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nuns

nuns Sentence Examples

  • A vigorous campaign against monasticism took place; the monasteries were closed, and many of them pulled down or converted into barracks; monks and nuns were compelled to marry, and exiled in large numbers to Cyprus; the literary and artistic treasures were sold for the benefit of the imperial treasury.

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  • According to the census of 1871 there were in the city and province of Rome 474 monastic establishments (311 for monks, 163 for nuns), occupied by 4326 monks and 3825 nuns, and possessing a gross revenue of 4,780,89i lire.

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  • The registration of anomalies, such as the suspended letters, inverted nuns and larger letters, enabled any one to test the accuracy of a copy.

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  • She'd seen a handful of nuns yesterday, and only Daniela spoke to her.

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  • Even the nuns of Geneva were notorious for their conduct."

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  • The law includes with clerics, monks, deaconesses, nuns, ascetics; and the word " clerics " covered persons in minor orders, down to doorkeepers.

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  • Just to flutter the nuns a bit.

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  • of Bohemia, founded here a convent for Benedictine nuns, which was destroyed in the Hussite wars.

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  • Originally located in the convent of St Barbara, the university was removed in 1581 to the convent of the White Nuns, the site of which it still occupies, though that building was destroyed in 1616.

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  • At Marseilles (after 410) he founded two religious societies - a convent for nuns, and the abbey of St Victor, which during his time is said to have contained 5000 inmates.

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  • His friends and admirers were distributed over all the countries of Europe, and presents were continually arriving from small as well as great, from a donation of 200 florins, made by Pope Clement VII., down to sweetmeats and comfits contributed by the nuns of Cologne 666).

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  • His friends and admirers were distributed over all the countries of Europe, and presents were continually arriving from small as well as great, from a donation of 200 florins, made by Pope Clement VII., down to sweetmeats and comfits contributed by the nuns of Cologne 666).

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  • monks and nuns, or the furniture of the altar.

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  • Though her reading was confined to the lives of the saints, she taught in the school kept by the nuns for the girls of the neighbourhood, to whom she endeared herself by her kindly disposition.

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  • The monks and nuns were looked upon as the most consistent Christians, and were honoured accordingly.

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  • It was Boniface, too, who, with the aid of numerous English priests, monks and nuns, introduced the literary culture of England into Germany.

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  • In later times his regulations enjoyed a high reputation, and were adopted by the monks and nuns of Port Royal.

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  • "I'll really call in on the nuns," he said to the officers who watched him smilingly, and he rode off by the winding path down the hill.

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  • Certain concordats deal with the orders and congregations of monks and nuns with a view to subjecting them to a certain control while securing to them the legal exercise of their activities.

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  • Her famous letters to the pope are part of the history of Port Royal, and as long as she lived the nuns of Port Royal des Champs were left in safety.

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  • On her death in 1679 she was buried with great splendour by her brother Conde, and her heart, as she had directed, was sent to the nuns of the Port Royal des Champs.

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  • Some of these were refounded, and the principal monastic remains now existing are those of the Benedictine priories at Rochester (1089), Folkestone (1095), Dover (1140); the Benedictine nunneries at Malling (time of William Rufus),Minster-in-Sheppey (1130), Higham (founded by King Stephen), and Davington (I 153); the Cistercian Abbey at Boxley (1146); the Cluniac abbey at Faversham (1147) and priory at Monks Horton (time of Henry II.), the preceptory of Knights Templars at Swingfield (time of Henry II.); the Premonstratensian abbey of St Radigund's, near Dover (1191); the first house of Dominicans in England at Canterbury (1221); the first Carmelite house in England, at Aylesford (1240); and the priory of Augustinian nuns at Dartford (1355).

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  • Some of these were refounded, and the principal monastic remains now existing are those of the Benedictine priories at Rochester (1089), Folkestone (1095), Dover (1140); the Benedictine nunneries at Malling (time of William Rufus),Minster-in-Sheppey (1130), Higham (founded by King Stephen), and Davington (I 153); the Cistercian Abbey at Boxley (1146); the Cluniac abbey at Faversham (1147) and priory at Monks Horton (time of Henry II.), the preceptory of Knights Templars at Swingfield (time of Henry II.); the Premonstratensian abbey of St Radigund's, near Dover (1191); the first house of Dominicans in England at Canterbury (1221); the first Carmelite house in England, at Aylesford (1240); and the priory of Augustinian nuns at Dartford (1355).

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  • In 1212 Francis invested St Clara (q.v.) with the Franciscan habit, and so instituted the "Second Order," that of the nuns.

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  • There were in 1901 20,707 parishes in Italy, 68,444 secular clergy and 48,043 regulars (monks, lay brothers and nuns).

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  • On the 30th of June 1903 the patrimony of the endowment fund amounted to 17,339,040, of which only 264,289 were represented by buildings still occupied by monks or nuns.

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  • In 1001 Æthelred gave this monastery and the town of Bradford to the nunnery of Shaftesbury, in order that the nuns might have a safe refuge against the insults of the Danes.

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  • He founded the Congregation of the French Oratory in 1611 and introduced the Carmelite nuns into France, notwithstanding the opposition of the friars of that order, who were jealous of his ascendancy.

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  • St Helen's, Bishopsgate, belonged to a priory of nuns founded c. 1212, but the greater part of the building is later.

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  • The Minories, a street leading south from Aldgate, takes name from an abbey of nuns of St Clare (Sorores Minores) founded in 1293.

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  • One of the most striking changes in the appearance of Norman London was caused by the rebuilding of old churches and the building of new ones, and also by the foundation of bourhood of London, although the houses of nuns, of which there were many dotted over the suburbs of London, were governed by this rule.

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  • It was in existence many years before the priory of the nuns of St Helen's was founded.

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  • When we remember that more than half of the area of London was occupied by these establishments, and that about a third of the inhabitants were monks, nuns and friars, it is easy to imagine how great must have been the disorganization caused by this root and branch reform.

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  • To the west are the archbishop's palace and a convent of Presentation nuns.

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  • The family had strong Catholic leanings, and two of Nicholas's sisters, who must have been much older than he was, became nuns of Sion convent before its dissolution.

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  • The house afterwards acquired such ill repute that in 1177 the nuns were dispersed and the house was attached to the abbey of Fontevrault, by whom it was re-established.

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  • To marry, to do away with images, to become monks and nuns, or for monks and nuns to leave their convent, to eat meat on Friday or not to eat it, and other like things - all these are open questions, and should not be forbidden by any man.

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  • In conclusion a word must be said on the Benedictine nuns.

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  • St Gregory describes St Benedict's sister Scholastica as a nun (sanctimonialis), and she is looked upon as the foundress of Benedictine nuns.

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  • In the early times the Benedictine nuns were not strictly enclosed, and could, when occasion called for it, freely go out of their convent walls to perform any special work: on the other hand, they did not resemble the modern active congregations of women, whose ordinary work lies outside the convent.

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  • At the present day there are of Black Benedictine nuns 262 convents with 7000 nuns, the large majority being directly subject to the diocesan bishops; if the Cistercians and others be included, there are 387 convents with nearly Ii,000 nuns.

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  • On Benedictine nuns much will be found in the above-mentioned authorities, and also in Lina Eckenstein, Woman in Monasticism (1896).

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  • Most of the congregations of Augustinian canons had convents of nuns, called canonesses; many such exist to this day.

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  • It is a heritage from the middle ages, when the Knights Hospitallers undertook for men the duties discharged in female institutions by the nuns.

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  • The foundation provided for seven to thirteen canons, with a number of lay brothers and a community of nuns.

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  • The best girls' schools are generally those kept by nuns.

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  • Cracow has 39 churches - about half the number it formerly had - and 25 convents for monks and nuns.

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  • St Peter's chapel formerly served as the cathedral of the Roman Catholic archbishopric of Armagh; and in the abbey of the Dominican nuns there is still preserved the head of Oliver Plunkett, the archbishop who was executed at Tyburn in 1681 on an unfounded charge of treason.

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  • The Order of Fontevrault was founded about 1too by Robert of Arbrissel, who was born in the village of Arbrissel or Arbresec, in the diocese of Rennes, and attained great fame as a preacher and ascetic. The establishment was a double monastery, containing a nunnery of 300 nuns and a monastery of 200 monks, separated completely so that no communication was allowed except in the church, where the services were carried on in common; there were, moreover, a hospital for 120 lepers and other sick, and a penitentiary for fallen women, both worked by the nuns.

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  • The special feature of the institute was that the abbess ruled the monks as well as the nuns.

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  • At the beginning the order had a great vogue, and at the time of Robert's death, 1117, there were several monasteries and 3000 nuns; afterwards the number of monasteries reached 57, all organized on the same plan.

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  • The nuns in England as in France were recruited from the highest families, and the abbess of Fontevrault, who was the superior-general of the whole order, was usually of the royal family of France.

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  • Immediately below Rolandseck in mid-river is the island of Nonnenwerth, on which is a nursing school under the conduct of Franciscan nuns, established in 1850.

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  • A convent school of the Ursuline nuns is a prominent feature on a hill to the south.

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  • There have been Basilian nuns from the beginning, St Macrina, St Basil's sister, having established a nunnery which was under his direction.

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  • The nuns are devoted to a purely contemplative life, and in Russia, where there are about a hundred nunneries, they are not allowed to take final vows until the age of sixty.

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  • The cope belonged to the convent of Syon near Isleworth, was taken to Portugal at the Reformation, brought back early in the 19th century to England by exiled nuns and given by them to the Earl of Shrewsbury.

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  • The Nuns.

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  • - In the foregoing sketch nothing has been said concerning the nuns; and yet in all ages women, hardly less than men, have played their part in monasticism.

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  • It is a curious coincidence that the sister of each of the three great cenobitical founders, Pachomius, Basil and Benedict, was a nun and ruled a community of nuns according to an adaptation of her brother's rule for monks.

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  • In the West the Benedictine nuns played a great part in the Christian settlement of north-western Europe.

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  • As the various monastic and mendicant orders arose, a female branch was in most cases formed alongside of the order; and so we find canon.esses, and hermitesses, and Dominicanesses, and Franciscan nuns [or Clares (q.v.)] - requisite information will be found in the respective articles.

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  • Then there were the " double orders " of Sempringham (see ST Gilbert) and Fontevrault, in which the nuns were the predominant, or even the dominant, element.

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  • Of the modern orders of men only a few include nuns.

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  • In early times nuns could go out of their enclosure on occasion; but in the later middle ages, up to the council of Trent, the tendency was to keep them more and more strictly confined within their convent precincts.

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  • In 1609 an English lady, Mary Ward, founded at Munich the " Institute of Mary," the nuns of which were not bound to enclosure.

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  • As women are debarred from exercising the spiritual functions of the ministry, it follows that nuns have to devote themselves either to a more purely contemplative life, or else to a more wholly active one, than is usual among the orders of men, who commonly, in virtue of their priesthood, have been able to find a mixed form of life between the two extremes.

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  • The nuns belonging to the older orders tend to the contemplative idea, and they still find recruits in sufficient numbers, in spite of the modern rush to the active congregations.

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  • At first they were called "Brothers and Sisters of the Order of Penance"; but later on, when the Friars were called the "First Order" and the nuns the "Second Order," the Order of Penance became the "Third Order of St Francis" - whence the name Tertiaries: this threefold division already existed among the Humiliati.

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  • The abbey of Gandersheim was founded by Duke Ludolf of Saxony, who removed here in 856 the nuns who had been shortly before established at Brunshausen.

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  • In America are some convents of Olivetan nuns.

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  • Among the other buildings and institutions are Hamilton Hall (1805); the Franklin Building (1861) of the Salem Marine Society; a large armoury; a state normal school (1854); an orphan asylum (1871), under the Sisters of the Grey Nuns; the Association for the Relief of Aged and Destitute Women (1860), occupying a fine old brick house formerly the home of Benjamin W.

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  • Other buildings are: the Roman Catholic parish church, founded in 1726; the church of the Ursuline nuns, built in 1474; the town hall, an imposing building of the 15th century, purchased by the municipality in 1545 and containing the archives of the "Saxon nation."

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  • Hamilton in Dublin Review, 1888, "The Nuns of Syon."

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  • The escape from Omdurman of Father Ohrwalder and of two of the captive nuns in December 1891, of Father Rossignoli in October 1894, and of Siatin Bey in February 1895, revealed the condition of the Sudan to the outside world, threw a vivid light on the rule of the khalif a, and corroborated information already received of the discontent which existed among the tribes with the oppression and despotism under which they lived.

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  • After holding for some years the office of directress of the Hospice Trivulzio for Blue Nuns at Milan, she herself joined the sisterhood, and in this austere order ended her days on the 9th of January 1799.

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  • After the 4th century, monks and nuns begin to form no inconsiderable part of the pilgrimages - a fact which is especially manifest from the numerous notices to be found in Jerome, and the narratives of Theodoret in the Historia religiosa.

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  • SAINT CLARA (1194-1253), foundress of the Franciscan nuns, was born of a knightly family in Assisi in 1194.

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  • For forty years she was abbess at St Damian's, and the great endeavour of her life was that the rule of the nuns should be purged of the foreign elements that had been introduced, and should become wholly conformable to St Francis's spirit.

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  • The rescued nuns found places of refuge in the families of Wittenberg burghers.

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  • Monkery is common among them, but there are no nuns.

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  • It embraced an establishment for monks and (until the Conquest) for nuns of the Benedictine order, and under Hilda, a grand-niece of Edwin, a former king of Northumbria, acquired high celebrity.

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  • There were Trinitarian nuns and a Third Order.

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  • Since the expulsion of the religious orders from France in 1903 several communities of French monks and nuns have taken up their abode in the Principality.

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  • In the intervals of these journeys he governed Tours with great firmness, repressing disorders and reducing the monks and nuns to obedience.

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  • form of abbas, abbot), the female superior of an abbey or convent of nuns.

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  • Abbesses have a right to demand absolute obedience of their nuns, over whom they exercise discipline, extending even to the power of expulsion, subject, however, to the bishop. As a female an abbess is incapable of performing the spiritual functions of the priesthood belonging to an abbot.

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  • By Celtic usage abbesses presided over joint-houses of monks and nuns.

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  • There are 481 monasteries for men and 249 convents of nuns.

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  • Public education is not, however, entirely in the hands of the priesthood and nuns; there are an institute, a normal school to train teachers, a school of arts and handicrafts, a nautical school and numerous public primary schools for both sexes.

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  • The following orders, though not called Augustinians, also have St Augustine's Rule as the basis of their life: Dominicans, Servites, Our Lady of Ransom, Hieronymites, Assumptionists and many others; also orders of women: Brigittines, Ursulines, Visitation nuns and a vast number of congregations of women, spread over the Old and New Worlds, devoted to education and charitable works of all kinds.

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  • 109) is a long letter of practical advice to a community of nuns, on their daily life; and Serm.

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  • He sent to Syria, Assemanus, a Maronite educated at the Roman college of Gregory XIII.; and at last, at a council held at the monastery of Lowaizi on the 30th of September 1736, the Maronite Church accepted from Rome a constitution which is still in force, and agreed to abandon some of its more incongruous usages such as mixed convents of monks and nuns.

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  • An abbot also had the power of excommunicating refractory nuns, which he might use if desired by their abbess.

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  • It is a story, in itself exceedingly humorous, showing how a parrot, the delight of a convent, whose talk was all of prayers and pious ejaculations, was conveyed to another convent as a visitor to please the nuns.

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  • The treatment of the subject, the atmosphere which surrounds it, the delicacy in which the little prattling ways of the nuns, their jealousies, their tiny trifles, are presented, takes the reader entirely by surprise.

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  • Then trouble came upon him; complaints were made to the fathers of the alleged licentiousness of his verses, the real cause of complaint being the ridicule which Vert Vert seemed to throw upon the whole race of nuns and the anti-clerical tendency of the other poems. An example, it was urged, must be made; Gresset was expelled the order.

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  • This charitable activity, however, distinguishes the modern sister from the nuns of primitive and medieval times, who were cloistered and contemplative, and left external works to deaconesses, or to laywomen of a " third order," or to the freer societies like the Beguines.

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  • If so, parliament was told that temporal possessions ruin the church and drive out the Christian graces of faith, hope and charity; that the priesthood of the church in communion with Rome was not the priesthood Christ gave to his apostles; that the monk's vow of celibacy had for its consequence unnatural lust, and should not be imposed; that transubstantiation was a feigned miracle, and led people to idolatry; that prayers made over wine, bread, water, oil, salt, wax, incense, altars of stone, church walls, vestments, mitres, crosses, staves, were magical and should not be allowed; that kings should possess the jus episcopale, and bring good government into the church; that no special prayers should be made for the dead; that auricular confession made to the clergy, and declared to be necessary for salvation, was the root of clerical arrogance and the cause of indulgences and other abuses in pardoning sin; that all wars were against the principles of the New Testament, and were but murdering and plundering the poor to win glory for kings; that the vows of chastity laid upon nuns led to child murder; that many of the trades practised in the commonwealth, such as those of goldsmiths and armourers, were unnecessary and led to luxury and waste.

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  • Thomas Bagley was accused of declaring that if in the sacrament a priest made bread into God, he made a God that can be eaten by rats and mice; that the pharisees of the day, the monks, and the nuns, and the friars and all other privileged persons recognized by the church were limbs of Satan; and that auricular confession to the priest was the will not of God but of the devil.

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  • The nuns of Port Royal werein their turn subjected to persecution, which, after a truce between 1666 and 1679, became aggravated by the affair of the regale, the bishops of Aleth and Pamiers being Jansenists.

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  • Port Royal was destroyed, the nuns dispersed, and the ashes of the dead scattered to the four winds.

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  • The Gilbertines were a purely English order which took its rise in Lincolnshire, the canons following the Austin rule, the nuns and lay brothers that of the Cistercians.

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  • The monks number about 10,000, the nuns 40,000.

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  • The church of All Saints, originally of Norman foundation, was rebuilt in 1273 by the abbess and nuns of Godstow near Oxford, and was largely reconstructed early in the 15th century.

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  • A regular crusade now began against monks and nuns, and images and relics were destroyed on a great scale.

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  • In parts of Asia Minor (Lydia and Caria) the monks were even forced to marry the nuns.

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  • Next to the riddles, Aldhelm's best-known work is De Laude Virginitatis sive de Virginitate Sanctorum, a Latin treatise addressed about 705 to the nuns of Barking, 2 in which he commemorates a great number of saints.

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  • Their leader, named Pons, gathered round him nobles, priests, monks and nuns.

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  • Among public institutions are the university, which occupies part of the old Jesuit college, an astronomical observatory, and eleven large monastic institutions, six of which are for nuns.

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  • The Oracle had given him nothing, and he didn't feel able to sit still and drink tea with Daniela, the headmistress of the order of nuns who managed this Sanctuary.

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  • Governed by Death, the Sanctuaries were located on islands protected by magic and tended by convents of Immortal nuns, who helped any who came to them.

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  • The ultimate peacekeepers, the nuns running the Sanctuary would likely never let him forget the day the half-demon took out their wall.

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  • She'd seen a handful of nuns yesterday, and only Daniela spoke to her.

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  • She walked into the dark dining area to see a few others already present: two of the nuns and two normal looking people.

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  • She is seriously considering celibacy and thinks that the nuns might be able to advise her how to go about it.

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  • celibate monks and nuns is decreasing.

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  • Cistercian nunneries probably accommodated about fourteen nuns and several male helpers.

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  • contemplative nuns at Tymawr and now the Sisters of the Good Shepherd at Llanfrechfa.

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  • convent of nuns.

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  • dally he entertainingly dallies with the subgenre in the saints ' stories that the nuns, including María, drink in.

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  • discalced Carmelites - the friars, the enclosed nuns, the seculars.

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  • dopey turns back, " Your Worship, are there any dwarf nuns in all of Europe?

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  • encamped one night near a church and convent of nuns.

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  • grief-stricken mother to the missionary nuns as tradition demands.

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  • hobbled off to nuns cross, where we camped down for the night.

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  • If you would like to see a manuscript illumination of nuns in a wealthy convent, click here.

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  • luminary nuns.

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  • midget nuns in the world?

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  • At the age of five he is handed over by his seemingly nonchalant father and grief-stricken mother to the missionary nuns as tradition demands.

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  • Not to teach someone to make wine, but I have never known anyone from Uganda before neither have I ever met nuns.

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  • Since 1931 it has served as a closed monastery for Carmelite nuns, whose garden now includes St Serf's original cave.

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  • First he went to Rome; then he became organist to a community of English Benedictine nuns in Brussels.

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  • Cloistered nuns of the Jerusalem Order opened a convent in Malta.

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  • The Augustinian nuns formed their first community at Hippo, under Perpetua, the sister of Augustine.

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  • Fair Trade Goods In 1954, a group of Dominican nuns arrived in Ahmedabad to start a hospital.

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  • Are there ANY dwarf nuns anywhere in the world?

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  • nunnerygland, most Cistercian nunneries probably accommodated about fourteen nuns and several male helpers.

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  • ordination ceremonies for Buddhist monks, nuns, and lay people.

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  • orphanage run by nuns in Glasgow, Scotland.

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  • In the beginning of the year 1850 his decline became visible and the Nuns watched over his health with affectionate solicitude.

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  • In the later Middle Ages there were complaints that the Romsey nuns were frequenting local taverns.

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  • Soon the nuns joined in, resting their voices on top of Joseph's deeper thrum.

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  • Dressed as nuns the trombone trio wowed the audience with their fantastic playing and choreography.

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  • In theory, Cistercian nuns wore the characteristic habit of undyed wool.

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  • Chicheley was parson of Sherston, Wiltshire, and prebendary of Nantgwyly in the college of Abergwilly, North Wales; on the 23rd of February 1401/2, now called doctor of laws, he was pardoned for bringing in, and allowed to use, a bull of the pope " providing " him to the chancellorship of Salisbury cathedral, and canenries in the nuns' churches of Shaftesbury and Wilton in that diocese; and on the 9th of January 1402/3 he was archdeacon of Salisbury.

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  • Other decrees denounced the abuse of indulgences, of festivals of saints, and of processions and suggested reforms; others again enjoined the closing of shops on Sunday during divine service, the issue of service-books with parallel translations in the vernacular, and recommended the abolition of all monastic orders except that of St Benedict, the rules of which were to be brought into harmony with modern ideas; nuns were to be forbidden to take the vows before the age of 40.

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  • Certain concordats deal with the orders and congregations of monks and nuns with a view to subjecting them to a certain control while securing to them the legal exercise of their activities.

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  • Her famous letters to the pope are part of the history of Port Royal, and as long as she lived the nuns of Port Royal des Champs were left in safety.

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  • On her death in 1679 she was buried with great splendour by her brother Conde, and her heart, as she had directed, was sent to the nuns of the Port Royal des Champs.

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  • Even the nuns of Geneva were notorious for their conduct."

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  • In 1212 Francis invested St Clara (q.v.) with the Franciscan habit, and so instituted the "Second Order," that of the nuns.

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  • There were in 1901 20,707 parishes in Italy, 68,444 secular clergy and 48,043 regulars (monks, lay brothers and nuns).

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  • This act resulted in the suppression of 274 monasteries with 3733 friars, of 61 nunneries with 1756 nuns and of 2722 chapters and benefices.

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  • On the 30th of June 1903 the patrimony of the endowment fund amounted to 17,339,040, of which only 264,289 were represented by buildings still occupied by monks or nuns.

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  • Monastic pensions, liquidation of religious property and provision of shelter for nuns 749,172 491,339

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  • According to the census of 1871 there were in the city and province of Rome 474 monastic establishments (311 for monks, 163 for nuns), occupied by 4326 monks and 3825 nuns, and possessing a gross revenue of 4,780,89i lire.

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  • While leaving intact the general houses of the various confraternities (except that of the Jesuits), the bill abolished the Religious corporate personality of religious orders, handed over Bill, their schools and hospitals to civil administrators, placed their churches at the disposal of the secular clergy, and provided pensions for nuns and monks, those who had families being sent to reside with their relatives, and those who by reason of age or bereavement had no home but their monasteries being allowed to end their days in religious houses specially set apart for the purpose.

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  • The proceeds of the sale of the suppressed convents and monasteries were partly converted into pensions for monks and nuns, and partly allotted to the municipal charity boards which had undertaken the educational and charitable functions formerly exercised by the religious orders.

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  • The law includes with clerics, monks, deaconesses, nuns, ascetics; and the word " clerics " covered persons in minor orders, down to doorkeepers.

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  • monks, friars, nuns, &c. Later the custom arose of taking " clerk " to include any " literate, " even if not in orders or " religious" (cf.

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  • The registration of anomalies, such as the suspended letters, inverted nuns and larger letters, enabled any one to test the accuracy of a copy.

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  • The most important enactments of the council of Chalcedon were the following: (1) the approval of the canons of the first three ecumenical councils and of the synods of Ancyra, NeoCaesarea, Changra, Antioch and Laodicea; (2) forbidding trade, secular pursuits and war to the clergy, bishops not even being allowed to administer the property of their dioceses; (3) forbidding monks and nuns to marry or to return to the world; likewise forbidding the establishment of a monastery in any diocese without the consent of the bishop, or the disestablishment of a monastery once consecrated; (4) punishing with deposition an ordination or clerical appointment made for money; forbidding "absolute ordination" (i.e.

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  • At Marseilles (after 410) he founded two religious societies - a convent for nuns, and the abbey of St Victor, which during his time is said to have contained 5000 inmates.

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  • In later times his regulations enjoyed a high reputation, and were adopted by the monks and nuns of Port Royal.

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  • Armed with it he passed safely into heathen Germany and began a systematic crusade, baptizing, overturning idols, founding churches and monasteries, and calling from England a band of missionary helpers, monks and nuns, some of whom have become famous: St Lull, his successor in the see at Mainz; St Burchard, bishop of Wurzburg; St Gregory, abbot at Utrecht; Willibald, his biographer; St Lioba, St Walburge, St Thecla.

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  • A vigorous campaign against monasticism took place; the monasteries were closed, and many of them pulled down or converted into barracks; monks and nuns were compelled to marry, and exiled in large numbers to Cyprus; the literary and artistic treasures were sold for the benefit of the imperial treasury.

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  • monks and nuns, or the furniture of the altar.

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  • In 1001 Æthelred gave this monastery and the town of Bradford to the nunnery of Shaftesbury, in order that the nuns might have a safe refuge against the insults of the Danes.

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  • He founded the Congregation of the French Oratory in 1611 and introduced the Carmelite nuns into France, notwithstanding the opposition of the friars of that order, who were jealous of his ascendancy.

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  • St Helen's, Bishopsgate, belonged to a priory of nuns founded c. 1212, but the greater part of the building is later.

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  • It has two naves parallel, originally for the use of the nuns and the parishioners respectively.

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  • The Minories, a street leading south from Aldgate, takes name from an abbey of nuns of St Clare (Sorores Minores) founded in 1293.

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  • One of the most striking changes in the appearance of Norman London was caused by the rebuilding of old churches and the building of new ones, and also by the foundation of bourhood of London, although the houses of nuns, of which there were many dotted over the suburbs of London, were governed by this rule.

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  • It was in existence many years before the priory of the nuns of St Helen's was founded.

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  • When we remember that more than half of the area of London was occupied by these establishments, and that about a third of the inhabitants were monks, nuns and friars, it is easy to imagine how great must have been the disorganization caused by this root and branch reform.

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  • To the west are the archbishop's palace and a convent of Presentation nuns.

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  • The family had strong Catholic leanings, and two of Nicholas's sisters, who must have been much older than he was, became nuns of Sion convent before its dissolution.

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  • In the monastery, however, she was held in high honour by the archimandrite; the nuns persisted in regarding her as the lawful empress; and she was permitted an extraordinary degree of latitude, unknown to Peter, who dragged her from her enforced retreat in 1718 on a charge of adultery.

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  • The wheel being her symbol she was the patron saint of wheelwrights and mechanics; as the confounder of heathen sophistry she was invoked by theologians, apologists, preachers and philosophers, and was chosen as the patron saint of the university of Paris; as the most holy and illustrious of Christian virgins she became the tutelary saint of nuns and virgins generally.

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  • Near the station are the ruins of the abbey of Cistercian nuns founded by David I.

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  • The French plundered the churches, abolished monks, nuns and nobles, and set up forthwith the ways and doings of the French Revolution.

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  • The house afterwards acquired such ill repute that in 1177 the nuns were dispersed and the house was attached to the abbey of Fontevrault, by whom it was re-established.

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  • Besides a number of settlers a Roman Catholic bishop and a party of four missionaries and nuns were murdered in the Kilwa hinterland, while nearer Nyasa the warlike Wangoni held possession of the country.

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  • Now, a prince or legislative assembly that accepted the doctrine of Luther, that the temporal power had been " ordained by God for the chastisement of the wicked and the protection of the good " and must be permitted to exercise its functions " unhampered throughout the whole Christian body, without respect to persons, whether it strikes popes, bishops, priests, monks, nuns, or whoever else " - such a government could proceed to ratify such modifications of the Christian faith as appealed to it in a particular religious confession; it could order its subject to conform to the innovations, and could expel, persecute or tolerate dissenters, as seemed good to it.

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  • To marry, to do away with images, to become monks and nuns, or for monks and nuns to leave their convent, to eat meat on Friday or not to eat it, and other like things - all these are open questions, and should not be forbidden by any man.

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  • In conclusion a word must be said on the Benedictine nuns.

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  • St Gregory describes St Benedict's sister Scholastica as a nun (sanctimonialis), and she is looked upon as the foundress of Benedictine nuns.

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  • As the institute spread to other lands nunneries arose on all sides, and nowhere were the Benedictine nuns more numerous or more remarkable than in England, from Saxon times to the Reformation.

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  • A strong type of womanhood is revealed in the correspondence of St Boniface with various Saxon Benedictine nuns, some in England and some who accompanied him to the continent and there established great convents.

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  • In the early times the Benedictine nuns were not strictly enclosed, and could, when occasion called for it, freely go out of their convent walls to perform any special work: on the other hand, they did not resemble the modern active congregations of women, whose ordinary work lies outside the convent.

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  • At the present day there are of Black Benedictine nuns 262 convents with 7000 nuns, the large majority being directly subject to the diocesan bishops; if the Cistercians and others be included, there are 387 convents with nearly Ii,000 nuns.

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  • On Benedictine nuns much will be found in the above-mentioned authorities, and also in Lina Eckenstein, Woman in Monasticism (1896).

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  • Most of the congregations of Augustinian canons had convents of nuns, called canonesses; many such exist to this day.

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  • Sir Henry Burdett quotes an order, dated 30th May 1578, directing the master and the prior of the Hotel Dieu "not to receive henceforth any novices without speaking of it to the company, because there are an excessive number of nuns and novices, who cause great expense to the said Hotel Dieu."

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  • It is a heritage from the middle ages, when the Knights Hospitallers undertook for men the duties discharged in female institutions by the nuns.

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  • Though her reading was confined to the lives of the saints, she taught in the school kept by the nuns for the girls of the neighbourhood, to whom she endeared herself by her kindly disposition.

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  • The foundation provided for seven to thirteen canons, with a number of lay brothers and a community of nuns.

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  • The monks and nuns were looked upon as the most consistent Christians, and were honoured accordingly.

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  • It was Boniface, too, who, with the aid of numerous English priests, monks and nuns, introduced the literary culture of England into Germany.

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  • The best girls' schools are generally those kept by nuns.

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  • Originally located in the convent of St Barbara, the university was removed in 1581 to the convent of the White Nuns, the site of which it still occupies, though that building was destroyed in 1616.

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  • of Bohemia, founded here a convent for Benedictine nuns, which was destroyed in the Hussite wars.

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  • Cracow has 39 churches - about half the number it formerly had - and 25 convents for monks and nuns.

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  • St Peter's chapel formerly served as the cathedral of the Roman Catholic archbishopric of Armagh; and in the abbey of the Dominican nuns there is still preserved the head of Oliver Plunkett, the archbishop who was executed at Tyburn in 1681 on an unfounded charge of treason.

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  • The Order of Fontevrault was founded about 1too by Robert of Arbrissel, who was born in the village of Arbrissel or Arbresec, in the diocese of Rennes, and attained great fame as a preacher and ascetic. The establishment was a double monastery, containing a nunnery of 300 nuns and a monastery of 200 monks, separated completely so that no communication was allowed except in the church, where the services were carried on in common; there were, moreover, a hospital for 120 lepers and other sick, and a penitentiary for fallen women, both worked by the nuns.

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  • The special feature of the institute was that the abbess ruled the monks as well as the nuns.

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  • At the beginning the order had a great vogue, and at the time of Robert's death, 1117, there were several monasteries and 3000 nuns; afterwards the number of monasteries reached 57, all organized on the same plan.

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  • The nuns in England as in France were recruited from the highest families, and the abbess of Fontevrault, who was the superior-general of the whole order, was usually of the royal family of France.

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  • The prefix of the name of the town is derived from a priory of nuns founded here in 1150.

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  • Immediately below Rolandseck in mid-river is the island of Nonnenwerth, on which is a nursing school under the conduct of Franciscan nuns, established in 1850.

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  • A convent school of the Ursuline nuns is a prominent feature on a hill to the south.

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  • There have been Basilian nuns from the beginning, St Macrina, St Basil's sister, having established a nunnery which was under his direction.

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  • The nuns are devoted to a purely contemplative life, and in Russia, where there are about a hundred nunneries, they are not allowed to take final vows until the age of sixty.

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  • The cope belonged to the convent of Syon near Isleworth, was taken to Portugal at the Reformation, brought back early in the 19th century to England by exiled nuns and given by them to the Earl of Shrewsbury.

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  • The Nuns.

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  • - In the foregoing sketch nothing has been said concerning the nuns; and yet in all ages women, hardly less than men, have played their part in monasticism.

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  • It is a curious coincidence that the sister of each of the three great cenobitical founders, Pachomius, Basil and Benedict, was a nun and ruled a community of nuns according to an adaptation of her brother's rule for monks.

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  • In the West the Benedictine nuns played a great part in the Christian settlement of north-western Europe.

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  • As the various monastic and mendicant orders arose, a female branch was in most cases formed alongside of the order; and so we find canon.esses, and hermitesses, and Dominicanesses, and Franciscan nuns [or Clares (q.v.)] - requisite information will be found in the respective articles.

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  • Then there were the " double orders " of Sempringham (see ST Gilbert) and Fontevrault, in which the nuns were the predominant, or even the dominant, element.

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  • Of the modern orders of men only a few include nuns.

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  • The great majority of these modern congregations of women follow the Augustinian rule, supplemented by special constitutions or by-laws; such are the Brigittines, the Ursulines and the Visitation nuns: others follow the rule of the third order of the Franciscans or other Mendicants (see Tertiaries).

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  • In early times nuns could go out of their enclosure on occasion; but in the later middle ages, up to the council of Trent, the tendency was to keep them more and more strictly confined within their convent precincts.

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  • In 1609 an English lady, Mary Ward, founded at Munich the " Institute of Mary," the nuns of which were not bound to enclosure.

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  • As women are debarred from exercising the spiritual functions of the ministry, it follows that nuns have to devote themselves either to a more purely contemplative life, or else to a more wholly active one, than is usual among the orders of men, who commonly, in virtue of their priesthood, have been able to find a mixed form of life between the two extremes.

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  • The nuns belonging to the older orders tend to the contemplative idea, and they still find recruits in sufficient numbers, in spite of the modern rush to the active congregations.

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  • At first they were called "Brothers and Sisters of the Order of Penance"; but later on, when the Friars were called the "First Order" and the nuns the "Second Order," the Order of Penance became the "Third Order of St Francis" - whence the name Tertiaries: this threefold division already existed among the Humiliati.

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  • The abbey of Gandersheim was founded by Duke Ludolf of Saxony, who removed here in 856 the nuns who had been shortly before established at Brunshausen.

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  • In America are some convents of Olivetan nuns.

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  • Among the other buildings and institutions are Hamilton Hall (1805); the Franklin Building (1861) of the Salem Marine Society; a large armoury; a state normal school (1854); an orphan asylum (1871), under the Sisters of the Grey Nuns; the Association for the Relief of Aged and Destitute Women (1860), occupying a fine old brick house formerly the home of Benjamin W.

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  • Other buildings are: the Roman Catholic parish church, founded in 1726; the church of the Ursuline nuns, built in 1474; the town hall, an imposing building of the 15th century, purchased by the municipality in 1545 and containing the archives of the "Saxon nation."

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  • Hamilton in Dublin Review, 1888, "The Nuns of Syon."

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  • The escape from Omdurman of Father Ohrwalder and of two of the captive nuns in December 1891, of Father Rossignoli in October 1894, and of Siatin Bey in February 1895, revealed the condition of the Sudan to the outside world, threw a vivid light on the rule of the khalif a, and corroborated information already received of the discontent which existed among the tribes with the oppression and despotism under which they lived.

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  • After holding for some years the office of directress of the Hospice Trivulzio for Blue Nuns at Milan, she herself joined the sisterhood, and in this austere order ended her days on the 9th of January 1799.

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  • After the 4th century, monks and nuns begin to form no inconsiderable part of the pilgrimages - a fact which is especially manifest from the numerous notices to be found in Jerome, and the narratives of Theodoret in the Historia religiosa.

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  • SAINT CLARA (1194-1253), foundress of the Franciscan nuns, was born of a knightly family in Assisi in 1194.

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  • Her two younger sisters, and, after her father's death, her mother and many others joined her, and the Franciscan nuns spread widely and rapidly (see Clares, Poor).

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  • For forty years she was abbess at St Damian's, and the great endeavour of her life was that the rule of the nuns should be purged of the foreign elements that had been introduced, and should become wholly conformable to St Francis's spirit.

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  • The rescued nuns found places of refuge in the families of Wittenberg burghers.

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  • Monkery is common among them, but there are no nuns.

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  • It embraced an establishment for monks and (until the Conquest) for nuns of the Benedictine order, and under Hilda, a grand-niece of Edwin, a former king of Northumbria, acquired high celebrity.

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  • There were Trinitarian nuns and a Third Order.

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  • Since the expulsion of the religious orders from France in 1903 several communities of French monks and nuns have taken up their abode in the Principality.

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  • In the intervals of these journeys he governed Tours with great firmness, repressing disorders and reducing the monks and nuns to obedience.

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  • form of abbas, abbot), the female superior of an abbey or convent of nuns.

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  • Abbesses have a right to demand absolute obedience of their nuns, over whom they exercise discipline, extending even to the power of expulsion, subject, however, to the bishop. As a female an abbess is incapable of performing the spiritual functions of the priesthood belonging to an abbot.

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  • By Celtic usage abbesses presided over joint-houses of monks and nuns.

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  • There are 481 monasteries for men and 249 convents of nuns.

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  • Public education is not, however, entirely in the hands of the priesthood and nuns; there are an institute, a normal school to train teachers, a school of arts and handicrafts, a nautical school and numerous public primary schools for both sexes.

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  • The following orders, though not called Augustinians, also have St Augustine's Rule as the basis of their life: Dominicans, Servites, Our Lady of Ransom, Hieronymites, Assumptionists and many others; also orders of women: Brigittines, Ursulines, Visitation nuns and a vast number of congregations of women, spread over the Old and New Worlds, devoted to education and charitable works of all kinds.

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  • 109) is a long letter of practical advice to a community of nuns, on their daily life; and Serm.

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  • He sent to Syria, Assemanus, a Maronite educated at the Roman college of Gregory XIII.; and at last, at a council held at the monastery of Lowaizi on the 30th of September 1736, the Maronite Church accepted from Rome a constitution which is still in force, and agreed to abandon some of its more incongruous usages such as mixed convents of monks and nuns.

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  • In this litany seven processions, of clergy, laymen, monks, nuns, matrons, the poor, and children respectively, starting from seven different churches, proceeding to hear mass at Sta Maria Maggiore (see Greg.

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  • An abbot also had the power of excommunicating refractory nuns, which he might use if desired by their abbess.

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  • It is a story, in itself exceedingly humorous, showing how a parrot, the delight of a convent, whose talk was all of prayers and pious ejaculations, was conveyed to another convent as a visitor to please the nuns.

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  • The treatment of the subject, the atmosphere which surrounds it, the delicacy in which the little prattling ways of the nuns, their jealousies, their tiny trifles, are presented, takes the reader entirely by surprise.

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  • Then trouble came upon him; complaints were made to the fathers of the alleged licentiousness of his verses, the real cause of complaint being the ridicule which Vert Vert seemed to throw upon the whole race of nuns and the anti-clerical tendency of the other poems. An example, it was urged, must be made; Gresset was expelled the order.

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  • This charitable activity, however, distinguishes the modern sister from the nuns of primitive and medieval times, who were cloistered and contemplative, and left external works to deaconesses, or to laywomen of a " third order," or to the freer societies like the Beguines.

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  • If so, parliament was told that temporal possessions ruin the church and drive out the Christian graces of faith, hope and charity; that the priesthood of the church in communion with Rome was not the priesthood Christ gave to his apostles; that the monk's vow of celibacy had for its consequence unnatural lust, and should not be imposed; that transubstantiation was a feigned miracle, and led people to idolatry; that prayers made over wine, bread, water, oil, salt, wax, incense, altars of stone, church walls, vestments, mitres, crosses, staves, were magical and should not be allowed; that kings should possess the jus episcopale, and bring good government into the church; that no special prayers should be made for the dead; that auricular confession made to the clergy, and declared to be necessary for salvation, was the root of clerical arrogance and the cause of indulgences and other abuses in pardoning sin; that all wars were against the principles of the New Testament, and were but murdering and plundering the poor to win glory for kings; that the vows of chastity laid upon nuns led to child murder; that many of the trades practised in the commonwealth, such as those of goldsmiths and armourers, were unnecessary and led to luxury and waste.

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  • Thomas Bagley was accused of declaring that if in the sacrament a priest made bread into God, he made a God that can be eaten by rats and mice; that the pharisees of the day, the monks, and the nuns, and the friars and all other privileged persons recognized by the church were limbs of Satan; and that auricular confession to the priest was the will not of God but of the devil.

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  • The nuns of Port Royal werein their turn subjected to persecution, which, after a truce between 1666 and 1679, became aggravated by the affair of the regale, the bishops of Aleth and Pamiers being Jansenists.

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  • Port Royal was destroyed, the nuns dispersed, and the ashes of the dead scattered to the four winds.

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  • The Gilbertines were a purely English order which took its rise in Lincolnshire, the canons following the Austin rule, the nuns and lay brothers that of the Cistercians.

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  • The monks number about 10,000, the nuns 40,000.

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  • The church of All Saints, originally of Norman foundation, was rebuilt in 1273 by the abbess and nuns of Godstow near Oxford, and was largely reconstructed early in the 15th century.

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  • A regular crusade now began against monks and nuns, and images and relics were destroyed on a great scale.

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  • In parts of Asia Minor (Lydia and Caria) the monks were even forced to marry the nuns.

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  • Next to the riddles, Aldhelm's best-known work is De Laude Virginitatis sive de Virginitate Sanctorum, a Latin treatise addressed about 705 to the nuns of Barking, 2 in which he commemorates a great number of saints.

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  • Their leader, named Pons, gathered round him nobles, priests, monks and nuns.

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  • Among public institutions are the university, which occupies part of the old Jesuit college, an astronomical observatory, and eleven large monastic institutions, six of which are for nuns.

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  • In the beginning of the year 1850 his decline became visible and the Nuns watched over his health with affectionate solicitude.

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  • In the later Middle Ages there were complaints that the Romsey nuns were frequenting local taverns.

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  • Soon the nuns joined in, resting their voices on top of Joseph 's deeper thrum.

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  • The nuns would be down on them like a ton of bricks.

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  • Dressed as nuns the trombone trio wowed the audience with their fantastic playing and choreography.

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  • In theory, Cistercian nuns wore the characteristic habit of undyed wool.

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  • Madonna dolls-These dolls are typically handmade by the nuns of a particular order, who may or may not be affiliated with the family's church and/or school.

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  • Newberg performed experiments with Tibetan Monks who meditate and Catholic Nuns who pray.

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  • The original nursing uniform of a white dress and cap is based on the habits of nuns, once the first and only people allowed as nurses.

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  • It originally came from the nuns' habits, since before there were nurses nuns traditionally cared for the sick in hospitals and during wartime.

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  • The Oracle had given him nothing, and he didn't feel able to sit still and drink tea with Daniela, the headmistress of the order of nuns who managed this Sanctuary.

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  • She walked into the dark dining area to see a few others already present: two of the nuns and two normal looking people.

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  • Katie fought back a smile at the irritated look on Rhyn's face.  He was in raw form: bloodied, drenched with underworld rain, disheveled, in need of a good shave.  His thick frame was still on edge, as if he expected one of the Sanctuary's nuns to turn into a demon and fly at them.  He looked every bit the muscular, powerful, glowering half-demon the nuns wanted to throw out of the Sanctuary.

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  • Instead they ask me if I want some Burmese Rain forest mixture or some leaves pressed by cloistered nuns in Nepal.

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  • While leaving intact the general houses of the various confraternities (except that of the Jesuits), the bill abolished the Religious corporate personality of religious orders, handed over Bill, their schools and hospitals to civil administrators, placed their churches at the disposal of the secular clergy, and provided pensions for nuns and monks, those who had families being sent to reside with their relatives, and those who by reason of age or bereavement had no home but their monasteries being allowed to end their days in religious houses specially set apart for the purpose.

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  • The proceeds of the sale of the suppressed convents and monasteries were partly converted into pensions for monks and nuns, and partly allotted to the municipal charity boards which had undertaken the educational and charitable functions formerly exercised by the religious orders.

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  • Armed with it he passed safely into heathen Germany and began a systematic crusade, baptizing, overturning idols, founding churches and monasteries, and calling from England a band of missionary helpers, monks and nuns, some of whom have become famous: St Lull, his successor in the see at Mainz; St Burchard, bishop of Wurzburg; St Gregory, abbot at Utrecht; Willibald, his biographer; St Lioba, St Walburge, St Thecla.

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  • It has two naves parallel, originally for the use of the nuns and the parishioners respectively.

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    1
  • In the monastery, however, she was held in high honour by the archimandrite; the nuns persisted in regarding her as the lawful empress; and she was permitted an extraordinary degree of latitude, unknown to Peter, who dragged her from her enforced retreat in 1718 on a charge of adultery.

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  • The wheel being her symbol she was the patron saint of wheelwrights and mechanics; as the confounder of heathen sophistry she was invoked by theologians, apologists, preachers and philosophers, and was chosen as the patron saint of the university of Paris; as the most holy and illustrious of Christian virgins she became the tutelary saint of nuns and virgins generally.

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  • Near the station are the ruins of the abbey of Cistercian nuns founded by David I.

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    1
  • When they returned to Palestine they all settled at Bethlehem, where Paula built four monasteries, three for nuns and one for monks.

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    1
  • The French plundered the churches, abolished monks, nuns and nobles, and set up forthwith the ways and doings of the French Revolution.

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    1
  • Besides a number of settlers a Roman Catholic bishop and a party of four missionaries and nuns were murdered in the Kilwa hinterland, while nearer Nyasa the warlike Wangoni held possession of the country.

    0
    1
  • As the institute spread to other lands nunneries arose on all sides, and nowhere were the Benedictine nuns more numerous or more remarkable than in England, from Saxon times to the Reformation.

    0
    1
  • A strong type of womanhood is revealed in the correspondence of St Boniface with various Saxon Benedictine nuns, some in England and some who accompanied him to the continent and there established great convents.

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  • Sir Henry Burdett quotes an order, dated 30th May 1578, directing the master and the prior of the Hotel Dieu "not to receive henceforth any novices without speaking of it to the company, because there are an excessive number of nuns and novices, who cause great expense to the said Hotel Dieu."

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  • Katie fought back a smile at the irritated look on Rhyn's face.  He was in raw form: bloodied, drenched with underworld rain, disheveled, in need of a good shave.  His thick frame was still on edge, as if he expected one of the Sanctuary's nuns to turn into a demon and fly at them.  He looked every bit the muscular, powerful, glowering half-demon the nuns wanted to throw out of the Sanctuary.

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  • Instead they ask me if I want some Burmese Rain forest mixture or some leaves pressed by cloistered nuns in Nepal.

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  • When they returned to Palestine they all settled at Bethlehem, where Paula built four monasteries, three for nuns and one for monks.

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