will flourish in nearly any deep well-drained soil, excepting peat or loose sand; in marshy or moist places the tree may grow well for a time, but the timber is rarely sound; on hard rocky ground and exposed hillsides.
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  • The oak will not bear exposure to the full force of the sea gale, though in ravines and on sheltered slopes oak woods sometimes extend nearly to the shore.
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  • The oak requires shelter in the early stages of growth; in England the Scotch pine is thought best for this purpose, though Norway spruce answers as well on suitable ground, and larch and other trees are sometimes substituted.
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  • The growth of the oak is slow, though it varies greatly in different trees; Loudon states that an oak, raised from the acorn in a garden at Sheffield Place, Sussex, became in seventy years 12 ft.
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  • As firewood oak holds a high position, though in Germany it is considered inferior to beech for that purpose.
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  • An important product of oak woods is the bark that from a remote period has been the chief tanning material of Europe.
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  • The value of oak bark depends upon the amount of tannin contained in it, which varies much, depending not only on the growth of the tree but on the care bestowed on the preparation of the bark itself, as it soon ferments and spoils by exposure to wet, while too much sun-heat is injurious.
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  • The bark of young oak branches has been employed in medicine from the days of Dioscorides, but is not used in modern practice.
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  • The astringent principle is a peculiar kind of tannic acid, called by chemists quercitannic, which, yielding more stable compounds with gelatine than other forms, gives oak bark its high value to the tanner.
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  • Some trees of the sessile-fruited oak bear sweet acorns in Britain, and several varieties were valued by the ancient Italians for their edible fruit.
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  • A bitter principle to which the name of quercin has been applied by Gerber, its discoverer, has also been detected in the acorn of the common oak; the nutritive portion seems chiefly a form of starch.
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  • The oak in Europe is liable to injury from a great variety of insect enemies: the young wood is attacked by the larvae of the small stag-beetle and several other Coleoptera, and those of the wood-leopard moth, goat moth and other Lepidoptera feed upon it occasionally; the foliage is devoured by innumerable larvae; indeed, it has been stated that half the plant-eating insects of England prey more or less upon the oak, and in some seasons it is difficult to find a leaf perfectly free from their depredations.
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  • The wood is hard, heavy and of fine grain, quite equal to the best British oak for indoor use, but of very variable durability where exposed to weather.
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  • Robur than any other species, forming a thick trunk with spreading base and, when growing in glades or other open places, huge spreading boughs, less twisted and gnarled than those of the English oak, and covered with a whitish bark that gives a marked character to the tree.
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  • The wood is variable in quality and, though hard in texture, is less durable than the best oak of British growth; the heart-wood is of a light reddish brown varying to an olive tint; a Canadian specimen weighs 524 lb the cubic foot.
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  • Common throughout the northern and middle states and Canada, the red oak attains a large size only on good soils; the wood is of little value, being coarse and porous, but it is largely used for cask-staves; the bark is a valuable tanning material.
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  • Nearly akin to these are several other forms of little but botanical interest; not _ far removed is the black or dyer's oak, F rom Isotschy op. c i t.
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  • The live oak is one of the most valuable timber trees of the genus, the wood being extremely durable, both exposed to air and under water; heavy and closegrained, it is perhaps the best of the American oaks for shipbuilding, and is invaluable for water-wheels and mill-work.
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  • The ilex, also known as the "holm oak" from its resemblance to the holly, abounds in all the Mediterranean countries, showing a partiality for the sea air.
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  • In Britain the evergreen oak is quite hardy in ordinary winters, and is useful to the ornamental planter from its capacity for resisting the sea gales; but it generally remains of small size.
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  • Mr Robertson catalogues a number of valuable timbers that are obtained there, among them being Tremana, cedar, rose-wood, iron-wood (red and white), box-wood, sandal and white oak.
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  • The insulators are planted on creosoted oak arms, 21 in.
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  • The chief trees are beech, oak and conifers.
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  • Throughout this tract the Apennines are generally covered with extensive forests of chestnut, oak and beech; while their upper slopes afford admirable pasturage.
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  • The sugar-cane flourishes, the cotton-plant ripens to perfection, date-trees are seen in the gardens, the rocks are clothed with the prickly-pear or Indian fig, the enclosures of the fields are formed by aloes and sometimes pomegranates, the liquorice-root grows wild, and the mastic, the myrtle and many varieties of oleander and cistus form the underwood of the natural forests of arbutus and evergreen oak.
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  • The woods consist chiefly of pine and hazel upon theApennines, and upon the Calabrian, Sicilian and Sardinian mountains of oak, ilex, hornbeam and similar trees.
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  • The Mediterranean basin has been a centre of preservation of Mibcene vegetation: the oleander is said to have been found in local deposits of even earlier age, and the hoim oak (Quercus hex) is the living representative of a Miocene ancestor.
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  • East of the Ain, forests of fir and oak abound on the mountains, the lower slopes of which give excellent pasture for sheep and cattle, and much cheese is produced.
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  • The old council-chamber is wainscoted in black oak, and contains a remarkable sculptured chimney-piece (1545) and fine wood carving.
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  • St Michael's, the parish church, has a striking Perpendicular tower, an arch of carved oak dividing its nave and chancel, a magnificent rood-loft, and a 13th-century monument doubtfully described as the tomb of Bracton, the famous lawyer, whose birthplace, according to local tradition, was Bratton Court in the vicinity.
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  • The montes, by which are understood plantations as well as native thickets, produce among other woods the algarrobo, a poor imitation of oak; the guayabo, a substitute for boxwood; the quebracho, of which the red kind is compared to sandalwood; and the urunday, black and white, not unlike rosewood.
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  • The characteristics of the oak region, which comprises all central Russia, are totally different.
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  • The forests are composed of the birch, oak and other deciduous trees, the soil is dry, and the woodlands are divided by green prairies.
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  • The silver fir does not extend over Russia, and the oak does not cross the Urals.
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  • Its true domains are the oak region and the steppes.
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  • Apples, pears and cherries are grown throughout the oak region.
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  • The keys which hold the rail in the chairs are usually of oak and are placed outside the rails; the inside position has also been employed, but has the disadvantage of detracting from the elasticity of the road since the weight of a passing train presses the rails up against a rigid mass of metal instead of against a slightly yielding block of wood.
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  • Attached to it is the great hall, capable of accommodating l000 men, with an open roof of fine dark oak, the only remaining portion of the castle that was erected by Archibald Douglas, earl of Moray, in 1450.
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  • Chestnut woods are found in the Selino district, and forests of the valonia oak in that of Retimo; in some parts the carob tree is abundant and supplies an important article of consumption.
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  • There are more than 120 species of trees in the state, 15 of oak alone.
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  • The most valuable species for lumber are the long-leaf pine which is predominant in the low southern third of the state, sometimes called the "cow-country"; the short-leaf pine, found farther north; the white oak, quite widely distributed; cotton-wood and red gum, found chiefly on the rich alluvial lands; and the cypress, found chiefly in the marshes of the Delta.
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  • From the extreme south most of the merchantable timber had been cut, but immediately north of this there were still vast quantities of valuable long-leaf pine; in the marshes of the Delta was much cypress, the cotton-wood was nearly exhausted, and the gum was being used as a substitute for it; and on the rich upland soil were oak and red gum, also cotton-wood, hickory and maple.
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  • In the swamps are the bald cypress, the white cedar and the live oak, usually draped in southern long moss; south of Cape Fear river are palmettos, magnolias, prickly ash, the American olive and mock orange; along streams in the Coastal Plain Region are the sour gum, the sweet bay and several species of oak; but the tree that is most predominant throughout the upland portion of this region is the long-leaf or southern pine.
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  • All of the species of pine and of magnolia, and nearly all of the species of oak, of hickory and of spruce, indigenous to the United States, are found in North Carolina.
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  • The trees of the greatest commercial value are oak and chestnut at the foot of the mountains and yellow pine on the uplands of the Coastal Plain.
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  • But mixed with the oak and chestnut or higher up are considerable hickory, birch and maple; farther up the mountain sides are some hemlock and white pine; and on the swamp lands of the Coastal Plain are much cypress and some cedar, and on the Coastal Plain south of the Neuse there is much long-leaf pine from which resin is obtained.
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  • The absence of the oak and of all heaths east of the Ural may be noticed.
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  • The higher mountains rise abruptly from the plains; on their slopes, clothed below almost exclusively with the more tropical forms, a vegetation of a warm temperate character, chiefly evergreen, soon begins to prevail, comprising Magnoliaceae, Ternstroemiaceae, subtropical Rosaceae, rhododendron, oak, Ilex, Symplocos, Lauraceae, Pinus longifolia, with mountain forms of truly tropical orders, palms, Pandanus, Musa, Vitis, Vernonia, and many others.
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  • Quercus Ilex, the evergreen oak of southern Europe, is found in forests as far east as the Sutlej, accompanied with other European forms. In the higher parts of Afghanistan and Persia Boraginaceae and thistles abound; gigantic Umbelliferae, such as Ferula, Galbanum, Dorema, Bubon, Peucedanum, Prangos, and others, also characterize the same districts, and some of them extend into Tibet.
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  • The hills are generally richly wooded, chiefly with fir, beech and oak.
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  • The oak, pine, beech, hornbeam and birch are the chief varieties of trees.
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  • On this surface of pile heads was laid a platform of two layers of squared oak beams; and on this again the foundations proper were built.
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  • In some cases, however, as for example in the ducal palace itself, if the clay appeared sufficiently firm, the piles were dispensed with and the foundations went up directly from the oak platform which rested immediately on the clay.
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  • 1 In 1851 the mayor of the English Boston sent over a copy of that city's seals, framed in oak from St Botolph's church, of which John Cotton, the famous Boston divine (he came over in 1633) had been vicar.
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  • Groves of oak were their chosen retreat.
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  • The eight in 1905 were Jacksonville (35,301), Tampa (22,823), Pensacola (21,505), Key West (20,498), Live Oak (7200), Lake City (6409), Gainesville (J413), and St Augustine (5121).
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  • The eastern slopes are comparatively bare of trees; but the western are well supplied with oak, terebinth and pine.
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  • In 1903 there was established at Woodbrooke, an estate at Selly Oak on the outskirts of Birmingham, a permanent settlement for men and women, for the study of these questions on modern lines.
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  • In Oak Ridge cemetery, adjacent to the city, is the Lincoln monument, erected over Abraham Lincoln's grave with funds raised throughout the country by a Lincoln Monument Association.
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  • The lower parts of the Riesengebirge are clad with forests of oak, beech, pine and fir; above 1600 ft.
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  • Nevertheless, in 1900 the cypress forests remained practically untouched, only slight impression had been made upon the pine areas, and the hard-wood forests, except that they had been culled of their choicest oak, remained in their primal state (U.S. census).
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  • Farther south, in central Bosnia, the oak rarely mounts beyond the foothills, being superseded by the beech, elm, ash, fir and pine, up to 5000 ft.
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  • These measures were largely successful, but in 1902 the export of oak staves was discontinued owing to a shortage of supply.
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  • The place-name "Gospel Oak," which occurs in London and elsewhere, is a relic of these rogation processions, the gospel of the day being read at the foot of the finest oak the parish boasted.
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  • The goddess Athena herself superintended its construction, and inserted in the prow a piece of oak from Dodona, which was endowed with the power of speaking and delivering oracles.
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  • The northern sides and tops of the lower heights are often covered with dense forests of oak, cork, pine, cedar and other trees, with walnuts up to the limit of irrigation.
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  • A large area is under forests, the oak, beech, fir, birch and hornbeam being the principal trees.
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  • In the southern and central portions of the state open rolling prairies interspersed with groves and belts of oak and other deciduous hard-wood timber predominate.
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  • A little north of the centre the state is traversed from northwest to south-east by the extensive forest known as the " Big Woods," in which also oak occurs most frequently.
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  • A majestic oak, one of the finest trees in the Forest, stands near it.
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  • The oak, elm, hazel, ash, apple, lime and maple disappear to the east of the Urals, but reappear in new varieties on the eastern slope of the border-ridge of the great plateau.
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  • The hills also, as far as possible, are terraced for cultivation and in some instances are planted with dwarf pine and scrub oak.
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  • The fine interior is remarkable for the peculiar structure of its apse, and for the choir-stalls carved in English oak by Miguel Ancheta, a native artist (1530).
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  • The oak and sycamore in front of Birnam House, the famed twin trees of Birnam, are believed to be more than 1000 years old, and to be the remnant of the wood of Birnam which Shakespeare immortalized in Macbeth.
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  • The Michigan school for the deaf, established in 1854, and the Oak Grove hospital (private) for the treatment of mental and nervous diseases, are here.
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  • The great hall, with its fine open-timbered oak roof, is adorned with a splendid stained-glass window and several statues of notable men, including one (by Louis Francois Roubiliac) of Duncan Forbes of Culloden, lord president of the court of session (1685-1747), and now forms the ante-room for lawyers and their clients.
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  • A tree close to the house still bears the name of Charles's oak, but tradition goes no further than to assert that it grew from an acorn of the original tree.
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  • The Australian Eucalyptus and Casuarina in great variety, and many other imported trees, including syringas, wattles, acacias, willows, pines, cypress, cork and oak all thrive when properly planted and protected from grass fires.
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  • The site of the sacred oak has been sought at two places: one called El-'Amud, " the column" - where is "Joseph's tomb"; and the other at Balata (a name containing the consonants of the Semitic word for "oak"), near Jacob's well.
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  • Tree-worship again is a constantly recurring feature, seen, for instance, in the permanently sacred character of the ficus Ruminalis and the caprcus of the Campus Martius, and above all in the oak of luppiter Feretrius, on which the spolia opima were hung after a victory.
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  • Jupiter in the rusticcult was a sky-god concerned mainly with the wine festivals and associated with the sacred oak on the Capitol.
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  • The trees principally represented are oak and beech, with some newer plantations of Scotch fir.
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  • The council chamber contains a fine oak door and Gothic chimney-piece, both c. 1530.
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  • He was buried by his comrades under an oak close to the village of WObbelin, where there is a monument to him.
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  • The props used are preferably of small oak or English larch, but large quantities of fir props, cut to the right length, are also imported from the north of Europe.
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  • In the broad river valleys of the eastern part of the Prairie Plains region are forests and isolated groves consisting principally of pecan, cypress, cottonwood and several species of oak.
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  • Farther west two narrow belts of timber, consisting mostly of stunted post oak and black jack, and known as the Eastern and Western Cross Timbers, cross the prairies southward from the Red river, and a low growth of mesquite, other shrubs and vines are common in the eastern half of the Prairie Plains.
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  • The western half of these plains has only a few trees along the watercourses and some scraggy bushes of oak, juniper and cedar in the more hilly sections.
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  • In the canyons of the Edwards Plateau grow the pecan, live oak, sycamore, elm, walnut and cypress; on the hilly dissected borders of the same plateau are cedars, dwarf and scrubby oak, and higher up are occasional patches of stunted oak, called "shinneries."
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  • The low country along the coast is covered chiefly with grasses and rushes, but scattered over it are clumps of live oak, called "mottes."
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  • The maple, walnut, oak, ash, beech, elm, gum, sycamore, hickory and poplar, found on the southern slope of the Osage highlands, on the uplands about the source of the highlands and in the central portions of the Red river valley, are valuable for cabinet woods.
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  • The corona civica, made of oak leaves with acorns, was bestowed on the soldier who in battle saved the life of a Roman citizen.
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  • The kings of arms in England, Scotland and Ireland wear crowns, the ornamentation of which round the upper rim of the circlet is composed of a row of acanthus or oak leaves.
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  • The avenue itself is fully half a mile long and is lined on either side with fine oak trees.
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  • Many of the mountains are clothed with forests of oak, chestnuts, beeches and other trees, and contain iron, copper, lead and marble.
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  • Its population was formerly dependent wholly upon the sea, but its climate has made it a popular summer resort, Oak Bluffs being one of the chief resorts of the Atlantic coast.
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  • Sainte-Marie contains many artistic treasures, the chief of which are the magnificent stained-glass windows of the Renaissance which light the apsidal chapels, and the 113 choir-stalls of carved oak, also of Renaissance workmanship. The archbishop's palace adjoins the cathedral; it is a building of the 18th century with a Romanesque hall and a tower of the r4th century.
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  • There are, however, extensive oak, pine and beech forests in the highlands, and many beautiful oases in the deeply sunk valleys, and along the rivers, especially beside the Ebro, which is, therefore, often called the "Nile of Aragon."
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  • In the Catskills and in the farming regions the lumber product consists largely of hardwoods (mostly oak, chestnut and hickory), smaller amounts of hemlock and pine, and a very little spruce.
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  • Among veld plants the elandsboontje provides tanning material equal to oak bark.
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  • They are formed of split oak trunks, while those of the two first settlements are round stems chiefly of soft wood.
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  • The oak forests for which it was renowned in Roman times have entirely disappeared.
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  • Most of the forest consists of yellow pine, but the spruce, aspen, white birch, bur oak, box elder, red cedar, white elm and cottonwood are among the other varieties found.
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  • Fine oaks and beeches are numerous, and yew trees of great size and age are seen in some Kentish churchyards, as at Stansted, while the fine oak at Headcorn is also famous.
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  • Many trees of the eastern forest, such as basswood, sugar, river and red maple, red, white and black ash, red and rock elm, black and bur oak, white and red pine and red cedar find their western limit here.
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  • The curious oak pulpit representing Adam and Eve expelled from the Garden of Eden came originally from the Jesuit church at Louvain, and is considered the masterpiece of Verbruggen.
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  • The elaborately carved chair of the lieutenant-governor in the senate chamber, made of wood from the historic Charter Oak, and the original charter of 1662 (or its duplicate of the same date) are preserved in a special vault in the Connecticut state library.
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  • Among the more common trees are several species of oak, pine, hickory, gums and maple, and the chestnut, the poplar, the beech, the cypress and the red cedar; the merchantable pine has been cut, but the chestnut and other hard woods of West Maryland are still a product of considerable value.
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  • On the 29th of March the movement began, followed in rapid succession by the combats of White Oak Road and Dinwiddie Court House and Sheridan's great victory of Five Forks.
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  • Wild boars are found in the oak forests, and brown bears in the uplands.
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  • On June 30 Jackson got into action with Whiting's division at White Oak Swamp, while Longstreet encountered the Federals at Frazier's Farm (or Glendale).
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  • Extensive forest areas still remain both in the east and the west, In the east oak, maple, beech, chestnut, elm, tulip-tree (locally " yellow poplar "), walnut, pine and cedar trees are the most numerous; in the west the forests are composed largely of cypress, ash, oak, hickory, chestnut, walnut, beech, tulip-tree, gum and sycamore trees.
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  • As the marquess of Winchester said of himself, he was sprung from the willow rather than the oak, and he was not the man to suffer for convictions.
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  • Within the city proper the Fitzroy Gardens are a network of avenues bordered with oak, elm and plane, with a " ferntree gully " in the centre; they are ornamented with casts of famous statues, and ponds, fountains and classic temples.
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  • These widely divergent conditions give to Mexico a flora that includes the genera and species characteristic of nearly all the zones of plant life on the western continents - the tropical jungle of the humid coastal plains with its rare cabinet-woods, dye-woods, lianas and palms; the semi-tropical and temperate mountain slopes where oak forests are to be found and wheat supplants cotton and sugar-cane; and above these the region of pine forests and pasture lands.
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  • In the valleys of some of these denuded slopes oak and pine are succeeding the tropical species where fires have given them a chance to get a good foothold.
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  • Though the country is generally mountainous, with dense forests of oak and walnut, there are some deep, well-watered valleys, and the climate is mild.
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  • White cedar is almost wholly confined to the swamps of the north, and white oak is found chiefly on the more fertile lands of the south.
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  • Its most noteworthy feature is the fine original roof of oak.
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  • The principal villages are Oak Bluffs on the north-east coast, facing Vineyard Sound; Vineyard Haven, in Tisbury township, beautifully situated on the west shore of Vineyard Haven Harbor, and Edgartown on Edgartown Harbor - all summer resorts.
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  • Martha's Vineyard is served by steamship lines from Wood's Hole and New Bedford to Vineyard Haven, Oak Bluffs, and Edgartown.
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  • The Martha's Vineyard railway (from Oak Bluffs to the south-east extremity of the island, by way of Edgartown), opened in 1874, was not a financial success, and had been practically abandoned in 1909, but an electric line from Oak Bluffs to Vineyard Haven provides transit facilities for that part of the island.
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  • Oak Bluffs had its origin as a settlement in the camp meetings, which were begun here in 1835, and by 1860 had grown to large proportions.
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  • In 1880 the township was incorporated under that name, which it retained until January 1907, when the name (and that of the village also) was changed to Oak Bluffs.
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  • Lake Cliff, Cycle and Oak Lawn parks are amusement grounds.
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  • The Austroriparian zone has the long-leaf and loblolly pines, magnolia and live oak on the uplands, and the bald cypress, tupelo and cane in the swamps; and in the semi-tropical Gulf strip are the cabbage palmetto and Cuban pine; here, too, Sea Island cotton and tropical fruits are successfully cultivated.
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  • It has two facades, one overlooking the Place du Palais and the town, the other, more imposing, facing towards a fine park and the forest, which is chiefly of oak and beech and covers over 36,000 acres.
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  • Oak Farm in the parish of Monk's Coppenhall, and takes its name from the original stations having been placed in the township of Crewe, in which the seat of Lord Crewe is situated.
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  • Consisting of a chancel, clerestoried nave, and aisles, it is Early English and Perpendicular in style, and contains a beautiful 13th-century oak roof of 350 panels, each with a different design; a 15th-century pulpit of carved stone; and some interesting old monuments of the Strode, Mallet and Gournay families.
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  • The other important woods are cypress, oak and poplar.
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  • The bark of the larch is largely used in some countries for tanning; it is taken from the trunk only, being stripped from the trees when felled; its value is about equal to that of birch bark; but, according to the experience of British tanners, it is scarcely half as strong as that of the oak.
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  • Marshall is situated in a region growing cotton and Indian corn, vegetables, small fruits and sugar-cane; in the surrounding country there are valuable forests of pine, oak and gum.
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  • All kinds of trees grow well, from the date palm to the oak; and there are over 200,000 wild olives in the country.
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  • The main feature of the northern plain is the so-called Luneburger Heide, a vast expanse of moor and fen, mainly covered with low brushwood (though here and there are oases of fine beech and oak woods) and intersected by shallow valleys, and extending almost due north from the city of Hanover to the southern arm of the Elbe at Harburg.
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  • Here the more common European plants and trees give place to the wild olive, the caper bush, the aloe, the cactus, the evergreen oak, the orange, the lemon, the palm and other productions of a tropical climate.
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  • The trees most commonly found are the plane, poplar, maple, walnut, oak, the Cupressus funebris, and various varieties of the genera Pinus, Abies and Larix.
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  • The spot, outside the Elster Gate, where Luther publicly burned the papal bull in 1520, is marked by an oak tree.
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  • There are a British medical mission, a German Protestant mission with church and schools, and, near Abraham's Oak, a Russian mission.
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  • Cattle breeding is another great source of revenue, and the exploitation of the forests gives beech and oak timber (good for shipbuilding), gall-nuts, oak-bark and cork.
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  • The badge is a white enamelled cross, with gold borders and balls, suspended from a royal crown and resting on a green laurel and oak wreath.
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  • The badge is a white cross, the arms of which expand and terminate in an obtuse angle; round the cross is a green laurel and oak wreath; the central medallion is red, bearing in gold two crossed swords, the initials of the founder and the date 1855.
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  • The Order of Adolphus of Nassau, for civil and military merit, in four classes, was founded in 1858, and the Order of the Oak Crown as a general order of merit, in five classes, in 1841, modified 1858.
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  • The evergreen oak is wild on the rocks about the Lake of Garda, and lemons are cultivated on a large scale, with partial protection in winter.
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  • A more natural limit is afforded by the presence of the chief deciduous trees - oak, beech, ash and sycamore.
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  • Rising in terraces from Rock Creek is Oak Hill Cemetery, a beautiful burying-ground containing the graves of John Howard Payne,.
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  • In the hilly districts more than half the surface is sc:netimes occupied by forests, and large plantations of oak are formed for the use of the bark in tanning.
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  • These plateaus, with an average elevation of Boo to 1000 ft., are mostly covered with forests of oak, beech and lime, and are deeply cut by river valleys, some being narrow and craggy, and others broad, with gentle slopes and marshy bottoms. Narrow ravines intersect them in all directions, and they often assume, especially in the east, the character of wild, impassable, woody and marshy tracts.
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  • Within are a priest's chamber over the porch, a handsome oak ceiling, a 15th-century pulpit, and some curious monuments and brasses.
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  • All trees were long little thought of in comparison with the pine, but of late years poplar and spruce have proved of great value in the making of paper pulp, and hard-wood (oak, beech, ash, elm, certain varieties of maple) is becoming increasingly valuable for use in flooring and the making of furniture.
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  • The oak and ash are now rare, though in ancient times both were abundant in the Danish islands.
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  • An ardent opponent of slavery, he became a Free Soiler, was a delegate to the National Convention which nominated John P. Hale for the presidency in 1852, and subsequently served as chairman of the State Committee, having at the same time editorial control of the Charter Oak, the party organ.
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  • Among these are a Roman slab, carved with figures of a horseman trampling upon an enemy, several fine tombs and stones of the 13th and 14th centuries, the frith or fridstool of stone, believed to be the original bishop's throne, and the fine Perpendicular roodscreen of oak, retaining its loft.
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  • Owing to the lack of railway communication Jerez is of little commercial importance; its staple trade is in agricultural produce, especially in ham and bacon from the large herds of swine which are reared in the surrounding oak forests.
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  • Great numbers of grasses and flowering plants which once beautified the prairie landscape are still found on uncultivated lands, and there are about 80 species of trees, of which the oak, hickory, maple and ash are the most common.
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  • The oak should be about one hundred years old when it is cut.
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  • For oak and other hard woods another method of conversion is often adopted, called quarter sawing.
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  • In oak this develops the beautiful silver grain by cutting longitudinally through the medullary rays.
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  • The time allowed in the English government dockyards for the natural process of seasoning for hard woods such as oak is, for pieces 24 in.
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  • "Doatiness," similarly, is a speckled or spotted stain denoting decay in certain varieties of timber, such as beech and some kinds of oak.
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  • The oak (Quercus), of which some sixty distinct species are known, grows freely in Europe and America.
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  • Oak is very durable either in a dry or a wet situation, or in a position where it will be alternately dry and wet.
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  • The Durmast oak grows in France and the south of England; it is not so strong or durable as the English oak.
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  • Baltic oak is grown in Norway, Russia and Germany, and is exported from the Baltic ports.
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  • Though inferior to the English oak, it is very straight in the grain and free from knots.
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  • Austrian oak is light in colour, and is much used for joinery work.
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  • White oak comes principally from Canada, under the name of American oak.
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  • It is straight in grain but subject to warping, and is not so durable as British oak.
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  • The following is a list of the best timbers for different situations: for general construction, spruce and pine of the different varieties; for heavy constructions, pitch pine, oak (preferably of English growth), teak, jarrah; for constructions immersed in water, Baltic pine, elm, oak, teak, jarrah; for very dry situations, spruce, pines, mahogany, teak, birch, sycamore.
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  • By Theophilus's instrumentality a synod was called to try or rather to condemn the archbishop; but fearing the violence of the mob in the metropolis, who idolized him for the fearlessness with which he exposed the vices of their superiors, it held its sessions at the imperial estate named " The Oak " (Synodus ad quercum), near Chalcedon, where Rufinus had erected a stately church and monastery.
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  • It consists of an undulating plateau, surrounded by hills, which are covered with thin oak forest and bracken.
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  • He returned to England in November 1678, having by the registration of 341 stars won the title of the "Southern Tycho," and by the translation to the heavens of the "Royal Oak," earned a degree of master of arts, conferred at Oxford by the king's command on the 3rd of December 1678, almost simultaneously with his election as fellow of the Royal Society.
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  • A notable further instance of the connexion of the western Himalayan flora with that of Europe is the holm oak (Quercus Ilex), which is characteristic of the Mediterranean region.
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  • The pine and oak were sacred to him, and his offerings were goats, lambs, cows, new wine, honey and milk.
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  • The northern groups and the Diamond Mountain are heavily timbered, but the hills are covered mainly with coarse, sour grass, oak and chestnut scrub.
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  • Among the indigenous trees are the Abies excelsa, Abies microsperma, Pinus sinensis, Pinus pinea, three species of oak, five of maple, lime, birch, juniper, mountain ash, walnut, Spanish chestnut, hazel, willow, hornbeam, hawthorn, plum, pear, peach, Rhus vernicifera, (?) Rhus semipinnata, Acanthopanax ricinifolia, Zelkawa, Thuja orientalis, Elaeagnus, Sophora Japonica, &c. Azaleas and rhododendrons are widely distributed, as well as other flowering shrubs and creepers, Ampelopsis Veitchii being universal.
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  • Its large variety of trees and shrubs, including oak, hickory, elm, maple, chestnut, birch, ash, cedar, pine, larch and sumach, its flower gardens, a palm house, ponds, a lake of 61 acres for boating, skating and curling, a parade ground of 40 acres for other athletic sports, a menagerie, and numerous pieces of statuary, are among its objects of interest or beauty.
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  • The yellow pine, the white oak and the cypress are the most valuable growths.
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  • " The hard-wood forests of the state are hardly surpassed in variety and richness, and contain inestimable bodies of the finest oak, walnut, hickory and ash timber " (U.S. Census, 1870 and 1900).
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  • Cotton and leather are manufactured; the country around is fertile, and in the neighbourhood are large forests of oak, beech, elm, chestnut and pine, the timber of which is partly used locally and partly exported to Constantinople.
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  • The forests produce abundance of excellent oak and teak timber.
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  • Among these the beetle Balaninus nucum, the nut-weevil, seen on hazel and oak stems from the end of May till July, is highly destructive to the nuts.
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  • Other trees are the juniper, willow, green ash, box elder, scrub oak, wild plum and wild cherry.
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  • Large districts on the southern slopes of the Taurus chain are covered with forests of oak and fir, and there are numerous yailas or grassy "alps," with abundant water, to which villagers and nomads move with their flocks during the summer months.
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  • The mountains on the north coast are clothed with dense forests of pine, fir, cedar, oak, beech, &c. On the Taurus range the forests are smaller, and there is a larger proportion of pine.
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  • On the west coast the ilex, plane, oak, valonia oak, and pine predominate.
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  • A Hesiodic fragment gives a complete description of the Dodonaea or Hellopia, which is called a district full of corn-fields, of herds and flocks and of shepherds, where is built on an extremity (ir' Eo arin) Dodona, where Zeus dwells in the stem of an oak (07y6s).
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  • The crannog of Cloonfinlough in Connaught had a triple stockade of oak piles, connected by horizontal stretchers and enclosing an area 130 ft., in diameter, laid with trunks of oak trees.
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  • North of Georgetown is Oak Hill Cemetery, and in the vicinity of the Soldiers' Home are Rock Creek, Glenwood, Harmony, Prospect Hill and St Mary's Cemeteries.
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  • The Blue Ridge and Newer Appalachian regions are covered with pine, hemlock, white oak, cherry and yellow poplar; while that portion of these provinces lying in the S.W.
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  • The lower slopes are usually covered with the scrub oak, juniper and pinon; but some mountains, especially those along the eastern border of the Rio Grande Valley, are absolutely treeless.
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  • 11 " To inquire into the form of a lion, of an oak, or gold, nay, even of water or air, is a vain pursuit; but to inquire the form of dense, rare, hot, cold, &c., as well configurations as motions, which in treating of physic I have in 6 Valerius Terminus, iii.
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  • After the decline of episcopacy the building was neglected for a long period, but the choir, which contains some carved oak stalls of the 16th century, was restored in 1873, and the nave roofed and restored in 1892-1895, under the direction of Sir Rowand Anderson, the architect.
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  • The new oak roof is emblazoned with the arms of the Scottish and later British monarchs, and of the old earls of Strathearn.
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  • The city's streets are broad and heavily shaded with a profusion of elm, oak and maple trees.
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  • The tannin of oak, C/9H16010, which is found, mixed with gallic acid, ellagic acid and quercite, in oak bark, is a red powder; its aqueous solution is coloured dark blue by ferric chloride, and boiling with dilute sulphuric acid gives oak red or phlobaphene.
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  • South of the southern limit indicated, in the midland district of the great lakes, the oak (Quercus pedunculata) appears as well as pine and fir; and, as much of this area is under cultivation, many other trees have been introduced, as the ash, maple, elm and lime.
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  • For all indoor and most outdoor purposes it is as lasting as oak, and for ship planking is perhaps little inferior; from its.
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  • In England the pine is largely employed as a " nurse " for oak trees, its conical growth when young admirably adapting it for this purpose; its dense foliage renders it valuable as a shelter tree for protecting land from the wind; it stands the sea gales better than most conifers, but will not flourish on the shore like some other species.
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  • The oak forests of Kurdistan, Luristan and the Bakhtiari district are also being rapidly thinned.
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  • The monopoly for cutting and exporting the timber of the Mazandaran forests is leased to European firms, principally for box and oak.
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  • The forests contain valuable timber trees such as African oak or teak (Oldfieldia Africana), rosewood, ebony, tamarind, camwood, odum - whose wood resists the attacks of termites - and the tolmgah or brimstone tree.
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  • Of non-indigenous flora are the oak, poplar, bluegum, the Australian wattle, the vine, and almost every variety of fruit tree and European vegetables.
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  • The outer ranges of mountains are mainly covered with forests of Pinus longifolia, rhododendron, oak and Pieris.
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  • As we pass to the west the species of rhododendron, oak and Magnolia are much reduced in number as compared to the eastern region, and both the Malayan and Japanese forms are much less common.
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  • Large herds of swine are fed in the oak and chestnut woods of Alemtejo; sheep and goats are reared in the mountains, where excellent cheeses are made from goats' milk.
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  • Even in the Mexican border, desert oak, juniper and manzanita cover the mountains, and there is a vigorous though short-lived growth of grasses and flower from July to October.
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  • The flame-like P u t the matter in another processes and outliers are composed of way, if we could imagine writhing filaments, and the contours all the living cells of a are continually changing while the large oak or of a horse, colony moves as a whole.
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  • The timber bears a striking resemblance to that of the oak, which has been mistaken for chestnut; but it may be distinguished by the numerous fine medullary rays.
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  • Unlike oak, the wood is more valuable while young than old.
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  • An old oak lectern, dating from the middle of the 15th century, carries a chained copy, in a Tudor binding of brass, of Dean Comber's (1655-99) book on the Common Prayer, and a black-letter copy of Erasmus's Paraphrase of the Gospels.
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  • The beauty of this range of mountains consists in its pure crystalline torrents, in the numerous blue lakes of its valleys, and above all in the magnificent forests of oak and pine with which its sides are covered.
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  • The sandy lands were in part burnt over by Indians, and there was a growth of scrub oak, aspens and huckleberry bushes.
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  • Red oak, birch, elm, ash, white cedar, hemlock, basswood, spruce, poplar, balsam, fir and several other kinds of trees are found in many sections; but a large portion of the merchantable timber, especially in the lower peninsula, has been cut.'
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  • The oak stalls in the choir are fine examples of late 16th-century carving.
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  • A substance collected by the inhabitants of Laristan from Pyrus glabra strongly resembles oak manna in appearance.
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  • And it is at Dodona that his association with the oak is of the closest.
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  • His prophet-priests the Selloi " with unwashed feet, couching on the ground," 1° lived about the sacred oak, which may be re garded" as the primeval shrine of the Aryan God, and interpreted its oracular voice, which spoke in the rustling of its leaves or the cooing of its doves.
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  • See Chadwick in Anthropological Journ., 1900, on " The Oak and the Thunder-God."
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  • These are sparsely clothed with prostrate pitch pine, scrub oak and laurel.
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  • ' 'etr i, and the forests are chiefly of chestnut and various species of oak.
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  • It is common on branches of elder, which it often kills, and is also found on elm, willow, oak and other trees.
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  • The middle of the government is also hilly (850 - 1000 ft.), and is heavily timbered, chiefly with beech, oak and mountain-ash, and, though to a smaller extent, with birch.
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  • It is largely a region of oak and pine trees, in contrast to the beech of the Chalk Downs.
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  • The scenery is quiet in its character, but the gravel hills are often prominent features, as at Harrow and in the northern suburbs of London; the country is now mainly under grass or occupied with market and nursery gardens, and many parts, of which Epping Forest is a fine example, are still densely wooded, the oak being the prevailing tree.
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  • The cathedral contains a fine altar-piece by Van Dyck, and the pulpit is in carved oak of the 17th century.
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  • The original work of oak is especially noteworthy.
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  • Maine was formerly covered with forests, principally of white pine and spruce, but mixed with these were some hemlock, tamarack, cedar, and, on the south slope, birch, poplar, oak, maple and beech.
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  • Oak, maple and beech are rather scarce.
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  • The commonest species of trees are such as grow in central Europe, namely, ash, fir, pine, beech, acacia, maple, birch, box, chestnut, laurel, holm-oak, poplar, elm, lime, yew, elder, willow, oak.
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  • The chief imports comprise coal, timber, especially oak staves, and various manufactured goods.
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  • The interior is characterized by wooded dunes, covered with pine, fir, birch and oak, with swamps and lakes, and fertile patches between.
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  • The spur on which it stands is thickly wooded with oak and other trees; behind it the pine-clad slopes of the mountain tower towards the jagged peaks of the higher range, snow-clad for half the year; while below stretches the luxuriant cultivation of the Kangra valley.
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  • A splendid series of carved oak stalls lines each side of the nave, and above them hang the banners of the Knights of the Bath, of whom this was the place of installation when the Order was reconstituted in 1725.
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  • It has a magnificent open roof of carved oak, and is used as the vestibule of the Houses of Parliament.
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  • In the interior several ancient monuments of the Suttons and Heathcotes are preserved, besides some beautiful carved stone work, and two rich ceilings of oak over the chapels.
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  • The cargoes which they here took in consisted of Moldavian timber (oak, deal and cornel), grain, butter, honey and wax, salt and nitre.
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  • The Oak Chair in the town-hall also is made from a fragment.
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  • The heavy timber in the south-eastern counties (cypress, &c.), and even scattered stands of such valuable woods as walnut, white oak and red-gum, have already been considerably exploited.
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  • In Geoffrey of Monmouth's tract, De prophetiis Merlini, there is a reference to an ancient prophecy of the enchanter Merlin concerning a virgin ex nemore canuto, and it appears that this nemus canutum had been identified in folk-lore with the oak wood of Domremy.
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  • Among trees introduced by the Dutch or British colonists the oak, poplar, various pines, the Australian blue-gum (eucalyptus) and wattle flourish.
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  • The oak grows more rapidly and more luxuriantly than in Europe.
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  • This danger has been increased, as elsewhere in Italy, by indiscriminate timber-felling on the higher mountains without provision for re-afforestation, though considerable oak, beech, elm and pine forests still exist and are the home of wolves, wild boars and even bears.
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  • Amongst the more conspicuous secular buildings in the street may be mentioned the Town and County Bank, the Music Hall, with sitting accommodation for 2000 persons, the Trinity Hall of the incorporated trades (originating in various years between 1398 and 1527, and having charitable funds for poor members, widows and orphans), containing some portraits by George Jamesone, a noteworthy set of carved oak chairs, dating from 1574, and the shields of the crafts with quaint inscriptions; the office of the Aberdeen Free Press, one of the most influential papers in the north of Scotland; the Palace Hotel; the office of the Northern Assurance Company, and the National Bank of Scotland.
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  • The choir of the chapel still contains the original oak canopied stalls, miserere seats and lofty open screens in the French flamboyant style, and of unique beauty of design and execution.
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  • The chapel, with fine oak choir-stalls, mosaic pavements, marble altars and stained glass, and with adjoining cloisters, was dedicated in 1890.
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  • There are about 110 species of trees in the state, the commonest being the oak.
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  • Along the shore of Lake Michigan, and extending inland a quarter of the distance across the state and northward through the Fox River Valley, there was a heavy belt of oak, maple, birch, ash, hickory, elm and some pine.
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  • About 60% (both in quantity and value) of the lumber sawed in 1905 was white pine; next in importance were hemlock (more than one-fourth in quantity), basswood (nearly 4%) and, in smaller quantities, birch, oak, elm, maple, ash, tamarack, Norway pine, cedar and spruce.
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  • The oak, elm and birch are common, while the beech especially attains an unusual size and beauty.
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  • The trade of Alicante consists chiefly in the manufacture of cotton, linen and woollen goods, cigars and confectionery; the importation of coal, iron, machinery, manures, timber, oak staves and fish; and the exportation of lead, fruit, farm produce and red wines, which are sent to France for blending with better vintages.
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  • The Dioscuri overtook him and lay in wait in a hollow oak.
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  • The chancel contains some superb Jacobean carved oak screens, with stalls of earlier date.
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  • The outer layer of bark in the cork oak by annual additions from within gradually becomes a thick soft homogeneous mass, possessing those compressible and elastic properties upon which the economic value of the material chiefly depends.
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  • His next novel was The Crater, or Vulcan's Peak (1847), in which he attempted to introduce supernatural machinery with indifferent success; and this was succeeded by Oak Openings and Jack Tier (1848), the latter a curious rifacimento 'of' The Red Rover; by The Sea Lions (1849); and finally by The Ways of the Hour (1850), another novel with a purpose, and his last book.
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  • The surface consists of a narrow coastal zone where tropical conditions prevail, a broad belt of mountainous country covered by the ranges of the Sierra Madre Occidental and their intervening valleys where oak and pine forests are to be found, and an intervening zone among the foothills of the Sierra Madre up to an elevation of 2000 ft., where the conditions are subtropical.
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  • The Nazareth hills and Gilboa are bare and white, but west of Nazareth is a fine oak wood, and another thick wood spreads over the northern slopes of Tabor.
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  • Bede, speaking of a church built by Finan at Lindisfarne, says, " nevertheless, after the manner of the Scots, he made it not of stone but of hewn oak and covered it with reeds."
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  • In the north, and in the deep valleys through which the streams descend to the plain, there are extensive forests of oak, birch and beech, and in the south, of fir and larch.
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  • Large herds of swine fatten in the oak and beech forests; and dairy-farming is a thriving industry in the highlands between Agram and Warasdin, where, during the last years of the icth century, systematic attempts were made to replace the mountain pastures by clover and sown grass.
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  • Forests, principally of oak, pine and beech, covered 3,734, 000 acres in 1895, about one-fifth being state property.
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  • At the base are found vines and maize; on the lower slopes are green pastures, or wheat, barley and other kinds of corn; above are often forests of oak, ash, elm, &c.; and still higher the yew and the fir may be seen braving the climatic conditions.
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  • Thus the ghost of the hero or medicine man of a kin or tribe may be raised to divine rank, while again - the doctrine of spirits once developed, and spirits once allotted to the great elemental forces and phenomena of nature, sky, thunder, the sea, the forests - we have the beginnings of departmental deities, such as Agni, god of fire; Poseidon, god of the sea; Zeus, god of the sky - though in recent theories Zeus appears to be regarded as primarily the god of the oak tree, a spirit of vegetation.
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  • 5), and her name is also that of the foster-mother of Rebekah who was buried near Bethel beneath the "oak of weeping" (xxxv.
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  • Beneath the oak there appeared the three divine beings, and in the cave of Machpelah the illustrious ancestor and his wife were buried.
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  • The hilly districts consist almost entirely of forest and pasture, the most common trees being the pine, beech, oak and chestnut.
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  • The bombax or silk-cotton tree attains gigantic proportions in the forests, which are the home of the indiarubber-producing plants and of many valuable kinds of timber trees, such as odum (Chlorophora excelsa), ebony, mahogany (Khaya senegalensis), African teak or oak (Oldfieldia africana) and camwood (Baphia nitida).
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  • The oak of Vincennes, under which the king would sit to mete out justice, cast its shade over the whole political action of Louis IX.
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  • His genius, assisted by the impoverishment of two generations, was like the oak which admits beneath its shade none but the smallest of saplings.
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  • The prevailing types of trees are the oak, maple, hornbeam, beech, ash and elm.
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  • Here only are to be found rich grassy meadows covered with flowers such as are seen in English fields, and here only do forests of oak, beech and chestnut cover a large proportion of the area.
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  • The forest, with which it is densely covered, consists of oak, beech, ash and fir, and the scenery, especially on the main side, between Gemiinden and Lohr, is impressive.
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  • It is an agricultural district, producing cocoons and tobacco, and there are large forests of oak, beech and fir.
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  • The specimens are very fragmentary, and all that can be said is that one of the forms may be allied to oak, another to fig, a third to Sapindus, and the fourth may perhaps be near to elm.
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  • Hosius and von der Marck describe, for instance, 12 species of oak from the Upper and 6 from the Lower strata, but no species is common to the two.
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  • No doubt this amber flora is still imperfectly known, but it is valuable as giving a good idea of the vegetation, during Oligocene times, of a mixed wood of pine and oak, in which there is a mixture of herbaceous and woody plants, such as would now be found under similar conditions.
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  • The plants of which the floral organs or perfect fruits are preserved include the amber-bearing Pinus succinifera, Smilax, Phoenix, the spike of an aroid, i i species of oak, 2 of chestnut, a beech, Urticaceae, 2 cinnamons and Trianthera among the Lauraceae, representatives of the Cistaceae, Ternstroemiaceae, Dilleniaceae (3 species of Hibbertia), Geraniaceae (Geranium and Erodium), Oxalidaceae, Acer, Celastraceae, Olacaceae, Pittosporaceae, Ilex (2 species), Euphorbiaceae, Umbelliferae (Chaerophyllum), Saxifragaceae (3 genera), Hamamelidaceae, Rosaceae, Connaraceae, Ericaceae (Andromeda and Clethra), Myrsinaceae (3 species), Rubiaceae, Sambucus (2 species), Santalaceae, Loranthaceae (3 species).
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  • The plants of Disco include, besides the plane and Sequoia, such warm-temperate trees as Ginkgo, oak, beech, poplar, maple, walnut, lime and magnolia.
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  • Among the more interesting plants of this deposit may be mentioned Torreya nucifera, now Japanese; an evergreen oak close to the common Quercus Ilex; Laurus canariensis, Apollonias canariensis, Persea carolinensis, and Ilex canariensis; Daphne pontica (a plant of Asia Minor); a species of box, scarcely differing from the English, and a bamboo.
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  • - Tannic acid is present in small quantities in the great majority of plants, but in notable quantity in gall-nuts, oak bark, bearberry leaves, rhatany root, catechu, kino, red gum, bael fruit, logwood and witch hazel, all of which are largely used as medicines.
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  • In the northeast the ridges are more numerous and higher than in the southwest, where White Oak Ridge and Taylor's Mountain are among the highest, although Missionary and Chickamauga Ridges are better known, because of their association with battles of the Civil War.
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  • But in most parts of the state there are mixed forests of white oak, red oak, ash, red gum, black gum, maple, hickory, chestnut, sycamore, magnolia, tulip tree, cherry, pecan, walnut, elm, beech, locust and persimmon.
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  • A cold gust of wind ripped brittle brown leaves from the limbs of old oak tree, tossing them carelessly in front of the headstone below.
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  • A tall figure lounged against a huge Oak tree beside the trail.
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  • As our most enthusiastic dream team member, she set out the chores for all of us as we gathered about the oak table.
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  • There was a listing for newly arrived L. Larkin, with an address on Oak Street.
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  • He shoved the massive oak door closed.
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  • "They can be pains in the ass," Katie said from her seat on a stone bench beneath a massive oak tree.
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  • Rhyn didn.t wait for him to settle himself but struck first with his long, oak bo, a blow that caught the Immortal by surprise.
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  • So Mrs. Martin is up there socializing with Mr. Martin in her heaven, unaware that Mr. Martin is balling his brains out with Annie across the hall—cloud—while Annie, in her heaven, is the happy homemaker up on Oak Street.
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  • Under the old Oak tree, among the cheerful flowers, was a headstone for Alexia Barnett.
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  • If we plant an acorn in the ground, an oak tree will grow.
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  • A tiny acorn of an idea grew rapidly into a massive oak.
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  • The palate is complex, with a combination of ripe fruit, citrus and oak, and a long and lingering aftertaste.
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  • The Rydal Wetland has much alder, willow and birch which produce their own special fungi, with oak around the drier edges.
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  • Customers can choose from willow, birch, cherry, alder, sweet chestnut, ash, beech chestnut, poplar or oak.
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  • Oak beams, exposed stone walls and a feature bed head make this cottage very alluring.
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  • Beyond, the three-sided altar rails are almost ghost-like, the oak is so silvered.
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  • Andrea Says: November 9th, 2005 at 6:18 pm aw no, I like the oak idea.
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  • At the moment, the blend is aging in new oak barrels.
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  • Work began on removing the remaining oil from the sunken battleship HMS Royal Oak.
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  • The oak beamed lounge with log fires in winter provides room to relax.
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  • There is a well-equipped kitchen with fitted oak units and three pretty bedrooms, the master bedroom having a four-poster bed.
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  • The reserve's woodland is predominantly oak - many of which are magnificent old pollards - with some areas dominated by beech.
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  • The predominant tree is oak, many arising from coppice shoots from an earlier woodland, and there are some planted beech.
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  • The church is famous for its wonderful early Tudor collection of just over fifty early 16th century carved oak bench ends.
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  • Relax in your own garden with oak picnic bench whilst listening to the owls.
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  • Much of the wych elm has been affected by Dutch Elm Disease and other trees include birch, sycamore and oak.
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  • Woodland is mainly birch although in sheltered places there is some mixed oak and elm.
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  • The original oak paneled dining room now makes a fine boardroom.
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  • The Zeppelin Oak - October 2nd, 1916 The airship was the original " stealth bomber.
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  • An oak bookcase that held the library of Scott's Terra Nova was also given.
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  • The Library contains a huge mahogany double secretaire bookcase and a walnut veneered oak collector's cabinet.
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  • There are no more sins to be sinned On the dead oak tree bough.
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  • Spanish Sherry casks and American bourbon Oak Casks pass rich and mellow flavors to the whiskey whilst it matures.
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  • Principally two types of cask are used - Oloroso sherry casks and American oak bourbon casks.
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  • The barren cages at Darley Oak provide them with nothing to live for.
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  • However Q. robur and Q. petraea trees with oak decline do not usually exhibit bleeding cankers of the main stem.
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  • The lovely old oak beams, warm carpeting and cheerful fabrics all combine to make your stay truly comfortable and relaxing.
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  • The smaller oak casks are then taken outside to age for a full 12 months.
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  • All the timber used is either pressure treated western red cedar or oak.
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  • Detailed assessment identified oak charcoal along with traces if charred cereal grains which included oat, barley and wheat along with fused plant ash.
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  • The CHARDONNAY offers refined citrus, peach and pineapple flavors with a gentle creamy, toasty oak finish.
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  • Bert and I made the very posh oak coffin with all the best trimmings and furniture.
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  • For the past year Colin has been studying full time at Oak Hill theological college.
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  • The Broxbourne Wood record differs in that although taken from oak, the wood is predominantly coniferous.
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  • Until recently, all draft beers were delivered to pubs in oak casks, and each brewery employed coopers to make and repair them.
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  • The rear label notes that it has been aged in barrels of American or French oak, made on site in their own cooperage.
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  • The adjacent woodland is a mixture of old coppice, ash and maple with semi-mature oak.
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  • Apple orchards are plentiful in favored situations, especially adjoining the Herefordshire border, and oak coppice abounds.
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  • These forest remnants take the form of small copses of Holm Oak where the total number of trees is less than thirty.
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  • Set in a beautiful oak copse divided between two parks amidst the shy red squirrels.
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  • He has made 2 wooden crosses in light-coloured oak.
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  • Like my previous oak cudgel, it's impossible to place an age on this stick.
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  • Tiled floor; plastered walls above oak paneled dado, probably from old pews; wood paneled ceiling.
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  • A Cotswold Style oak leather topped stool with chip carved decoration, circa 1925.
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  • Shelves and cupboards for plenty of storage. * Dining Room: Beautiful built-in oak dinette, comfortably seats four.
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  • Some of it was recorded in an old college, where they had this big oak dining room.
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  • It is expected that the effects of weathering will ensure that these new sections of oak become more discrete with time.
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  • After double distillation, the spirit was matured in new Limousin oak barrels for approximately one year.
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