How to use Nosebleeds in a sentence

nosebleeds
  • Why do some children get nosebleeds more often than others?

    0
    0
  • Seek medical treatment for any disease causing the nosebleeds.

    0
    0
  • For example, patients might notice blood on their toothbrush from bleeding gums or might develop nosebleeds.

    0
    0
  • If the person frequently suffers sudden, intense nosebleeds, they should also consult a doctor.

    0
    0
  • In very severe cases, skin from the leg can be transplanted into the nose to stop frequent nosebleeds.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • As a result, frequent and heavy nosebleeds are common in people with Gaucher disease.

    0
    0
  • People who snort cocaine may develop frequent nosebleeds and even do permanent damage to the nasal tissues.

    0
    0
  • If the drug is snorted, some users will experience nosebleeds immediately after using the drug or later.

    0
    0
  • Nasal congestion, dry nose, dry eyes, sore throat, and nosebleeds are common CPAP problems.

    0
    0
  • Most parents consult a pediatrician or primary care doctor after noticing their child has the typical purpuric skin rash, frequent nosebleeds, or bleeding from the digestive or urinary tract.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • If nosebleeds or bleeding from the mouth or other parts of the body have been reported, the doctor will examine these areas for other possible causes of bleeding.

    0
    0
  • Nosebleeds can be treated with ice packs when necessary.

    0
    0
  • The symptoms to be alert for are frequent nosebleeds or frequent bruising with no specific cause, particularly if the child has had a recent illness or virus.

    0
    0
  • The parent of a child with albinism should also call the doctor if the child bruises easily or has unusual bleeding, such as repeated nosebleeds or bloody diarrhea.

    0
    0
  • Recurrent nosebleeds are a nearly universal symptom in this condition.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Usually the nosebleeds begin in childhood and become worse with age.

    0
    0
  • Frequent nosebleeds should be followed up with the pediatrician.

    0
    0
  • Parents should be aware that frequent nosebleeds are a common sign of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    0
    0
  • Most nosebleeds are treated by five to 30 minutes of direct pressure on the nostrils, with the child's head placed in an upright position.

    0
    0
  • Nosebleeds or tissue damage caused by scratching or picking at the nose usually clear completely once the child stops these habits.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Minor nosebleeds and uncomplicated fractures of the nose caused by accidents generally heal without problems and are quickly absorbed into the family's routine.

    0
    0
  • Symptoms include sudden onset of small bruises or spots of hemorrhage on the skin or bleeding into mucous membranes (such as nosebleeds).

    0
    0
  • Nosebleeds and blood in the stool with a black, tarlike appearance are also signs of von Willebrand's disease.

    0
    0
  • Easy bruising, profuse nosebleeds, postpartum hemorrhage, excessively prolonged or heavy menstrual bleeding, and postsurgical hemorrhage may also result.

    0
    0
  • Nearly 50 percent of individuals with this disorder experience no symptoms, but others may notice blood in their urine, nosebleeds, or bruising.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • It involves reduced activity of factor XI and is characterized by mild bleeding such as nosebleeds (epistaxis) or prolonged menstrual bleeding, or mild bleeding after tonsillectomies or dental extractions.

    0
    0
  • Type 1, the mildest form of VWD, is usually associated with easy bruising, recurrent nosebleeds, heavy menstrual periods, and prolonged bleeding after surgeries and invasive work.

    0
    0
  • These children usually experience prolonged bleeding from cuts, easy bruising, nosebleeds, skin hematomas, and prolonged bleeding from the gums following tooth extraction and minor trauma.

    0
    0
  • However there are significant side effects, including temporary worsening of the acne; dry skin; nosebleeds; vision disorders; and elevated liver enzymes, blood fats, and cholesterol.

    0
    0
  • Side effects are usually mild, but may include headaches, nosebleeds, and unpleasant taste sensations.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Although unexpected or persistent bleeding from anywhere is a warning sign of cancer and should be investigated, nosebleeds are rarely a sign of serious illness.

    0
    0
  • Nosebleeds most often come from the front of the septum, the cartilage that separates the nose into two nostrils.

    0
    0
  • These anterior nosebleeds comprise 80 percent of all nosebleeds.

    0
    0
  • Posterior nosebleeds, which come from the back of the nose, are less common and much harder to manage.

    0
    0
  • It is difficult to determine how much blood is lost in these nosebleeds.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Though it is a common misconception that children are more susceptible to nosebleeds than adults, research has found that nosebleeds are more prevalent in older adults and more often are a sign of other health problems.

    0
    0
  • Nosebleeds do, however, occur frequently in childhood.

    0
    0
  • About 30 percent of children up to five years of age have had spontaneous nosebleeds that appeared without apparent injury to the nose.

    0
    0
  • Moreover, over half of adults with recurring nosebleeds had them as children.

    0
    0
  • Only about 10 percent of children with frequent nosebleeds have been found to have a previously undiagnosed bleeding disorder.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The most common cause of nosebleeds is injury from picking or blowing the nose.

    0
    0
  • Physical injury to the nose from falls, sports, or fighting can also cause nosebleeds.

    0
    0
  • Chemical irritants such as cleaning products, aerosols, and paint can irritate the nose, sometimes resulting in nosebleeds.

    0
    0
  • Children with deviated septums or crooked noses are also prone to nosebleeds.

    0
    0
  • Nosebleeds occur more frequently in the winter when the air is cold outside and homes are filled with dry air from furnaces and other heating sources.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Even some medications can cause nosebleeds.

    0
    0
  • Overuse of nasal sprays can also produce nosebleeds.

    0
    0
  • In addition, nosebleeds can be a side effect of alcohol abuse.

    0
    0
  • Nosebleeds in children can sometimes be caused by children putting objects into their noses.

    0
    0
  • Frequent nosebleeds, especially if they are occurring more often and are not due to colds, allergies, or trauma, will need to be seen by a doctor as well.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Most nosebleeds will stop within this time period, especially if the child is encouraged to remain calm.

    0
    0
  • Homeopathic remedies can be one of the quickest and most effective treatments for nosebleeds.

    0
    0
  • If nosebleeds recur within that time, it is recommended to take 500 mg of bioflavonoids twice a day.

    0
    0
  • Most common nosebleeds are easily managed and can be prevented.

    0
    0
  • Serious nosebleeds need further investigation but are usually controlled by treating the underlying cause.

    0
    0
  • Keeping the home cooler in winter and using a humidifier help keep the nasal passages moist and reduce the risk of nosebleeds due to dry air.

    0
    0
  • Gently blowing the nose and not picking it will also prevent nosebleeds.

    0
    0
  • Nosebleeds can be frightening for children.

    0
    0
  • Side effects may include headaches, nosebleeds, and unpleasant taste sensations.

    0
    0
  • Other side effects could include blisters, nosebleeds, and vomiting.

    0
    0