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northamptonshire

northamptonshire

northamptonshire Sentence Examples

  • HENRY CHICHELEY (1364-1443), English archbishop, founder of All Souls College, Oxford, was born at Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, in 1363 or 1364.

  • The only alien priories granted were Abberbury in Oxfordshire, Wedon Pinkney in Northamptonshire, Romney in Kent, and St Clare and Llangenith in Wales, all very small affairs, single manors and rectories, and these did not form a quarter of the whole endowment.

  • During his stay at the Northamptonshire village of Holdenby or Holmby - where Sir Thomas Herbert complains the green was not well kept - Charles frequently rode over to Lord Vaux's place at Harrowden, or to Lord Spencer's at Althorp, for a game, and, according to one account, was actually playing on the latter green when Cornet Joyce came to Holmby to remove him to other quarters.

  • 1600) of Althorp, Northamptonshire, who claimed descent from the baronial family of Despenser.

  • paid him at Althorp, his Northamptonshire seat, in 1691, being the prelude to his recall into the royal counsels.

  • It rises near Naseby in Northamptonshire, and, with a course of about zoo m.

  • JOHN STOKESLEY (c. 1475-1539), English prelate, was born at Colly Weston in Northamptonshire, and became a fellow of Magdalen College, serving also as a lecturer.

  • Having entered the army at an early age, Conway was elected to the Irish parliament in 1741 as member for Antrim, which he continued to represent for twenty years; in the same year he became a member of the English House of Commons, sitting for Higham Ferrers in Northamptonshire, and he remained in parliament, representing successively a number of different constituencies, almost without interruption for more than forty years.

  • 1640-1649), English royalist, son of Sir Henry Capel of Raines Hall, Essex, and of Theodosia, daughter of Sir Edward Montagu of Broughton, Northamptonshire, was elected a member of the Short and Long Parliaments in 1640 for Hertfordshire.

  • In 1643 he was presented to the rectory of Overstone, Northamptonshire, by Charles I.

  • WILLIAM LAW (1686-1761), English divine, was born at King's Cliffe, Northamptonshire.

  • Thus, the upper portion of the system, above the gap at Goring, is a basin in itself, defined on the west and south by the Cotteswold and White Horse Hills and on the east and north by the Chilterns and the uplands of Northamptonshire.

  • His grandfather, Daniel Foe, lived at Etton, Northamptonshire, apparently in comfortable circumstances, for he is said to have kept a pack of hounds.

  • Thus it came about that he was brought up as a Roman Catholic, chiefly at the scat of Mr Holman at Warkworth, Northamptonshire, where the Rev. John Gother, a celebrated controversialist, officiated as chaplain.

  • His scruples having thus been overcome, he was, in the following year (1638), promoted to the chancellorship of the church of Sarum, with the prebend of Brixworth 1, in Northamptonshire annexed to it.

  • The elder Franklin was born at Ecton in Northamptonshire, England, where the strongly Protestant Franklin family may be traced back for nearly four centuries.

  • FOTHERINGHAY, a village of Northamptonshire, England, picturesquely situated on the left bank of the river Nene, iz m.

  • JOHN LANDEN (1719-1790), English mathematician, was born at Peakirk near Peterborough in Northamptonshire on the 23rd.

  • Coleman, Independent Churches of Northamptonshire (1853), T.

  • OUNDLE, a market-town in the Northern parliamentary division of Northamptonshire, England, 302 m.

  • In 1607 he was made vicar of Stanford in Northamptonshire, and in 1608 he became chaplain to Bishop Neile, who in 1610 presented him to the living of Cuxton, when he resigned his fellowship. In 1611, in spite of the influence of Archbishop Abbot and Lord Chancellor Ellesmere, Laud was made president of St John's, and in 1614 obtained in addition the prebend of Buckden, in 1615 the archdeaconry of Huntingdon, and in 1616 the deanery of Gloucester.

  • TOWCESTER, a market town in the southern parliamentary division of Northamptonshire, England, 8 m.

  • in 1526, sheriff of Northamptonshire in 1532, and a justice of the peace for Rutland.

  • He represented Lincolnshire in the parliament of 1559, and Northamptonshire in that of 1563, and he took an active part in the proceedings of the House of Commons until his elevation to the peerage; but there seems no good evidence for the story that he was proposed as speaker in 1563.

  • RICHARD KNOLLES (c. 1545-1610), English historian, was a native of Northamptonshire, and was educated at Lincoln College, Oxford.

  • WELLINGBOROUGH, a market town in the eastern parliamentary division of Northamptonshire, England, 632 m.

  • He was in turn vicar at Ware, Hertfordshire (1627-1633), and at Marston St Lawrence, Northamptonshire (1633-1637).

  • WILLIAM CAREY (1761-1834), English Oriental scholar, and the pioneer of modern missionary enterprise, was born at Paulerspury, Northamptonshire, on the 17th of August 1761.

  • JOHN WILKINS (1614-1672), bishop of Chester, was born at Fawsley, Northamptonshire, and educated at Magdalen Hall, Oxford.

  • He became vicar of Polebrook, Northamptonshire, in 1666, prebendary of Exeter in 1667, and in the following year prebendary of St Paul's and bishop of Chester.

  • DAVENTRY, a market town and municipal borough in the Southern parliamentary division of Northamptonshire, England, 14 m.

  • He also received the livings of Cottesmore, Rutlandshire, and Stoke Bruerne, Northamptonshire.

  • The chief movers in the enterprise were the Congregationalist, David Bogue of Gosport, and the Episcopalian, Thomas Haweis, rector of Aldwinkle, Northamptonshire.

  • On the 25th of September she was removed to the strong castle of Fotheringay in Northamptonshire.

  • They extend from Northamptonshire to near Glasgow.

  • In 1905 the Cleveland district in North Yorkshire supplied 41% of the total British product of iron ores; Lincolnshire, 14.8%; Northamptonshire, 13.9%; Leicestershire, 4.7%; Cumberland, 8.6%; North Lancashire, 2.7%; Staffordshire, 6.1%; and Scotland, 5.7%.

  • Most of the British iron works lie in and near the important coal-fields in Scotland between the mouth of the Clyde and the Forth, in Cleveland and Durham, in Cumberland and Lancashire, in south Yorkshire, Derbyshire, and Lincolnshire, in Staffordshire and Northamptonshire, and in south Wales in spite of its lack of ore.

  • 1692), English soldier and politician, third son of Sir Miles Fleetwood of Aldwinkle, Northamptonshire, and of Anne, daughter of Nicholas Luke of Woodend, Bedfordshire, was admitted into Gray's Inn on the 30th of November 1638.

  • HENRY LONGUEVILLE MANSEL (1820-1871), English philosopher, was born at Cosgrove, Northamptonshire (where his father, also Henry Longueville Mansel, fourth son of General John Mansel, was rector), on the 6th of October 1820.

  • Not long after he died at Oundle in Northamptonshire as he was going on a visit to Ceolred, king of Mercia (709).

  • The three counties included in the expression are Leicestershire, Rutlandshire and Northamptonshire.

  • In 1782 he removed to Kettering in Northamptonshire, where he became friendly with some of the most eminent ministers of the denomination.

  • HIGHAM FERRERS, a market town and municipal borough in the Eastern parliamentary division of Northamptonshire, England, 63 m.

  • The church of St Mary is among the most beautiful of the many fine churches in Northamptonshire.

  • seem to have established the connexion of the family with the Washingtons of Sulgrave, Northamptonshire, England.

  • Shortly after, in 1792, the Baptist Missionary Society was formed at Kettering in Northamptonshire, after a sermon on Isaiah lii.

  • KETTERING, a market town in the eastern parliamentary division of Northamptonshire, England, 72 m.

  • The hue and cry was out against him; henceforth he led a hunted life, preaching and ministering to Catholics in Berkshire, Oxfordshire, Northamptonshire and Lancashire.

  • The uplands of Northamptonshire continue this range north-eastward, decreasing in elevation.

  • It connects with the Oxford Canal at Braunston in Northamptonshire, and through this with canals to Birmingham and the midlands, and continues to Leicester.

  • Northamptonshire.

  • The counties having the greatest area under cultivation (ranging up to about nine-tenths of the whole) may be taken to be - Leicestershire, the East Riding of Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Huntingdonshire, Rutland, Northamptonshire, Bedfordshire and Cambridgeshire.

  • There is also a considerable working of brown iron ore at various points in Lincolnshire, Northamptonshire and Leicestershire; with further workings of less importance in Staffordshire and several other districts.

  • parliamentary division of Northamptonshire, England, 66 m.

  • In the latter year he was appointed to the vicarage of Easton Maudit, Northamptonshire, and three years later was instituted to the rectory of Wilby in the same county, benefices which he retained until 1782.

  • by Northamptonshire.

  • Northamptonshire >>

  • From this point the boundary is left undefined, perhaps because the kingdoms of Alfred and Guthrum ceased to be conterminous here, though if Northamptonshire was included in the kingdom of Guthrum, as seems likely, the boundary must be carried a few miles along Watling Street.

  • the border of modern Northamptonshire), submitted to Edward and at the same time Colchester was fortified; a large portion of Essex submitted and the whole of the East Anglian Danes came in.

  • In Derbyshire, Leicestershire, Lincolnshire, part of Northamptonshire, Nottinghamshire, Rutlandshire (of later formation) and Yorkshire we have the counties divided into "wapentakes" instead of "hundreds," again a mark of Danish influence.

  • The whole of the place nomenclature of Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Nottinghamshire and Northern Northamptonshire is Scandinavian rather than native English, and in the remaining districts of the Danelagh a goodly proportion of Danish place-names may be found.

  • BRACKLEY, a market town and municipal borough in the southern parliamentary division of Northamptonshire, England, 59 m.

  • by Cambridgeshire and Northamptonshire, S.W.

  • The Welland rises in north-west Northamptonshire, enters the county at Stamford, and, after receiving the Glen, flows through an artificial channel into the Fosdyke Wash.

  • 1616) of Rockingham Castle in Northamptonshire.

  • He is based at the Northamptonshire office and is working primarily in the areas of sound insulation testing and architectural acoustics.

  • Mr Whiteley, who is deputy chief constable of Northamptonshire police said senior officers were urging caution over how the powers are used.

  • For the purposes of minimizing duplication the report should be read in conjunction with the Scoping Report for the North Northamptonshire Joint Spatial Strategy.

  • gunpowder plot was hatched by Guy Fawkes 400 years ago in Northamptonshire.

  • Includes details of Anglo-Saxon weapons and armor, including an Anglo-Saxon helmet and other items found in a grave in Northamptonshire.

  • impaired youngsters in Northamptonshire's mainstream schools and nurseries.

  • It is the Northamptonshire Sand which contains the distinctive ironstone with which so many buildings in Northamptonshire and surrounding counties are constructed.

  • The adjacent former paymaster 's building houses the Museum of the Northamptonshire Aviation Society.

  • In 1557, a shoemaker in the parish of Syresham in Northamptonshire was sentenced to death at All Saints for denying transubstantiation.

  • Having been directly involved in the County of Northamptonshire he was then invited to become an umpire on the national chess circuit.

  • There are seven registered blind children and around 50 visually impaired youngsters in Northamptonshire's mainstream schools and nurseries.

  • HENRY CHICHELEY (1364-1443), English archbishop, founder of All Souls College, Oxford, was born at Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, in 1363 or 1364.

  • The only alien priories granted were Abberbury in Oxfordshire, Wedon Pinkney in Northamptonshire, Romney in Kent, and St Clare and Llangenith in Wales, all very small affairs, single manors and rectories, and these did not form a quarter of the whole endowment.

  • During his stay at the Northamptonshire village of Holdenby or Holmby - where Sir Thomas Herbert complains the green was not well kept - Charles frequently rode over to Lord Vaux's place at Harrowden, or to Lord Spencer's at Althorp, for a game, and, according to one account, was actually playing on the latter green when Cornet Joyce came to Holmby to remove him to other quarters.

  • 1600) of Althorp, Northamptonshire, who claimed descent from the baronial family of Despenser.

  • paid him at Althorp, his Northamptonshire seat, in 1691, being the prelude to his recall into the royal counsels.

  • It rises near Naseby in Northamptonshire, and, with a course of about zoo m.

  • JOHN STOKESLEY (c. 1475-1539), English prelate, was born at Colly Weston in Northamptonshire, and became a fellow of Magdalen College, serving also as a lecturer.

  • Having entered the army at an early age, Conway was elected to the Irish parliament in 1741 as member for Antrim, which he continued to represent for twenty years; in the same year he became a member of the English House of Commons, sitting for Higham Ferrers in Northamptonshire, and he remained in parliament, representing successively a number of different constituencies, almost without interruption for more than forty years.

  • 1640-1649), English royalist, son of Sir Henry Capel of Raines Hall, Essex, and of Theodosia, daughter of Sir Edward Montagu of Broughton, Northamptonshire, was elected a member of the Short and Long Parliaments in 1640 for Hertfordshire.

  • In 1643 he was presented to the rectory of Overstone, Northamptonshire, by Charles I.

  • WILLIAM LAW (1686-1761), English divine, was born at King's Cliffe, Northamptonshire.

  • Thus, the upper portion of the system, above the gap at Goring, is a basin in itself, defined on the west and south by the Cotteswold and White Horse Hills and on the east and north by the Chilterns and the uplands of Northamptonshire.

  • His grandfather, Daniel Foe, lived at Etton, Northamptonshire, apparently in comfortable circumstances, for he is said to have kept a pack of hounds.

  • Thus it came about that he was brought up as a Roman Catholic, chiefly at the scat of Mr Holman at Warkworth, Northamptonshire, where the Rev. John Gother, a celebrated controversialist, officiated as chaplain.

  • His scruples having thus been overcome, he was, in the following year (1638), promoted to the chancellorship of the church of Sarum, with the prebend of Brixworth 1, in Northamptonshire annexed to it.

  • The elder Franklin was born at Ecton in Northamptonshire, England, where the strongly Protestant Franklin family may be traced back for nearly four centuries.

  • FOTHERINGHAY, a village of Northamptonshire, England, picturesquely situated on the left bank of the river Nene, iz m.

  • JOHN LANDEN (1719-1790), English mathematician, was born at Peakirk near Peterborough in Northamptonshire on the 23rd.

  • Coleman, Independent Churches of Northamptonshire (1853), T.

  • OUNDLE, a market-town in the Northern parliamentary division of Northamptonshire, England, 302 m.

  • In 1607 he was made vicar of Stanford in Northamptonshire, and in 1608 he became chaplain to Bishop Neile, who in 1610 presented him to the living of Cuxton, when he resigned his fellowship. In 1611, in spite of the influence of Archbishop Abbot and Lord Chancellor Ellesmere, Laud was made president of St John's, and in 1614 obtained in addition the prebend of Buckden, in 1615 the archdeaconry of Huntingdon, and in 1616 the deanery of Gloucester.

  • TOWCESTER, a market town in the southern parliamentary division of Northamptonshire, England, 8 m.

  • in 1526, sheriff of Northamptonshire in 1532, and a justice of the peace for Rutland.

  • He represented Lincolnshire in the parliament of 1559, and Northamptonshire in that of 1563, and he took an active part in the proceedings of the House of Commons until his elevation to the peerage; but there seems no good evidence for the story that he was proposed as speaker in 1563.

  • RICHARD KNOLLES (c. 1545-1610), English historian, was a native of Northamptonshire, and was educated at Lincoln College, Oxford.

  • WELLINGBOROUGH, a market town in the eastern parliamentary division of Northamptonshire, England, 632 m.

  • He was in turn vicar at Ware, Hertfordshire (1627-1633), and at Marston St Lawrence, Northamptonshire (1633-1637).

  • WILLIAM CAREY (1761-1834), English Oriental scholar, and the pioneer of modern missionary enterprise, was born at Paulerspury, Northamptonshire, on the 17th of August 1761.

  • JOHN WILKINS (1614-1672), bishop of Chester, was born at Fawsley, Northamptonshire, and educated at Magdalen Hall, Oxford.

  • He became vicar of Polebrook, Northamptonshire, in 1666, prebendary of Exeter in 1667, and in the following year prebendary of St Paul's and bishop of Chester.

  • DAVENTRY, a market town and municipal borough in the Southern parliamentary division of Northamptonshire, England, 14 m.

  • He also received the livings of Cottesmore, Rutlandshire, and Stoke Bruerne, Northamptonshire.

  • The chief movers in the enterprise were the Congregationalist, David Bogue of Gosport, and the Episcopalian, Thomas Haweis, rector of Aldwinkle, Northamptonshire.

  • On the 25th of September she was removed to the strong castle of Fotheringay in Northamptonshire.

  • They extend from Northamptonshire to near Glasgow.

  • In 1905 the Cleveland district in North Yorkshire supplied 41% of the total British product of iron ores; Lincolnshire, 14.8%; Northamptonshire, 13.9%; Leicestershire, 4.7%; Cumberland, 8.6%; North Lancashire, 2.7%; Staffordshire, 6.1%; and Scotland, 5.7%.

  • Most of the British iron works lie in and near the important coal-fields in Scotland between the mouth of the Clyde and the Forth, in Cleveland and Durham, in Cumberland and Lancashire, in south Yorkshire, Derbyshire, and Lincolnshire, in Staffordshire and Northamptonshire, and in south Wales in spite of its lack of ore.

  • 1692), English soldier and politician, third son of Sir Miles Fleetwood of Aldwinkle, Northamptonshire, and of Anne, daughter of Nicholas Luke of Woodend, Bedfordshire, was admitted into Gray's Inn on the 30th of November 1638.

  • HENRY LONGUEVILLE MANSEL (1820-1871), English philosopher, was born at Cosgrove, Northamptonshire (where his father, also Henry Longueville Mansel, fourth son of General John Mansel, was rector), on the 6th of October 1820.

  • Not long after he died at Oundle in Northamptonshire as he was going on a visit to Ceolred, king of Mercia (709).

  • The three counties included in the expression are Leicestershire, Rutlandshire and Northamptonshire.

  • In 1782 he removed to Kettering in Northamptonshire, where he became friendly with some of the most eminent ministers of the denomination.

  • HIGHAM FERRERS, a market town and municipal borough in the Eastern parliamentary division of Northamptonshire, England, 63 m.

  • The church of St Mary is among the most beautiful of the many fine churches in Northamptonshire.

  • seem to have established the connexion of the family with the Washingtons of Sulgrave, Northamptonshire, England.

  • As early as the year 1784 the Northamptonshire Association of Baptist churches resolved to recommend that the first Monday of every month should be set apart for prayer for the spread of the gospel.

  • Shortly after, in 1792, the Baptist Missionary Society was formed at Kettering in Northamptonshire, after a sermon on Isaiah lii.

  • KETTERING, a market town in the eastern parliamentary division of Northamptonshire, England, 72 m.

  • The hue and cry was out against him; henceforth he led a hunted life, preaching and ministering to Catholics in Berkshire, Oxfordshire, Northamptonshire and Lancashire.

  • The uplands of Northamptonshire continue this range north-eastward, decreasing in elevation.

  • It connects with the Oxford Canal at Braunston in Northamptonshire, and through this with canals to Birmingham and the midlands, and continues to Leicester.

  • The counties having the greatest area under cultivation (ranging up to about nine-tenths of the whole) may be taken to be - Leicestershire, the East Riding of Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Huntingdonshire, Rutland, Northamptonshire, Bedfordshire and Cambridgeshire.

  • There is also a considerable working of brown iron ore at various points in Lincolnshire, Northamptonshire and Leicestershire; with further workings of less importance in Staffordshire and several other districts.

  • Finally, the bootmakers of Northamptonshire (at Wellingborough, Rushden, &c.), and the strawplaiters of Bedfordshire (at Luton and Dunstable), deserve mention among localized industrial communities.

  • parliamentary division of Northamptonshire, England, 66 m.

  • In the latter year he was appointed to the vicarage of Easton Maudit, Northamptonshire, and three years later was instituted to the rectory of Wilby in the same county, benefices which he retained until 1782.

  • by Northamptonshire.

  • From this point the boundary is left undefined, perhaps because the kingdoms of Alfred and Guthrum ceased to be conterminous here, though if Northamptonshire was included in the kingdom of Guthrum, as seems likely, the boundary must be carried a few miles along Watling Street.

  • the border of modern Northamptonshire), submitted to Edward and at the same time Colchester was fortified; a large portion of Essex submitted and the whole of the East Anglian Danes came in.

  • In Derbyshire, Leicestershire, Lincolnshire, part of Northamptonshire, Nottinghamshire, Rutlandshire (of later formation) and Yorkshire we have the counties divided into "wapentakes" instead of "hundreds," again a mark of Danish influence.

  • The whole of the place nomenclature of Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Nottinghamshire and Northern Northamptonshire is Scandinavian rather than native English, and in the remaining districts of the Danelagh a goodly proportion of Danish place-names may be found.

  • BRACKLEY, a market town and municipal borough in the southern parliamentary division of Northamptonshire, England, 59 m.

  • by Cambridgeshire and Northamptonshire, S.W.

  • The Welland rises in north-west Northamptonshire, enters the county at Stamford, and, after receiving the Glen, flows through an artificial channel into the Fosdyke Wash.

  • 1616) of Rockingham Castle in Northamptonshire.

  • In 1557, a shoemaker in the parish of Syresham in Northamptonshire was sentenced to death at All Saints for denying transubstantiation.

  • Having been directly involved in the County of Northamptonshire he was then invited to become an umpire on the national chess circuit.

  • She is buried in Althorp Park in Northamptonshire, England.

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