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nystagmus

nystagmus

nystagmus Sentence Examples

  • There is some reason to believe that a peculiar condition found in the majority of human albinoes, and known as nystagmus, is correlated with the absence of pigment in the central nervous system.

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  • In complete human albinoes, albinism is correlated, in addition to nystagmus, with a peculiar roughness of the skin, making it harsh to the touch.

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  • Aspects of the human condition include exotropia, accommodative esotropia, A and V patterns, dissociated vertical deviation and latent nystagmus.

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  • The ocular findings in albinism include nystagmus, decreased visual acuity; hypopigmentation of retinal tissue, and macular hypoplasia.

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  • The presence of optokinetic nystagmus may not exclude loss of vision due to brain injury.

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  • A pendular nystagmus was present in all fields of gaze.

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  • Nystagmus that appears in the first months of life is called " early onset nystagmus that appears in the first months of life is called " early onset nystagmus " or " congenital nystagmus " .

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  • If spontaneous nystagmus is present, this must be taken into consideration when calculating both canal paresis and directional preponderance.

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  • Aspects of the human condition include exotropia, accommodative esotropia, A and V patterns, dissociated vertical deviation and latent nystagmus.

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  • Symptoms of acute intoxication include unsteady gait, slurred speech and sustained nystagmus.

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  • Glasses will not stop you having nystagmus nor are they a cure.

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  • The condition may also develop later in life when the term " acquired nystagmus " is used.

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  • The most common sign in foals is rapid movement of the eyes (called nystagmus ).

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  • Overdose has resulted in symptoms including nystagmus, ataxia, impaired consciousness and coma.

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  • Over the years, many treatments have been offered to reduce nystagmus.

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  • Topic: Can you get nystagmus later in life?

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  • nystagmus in early childhood may be caused by a defect in the eye or the visual pathway from the eye to the brain.

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  • On the other hand there are many sports which are not particularly affected by nystagmus.

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  • Infants with early-onset nystagmus are not at any special risk for neurological disease later in life.

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  • Insight Insight is a new phone-in service for those people living with or interested in the condition nystagmus.

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  • Causes There are many underlying causes for early- onset nystagmus.

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  • Nystagmus Network Self help group for all those affected by the eye condition nystagmus Network Self help group for all those affected by the eye condition nystagmus.

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  • The ocular findings in albinism include nystagmus, decreased visual acuity; hypopigmentation of retinal tissue, and macular hypoplasia.

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  • There is some reason to believe that a peculiar condition found in the majority of human albinoes, and known as nystagmus, is correlated with the absence of pigment in the central nervous system.

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  • In complete human albinoes, albinism is correlated, in addition to nystagmus, with a peculiar roughness of the skin, making it harsh to the touch.

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  • A condition, nystagmus, which sometimes develops in infancy, causes the eyes to jump, dance, wiggle, or oscillate.

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  • Everyone with oculocutaneous albinism experiences abnormal flickering eye movements (nystagmus) and sensitivity to bright light.

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  • They may have a constant, involuntary movement of the eyeball called nystagmus.

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  • There is no cure for involuntary eye movements (nystagmus), and treatments for focusing problems (surgery or contact lenses) are not effective in all cases.

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  • Other early symptoms include changes in speech, swallowing difficulties, loss of reflexes, and jerky eye movements (nystagmus).

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  • Chiari II malformation: Impaired swallowing and gag reflex, loss of the breathing reflex, facial paralysis, uncontrolled eye movements (nystagmus), impaired balance and gait.

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  • Nystagmus is a condition in which there is involuntary and rhythmic movement or oscillation of the eye.

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  • The eye movements associated with nystagmus are varied.

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  • Nystagmus can be sensory and develop as a result of poor vision, or it can be motor and develop as a result of a neurological problem.

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  • Nystagmus may be congenital, or it may be acquired.

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  • Congenital, or infantile, nystagmus appears within the first few months of life.

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  • Congenital nystagmus is usually binocular and affects both eyes, is horizontal in direction, and does not occur while the child is sleeping.

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  • Most of these cases of nystagmus develop because of poor vision and do not have an underlying neurological cause.

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  • Children with congenital nystagmus usually have a point in their eye movement in which the intensity of the nystagmus is decreased.

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  • Children with nystagmus who have their the null point located at a position in which the eyes are positioned inward may develop an esotropia, a form of strabismus or eye turn.

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  • Usually spasmus nutans appears bilaterally, and the nystagmus is in a horizontal direction.

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  • When the nystagmus of spasmus nutans is vertical or rotary, the child does not have a head tilt.

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  • Downbeat nystagmus is characterized by a nystagmus that is more pronounced when the child looks down, especially when looking to the side, or in lateral gaze.

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  • An accentuated oscillation when looking up is seen in upbeat nystagmus.

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  • Seesaw nystagmus is an unusual type of in which one eye moves in and down and the other out and up.

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  • A periodic alternating nystagmus (PAN) is observed in primary gaze when the patient is looking straight ahead and is characterized by eye movements that continuously change direction and speed.

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  • Peripheral vestibular nystagmus may be accompanied by vertigo, nausea, and tinnitus, or ringing in the ears.

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  • This type of nystagmus is not always apparent but can be seen by a doctor when he or she looks in the back of the eye with a direct ophthalmoscope.

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  • Latent nystagmus appears only when one eye is covered.

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  • This is a congenital nystagmus caused by an ocular motor disturbance rather than visual deprivation.

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  • A child with latent nystagmus will not see well when one eye is covered.

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  • Gaze evoked nystagmus occurs only when one is looking to the side in extreme lateral gaze.

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  • This type of nystagmus can be caused by ethanol and recreational drug use, but is seen in myasthenia gravis and thyroid disease as well.

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  • If one looks at an object in extreme gaze for a long period of time, endpoint nystagmus may be noted.

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  • Optokinetic nystagmus (OKN) is a nystagmus that can be elicited involuntarily when a rapidly moving striped object is passed in front of an individual's eyes.

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  • Congenital nystagmus may be transmitted genetically, either as an autosomal recessive or dominant, or as an X-linked recessive trait.

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  • Congenital nystagmus occurs twice as frequently in males than in females.

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  • The prevalence of nystagmus in the pediatric population is .015 percent.

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  • Eighty percent of nystagmus is congenital, and the remaining 20 percent is acquired.

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  • The eyes of an individual with nystagmus cannot remain still and oscillate in some position of gaze.

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  • Those with nystagmus usually have decreased vision and poor depth perception, although those born with nystagmus, may not realize that their vision is poor.

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  • Those with acquired nystagmus may experience double vision or oscillopsia, or that objects in their visual space appear to move.

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  • An acquired nystagmus may be accompanied by other symptoms such dizziness, difficulty with balance, hearing loss, poor coordination, and numbness.

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  • If an individual with nystagmus experiences oscillopsia, then the nystagmus is acquired.

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  • Other causes of acquired nystagmus are Arnold-Chiari malformations, vitamin deficiencies, syphilis, Wernicke's encephalopathy, Behcet's syndrome, and Meniere's disease.

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  • Since nystagmus can be caused by tumors, stroke, and trauma or neurological disorder, any type of nystagmus must be evaluated by a qualified practitioner.

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  • The nystagmus can be a sign of a serious problem.

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  • Diagnosis of nystagmus is made primarily by patient history as reported by a parent, the age of onset, and observation of any accompanying signs such as a head turn, tilt or tremor, or oscillopsia.

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  • If the onset is acute, then usually the nystagmus is acquired.

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  • The type of nystagmus can accurately be determined by eye movement recordings, which map direction, frequency, null point, and amplitude of the nystagmus.

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  • The treatment for nystagmus, once the etiology is determined and treated, includes optical devices such as contact lenses and glasses, medication, and surgery.

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  • For individuals with nystagmus correction of refractive error with glasses or contact lenses is the first step in treating the condition.

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  • For 85 percent of children with nystagmus, a spectacle prescription improves vision significantly.

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  • For those with congenital nystagmus, prism may be put in glasses to help position the eye at its null point or to help the eyes converge.

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  • Tinting of the glasses or sunglasses may decrease the nystagmus of individuals with albinism.

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  • Congenital nystagmus, when due to a visual deprivation, is rarely improved by surgery.

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  • But when a head tilt or head turn accompanies nystagmus, surgery to correct a muscle imbalance may improve nystagmus and visual acuity.

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  • When a tumor or stroke has caused an acquired nystagmus, then neurosurgery, if indicated for the underlying cause, may lead to resolution of the nystagmus.

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  • Vestibular nystagmus can be treated by diazepam or scopolamine.

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  • Drugs called GABA agonists, such as baclofen and carbamazepine, are useful in treatment of seesaw nystagmus and PAN, if the nystagmus is acquired and not congenital.

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  • If the nystagmus is due to drug toxicity, then reducing or discontinuing the drug eventually resolves the problem.

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  • Congenital nystagmus is usually a benign condition.

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  • The best corrected vision for most individuals with congenital nystagmus is between 20/40 and 20/70, but correction to 20/20 is possible for some.

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  • Nystagmus associated with spasmus nutans resolves spontaneously before the child reaches school age.

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  • The prognosis for an acquired nystagmus depends on its cause.

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  • If the condition is due to a side effect of a drug, then decreasing or changing the treatment drug eventually resolves the nystagmus.

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  • In general nystagmus cannot be prevented.

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  • Careful monitor of dosage of those drugs with nystagmus as a side effect may prevent the condition.

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  • Because nystagmus can be associated with many medical problems, the child with this condition must undergo a complete ocular and neurological evaluation.

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  • Children with nystagmus are not aware that they may have a visual deficiency and as they get older must be helped with the restrictions that nystagmus places on them.

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  • Every effort must be made to integrate the child with nystagmus into a normal school setting in order to prepare the child for adult life, even if cosmetic concerns may instinctively lead the parent to want to protect the child.

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  • Support for families of those with nystagmus can be found through the American Nystagmus Network.

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  • "Nystagmus." In Current Ocular Therapy 5.

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  • "Examination of the Refractive Management of Patients with Nystagmus."

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  • "Nystagmus." Ophthalmology Clinics of North America 14 (March 2001): 205-15.

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  • "Solving the Diagnostic Puzzle of Congenital Nystagmus."

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