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o'connell

o'connell

o'connell Sentence Examples

  • On the site of the old court-house a colossal statue in white limestone of Daniel O'Connell was erected in 1865.

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  • Even the London street dogs, as Sydney Smith said, joined with O'Connell in barking" God save the Queen."Oxford seems to have been craving for notoriety; but it may be doubted whether the jury who tried him did right to pronounce his acquittal on the ground of insanity.

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  • Though a zealous supporter of repeal, he endeavoured to supplant O'Connell as the leader of the party, an attempt which aroused against him the popular antipathy of the Irish.

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  • There are also the statue to Sir Redmond Barry, first chancellor of the university, outside the public library; the Gordon statue in Spring Street, a replica of that in Trafalgar Square, London, and a statue of Daniel O'Connell, outside St Patrick's cathedral.

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  • Of these O'Connell bridge (formerly known as Carlisle) is the principal, as it connects the chief thoroughfare on the north side, namely Sackville (or O'Connell) Street, with Great Brunswick Street and others on the south.

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  • At the southern end of the street is Daniel O'Connell's monument, almost completed by John Henry Foley before his death, and erected in 1882.

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  • Crossing O'Connell bridge, the short Westmoreland Street strikes into a thoroughfare which traverses the entire city parallel with the river, and is known successively (from west to east) as James, Thomas, High, Castle, Dame, College and Great Brunswick streets.

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  • Grattan supported the veto, but a more extreme Catholic party was now arising in Ireland under the leadership of Daniel O'Connell, and Grattan's influence gradually declined.

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  • Lushington, T.Fowell Buxton, James Cropper, Daniel O'Connell and others, in which they declared their deliberate judgment that "its precepts were delusive," and "its real effects of the most dangerous nature."

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  • In the debate on the reform bill O'Connell stated that there was but one borough more rotten than East Looe and that was West Looe.

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  • DANIEL O'CONNELL (1775-1847), Irish statesman, known as "the Liberator," was born on the 6th of August 1775 near Cahirciveen, a small town in Kerry.

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  • While a boy he was adopted by his uncle, Maurice O'Connell of Derrynane, and sent to a school at Queenstown, one of the first which the state in those days allowed to be opened for Catholic teaching; and a few years afterwards he became a student, as was customary with Irish youths of his class, in the English colleges of St Omer and Douai in France.

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  • As an advocate, too, he stood in the very highest rank; in mere oratory he was surpassed by Plunket, and in rhetorical gifts by Bushe, the only ' See the account of O'Connell's uncle, Count Daniel O'Connell (1745-1833), to whose property he fell heir, in Mrs O'Connell's Last Colonel of the Irish Brigade (1892), and O'Callaghan's Irish Brigade in the Service of France (1870).

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  • To understand, however, O'Connell's greatness we must look to the field of Irish politics.

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  • O'Connell inaugurated a different policy, and had soon given the Catholic movement an energy it had not before possessed.

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  • O'Connell, having long before attained an undisputed and easy ascendancy, stood at the head of this great national movement; but it will be observed that, having been controlled from first to last by himself and the priesthood, it had little in common with the mob rule and violence which he had never ceased to regard with aversion.

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  • The result, unquestionably, was almost wholly due to the energy and genius of a single man, though the Catholic question would have been settled, in all probability, in the course of time; and it must be added that O'Connell's triumph, which showed what agitation could effect in Ireland, was far from doing his country unmixed good.

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  • O'Connell joined the Whigs on entering parliament, and gave effective aid to the cause of reform.

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  • It may be questioned whether O'Connell was not rather led than a leader in this; the movement, at least, passed beyond his control, and the country for many months was terrorized by scenes of appalling crime and bloodshed.

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  • Lord Grey, very properly, proposed measures of repression to put this anarchy down, and O'Connell opposed them with extreme vehemence, a seeming departure from his avowed principles, but natural in the case of a popular tribune.

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  • By this time O'Connell had attained a position of great eminence in the House of Commons: as a debater he stood in the very first rank, though he had entered St Stephen's after fifty; and his oratory, massive and strong in argument, although too often scurrilous and coarse, and marred by a bearing in which cringing flattery and rude bullying were strangely blended, made a powerful, if not a pleasing, impression.

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  • O'Connell steadily supported Lord Melbourne's government, gave it valuable aid in its general measures, and repeatedly expressed his cordial approval of its policy in advancing Irish Catholics to places of trust and power in the state, though personally he refused a high judicial office.

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  • O'Connell changed his policy as regards Ireland when Peel became minister in 1841.

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  • O'Connell, nevertheless, was sincere and even consistent in his conduct: he had denounced the union in early manhood as an obstacle to the Catholic cause; he had spoken against the measure in parliament; he believed that the claims of Ireland were set aside or slighted in what he deemed an alien assembly; and, though he had ceased for some years to demand repeal, and regarded it as rather a means than an end, he was throughout life an avowed repealer.

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  • Enormous meetings, convened by the priesthood, and directed or controlled by O'Connell, assembled in 1842-1843, and probably nine-tenths of the Irish Catholics were unanimous in the cry for repeal.

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  • O'Connell seems to have thought success certain; but he had not perceived the essential difference between his earlier agitation and this.

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  • A vast intended meeting was proclaimed unlawful, and in October 1843 O'Connell was arrested and held to bail, with ten or twelve of his principal followers.

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  • The spell, however, of O'Connell's power had vanished; his health had suffered much from a short confinement; he was verging upon his seventieth year; and he was alarmed and pained by the growth of a party in the repeal ranks who scoffed at his views, and advocated the revolutionary doctrines which he had always feared and abhorred.

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  • O'Connell died on the 15th of May 1847, at Genoa, whilst on his way to Rome.

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  • O'Connell was a remarkable man in every sense of the word, of splendid physique, and with all the attractions of a popular leader.

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  • O'Connell married in 1802 his cousin Mary O'Connell, by whom he had three daughters and four sons, Maurice, Morgan, John (1810-1858), known as the "Young Liberator," and Daniel, who all sat in parliament.

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  • His funeral orations are the most notable in their kind of any delivered during his time, those devoted to Marshal Drouet and Daniel O'Connell being especially marked by point and clearness.

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  • He defended Daniel O'Connell in the state trial of 1843, and William Smith O'Brien in 1848; and his greatest triumph was in the Yelverton case in 1861.

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  • He is remembered as having prosecuted O'Connell and presided at the trial of Smith O'Brien.

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  • In the first he was recommended to the electors by Daniel O'Connell and the Radical Hume.

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  • It was at Taunton that Disraeli fell upon O'Connell, rather ungratefully; whereupon the Liberator was roused to retort on his assailant vehemently as "a liar," and humorously as a probable descendant of the impenitent thief.

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  • And then followed the challenge which, when O'Connell declined it, was fastened on his son Morgan, and the interruption of the duel by seizure of Mr Disraeli in his bed, and his famous appearance in the Marylebone police court.

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  • And Disraeli had another promise to redeem: that which he uttered when he told O'Connell that they would meet again at Philippi.

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  • was not invincibly opposed to it; but Daniel O'Connell took the lead against it.

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  • The repeal agitation was unsuccessful, but let us not be extreme to mark the faults of O'Connell's later years.

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  • There is a sympathetic sketch of O'Connell's career in Lecky's Leaders of Public Opinion in Ireland (1871); Sir Thomas Wyse's Historical Sketch of the late Catholic Association (1829) gives the best account of the religious struggle, and much may be learned from W.

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  • On the site of the old court-house a colossal statue in white limestone of Daniel O'Connell was erected in 1865.

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  • Even the London street dogs, as Sydney Smith said, joined with O'Connell in barking" God save the Queen."Oxford seems to have been craving for notoriety; but it may be doubted whether the jury who tried him did right to pronounce his acquittal on the ground of insanity.

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  • Though a zealous supporter of repeal, he endeavoured to supplant O'Connell as the leader of the party, an attempt which aroused against him the popular antipathy of the Irish.

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  • There are also the statue to Sir Redmond Barry, first chancellor of the university, outside the public library; the Gordon statue in Spring Street, a replica of that in Trafalgar Square, London, and a statue of Daniel O'Connell, outside St Patrick's cathedral.

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  • Between this and North Wall the river is crossed by twelve bridges, which, in order from west to east, are these: - Sarah Bridge, the bridge of the North Wall extension railway; King's, commemorating a visit of George IV.; Victoria or Barrack; Queen's; Whitworth, of interest as occupying the site where a bridge has stood since the 12th century; Richmond, Grattan and Wellington; O'Connell, Butt and a swivel bridge carrying a loop railway.

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  • Of these O'Connell bridge (formerly known as Carlisle) is the principal, as it connects the chief thoroughfare on the north side, namely Sackville (or O'Connell) Street, with Great Brunswick Street and others on the south.

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  • At the southern end of the street is Daniel O'Connell's monument, almost completed by John Henry Foley before his death, and erected in 1882.

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  • Crossing O'Connell bridge, the short Westmoreland Street strikes into a thoroughfare which traverses the entire city parallel with the river, and is known successively (from west to east) as James, Thomas, High, Castle, Dame, College and Great Brunswick streets.

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  • Opposite the castle is the city hall (1779), in the possession of the corporation, with statues in the central hall of George III., of Grattan (a superb work by Sir Francis Chantry), of Daniel O'Connell, and of Thomas Drummond by John Hogan and several others.

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  • Grattan supported the veto, but a more extreme Catholic party was now arising in Ireland under the leadership of Daniel O'Connell, and Grattan's influence gradually declined.

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  • Lushington, T.Fowell Buxton, James Cropper, Daniel O'Connell and others, in which they declared their deliberate judgment that "its precepts were delusive," and "its real effects of the most dangerous nature."

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  • In the debate on the reform bill O'Connell stated that there was but one borough more rotten than East Looe and that was West Looe.

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  • DANIEL O'CONNELL (1775-1847), Irish statesman, known as "the Liberator," was born on the 6th of August 1775 near Cahirciveen, a small town in Kerry.

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  • While a boy he was adopted by his uncle, Maurice O'Connell of Derrynane, and sent to a school at Queenstown, one of the first which the state in those days allowed to be opened for Catholic teaching; and a few years afterwards he became a student, as was customary with Irish youths of his class, in the English colleges of St Omer and Douai in France.

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  • As an advocate, too, he stood in the very highest rank; in mere oratory he was surpassed by Plunket, and in rhetorical gifts by Bushe, the only ' See the account of O'Connell's uncle, Count Daniel O'Connell (1745-1833), to whose property he fell heir, in Mrs O'Connell's Last Colonel of the Irish Brigade (1892), and O'Callaghan's Irish Brigade in the Service of France (1870).

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  • To understand, however, O'Connell's greatness we must look to the field of Irish politics.

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    0
  • O'Connell inaugurated a different policy, and had soon given the Catholic movement an energy it had not before possessed.

    0
    0
  • O'Connell, having long before attained an undisputed and easy ascendancy, stood at the head of this great national movement; but it will be observed that, having been controlled from first to last by himself and the priesthood, it had little in common with the mob rule and violence which he had never ceased to regard with aversion.

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    0
  • The result, unquestionably, was almost wholly due to the energy and genius of a single man, though the Catholic question would have been settled, in all probability, in the course of time; and it must be added that O'Connell's triumph, which showed what agitation could effect in Ireland, was far from doing his country unmixed good.

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    0
  • O'Connell joined the Whigs on entering parliament, and gave effective aid to the cause of reform.

    0
    0
  • It may be questioned whether O'Connell was not rather led than a leader in this; the movement, at least, passed beyond his control, and the country for many months was terrorized by scenes of appalling crime and bloodshed.

    0
    0
  • Lord Grey, very properly, proposed measures of repression to put this anarchy down, and O'Connell opposed them with extreme vehemence, a seeming departure from his avowed principles, but natural in the case of a popular tribune.

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    0
  • By this time O'Connell had attained a position of great eminence in the House of Commons: as a debater he stood in the very first rank, though he had entered St Stephen's after fifty; and his oratory, massive and strong in argument, although too often scurrilous and coarse, and marred by a bearing in which cringing flattery and rude bullying were strangely blended, made a powerful, if not a pleasing, impression.

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    0
  • O'Connell steadily supported Lord Melbourne's government, gave it valuable aid in its general measures, and repeatedly expressed his cordial approval of its policy in advancing Irish Catholics to places of trust and power in the state, though personally he refused a high judicial office.

    0
    0
  • O'Connell changed his policy as regards Ireland when Peel became minister in 1841.

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    0
  • O'Connell, nevertheless, was sincere and even consistent in his conduct: he had denounced the union in early manhood as an obstacle to the Catholic cause; he had spoken against the measure in parliament; he believed that the claims of Ireland were set aside or slighted in what he deemed an alien assembly; and, though he had ceased for some years to demand repeal, and regarded it as rather a means than an end, he was throughout life an avowed repealer.

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    0
  • Enormous meetings, convened by the priesthood, and directed or controlled by O'Connell, assembled in 1842-1843, and probably nine-tenths of the Irish Catholics were unanimous in the cry for repeal.

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    0
  • O'Connell seems to have thought success certain; but he had not perceived the essential difference between his earlier agitation and this.

    0
    0
  • A vast intended meeting was proclaimed unlawful, and in October 1843 O'Connell was arrested and held to bail, with ten or twelve of his principal followers.

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    0
  • The spell, however, of O'Connell's power had vanished; his health had suffered much from a short confinement; he was verging upon his seventieth year; and he was alarmed and pained by the growth of a party in the repeal ranks who scoffed at his views, and advocated the revolutionary doctrines which he had always feared and abhorred.

    0
    0
  • O'Connell died on the 15th of May 1847, at Genoa, whilst on his way to Rome.

    0
    0
  • O'Connell was a remarkable man in every sense of the word, of splendid physique, and with all the attractions of a popular leader.

    0
    0
  • O'Connell married in 1802 his cousin Mary O'Connell, by whom he had three daughters and four sons, Maurice, Morgan, John (1810-1858), known as the "Young Liberator," and Daniel, who all sat in parliament.

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    0
  • His funeral orations are the most notable in their kind of any delivered during his time, those devoted to Marshal Drouet and Daniel O'Connell being especially marked by point and clearness.

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    0
  • He defended Daniel O'Connell in the state trial of 1843, and William Smith O'Brien in 1848; and his greatest triumph was in the Yelverton case in 1861.

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  • He is remembered as having prosecuted O'Connell and presided at the trial of Smith O'Brien.

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  • In the first he was recommended to the electors by Daniel O'Connell and the Radical Hume.

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    0
  • It was at Taunton that Disraeli fell upon O'Connell, rather ungratefully; whereupon the Liberator was roused to retort on his assailant vehemently as "a liar," and humorously as a probable descendant of the impenitent thief.

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  • And then followed the challenge which, when O'Connell declined it, was fastened on his son Morgan, and the interruption of the duel by seizure of Mr Disraeli in his bed, and his famous appearance in the Marylebone police court.

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  • And Disraeli had another promise to redeem: that which he uttered when he told O'Connell that they would meet again at Philippi.

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  • was not invincibly opposed to it; but Daniel O'Connell took the lead against it.

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    0
  • The repeal agitation was unsuccessful, but let us not be extreme to mark the faults of O'Connell's later years.

    0
    0
  • There is a sympathetic sketch of O'Connell's career in Lecky's Leaders of Public Opinion in Ireland (1871); Sir Thomas Wyse's Historical Sketch of the late Catholic Association (1829) gives the best account of the religious struggle, and much may be learned from W.

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  • After the demonstration at Clontarf in 1843 O'Connell was arrested and early in 1844 was convicted of seditious conspiracy.

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  • In 2005, California state school superintendent Jack O'Connell advised state schools to drop the Narconon program in their districts after finding that it subtly taught Scientology beliefs during drug prevention presentations.

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  • With good news, comes bad - Charlie O'Connell, star of season seven's The Bachelor, and his chosen mate, Sarah Brice, parted ways in September 2007.

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  • Buddiga, Praveen, and Michael O'Connell.

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  • Goodtime Charlie O'Connell, brother to actor Jerry O'Connell, singled out cutie Sarah Brice from the herd.

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  • Charlie O'Connell ended that season with Krisily and Sarah Brice as the final two women remaining, but ultimately chose Sarah to receive the final rose.

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