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nuisances

nuisances Sentence Examples

  • one or more inspectors of nuisances and a treasurer.

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  • It should be noted that, according to Scottish usage, police " includes drainage, the suppression of nuisances, paving, lighting and cleansing, in addition to the provision of a constabulary force, and that in point of fact, paradoxical as it appears, the bulk of the police burghs do not manage their police.

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  • It should be noted that, according to Scottish usage, police " includes drainage, the suppression of nuisances, paving, lighting and cleansing, in addition to the provision of a constabulary force, and that in point of fact, paradoxical as it appears, the bulk of the police burghs do not manage their police.

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  • The surveyor is likewise specially charged with the removal of nuisances on the highway.

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  • The provisions as to nuisances are extended to ships by an act of 1885.

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  • With a further view to uniformity it has certain powers of supervision and control over local authorities, and can make by-laws respecting construction of local sewers, sanitary conveniences, offensive trades, slaughter-houses and dairies,, and prevention of nuisances outside the jurisdiction of local authorities.

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  • Sand-flies and biting gnats are lesser nuisances.

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  • The vestries and district boards became the authorities for local drainage, paving, lighting, repairing and maintaining streets, and for the removal of nuisances, &c.

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  • By the common law of England freedom from noise is essential to the full enjoyment of a dwelling house, and acts which affect that enjoyment may be actionable as nuisances.

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  • The payments which the county council have to make in substitution for the local grants formerly made out of Imperial funds include payments for or towards the remuneration of the teachers in poorlaw schools and public vaccinators; school fees paid for children sent from a workhouse to a public elementary school; half of the salaries of the medical officer of health and the inspector of nuisances of district councils; the remuneration of registrars for births and deaths; the maintenance of pauper lunatics; half of the cost of the pay and clothing of the police of the county, and of each borough maintaining a separate police force.

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  • the suppression of nuisances not already punishable By under the general law.

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  • It may be mentioned that, while by-laws relating to the good government of the county have to be confirmed by the secretary of state, those which relate to the suppression of nuisances have to be confirmed by the Local Government Board.

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  • and for the prevention and suppression of nuisances not already punishable in summary manner by virtue of an act in force throughout the borough.

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  • These relate for the most part to nuisances and infectious disease, having special reference to ships.

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  • Of these all but the medical officer of health and inspectors of nuisances hold office at pleasure and receive such remuneration as the council may determine.

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  • The salaries of the medical officer of health and inspectors of nuisances are, as to one moiety thereof, paid out of " the exchequer contribution account " by the county council, if they are appointed in accordance with the requirements of the Local Government Board as to qualification, appointment, duties, salary and tenure of office.

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  • If they do not undertake these duties, they may make by-laws imposing on the occupiers of premises the duty of cleansing footways and pavements, the removal of house refuse, and the cleansing of earth-closets, privies, ashpits and cesspools; and an urban council may also make by-laws for the prevention of nuisances arising from snow, filth, dust, ashes and rubbish, and for the prevention of the keeping of animals on any premises so as to be injurious to health.

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  • The Public Health Acts 1875 to 1907 contain elaborate provisions for dealing with nuisances.

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  • The nuisances above enumerated are said to be nuisances liable to be dealt with summarily.

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  • It is the duty of every district council to inspect their district with a view to the discovery of any such nuisances.

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  • Private persons may complain to justices in respect of nuisances by which they are personally aggrieved, and if the district council make default in doing their duty, the Local Government Board may authorize any officer of police to institute any necessary proceedings at the cost of the defaulting council.

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  • Any medical officer or inspector of nuisances may inspect any meat, &c., exposed for sale or deposited in any place for the purpose of sale or of preparation for sale and intended for the food of man.

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  • These relate to obstructions Hackney and nuisances in streets, fires, places of public resort, hackney carriages and public bathing.

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  • Under the Sale of Food and Drugs Acts certain important duties devolve upon medical officers and inspectors of nuisances who are officers of district councils.

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  • charities other than ecclesiastical charities in certain cases, and certain limited powers with reference to the supply of water to the parish, the removal of nuisances, and the acquisition of rights of way which are beneficial to the inhabitants.

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  • Environmental concern prior to the mid 19th century is reflected in local authority bylaws relating to public health, nuisances and buildings.

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  • The Clean Neighborhoods and Environment Act, which comes into effect in 2006, extends the list of statutory nuisances to include light pollution.

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  • Sand-flies and biting gnats are lesser nuisances.

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  • With a further view to uniformity it has certain powers of supervision and control over local authorities, and can make by-laws respecting construction of local sewers, sanitary conveniences, offensive trades, slaughter-houses and dairies,, and prevention of nuisances outside the jurisdiction of local authorities.

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  • The vestries and district boards became the authorities for local drainage, paving, lighting, repairing and maintaining streets, and for the removal of nuisances, &c.

    0
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  • The surveyor is likewise specially charged with the removal of nuisances on the highway.

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    0
  • By the common law of England freedom from noise is essential to the full enjoyment of a dwelling house, and acts which affect that enjoyment may be actionable as nuisances.

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  • The ringing of bells, building operations, vibration of machinery, fireworks, bands, a circus, merry-go-rounds, collecting disorderly crowds, dancing, singing, &c., have been held under certain circumstances to constitute nuisances so as to interfere with quiet and comfort, and have been restrained by injunction.

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  • The payments which the county council have to make in substitution for the local grants formerly made out of Imperial funds include payments for or towards the remuneration of the teachers in poorlaw schools and public vaccinators; school fees paid for children sent from a workhouse to a public elementary school; half of the salaries of the medical officer of health and the inspector of nuisances of district councils; the remuneration of registrars for births and deaths; the maintenance of pauper lunatics; half of the cost of the pay and clothing of the police of the county, and of each borough maintaining a separate police force.

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  • the suppression of nuisances not already punishable By under the general law.

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  • It may be mentioned that, while by-laws relating to the good government of the county have to be confirmed by the secretary of state, those which relate to the suppression of nuisances have to be confirmed by the Local Government Board.

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  • and for the prevention and suppression of nuisances not already punishable in summary manner by virtue of an act in force throughout the borough.

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  • These relate for the most part to nuisances and infectious disease, having special reference to ships.

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  • one or more inspectors of nuisances and a treasurer.

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  • Of these all but the medical officer of health and inspectors of nuisances hold office at pleasure and receive such remuneration as the council may determine.

    0
    0
  • The salaries of the medical officer of health and inspectors of nuisances are, as to one moiety thereof, paid out of " the exchequer contribution account " by the county council, if they are appointed in accordance with the requirements of the Local Government Board as to qualification, appointment, duties, salary and tenure of office.

    0
    0
  • If they do not undertake these duties, they may make by-laws imposing on the occupiers of premises the duty of cleansing footways and pavements, the removal of house refuse, and the cleansing of earth-closets, privies, ashpits and cesspools; and an urban council may also make by-laws for the prevention of nuisances arising from snow, filth, dust, ashes and rubbish, and for the prevention of the keeping of animals on any premises so as to be injurious to health.

    0
    0
  • The Public Health Acts 1875 to 1907 contain elaborate provisions for dealing with nuisances.

    0
    0
  • The nuisances above enumerated are said to be nuisances liable to be dealt with summarily.

    0
    0
  • It is the duty of every district council to inspect their district with a view to the discovery of any such nuisances.

    0
    0
  • Private persons may complain to justices in respect of nuisances by which they are personally aggrieved, and if the district council make default in doing their duty, the Local Government Board may authorize any officer of police to institute any necessary proceedings at the cost of the defaulting council.

    0
    0
  • The provisions as to nuisances are extended to ships by an act of 1885.

    0
    0
  • Any medical officer or inspector of nuisances may inspect any meat, &c., exposed for sale or deposited in any place for the purpose of sale or of preparation for sale and intended for the food of man.

    0
    0
  • These relate to obstructions Hackney and nuisances in streets, fires, places of public resort, hackney carriages and public bathing.

    0
    0
  • Under the Sale of Food and Drugs Acts certain important duties devolve upon medical officers and inspectors of nuisances who are officers of district councils.

    0
    0
  • charities other than ecclesiastical charities in certain cases, and certain limited powers with reference to the supply of water to the parish, the removal of nuisances, and the acquisition of rights of way which are beneficial to the inhabitants.

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  • "The Grand Marshal of the palace," wrote the governor, "complains bitterly that in spite of repeated orders, the soldiers continue to commit nuisances in all the courtyards and even under the very windows of the Emperor."

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  • You can even obtain insurance for nuisances like trip cancellation and interruption.

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  • Simple nuisances such as hangnails or ingrown nails can often be treated at home, but if you experience a fingernail health problem with multiple symptoms, it's pertinent you evaluate the condition and seek proper care if needed.

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