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o-neill

o-neill

o-neill Sentence Examples

  • In 1641 the town was taken by Owen Roe O'Neill, but shortly afterwards it was recaptured by Lord Inchiquin.

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  • C. O'Neill, New Things and Old in St Thomas Aquinas (1909), with biography.

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  • In 1585 Lord Deputy Sir John Perrot undertook the shiring of Ulster (excluding the counties Antrim and Down, which had already taken shape); and his work, though of little immediate effect owing to the rising of Hugh O'Neill, served as a basis for the division of the territory at the plantation of Ulster in the reign of James I.

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  • O'NEILL, the name of an Irish family tracing descent from Niall, king of Ireland early in the 5th century, and known in Irish history and legend as Niall of the Nine Hostages.

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  • O'Neill, grandson of Neill, or Niall, the name O'Neill becoming about this time an hereditary family surname 2), whose grandson, Flaherty, became renowned for piety by going on a pilgrimage to Rome in 1030.

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  • Aedh (Hugh) O'Neill, chief of the Cinel Eoghain, or lord of Tir-Eoghain (Tir-Owen, Tyrone) at the end of the 12th century, was the first of the family to be brought prominently into conflict with the Anglo-Norman monarchy, whose pretensions he took the lead in disputing in Ulster.

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  • Niall Og O'Neill, one of the four kings of Ireland, accepted knighthood from Richard II.

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  • chief of the clan) on the death of his kinsman Domhnall Boy O'Neill; a dignity from which he was deposed in 1455 by his son Henry, who in 1463 was acknowledged as chief of the Irish kings by Henry VII.

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  • Conn O'Neill (c. 1480-1559), 1st earl of Tyrone, surnamed Bacach (the Lame), grandson of Henry O'Neill mentioned above, was the first of the O'Neills whom the attempts of the English in the 16th century to subjugate Ireland brought to the front as leaders of the native Irish.

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  • When Kildare became viceroy in 1524, O'Neill consented to act as his swordbearer in ceremonies of state; but his allegiance was not to be reckoned upon, and while ready enough to give verbal assurances of loyalty, he could not be persuaded to give hostages as security for his conduct; but Tyrone having been invaded in 1541 by Sir Anthony St Leger, the lord deputy, Conn delivered up his son as a hostage, attended a parliament held at Trim, and, crossing to England, made his submission at Greenwich to Henry VIII., who created him earl of Tyrone for life, and made him a present of money and a valuable gold chain.

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  • This event created a deep impression in Ireland, where O'Neill's submission to the English king, and his acceptance of an English title, were resented by his clansmen and dependents.

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  • Conn was twice married, Shane being the son of his first wife, a daughter of Hugh Boy O'Neill of Clanaboy.

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  • Shane O'Neill (C. 1530-1567) was a chieftain whose support was worth gaining by the English even during his father's lifetime; but rejecting overtures from the earl of Sussex, the lord deputy, Shane refused to help the English against the Scottish settlers on the coast of Antrim, allying himself instead with the MacDonnells, the most powerful of these immigrants.

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  • She accordingly agreed to recognize his claims to the chieftainship, thus throwing over Brian O'Neill, son of the murdered Matthew, The ceremony of "inauguration" among the ancient Irish clans was an elaborate and important one.

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  • O'Neill, however, refused to put himself in the power of Sussex without a guarantee for his safety; and his claims in other respects were so exacting that Elizabeth consented to measures being taken to subdue him and to restore Brian.

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  • Camden describes the wonder with which O'Neill's wild gallowglasses were seen in the English capital, with their heads bare, their long hair falling over their shoulders and clipped short in front above the eyes, and clothed in rough yellow shirts.

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  • Characteristically, she temporized; but finding that O'Neill was in danger of becoming a tool in the hands of Spanish intriguers, she permitted him to return to Ireland, recognizing him as "the O'Neill," and chieftain of Tyrone; though a reservation was made of the rights of Hugh O'Neill, who had meantime succeeded his brother Brian as baron of Dungannon, Brian having been murdered in April 1562 by his kinsman Turlough Luineach O'Neill.

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  • There were at this time three powerful contemporary members of the O'Neill family in Ireland - Shane, Turlough and Hugh, 2nd earl of Tyrone.

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  • Elizabeth at last authorized Sussex to take the field against Shane, but two several expeditions failed to accomplish anything except some depredation in O'Neill's country.

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  • Force having ignominiously failed, Elizabeth consented to treat, and hostilities were stopped on terms that gave O'Neill practically the whole of his demands.

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  • O'Neill now turned his hand against the MacDonnells, claiming that he was serving the queen of England in harrying the Scots.

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  • This victory greatly strengthened Shane O'Neill's position, and Sir Henry Sidney, who became lord deputy in 1566, declared to the earl of Leicester that Lucifer himself was not more puffed up with pride and ambition than O'Neill.

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  • O'Neill ravaged the Pale, failed in an attempt on Dundalk, made a truce with the MacDonnells, and sought help from the earl of Desmond.

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  • Failing in an attempt to arrange terms, and also in obtaining the help which he solicited from France, O'Neill was utterly routed by the O'Donnells at Letterkenny; and seeking safety in flight, he threw himself on the mercy of his enemies, the MacDonnells.

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  • In his private character Shane O'Neill was a brutal, uneducated savage.

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  • Turlough Luineach O'Neill (c. 1530-1595), earl of Clanconnell, was inaugurated chief of Tyrone on Shane's death.

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  • But his conduct giving rise to suspicions, an expedition under the earl of Essex was sent against him, which met with such doubtful success that in 1575 a treaty was arranged by which O'Neill received extensive grants of lands and permission to employ three hundred Scottish mercenaries.

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  • After several years of rivalry and much fighting between the two relatives, Turlough resigned the headship of the clan in favour of Hugh, who was inaugurated O'Neill in 1593.

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  • Hugh O'Neill (c. 1540-1616), 2nd earl (known as the great earl) of Tyrone, was the second son of Matthew, reputed illegitimate son of Conn, 1st earl of Tyrone.'

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  • This increased his anxiety to temporize, which he did with signal success for more than two years, making ' The grave doubt as to the paternity of Matthew involved a doubt whether the great earl of Tyrone and his equally famous nephew Owen Roe had in fact any O'Neill blood in their veins.

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  • Acting on the queen's explicit instructions, Essex, after some ill-managed operations, had a meeting with Tyrone at a ford on the Lagan on th 7th of September 1599, when a truce was arranged; but Elizabeth was displeased by the favourable conditions allowed to the O'Neill and by Essex's treatment of him as an equal.

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  • In May of the same year Sir Henry Docwra, at the head of a considerable army, took up a position at Derry, while Mountjoy marched from Westmeath to Newry to support him, compelling O'Neill to retire to Armagh, a large reward having been offered for his capture alive or dead.

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  • SIR Phelim O'Neill (c. 1603-1653), a kinsman and younger contemporary of the earl of Tyrone, took a prominent part in the rebellion of 1641.

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  • During the summer his fortunes ebbed, and he was soon superseded by his kinsman Owen Roe O'Neill, who returned from military service abroad at the end of July.

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  • Owen Roe O'Neill (c. 1590-1649), one of the most celebrated of the O'Neills, the subject of the well-known ballad "The Lament for Owen Roe," was the son of Art O'Neill, a younger brother of Hugh, 2nd earl of Tyrone.

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  • Although Owen Roe O'Neill possessed the qualities of a general, the struggle dragged on inconclusively for three or four years.

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  • In March 1646 a cessation of hostilities was arranged between Ormonde and the Catholics; and O'Neill, furnished with supplies by the papal nuncio, Rinuccini, turned against the Scottish parliamentary army under General Monro, who had been operating with fluctuating success in Ireland since April 1642.

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  • On the 5th of June 1646 O'Neill utterly routed Monro at Benburb, on the Blackwater; but, being summoned to the south by Rinuccini, he failed to take advantage of the victory, and suffered Monro to remain unmolested at Carrickfergus.

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  • For the next two years confusion reigned supreme among the numerous factions in Ireland, O'Neill supporting the party led by Rinuccini, though continuing to profess loyalty to Ormonde as the king of England's representative.

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  • O'Neill's chief need was supplies for his forces, and failing to obtain them from Monck he turned once more to Ormonde and the Catholic confederates, with whom he prepared to co-operate more earnestly when Cromwell's arrival in Ireland in August 1649 brought the Catholic party face to face with serious danger.

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  • The alliance between Owen Roe and Ormonde had been opposed by Phelim O'Neill, who after his kinsman's death expected to be restored to his former position of command.

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  • Phelim married a daughter of the marquis of Huntly, by whom he had a son Gordon O'Neill, who was member of parliament for Tyrone in 1689; fought for the king at the siege of Derry and at the battles of Aughrim and the 1 See W.

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  • Daniel O'Neill (c. 1612-1664), son of Conn MacNeill MacFagartach O'Neill, a member of the Clanaboy branch of the family, whose wife was a sister of Owen Roe, was prominent in the Civil Wars.

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  • He then went to Ireland to negotiate between Ormonde and his uncle, Owen Roe O'Neill.

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  • Released in 1652 on the representation of the Spanish ambassador that O'Neill was a Spanish subject, he repaired to Spain, whence he wrote to Charles II.

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  • Neill Mor's great-greatgrandson, Henry O'Neill, was created baronet of Killeleagh in 1666.

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  • His son, Sir Neill O'Neill fought for James II.

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  • Through an elder line from Neill Mor was descended Brian Mac Phelim O'Neill, who was treacherously seized in 1573 by the earl of Essex, whom he was hospitably entertaining, and executed together with his wife and brother, some two hundred of his clan being at the same time massacred by the orders of Essex.

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  • But John O'Neill (1740-1798), who represented Randalstown in the Irish parliament 1761-1783, and the county of Antrim from the latter year till his death, took an active part in debate on the popular side, being a strong supporter of Catholic emancipation.

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  • In 1793 he was raised to the peerage of Ireland as Baron O'Neill of Shane's Castle, and in 1795 was created a viscount.

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  • In defending the town of Antrim against the rebels in 1798 O'Neill received wounds from which he died on the 18th of June, being succeeded as Viscount O'Neill by his son Charles Henry St John (1779-1841), who in 1800 was created Earl O'Neill.

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  • Dying unmarried, when the earldom therefore became extinct, Charles was succeeded as Viscount O'Neill by his brother John Bruce Richard (1780-1855), a general in the British army; on whose death without issue in 1855 the male line in the United Kingdom became extinct.

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  • 1721), eldest son of John O'Neill of Shane's Castle.

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  • Gilbert, History of the Viceroys of Ireland (Dublin, 1865), and, especially for Owen Roe O'Neill, Contemporary History of Affairs in Ireland, 1641-1652 (Irish Archaeol.

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  • Taylor, Owen Roe O'Neill (London, 1896); John Mitchell, Life and Times of Hugh, Earl of Tyrone, with an Account of his Predecessors, Con, Shane, Turlough (Dublin, 1846); L.

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  • For the O'Neills of the 18th century, and especially the 1st Viscount O'Neill, see The Charlemont Papers, and F.

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  • Eliza O'neill >>

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  • In 1286 Richard ravaged and subdued Connaught, and deposed Bryan O'Neill as chief native king, substituting a nominee of his own.

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  • The 4th earl (1601-1635) distinguished himself on the English side in O'Neill's rebellion and afterwards, and obtained the English earldom of St Albans in 1628, his son Ulick receiving further the Irish marquessate of Clanricarde (1646).

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  • Lieutenant O'Neill, British consul at Mozambique, writing in 1880, fixed at about 3000 the number then annually exported from the coast between the rivers Rovuma and Zambesi.

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  • At Newtonbreda, overlooking the Lagan, was the palace of Con O'Neill, whose sept was exterminated by Deputy Mountjoy in the reign of Queen Elizabeth.

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  • About the beginning of the 16th century, Belfast is described as a town and fortress, but it was in reality a mere fishing village in the hands of the house of O'Neill.

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  • The O'Neills, always opposed to the English, had forfeited every baronial right; but in 1552 Hugh O'Neill of Clandeboye promised allegiance to the reigning monarch, and obtained the castle of Carrickfergus, the town and fortress of Belfast, and all the surrounding lands.

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  • The turbulent successors of O'Neill having been routed by the English, the town and fortress were obtained by grant dated the 16th of November 1571 by Sir Thomas Smith, a favourite of Queen Elizabeth, but were afterwards forfeited by him to the lord deputy Sir Arthur Chichester, who, in 1612, was created Baron Chichester of Belfast.

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  • A monastery of Dominican friars, founded by O'Reilly, chieftain of the Brenny, formerly existed here, and became the burial-place of the celebrated Irish general, Owen O'Neill, who died as_ is supposed by poison, in 1649, at Cloughoughter.

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  • In 1865, through a companion in arms named O'Neill, he was brought into contact with Fenianism, and having learnt of the Fenian plot against Canada, he mentioned the designs when writing home to his father.

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  • In 1641 it declared for the Roman Catholic party, and in 1650 it was gallantly defended by Hugh O'Neill against the English under Cromwell.

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  • Armagh itself fell before the king Brian Boroime, who was buried here; and before Edward Bruce in 1315, while previous to the English war after the Reformation, it had witnessed the struggles of Shane O'Neill (1564).

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  • It had a full share in the several Irish wars, being sacked by Edward Bruce (1315) and by O'Neill (1538); and it was taken by the Irish and recaptured by the English in the wars of 1641, and was occupied later by the forces of James II.

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  • O'Neill, geologists; H.

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  • Like the family of O'Neill, that of O'Donnell was descended from Niall of the Nine Hostages, king of Ireland at the beginning of the 5th century; the O'Neills, or Cinel l Owen, tracing their pedigree to Owen (Eoghan), and the O'Donnells, or Cinel Connell, to Conall Gulban, both sons of Niall.

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  • chief of the clan, in 1248, made a successful inroad into Tyrone against Brian O'Neill in 1252.

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  • O'Donnell while still incapacitated by his wound was summoned by Brian O'Neill to give hostages in token of submission.

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  • Carried on a litter at the head of his clan he gave battle to O'Neill, whom he defeated with severe loss in prisoners and cattle; but he died of his wound immediately afterwards near Letterkenny, and was succeeded in the chieftainship by his brother Donnell Oge, who returned from Scotland in time to withstand successfully the demands of O'Neill.

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  • Conn Bacach O'Neill, ist earl of Tyrone, determined to bring the O'Donnells under thorough subjection.

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  • Supported by several septs of Munster and Connaught, and assisted also by English contingents and by the MacDonnells of Antrim, O'Neill took the castle of Ballyshannon, and after devastating a large part of Tyrconnel he encamped at Knockavoe, near Strabane.

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  • Conn O'Neill was a relative of Gerald Fitzgerald, and this event accordingly led to the formation of the Geraldine League, a federation which combined the O'Neills, the O'Donnells, the O'Briens of Thomond, and other powerful clans; the primary object of which was to restore Gerald to the earldom of Kildare, but which afterwards aimed at the complete overthrow of English rule in Ireland.

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  • In August 1539 Manus O'Donnell and Conn O'Neill were defeated with heavy loss by the lord deputy at Lake Bellahoe, in Monaghan, which crippled their power for many years.

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  • In 1542 he went to England and presented himself, together with Conn O'Neill and other Irish chiefs, before Henry VIII., who promised to make him earl of Tyrconnel, though he refused O'Donnell's request to be made earl of Sligo.

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  • His first wife, Joan O'Reilly, was the mother of Calvagh, and two daughters, both of whom married O'Neills; the younger, Margaret, was wife of the famous rebel Shane O'Neill.

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  • Hugh then appealed to Shane O'Neill, who invaded Tyrconnel at the head of a large army in 1557, desiring to make himself supreme throughout Ulster, and encamped on the shore of Lough Swilly.

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  • Calvagh, acting apparently on the advice of his father, who was his prisoner and who remembered the successful night attack on Conn O'Neill at Knockavoe in 1522, surprised the O'Neills in their camp at night and routed them with the loss of all their spoils.

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  • Calvagh was then recognized by the English government as lord of Tyrconnel; but in 1561 he and his wife were captured by Shane O'Neill in the monastery of Kildonnell.

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  • His wife, Catherine Maclean, who had previously been the wife of the earl of Argyll, was kept by Shane O'Neill as his mistress and bore him several children, though grossly ill-treated by her savage captor; Calvagh himself was subjected to atrocious torture"during the three years that he remained O'Neill's prisoner.

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  • Calvagh, however, died in the same year, and as his son Conn was a prisoner in the hands of Shane O'Neill, his half-brother Hugh MacManus was inaugurated The O'Donnell in his place.

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  • Hugh, who in the family feud with Calvagh had allied himself with O'Neill, now turned round and combined with the English to crush the hereditary enemy of his family; and in 1567 he utterly routed Shane at Letterkenny with the loss of 1300 men, compelling him to seek refuge with the MacDonnells of Antrim, by whom he was treacherously put to death.

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  • Hugh Roe O'Donnell (1572-1602), eldest son of Hugh MacManus O'Donnell, and grandson of Manus O'Donnell by his second marriage with Judith O'Neill, was the most celebrated member of his clan.

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  • His mother was Ineen Dubh, daughter of James MacDonnell of Kintyre; his sister was the second wife of Hugh O'Neill, 2nd earl of Tyrone.

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  • Red Hugh lost no time in leading an expedition against Turlough Luineach O'Neill, then at war with his kinsman Hugh, earl of Tyrone, with whom O'Donnell was in alliance.

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  • See O'NEILL, and the authorities there cited.

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  • Smith and a Mr O'Neill, both members of the Church Missionary Society, were in the same year murdered on Ukerewe Island.

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  • On the 7th of June 1798 there was a smart action in the town between the king's troops and a large body of rebels, in which the latter were defeated, and Lord O'Neill mortally wounded.

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  • In 973 his son Domnall, in alliance with Amlaib, defeated the high-king Domnall O'Neill at Cell Mona (Kilmoon in Co.

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  • This Domnall O'Neill, son of Muirchertach, son of Niall Glundub, was the first to adopt the name O'Neill (Ir.

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  • Even adulterine bastardy was no bar to a man becoming chief of his tribe, as in the case of Hugh O'Neill, earl of Tyrone.

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  • Supported by O'Neill and other chiefs, Edward government.

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  • Down and Louth paid black rent to O'Neill, Meath and Kildare to O'Connor, Wexford to the Kavanaghs, Kilkenny and Tipperary to O'Carroll, Limerick to the O'Briens, and Cork to the MacCarthies.

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  • [From Anglo-Norman Invasion] Butler and Geraldine, O'Neill and O'Donnell, continued to spill each other's blood, but the feudal and tribal systems were alike doomed.

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  • O'Neill and O'Brien went to London to be invested as earls of Tyrone and Thomond respectively.

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  • under the protection of Conn O'Neill, " prince of the Irish of Ulster," came to Ireland towards the end of Henry's reign, and helped to keep alive the Roman tradition.

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  • Her father had conferred the earldom of Tyrone on Conn Bacach O'Neill, with remainder to his supposed son Matthew, created baron of Dungannon, the offspring of a g p g O'Neill.

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  • When Tyrone died, Matthew's son, Brian O'Neill, baron of Dungannon, claimed his earldom under the patent.

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  • Shane being chosen O'Neill by his tribe claimed to be chief by election, and earl as Conn's lawful son.

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  • He treacherously captured Sir Brian O'Neill and massacred his followers.

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  • In 1584 Hugh O'Neill, if O'Neill he was (being second son of Matthew, mentioned above), became chief of part of Tyrone; in 1587 he obtained the coveted earldom, and in 1593 was the admitted head of the whole tribe.

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  • Londonderry, Enniskillen, Coleraine, Carrickfergus and some other places defied Sir Phelim O'Neill's xiv.

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  • Trained in foreign wars, Owen Roe O'Neill gradually formed a powerful army among the Ulster Irish, and showed many of the qualities of a skilful general.

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  • There are Old-Irish Catholics, under pope's nuncios, under Abba O'Teague of the excommunications, and Owen Roe O'Neill, demanding not religious freedom only, but what we now call ` repeal of the union,' and unable to agree with Catholics of the English Pale.

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  • Rinuccini took part in the proceedings, but as his demands were ignored he refused to recognize the peace which was concluded in March 1646, and gaining the support of the Irish general, Owen Roe O'Neill, he used all his influence, both ecclesiastical and political., to prevent its acceptance by others.

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  • O'Neill had to look away since he couldn't bear the implied reproach.

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  • anxious glances at O'Neill's scorched crotch.

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  • John O'Neill should be well known to Nerve readers, having provided the breathtaking backdrops for our last two covers.

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  • Top scorer was Tom O'Neill (twin brother of James) also making his debut.

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  • The existing management team retained a significant interest in the business along with the new Chief Executive Tony O'Neill.

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  • culpable homicide of his young assistant, John O'Neill.

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  • first time in years, Jonathan " Jack " O'Neill had cried.

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  • Comments England manager front-runner and Newcastle Utd target Martin O'Neill is not qualified for Newcastle job, but he is for England.

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  • In 1840, a Glasgow chimney sweep named Francis Hughes was charged with the culpable homicide of his young assistant, John O'Neill.

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  • Prof Luke O'Neill provided a keynote talk on the functioning of innate immunity at the mucosal barrier.

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  • incipient signs of O'Neill obduracy and kicked him.

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  • mayor of the city, Cha O'Neill also welcomed delegates to the town.

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  • O'Neill begins negotiations for an alliance with the Royalists.

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  • On several occasions, House Speaker Tip O'Neill received 5 million pieces of mail in a single day.. .

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  • finishing just 16 secs behind to take second place was Lauren O'Neill from Halifax S.C in 44mins 29secs.

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  • secretary O'Neill in an international.

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  • Colonel O'Neill could already hear the sniggers in the Pentagon.

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  • Ryan O'Neill Fantastic site and Forum Board Keep up the great work jack sparrow 1 of the best teams in the north east.

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  • subs not used: Lee Roche, Matt O'Neill.

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  • For the first time in years, Jonathan " Jack " O'Neill had cried.

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  • treasury secretary O'Neill in an international.

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  • versatile actress, equally at home with the works of Shakespeare or O'Neill.

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  • In 1641 the town was taken by Owen Roe O'Neill, but shortly afterwards it was recaptured by Lord Inchiquin.

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  • C. O'Neill, New Things and Old in St Thomas Aquinas (1909), with biography.

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  • In 1585 Lord Deputy Sir John Perrot undertook the shiring of Ulster (excluding the counties Antrim and Down, which had already taken shape); and his work, though of little immediate effect owing to the rising of Hugh O'Neill, served as a basis for the division of the territory at the plantation of Ulster in the reign of James I.

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  • O'NEILL, the name of an Irish family tracing descent from Niall, king of Ireland early in the 5th century, and known in Irish history and legend as Niall of the Nine Hostages.

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  • O'Neill, grandson of Neill, or Niall, the name O'Neill becoming about this time an hereditary family surname 2), whose grandson, Flaherty, became renowned for piety by going on a pilgrimage to Rome in 1030.

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  • Aedh (Hugh) O'Neill, chief of the Cinel Eoghain, or lord of Tir-Eoghain (Tir-Owen, Tyrone) at the end of the 12th century, was the first of the family to be brought prominently into conflict with the Anglo-Norman monarchy, whose pretensions he took the lead in disputing in Ulster.

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  • It was probably his son or nephew (for the relationship is uncertain, the genealogies of the O'Neills being rendered obscure by the contemporaneous occurrence of the same name in different branches of the family) Hugh O'Neill, lord of Tyrone, who was styled "Head of the liberality and valour of the Irish."

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  • Niall Og O'Neill, one of the four kings of Ireland, accepted knighthood from Richard II.

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  • of England; and his son Eoghan formally acknowledged the supremacy of the English crown, though he afterwards ravaged the Pale, and was inaugurated "the O'Neill" (i.e.

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  • chief of the clan) on the death of his kinsman Domhnall Boy O'Neill; a dignity from which he was deposed in 1455 by his son Henry, who in 1463 was acknowledged as chief of the Irish kings by Henry VII.

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  • Contemporary with him was Neill Mor O'Neill (see below), lord of Clanaboy, from whose son Brian was descended the branch of the O'Neills who, settling in Portugal in the 18th century, became prominent among the Portuguese nobility, and who at the present day are the representatives in the male line of the ancient Irish kings of the house of O'Neill.

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  • Conn O'Neill (c. 1480-1559), 1st earl of Tyrone, surnamed Bacach (the Lame), grandson of Henry O'Neill mentioned above, was the first of the O'Neills whom the attempts of the English in the 16th century to subjugate Ireland brought to the front as leaders of the native Irish.

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  • When Kildare became viceroy in 1524, O'Neill consented to act as his swordbearer in ceremonies of state; but his allegiance was not to be reckoned upon, and while ready enough to give verbal assurances of loyalty, he could not be persuaded to give hostages as security for his conduct; but Tyrone having been invaded in 1541 by Sir Anthony St Leger, the lord deputy, Conn delivered up his son as a hostage, attended a parliament held at Trim, and, crossing to England, made his submission at Greenwich to Henry VIII., who created him earl of Tyrone for life, and made him a present of money and a valuable gold chain.

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  • This event created a deep impression in Ireland, where O'Neill's submission to the English king, and his acceptance of an English title, were resented by his clansmen and dependents.

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  • For not only did the nomination of O'Neill's reputed son Matthew as his heir with the title of baron of Dungannon by the English king conflict with the Irish custom of tanistry which regulated the chieftainship of the Irish clans, but Matthew, if indeed he was O'Neill's son at all, was illegitimate; while Shane, Conn's eldest legitimate son, was not the man to submit tamely to any invasion of his rights.

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  • Conn was twice married, Shane being the son of his first wife, a daughter of Hugh Boy O'Neill of Clanaboy.

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  • Shane O'Neill (C. 1530-1567) was a chieftain whose support was worth gaining by the English even during his father's lifetime; but rejecting overtures from the earl of Sussex, the lord deputy, Shane refused to help the English against the Scottish settlers on the coast of Antrim, allying himself instead with the MacDonnells, the most powerful of these immigrants.

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  • Nevertheless Queen Elizabeth, on succeeding to the English throne, was disposed to come to terms with Shane, who after his father's death was de facto chief of the formidable O'Neill clan.

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  • She accordingly agreed to recognize his claims to the chieftainship, thus throwing over Brian O'Neill, son of the murdered Matthew, The ceremony of "inauguration" among the ancient Irish clans was an elaborate and important one.

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  • O'Neill, however, refused to put himself in the power of Sussex without a guarantee for his safety; and his claims in other respects were so exacting that Elizabeth consented to measures being taken to subdue him and to restore Brian.

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  • Sussex, indignant at Shane's request for his sister's hand in marriage, and his demand for the withdrawal of the English garrison from Armagh, was not supported by the queen, who sent the earl of Kildare to arrange terms with O'Neill.

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  • Camden describes the wonder with which O'Neill's wild gallowglasses were seen in the English capital, with their heads bare, their long hair falling over their shoulders and clipped short in front above the eyes, and clothed in rough yellow shirts.

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  • Characteristically, she temporized; but finding that O'Neill was in danger of becoming a tool in the hands of Spanish intriguers, she permitted him to return to Ireland, recognizing him as "the O'Neill," and chieftain of Tyrone; though a reservation was made of the rights of Hugh O'Neill, who had meantime succeeded his brother Brian as baron of Dungannon, Brian having been murdered in April 1562 by his kinsman Turlough Luineach O'Neill.

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  • There were at this time three powerful contemporary members of the O'Neill family in Ireland - Shane, Turlough and Hugh, 2nd earl of Tyrone.

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  • Turlough had been elected tanist (see Tanistry) when his cousin Shane was inaugurated the O'Neill, and he schemed to supplant him in the higher dignity during Shane's absence in London.

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  • Elizabeth at last authorized Sussex to take the field against Shane, but two several expeditions failed to accomplish anything except some depredation in O'Neill's country.

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  • Force having ignominiously failed, Elizabeth consented to treat, and hostilities were stopped on terms that gave O'Neill practically the whole of his demands.

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  • O'Neill now turned his hand against the MacDonnells, claiming that he was serving the queen of England in harrying the Scots.

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  • This victory greatly strengthened Shane O'Neill's position, and Sir Henry Sidney, who became lord deputy in 1566, declared to the earl of Leicester that Lucifer himself was not more puffed up with pride and ambition than O'Neill.

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  • O'Neill ravaged the Pale, failed in an attempt on Dundalk, made a truce with the MacDonnells, and sought help from the earl of Desmond.

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  • Failing in an attempt to arrange terms, and also in obtaining the help which he solicited from France, O'Neill was utterly routed by the O'Donnells at Letterkenny; and seeking safety in flight, he threw himself on the mercy of his enemies, the MacDonnells.

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  • In his private character Shane O'Neill was a brutal, uneducated savage.

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  • Turlough Luineach O'Neill (c. 1530-1595), earl of Clanconnell, was inaugurated chief of Tyrone on Shane's death.

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  • But his conduct giving rise to suspicions, an expedition under the earl of Essex was sent against him, which met with such doubtful success that in 1575 a treaty was arranged by which O'Neill received extensive grants of lands and permission to employ three hundred Scottish mercenaries.

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  • After several years of rivalry and much fighting between the two relatives, Turlough resigned the headship of the clan in favour of Hugh, who was inaugurated O'Neill in 1593.

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  • Hugh O'Neill (c. 1540-1616), 2nd earl (known as the great earl) of Tyrone, was the second son of Matthew, reputed illegitimate son of Conn, 1st earl of Tyrone.'

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  • Hugh's constant disputes with Turlough were fomented by the English with a view to weakening the power of the O'Neills, but after Hugh's inauguration as the O'Neill on Turlough's resignation in 1593, he was left without a rival in the north.

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  • This increased his anxiety to temporize, which he did with signal success for more than two years, making ' The grave doubt as to the paternity of Matthew involved a doubt whether the great earl of Tyrone and his equally famous nephew Owen Roe had in fact any O'Neill blood in their veins.

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  • If 'the earl had known how to profit by this victory, he might now have successfully withstood the English power in Ireland; for in every part of Ireland - and especially in the south, where James Fitzthomas Fitzgerald with O'Neill's support was asserting his claim to the earldom of Desmond at the head of a formidable army of Geraldine clansmen - discontent broke into flame.

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  • Acting on the queen's explicit instructions, Essex, after some ill-managed operations, had a meeting with Tyrone at a ford on the Lagan on th 7th of September 1599, when a truce was arranged; but Elizabeth was displeased by the favourable conditions allowed to the O'Neill and by Essex's treatment of him as an equal.

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  • In May of the same year Sir Henry Docwra, at the head of a considerable army, took up a position at Derry, while Mountjoy marched from Westmeath to Newry to support him, compelling O'Neill to retire to Armagh, a large reward having been offered for his capture alive or dead.

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  • SIR Phelim O'Neill (c. 1603-1653), a kinsman and younger contemporary of the earl of Tyrone, took a prominent part in the rebellion of 1641.

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  • During the summer his fortunes ebbed, and he was soon superseded by his kinsman Owen Roe O'Neill, who returned from military service abroad at the end of July.

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  • Owen Roe O'Neill (c. 1590-1649), one of the most celebrated of the O'Neills, the subject of the well-known ballad "The Lament for Owen Roe," was the son of Art O'Neill, a younger brother of Hugh, 2nd earl of Tyrone.

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  • Although Owen Roe O'Neill possessed the qualities of a general, the struggle dragged on inconclusively for three or four years.

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  • In March 1646 a cessation of hostilities was arranged between Ormonde and the Catholics; and O'Neill, furnished with supplies by the papal nuncio, Rinuccini, turned against the Scottish parliamentary army under General Monro, who had been operating with fluctuating success in Ireland since April 1642.

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  • On the 5th of June 1646 O'Neill utterly routed Monro at Benburb, on the Blackwater; but, being summoned to the south by Rinuccini, he failed to take advantage of the victory, and suffered Monro to remain unmolested at Carrickfergus.

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  • For the next two years confusion reigned supreme among the numerous factions in Ireland, O'Neill supporting the party led by Rinuccini, though continuing to profess loyalty to Ormonde as the king of England's representative.

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  • O'Neill's chief need was supplies for his forces, and failing to obtain them from Monck he turned once more to Ormonde and the Catholic confederates, with whom he prepared to co-operate more earnestly when Cromwell's arrival in Ireland in August 1649 brought the Catholic party face to face with serious danger.

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  • The alliance between Owen Roe and Ormonde had been opposed by Phelim O'Neill, who after his kinsman's death expected to be restored to his former position of command.

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  • Phelim married a daughter of the marquis of Huntly, by whom he had a son Gordon O'Neill, who was member of parliament for Tyrone in 1689; fought for the king at the siege of Derry and at the battles of Aughrim and the 1 See W.

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  • Daniel O'Neill (c. 1612-1664), son of Conn MacNeill MacFagartach O'Neill, a member of the Clanaboy branch of the family, whose wife was a sister of Owen Roe, was prominent in the Civil Wars.

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  • He then went to Ireland to negotiate between Ormonde and his uncle, Owen Roe O'Neill.

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  • Hugh O'Neill (d.

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  • Released in 1652 on the representation of the Spanish ambassador that O'Neill was a Spanish subject, he repaired to Spain, whence he wrote to Charles II.

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  • The Clanaboy (or Clandeboye) branch of the O'Neills descended from the ancient kings through Neill Mor O'Neill, lord of Clanaboy in the time of Henry VIII., ancestor (as mentioned above) of the Portuguese O'Neills.

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  • Neill Mor's great-greatgrandson, Henry O'Neill, was created baronet of Killeleagh in 1666.

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  • His son, Sir Neill O'Neill fought for James II.

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  • Through an elder line from Neill Mor was descended Brian Mac Phelim O'Neill, who was treacherously seized in 1573 by the earl of Essex, whom he was hospitably entertaining, and executed together with his wife and brother, some two hundred of his clan being at the same time massacred by the orders of Essex.

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  • (See Essex, Walter Devereux, 1st earl of.) Sir Brian Mac Phelim's son, Shane Mac Brian O'Neill, Was the last lord of Clanaboy, and from him the family castle of Edenduffcarrick, on the shore of Lough Neagh in Co.

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  • But John O'Neill (1740-1798), who represented Randalstown in the Irish parliament 1761-1783, and the county of Antrim from the latter year till his death, took an active part in debate on the popular side, being a strong supporter of Catholic emancipation.

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  • In 1793 he was raised to the peerage of Ireland as Baron O'Neill of Shane's Castle, and in 1795 was created a viscount.

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  • In defending the town of Antrim against the rebels in 1798 O'Neill received wounds from which he died on the 18th of June, being succeeded as Viscount O'Neill by his son Charles Henry St John (1779-1841), who in 1800 was created Earl O'Neill.

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  • Dying unmarried, when the earldom therefore became extinct, Charles was succeeded as Viscount O'Neill by his brother John Bruce Richard (1780-1855), a general in the British army; on whose death without issue in 1855 the male line in the United Kingdom became extinct.

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  • 1721), eldest son of John O'Neill of Shane's Castle.

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  • William Chichester (1813-1883), ISt Baron O'Neill, a clergyman, on succeeding to the estates as heir-general, assumed by royal licence the surname and arms of O'Neill; and in 1868 was created Baron O'Neill of Shane's Castle.

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  • On his death in 1883 he was succeeded by his son Edward, 2nd Baron O'Neill (b.

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  • Gilbert, History of the Viceroys of Ireland (Dublin, 1865), and, especially for Owen Roe O'Neill, Contemporary History of Affairs in Ireland, 1641-1652 (Irish Archaeol.

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  • Soc., 3 vols., Dublin, 1879); also History of the Irish Confederation and the War in Ireland (Dublin, 1882); John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees (Dublin, 1881); The Montgomery MSS., " The Flight of the Earls, 1607" (p. 767), edited by George Hill (Belfast, 1878); Thomas Carte, History of the Life of James, Duke of Ormonde (3 vols., London, 1 735); C. P. Meehan, Fate and Fortunes of Hugh O'Neill, Earl of Tyrone, and Rory O'Donel, Earl of Tyrconnel (Dublin, 1886); Richard Bagwell, Ireland under the Tudors, with an Account of the Earlier History (3 vols., London, 1885-1890); J.

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  • Taylor, Owen Roe O'Neill (London, 1896); John Mitchell, Life and Times of Hugh, Earl of Tyrone, with an Account of his Predecessors, Con, Shane, Turlough (Dublin, 1846); L.

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  • For the O'Neills of the 18th century, and especially the 1st Viscount O'Neill, see The Charlemont Papers, and F.

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  • Eliza O'neill >>

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  • In 1286 Richard ravaged and subdued Connaught, and deposed Bryan O'Neill as chief native king, substituting a nominee of his own.

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  • The 4th earl (1601-1635) distinguished himself on the English side in O'Neill's rebellion and afterwards, and obtained the English earldom of St Albans in 1628, his son Ulick receiving further the Irish marquessate of Clanricarde (1646).

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  • Lieutenant O'Neill, British consul at Mozambique, writing in 1880, fixed at about 3000 the number then annually exported from the coast between the rivers Rovuma and Zambesi.

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  • At Newtonbreda, overlooking the Lagan, was the palace of Con O'Neill, whose sept was exterminated by Deputy Mountjoy in the reign of Queen Elizabeth.

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  • About the beginning of the 16th century, Belfast is described as a town and fortress, but it was in reality a mere fishing village in the hands of the house of O'Neill.

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  • The O'Neills, always opposed to the English, had forfeited every baronial right; but in 1552 Hugh O'Neill of Clandeboye promised allegiance to the reigning monarch, and obtained the castle of Carrickfergus, the town and fortress of Belfast, and all the surrounding lands.

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  • The turbulent successors of O'Neill having been routed by the English, the town and fortress were obtained by grant dated the 16th of November 1571 by Sir Thomas Smith, a favourite of Queen Elizabeth, but were afterwards forfeited by him to the lord deputy Sir Arthur Chichester, who, in 1612, was created Baron Chichester of Belfast.

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  • A monastery of Dominican friars, founded by O'Reilly, chieftain of the Brenny, formerly existed here, and became the burial-place of the celebrated Irish general, Owen O'Neill, who died as_ is supposed by poison, in 1649, at Cloughoughter.

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  • In 1865, through a companion in arms named O'Neill, he was brought into contact with Fenianism, and having learnt of the Fenian plot against Canada, he mentioned the designs when writing home to his father.

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  • O'Neill Daunt, Ireland and her Agitators; Lord Mountmorres, History of the Irish Parliament (2 vols., London, 1792) Horace Walpole, Memoirs of the Reign of George III.

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  • In 1641 it declared for the Roman Catholic party, and in 1650 it was gallantly defended by Hugh O'Neill against the English under Cromwell.

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  • Armagh itself fell before the king Brian Boroime, who was buried here; and before Edward Bruce in 1315, while previous to the English war after the Reformation, it had witnessed the struggles of Shane O'Neill (1564).

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  • It had a full share in the several Irish wars, being sacked by Edward Bruce (1315) and by O'Neill (1538); and it was taken by the Irish and recaptured by the English in the wars of 1641, and was occupied later by the forces of James II.

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  • But in 1607, by "the flight of the Earls" (see O'Neill), he was relieved of the presence of the two formidable Ulster chieftains, the earls of Tyrone and Tyrconnell.

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  • O'Neill, geologists; H.

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  • Like the family of O'Neill, that of O'Donnell was descended from Niall of the Nine Hostages, king of Ireland at the beginning of the 5th century; the O'Neills, or Cinel l Owen, tracing their pedigree to Owen (Eoghan), and the O'Donnells, or Cinel Connell, to Conall Gulban, both sons of Niall.

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  • chief of the clan, in 1248, made a successful inroad into Tyrone against Brian O'Neill in 1252.

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  • O'Donnell while still incapacitated by his wound was summoned by Brian O'Neill to give hostages in token of submission.

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  • Carried on a litter at the head of his clan he gave battle to O'Neill, whom he defeated with severe loss in prisoners and cattle; but he died of his wound immediately afterwards near Letterkenny, and was succeeded in the chieftainship by his brother Donnell Oge, who returned from Scotland in time to withstand successfully the demands of O'Neill.

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  • Conn Bacach O'Neill, ist earl of Tyrone, determined to bring the O'Donnells under thorough subjection.

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  • Supported by several septs of Munster and Connaught, and assisted also by English contingents and by the MacDonnells of Antrim, O'Neill took the castle of Ballyshannon, and after devastating a large part of Tyrconnel he encamped at Knockavoe, near Strabane.

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  • Conn O'Neill was a relative of Gerald Fitzgerald, and this event accordingly led to the formation of the Geraldine League, a federation which combined the O'Neills, the O'Donnells, the O'Briens of Thomond, and other powerful clans; the primary object of which was to restore Gerald to the earldom of Kildare, but which afterwards aimed at the complete overthrow of English rule in Ireland.

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  • In August 1539 Manus O'Donnell and Conn O'Neill were defeated with heavy loss by the lord deputy at Lake Bellahoe, in Monaghan, which crippled their power for many years.

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  • In 1542 he went to England and presented himself, together with Conn O'Neill and other Irish chiefs, before Henry VIII., who promised to make him earl of Tyrconnel, though he refused O'Donnell's request to be made earl of Sligo.

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  • His first wife, Joan O'Reilly, was the mother of Calvagh, and two daughters, both of whom married O'Neills; the younger, Margaret, was wife of the famous rebel Shane O'Neill.

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  • His second wife, Hugh's mother, by whom he was ancestor of the earls of Tyrconnel (see below), was Judith, sister of Conn Bacach O'Neill, ist earl of Tyrone, and aunt of Shane O'Neill.

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  • Hugh then appealed to Shane O'Neill, who invaded Tyrconnel at the head of a large army in 1557, desiring to make himself supreme throughout Ulster, and encamped on the shore of Lough Swilly.

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  • Calvagh, acting apparently on the advice of his father, who was his prisoner and who remembered the successful night attack on Conn O'Neill at Knockavoe in 1522, surprised the O'Neills in their camp at night and routed them with the loss of all their spoils.

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  • Calvagh was then recognized by the English government as lord of Tyrconnel; but in 1561 he and his wife were captured by Shane O'Neill in the monastery of Kildonnell.

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  • His wife, Catherine Maclean, who had previously been the wife of the earl of Argyll, was kept by Shane O'Neill as his mistress and bore him several children, though grossly ill-treated by her savage captor; Calvagh himself was subjected to atrocious torture"during the three years that he remained O'Neill's prisoner.

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  • Calvagh, however, died in the same year, and as his son Conn was a prisoner in the hands of Shane O'Neill, his half-brother Hugh MacManus was inaugurated The O'Donnell in his place.

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  • Hugh, who in the family feud with Calvagh had allied himself with O'Neill, now turned round and combined with the English to crush the hereditary enemy of his family; and in 1567 he utterly routed Shane at Letterkenny with the loss of 1300 men, compelling him to seek refuge with the MacDonnells of Antrim, by whom he was treacherously put to death.

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  • Hugh Roe O'Donnell (1572-1602), eldest son of Hugh MacManus O'Donnell, and grandson of Manus O'Donnell by his second marriage with Judith O'Neill, was the most celebrated member of his clan.

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  • His mother was Ineen Dubh, daughter of James MacDonnell of Kintyre; his sister was the second wife of Hugh O'Neill, 2nd earl of Tyrone.

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  • Red Hugh lost no time in leading an expedition against Turlough Luineach O'Neill, then at war with his kinsman Hugh, earl of Tyrone, with whom O'Donnell was in alliance.

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  • In September 1607 " the flight of the earls " (see O'Neill) took place, Tyrconnel and Tyrone reaching Rome in April 1608, where Tyrconnel died on the 28th of July.

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  • See O'NEILL, and the authorities there cited.

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  • Smith and a Mr O'Neill, both members of the Church Missionary Society, were in the same year murdered on Ukerewe Island.

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  • On the 7th of June 1798 there was a smart action in the town between the king's troops and a large body of rebels, in which the latter were defeated, and Lord O'Neill mortally wounded.

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  • In 973 his son Domnall, in alliance with Amlaib, defeated the high-king Domnall O'Neill at Cell Mona (Kilmoon in Co.

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  • This Domnall O'Neill, son of Muirchertach, son of Niall Glundub, was the first to adopt the name O'Neill (Ir.

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  • Even adulterine bastardy was no bar to a man becoming chief of his tribe, as in the case of Hugh O'Neill, earl of Tyrone.

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  • (See O'Neill.) The food of the Irish was very simple, consisting in the main of oaten cakes, cheese, curds, milk, butter, and the flesh of domestic animals both fresh and salted.

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  • Supported by O'Neill and other chiefs, Edward government.

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  • Down and Louth paid black rent to O'Neill, Meath and Kildare to O'Connor, Wexford to the Kavanaghs, Kilkenny and Tipperary to O'Carroll, Limerick to the O'Briens, and Cork to the MacCarthies.

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  • [From Anglo-Norman Invasion] Butler and Geraldine, O'Neill and O'Donnell, continued to spill each other's blood, but the feudal and tribal systems were alike doomed.

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  • O'Neill and O'Brien went to London to be invested as earls of Tyrone and Thomond respectively.

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  • under the protection of Conn O'Neill, " prince of the Irish of Ulster," came to Ireland towards the end of Henry's reign, and helped to keep alive the Roman tradition.

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  • Her father had conferred the earldom of Tyrone on Conn Bacach O'Neill, with remainder to his supposed son Matthew, created baron of Dungannon, the offspring of a g p g O'Neill.

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  • When Tyrone died, Matthew's son, Brian O'Neill, baron of Dungannon, claimed his earldom under the patent.

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  • Shane being chosen O'Neill by his tribe claimed to be chief by election, and earl as Conn's lawful son.

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  • Thus the English government was committed to the cause of one who was at best an adulterine bastard, while Shane appeared as champion of hereditary right (See O'Neill).

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  • He treacherously captured Sir Brian O'Neill and massacred his followers.

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  • In 1584 Hugh O'Neill, if O'Neill he was (being second son of Matthew, mentioned above), became chief of part of Tyrone; in 1587 he obtained the coveted earldom, and in 1593 was the admitted head of the whole tribe.

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  • Londonderry, Enniskillen, Coleraine, Carrickfergus and some other places defied Sir Phelim O'Neill's xiv.

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  • Trained in foreign wars, Owen Roe O'Neill gradually formed a powerful army among the Ulster Irish, and showed many of the qualities of a skilful general.

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  • There are Old-Irish Catholics, under pope's nuncios, under Abba O'Teague of the excommunications, and Owen Roe O'Neill, demanding not religious freedom only, but what we now call ` repeal of the union,' and unable to agree with Catholics of the English Pale.

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  • Rinuccini took part in the proceedings, but as his demands were ignored he refused to recognize the peace which was concluded in March 1646, and gaining the support of the Irish general, Owen Roe O'Neill, he used all his influence, both ecclesiastical and political., to prevent its acceptance by others.

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  • O'Neill observed that scrutiny of government had become so intense that officials never could have gotten away with that—and he was writing in the late 1980s.

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  • Fast-forward a couple of decades, and the Internet has done vastly more than O'Neill could have imagined to promote open information about government.

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  • In O'Neill's day, getting a copy of the federal budget meant writing away and buying a hefty paper copy.

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  • O'Neill had to look away - could n't bear the implied reproach.

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  • Finishing just 16 secs behind to take second place was Lauren O'Neill from Halifax S.C in 44mins 29secs.

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  • To sell his in the stands watching treasury secretary o'neill in an international.

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  • Colonel O'Neill could already hear the sniggers in the Pentagon.

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  • Ryan O'Neill Fantastic site and Forum Board Keep up the great work jack sparrow 1 of the best teams in the north east.

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  • Subs not used: Lee Roche, Matt O'Neill.

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  • Michael O'Neill, the council 's director of education said force-feeding uninterested pupils was no longer tenable.

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  • She was a versatile actress, equally at home with the works of Shakespeare or O'Neill.

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  • In this exclusive LoveToKnow Online interview, Mark O'Neill, a professional writer, blogger and editor, answers that question by describing his own path to online freelance writing.

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  • In this interview, Mark O'Neill describes how he rode the wave of this expansion, so that today he writes at his own blog, Better Than Therapy, and works full time as editor for the popular Internet technology blog MakeUseOf.

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  • They're both natives of Colombia who ended up as single mothers of young sons, although now Gloria has moved on to marrying Ed O'Neill's character, Jay Pritchett.

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  • If Birdwells are not as popular with new surfers as O'Neill, they are still touted as being of high quality and great for performance.

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  • Brands include Paul Frank, O'Neill and Aqua Swimwear, and many pairs are under $40.00.

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  • Roxy has locations all over the United States, as does its surf wear competitors such as O'Neill and Billabong.

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  • The O'Neill name is one of the biggest in the world of surfing, and O'Neill board shorts for men and women are hugely popular summer surf wear among serious wave riders.

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  • For decades, O'Neill has been one of the trusted names of quality bodysuits - suits that would stand up to the cold water of Northern California, especially in winter.

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  • The same care and attention to detail in design that went into the bodysuits was and still is applied to all the O'Neill line of swim and surf wear.

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  • O'Neill shorts are made with a patented fabric called Dynasuede that achieves all of this.

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  • Whether you want a plain short or one with a pattern, O'Neill has you covered.

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  • O'Neill board shorts stretch and move with you, allowing for maximum action and comfort.

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  • O'Neill board shorts for women are designed to sit on the hips and stay there.

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  • As with most swimwear, you really want to buy your first pair of O'Neill shorts after you've had a chance to try them on and see how the length and cut work for you.

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  • O'Neill surf and swimwear is sold in all surf shops and most shops that carry quality swim wear.

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  • O'Neill shorts are designed to be long-lasting, but if you're a serious surfer, you'll need more than one pair to get you through a season.

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  • O'Neill 24/7 Sleeveless Rashie Crew Shirt: Here's a rashie that certainly doesn't look like one.

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  • O'Neill Skin Tank Top Rash Guard: This tank top rashie offers the minimum amount of coverage of all the rash guard styles, even if it does offer sun protection on the meager amount of body it covers.

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  • O'Neill Printed Cap Sleeve Rashie: This model offers only the slightest hint of a sleeve and full coverage from front to back.

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  • If by "very cheap board shorts" you mean $10.00 or less, this route may not work for you, but if you want quality board shorts like O'Neill's at half the original price, you should keep an eye out for markdowns.

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  • Your absolute best bet in saving money on rash guards is to look for sales and other markdowns on good makes such as O'Neill.

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  • You can get brands like O'Neill, Quiksilver, Speedo and Body Glove for well below retail price.

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  • Rash Guard Shirt Co. has a great selection, especially of O'Neill rash guards.

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  • O'Neill also has a green hoodie made of 90% recycled bottles and plastics and printed with water-based ink, letting you be that much more a part of the healthy planet.

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  • They don't give the amount of detail that you can get from O'Neill, but it offers UV protection, long sleeves and a hood, along with a board short connector in the form of a loop and a mesh-lined back utility zippered pocket.

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  • O'Neill Skins Series Tee: O'Neill is one of the most trusted names in surfwear.

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  • O'Neill Skin Tank Top: The lightest protection you can have, this top features UV protection, ease of wear, a connector loop and odor resistance.

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  • O'Neill 50+ UPF Long Sleeve Crewneck Shirt: A high-performance shirt designed for maximum ergonomic performance and protection for a whole day in the sun.

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  • SG-1 is the designation assigned to Colonel Jack O'Neill (Richard Dean Anderson) when he was called back into service during the series pilot episode Children of the Gods.

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  • Captain Carter would eventually achieve the rank of Colonel over the course of the series and Colonel O'Neill would be promoted to Brigadier General in the series final two years.

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  • During the eighth season, Jack O'Neill assumed the head of Stargate command after Elizabeth Weir joined the Atlantis mission.

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  • General Henry "Hank" Landry (Beau Bridges): General Landry took control of Stargate Command upon General O'Neill's promotion (and portrayer Richard Dean Anderson's relocation to Los Angeles).

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  • The adventures of Jack O'Neill and his team captivated the imagination as they explored the universe and humanity via the Stargate.

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  • Although Daniel longed to go on the mission, General Jack O'Neill blocked him.

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  • For more than a decade, Stargate: SG-1 kept fans stepping through the iris with then Colonel and later General Jack O'Neill and Dr. Daniel Jackson.

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  • Like SG-1 novels, the Atlantis series follows the adventures of the Atlantis team in the Pegasus Galaxy and can feature guest appearances by SG-1 team members such as Daniel Jackson or Jack O'Neill.

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  • The series followed the adventures of the reunited Jack O'Neill (Richard Dean Anderson) and Doctor Daniel Jackson (Michael Shanks) as they battled Ra's "people," the parasitic Go' auld.

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