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northampton

northampton

northampton Sentence Examples

  • After the death of her brother William Parr, marquess of Northampton, his share of the barony called Marquis Fee reverted to Queen Elizabeth.

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  • It was no doubt because of this that, three days before the Yorkist attack at Northampton, he delivered the great seal to the king in his tent near Delapre abbey, a nunnery by Northampton, on the 7th of July 1460 (Rot.

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  • Very rich lodes of the metal have been found in the Northampton, Murchison and Champion Bay districts, and also in the country to the south of these districts on the Irwin river.

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  • Langton followed his sovereign to Northampton and persuaded him, at least for the present, to refrain from any serious measures of revenge.

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  • A patent of 1604 created Henry Howard (1540-1614), younger son of Surrey the poet, earl of Northampton, a peerage which ended with the death of this, the most unprincipled of his house.

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  • After graduating from Amherst in 1895 he studied law in an office at Northampton, Mass.

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  • He was mayor of Northampton, 1910 - TI, and sat in the state Senate from 1912 to 1915, being its president during his last year.

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  • direction from the Falls of Roanoke between Halifax and Northampton counties to Anson county on the South Carolina border and marks a rapid increase in elevation of about 200 ft.

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  • It was a borough by prescription as early as 1201, in which year King John granted the burgesses a charter of liberties according to the custom of the burgesses of Northampton.

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  • There he would be in close connexion with his friend and patron Spencer Compton, 2nd earl of Northampton.

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  • Jesus Christ, a book which was inspired, its author tells us, by his earlier intercourse with the earl of Northampton.

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  • This determination closes the first chapter of his life; the second, from 1304 to 1314, is occupied by his contest for the kingdom, which was really won at Bannockburn, though disputed until the treaty of Northampton in 1328; the last, from 1314 to his death in 1329, was the period of the establishment of his government and dynasty by an administration as skilful as his generalship. It is to the second of these that historians, attracted by its brilliancy even amongst the many romances of history and its importance to Scottish history, have directed most of their attention, and it is during it that his personal character, tried by adversity and prosperity, gradually unfolds itself.

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  • became king of England, and one of the first acts of the new reign, after a narrow escape of the young king from capture by Moray, was the treaty of York, ratified at Northampton in April 1328, by which it was agreed that "Scotland, according to its ancient bounds in the days of Alexander III., should remain to Robert, king of Scots, and his heirs free and divided from England, without any subjection, servitude, claim or demand whatsoever."

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  • But his aunt was anxious for him to be a minister, as he himself desired, and therefore in 1752, when his health had improved, he went to Daventry to attend the Nonconformist academy formerly carried on by Dr P. Doddridge at Northampton.

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  • His nephew and heir, Humphrey X., who inherited the earldom of Northampton from his father, was territorially the most important representative of the Bohuns.

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  • of Northampton.

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  • It is served by the Boston & Maine and the Central Vermont railways, and by interurban electric railways to Northampton, Holyoke, Sunderland and Pelham.

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  • In 1075 the king's attention was claimed by a conspiracy of the earls of Hereford and Norfolk, in which the Englishman Waltheof, earl of Northampton, was implicated to some degree.

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  • ALBAN BUTLER (1710-1773), English Roman Catholic priest and hagiologist, was born in Northampton on the 24th of October 1710.

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  • Here, in 1460, Margaret, wife of Henry VI., defeated at Northampton, took refuge.

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  • Northumberland House, from which is named Northumberland Avenue, opening upon Trafalgar Square, was built c. 1605 by Henry Howard, earl of Northampton, and was acquired by marriage by Algernon Percy, earl of Northumberland, in 1642.

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  • Parts of Northampton and Southampton were incorporated as the "district" of Easthampton in 1785; it became a township in 1809, and in 1841 and 1850 annexed parts of Southampton.

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  • Allentown was first settled in 1751; in 1762 it was laid out as a town by James Allen, the son of a chief-justice of the province, in honour of whose family the city is named; in 1811 it was incorporated as a borough and its name was changed to Northampton; in 1812 it was made the county-seat; in 1838 the present name was again adopted; and in 1867 the first city charter was secured.

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  • He bitterly resented the concession of independence to Scotland by the treaty of Northampton of 1328, and the death of Robert Bruce in 1329 gave him a chance of retrieving his position.

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  • But in the derivant valley peneplains developed in the present cycle of denudation, and there are residual summits also; in the Connecticut Valley trap ridges, of which Mt Tom and Mt Holyoke are the best examples; at Mt Holyoke, lava necks; occasionally in the lowlands, ridges of resistant sandstone, like Deerfield Mountain near Northampton; in the Berkshire Valley, summits of resistant schists, like Greylock, the highest summit in the state.

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  • Of various institutions for the education of women, Mount Holyoke (1837) at South Hadley, Smith College (1875) at Northampton, Wellesley College (1875) at Wellesley near Boston, Radcliffe College (1879) in connexion with Harvard at Cambridge and Simmons College (1899) at Boston, are of national repute.

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  • Under the supervision of the state board of insanity, and each under the government of a board of seven trustees (of whom two are women) are state hospitals for the insane at Worcester (1833), Taunton, Northampton, Danvers, Westboro and Medford, a state colony for the insane at Gardner, a state hospital for epileptics at Palmer, a state school for the feebleminded at Waltham (governed by six trustees), a state school at Wrentham, state " hospital cottages for children " (1882) at Baldwinville (governed by five trustees), and the Foxboro state hospital for dipsomaniacs and insane.

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  • The Horace Mann school in Boston, a public day school for the deaf, the New England industrial school for deaf mutes at Beverly and the Clarke school for the deaf at Northampton are maintained in part by the state.

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  • Encouraged by these and other conventions in order to obstruct the collection of debts and taxes, a mob prevented a session of the Court of Common Pleas and General Sessions of the Peace at Northampton on the 29th of August, and in September other mobs prevented the same court from sitting in Worcester, Middlesex and Berkshire counties.

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  • Warner, Picturesque Berkshire (also Franklin, Hampden, Hampshire, Northampton, 1890-1893); U.

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  • This wave of enthusiasm spread from Northampton, Mass., till it swept New England.

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  • JOHN WOOLMAN (1720-1772), American Quaker preacher, was born in Northampton, Burlington county, New Jersey, in August 17 20.

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  • of Northampton by a branch of the London & North-Western railway.

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  • The Medico-Psychological Association of Great Britain and Ireland holds examinations and grants certificates in mental nursing; candidates must undergo three years' regular training, with instruction by lectures, &c., which may be obtained in a large number of public asylums by arrangement with the Association; one county asylum (Northampton) gives its own certificates after a three years' course.

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  • at Northampton by attacking the English possessions to the south of Scotland.

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  • He entered the academy of Dr Philip Doddridge at Northampton, became minister of a congregation formed by a fusion of Presbyterians and Independents at High Street Chapel, Shrewsbury (1741), received Presbyterian ordination there (1745), resigned in 1766 owing to ill-health, and lived in retirement at Kidderminster until his death.

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  • of Northampton, on the East & West Junction and the Northampton & Banbury Junction railways.

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  • The word "awakening" in this sense was frequently (and possibly first) used by Jonathan Edwards at the time of the Northampton revival of 1734-1735, which spread through the Connecticut Valley and prepared the way for the work in Rhode Island, Massachusetts and Connecticut (1740-1741) of GeorgeWhitefield, who had previously been preaching in the South, especially at Savannah, Georgia.

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  • EDWARD WASHBURN HOPKINS (1857-), American Sanskrit scholar, was born in Northampton, Massachusetts, on the 8th of September 18J7.

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  • On the 10th of July 1460 Henry was taken prisoner at Northampton, and forced to acknowledge York as heir, to the exclusion of his own son.

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  • Pennsylvania has extensive areas of limestone rock suitable for making cement, and in Northampton and Lehigh counties enormous quantities of it are used in this industry.

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  • Northampton, Lehigh and York counties contain the most productive slate quarries in the country, and in 1908 the value of their output was $3,902,958; the Northampton and Lehigh slate is the only kind in the United States used for school blackboards.

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  • Soapstone is quarried in Montgomery and Northampton counties, phosphate rock, in Juniata county; rocks from which mineral paints are made, in several counties, and there is some garnet in Delaware county.

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  • HENRY COMPTON (1632-1713), English divine, was the sixth and youngest son of the second earl of Northampton.

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  • As Beltz observes, the fame of Sir Reginald Cobham, Sir Walter Manny and the earls of Northampton, Hereford and Suffolk was already established by their warlike exploits, and they would certainly have been among the original companions had the order been then regarded as the reward of military merit only.

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  • In the same year he received an invitation from the independent congregation at Northampton, which he accepted.

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  • In 1824 the Classis of Northampton, Pennsylvania (13 ministers and 80 congregations), became the Synod of Ohio, the parent Synod having refused to allow the Classis to ordain.

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  • He found the conventional atmosphere of Cambridge uncongenial, and with a friend he established the Round Hill school at Northampton, Mass.

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  • (1327) was followed by successful Scottish raids in the north, and in May 1328 the Treaty of Northampton sealed the triumph of Scotland.

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  • Anlaf took York, besieged Northampton and destroyed Tamworth, but was met by Edmund at Leicester.

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  • On his release Penry married a lady of Northampton, which town was his home for some years.

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  • It was successively located at East Moulsey (Surrey), Fawsley (Northampton), Coventry and other places in Warwickshire, and finally at Manchester, where it was seized in August 1589.

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  • In January 1590 his house at Northampton was searched and his papers seized, but he succeeded in escaping to Scotland.

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  • In addition he was lecturer on history in Smith College, Northampton, Massachusetts, in 1878-1881, and for many years took an active part in Chautauqua work.

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  • above the sea, with a station on the 1 Francis Bernard, whose project for a college at Northampton seemed to Mayhew and others a move to strengthen Anglicanism.

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  • In 1888 the gates of Wellington dock were widened to admit a larger type of Channel steamers; new coal stores were erected on the Northampton quay; the slipway was lengthened 40 ft., and widened for the reception of vessels up to 800 tons.

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  • SOUTH BETHLEHEM, a borough of Northampton (disambiguation)|Northampton county, Pennsylvania, U.S.A., on the Lehigh river, about 57 m.

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  • BETHLEHEM, a borough of Northampton and Lehigh counties, Pennsylvania, U.S.A., on the N.

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  • He was present with his brother Warwick at the battle of Northampton in July 1460, immediately after which the great seal was committed to his keeping.

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  • He obtained the archdeaconry of Northampton on the 26th of April, and resigned it on the 12th of June, having been promoted to that of Lincoln, the richest of all his preferments, on the 23rd of May.

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  • She was not present with her husband at Northampton on the 10th of July 1460.

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  • From Yorkshire to the flat indented sea-coast north of the Thames estuary, east of the Pennines and the slight hills indicated as the Northampton uplands, and in part demarcated southward by the East Anglian ridge in Huntingdonshire, Cambridgeshire and Suffolk, the land, although divided between a succession of river-systems, varies so little in level as to be capable of consideration as a single plain.

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  • The Jurassic belt is occupied by the counties of Gloucester, Oxford, Buckingham, Bedford, Northampton, Huntingdon, Rutland, Lincoln and the North Riding of Yorkshire.

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  • Bath, Gloucester, Oxford, Northampton, Bedford, Rugby, Lincoln and Scarborough are amongst the chief.

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  • Northampton.

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  • Thence in the following July he accompanied them in their successful invasion of England, to be welcomed in London, and to share in the victory over the Lancastrians at Northampton.

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  • His mother, a daughter of the Rev. Solomon Stoddard, of Northampton, Mass., seems to have been a woman of unusual mental gifts and independence of character.

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  • On the 15th of February 1727 he was ordained minister at Northampton and assistant to his grandfather, Solomon Stoddard.

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  • In 1733 a revival of religion began in Northampton, and reached such intensity in the winter of 1734 and the following spring as to threaten the business of the town.

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  • But the relapse was brief, and the Northampton revival, which had spread through the Connecticut valley and whose fame had reached England and Scotland, was followed in1739-1740by the Great Awakening, distinctively under the leadership of Edwards.

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  • To offset this feeling Edwards' preached at Northampton during the years 1742 and 174 3 a series of sermons published under the title of Religious Affections (1746), a restatement in a more philosophical and general tone of his ideas as to " distinguishing marks."

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  • In 1749 he published a memoir of David Brainerd; the latter had lived in his family for several months, had been constantly attended by Edwards's daughter Jerusha, to whom he had been engaged to be married, and had died at Northampton on the 7th of October 1747; and he had been a case in point for the theories of conversion held by Edwards, who had made elaborate notes of Brainerd's conversations and confessions.

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  • The church by a vote of more than 200 to 23 ratified the action of the council, and finally a town meeting voted that Edwards should not be allowed to occupy the Northampton pulpit, though he did this on occasion as late as May 1755.

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  • Jonathan Edwards' the younger (1745-1801), second son of 1 Besides the younger Jonathan many of Edwards's descendants the philosopher, born at Northampton, Massachusetts, on the 26th of May 1745, also takes an important place among his followers.

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  • in the First Church of Christ in Northampton, Massachusetts, on the One Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary of his Dismissal from the Pastorate of that Church, edited by H.

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  • Clerkenwell is a centre of the watch-making and jeweller's industries, long established here; and the Northampton Polytechnic Institute, Northampton Square, a branch of the City Polytechnic, has a department devoted to instruction in these trades.

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  • NORTHAMPTON, a city and the county-seat of Hampshire county, Massachusetts, U.S.A., situated on the Connecticut river, about 16 m.

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  • The chief village, Northampton, is on the New York, New Haven & Hartford, and the Boston & Maine railways.

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  • of Northampton is Mount Holyoke (954 ft.), which may be ascended by carriage road and mountain railway, and the summit of which commands a magnificent view.

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  • The city is the seat of a state hospital for the insane; of the Clarke School for the Deaf (1867, founded by John Clarke of Northampton); of Smith College, one of the foremost colleges for women in the country; of the Mary A.

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  • Besides the college library, there are in Northampton two public libraries, the Clarke (1850) and the Forbes (1894).

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  • Cable, who became a resident of Northampton in 1886.

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  • The Smith Charities is a peculiar institution, endowed by Oliver Smith (1766-1845) of Hatfield, who left an estate valued at $370,000, to be administered by a board of three trustees, chosen by electors representing the towns of Northampton, Hadley, Hatfield, Amherst and Williamsburg in Hampshire county and Greenfield and Whately in Franklin county - the beneficiaries of the will.

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  • Of this $30,000 was to found Smith's Agricultural School at Northampton, which opened for instruction in 1908; an income of $10,000 was to be paid to the American Colonization Society, but this society failed to comply with the restrictions imposed by the will, and the $Io,000 was incorporated with the Agricultural School fund; and $360,000 was devoted to indigent boys and girls, indigent young women and indigent wido«s.

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  • Northampton was first settled in 1654, became a township in 1656, and was incorporated as a city in 1883.

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  • Whitney were natives of Northampton.

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  • Trumbull, History of Northam p ton (2 vols., Northampton, 1898-1902).

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  • at Northampton and at Lewes, and was afterwards imprisoned for a short time in London.

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  • In the same year after a keen struggle all the Danes belonging to the "borough" of Northampton, as far north as the Welland (i.e.

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  • The business came up at the council of Northampton (October 1164), when the archbishop was tried for refusing to recognize the jurisdiction of the kings courts, and declared to have forfeited his movable goods.

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  • The fortune of war in- batons dined at first in favor of the royalists, who captured wan Northampton and Nottingham.

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  • The people called it the shameful peace of Northampton, and firmly believed that he had been bribed by the Scots.

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  • It was actually provoked by the unwise and unjust poll-tax of one shilling a head on all adult persons, voted by the parliament of Northampton in November 1380.

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  • the Lancastrians at Northampton before he had been Lancnsfifteen days on shore (July 10, 1460).

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  • the Yorkists, after Northampton, showed themselves by no means so merciful and scrupulous as in their earlier days.

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  • At the general election of 1880, the borough of Northampton, which of late years has shown an unwaveringpreference for Liberals of an advanced type,returned as its members Henry Labouchere and Charles Bradlaugh.

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  • The town of Wolverhampton (Handone, Wolvernehamptone, Wollernehampton) seems to have grown up round the church of St Mary, afterwards the royal free chapel of Wolverhampton, probably founded in 996 by Wulfruna, widow of the earl of Northampton, who in that year endowed it with extensive lands.

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  • SAMUEL PARKER (1640-1688), English bishop, wasborn at Northampton, and educated at Wadham College, Oxford.

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  • ASSIZE OF NORTHAMPTON, a short code of English laws issued in 1176, is drawn up in the form of instructions to six committees of three judges each, which were to visit the six circuits into which England was divided for the purpose.

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  • Northampton, Massachusetts >>

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  • From school at Sleaford in Lincolnshire he passed at the age of sixteen to the nonconformist academy at Northampton, of which Dr Doddridge was then president.

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  • Although his narrative is colourless, and although he was one of those who showed some sympathy for Becket at the council of Northampton (1164),(1164), the correspondence of Diceto shows that he regarded the archbishop's conduct as ill-considered, and that he gave advice to those whom Becket regarded as his chief enemies.

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  • In 1880 he again entered the House of Commons as Radical member for Northampton with Mr. Bradlaugh as his colleague, and this seat he retained until his retirement in 1905.

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  • Between 1214 and 1231 Grosseteste held in succession the archdeaconries of Chester, Northampton and Leicester.

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  • Araucarites Hudlestoni, described by Mr Carruthers from the Coralline Oolite rocks of Malton in Yorkshire; Araucarites sphaerocarpa from the Inferior Oolite of Somerset; also another cone found in the Northampton Sands, which is probably specifically identical with A.

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  • The kingdom of Middle Anglia, which appears to have included the counties of Northampton, Rutland, Huntingdon, and parts of Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire, Leicestershire and Lincolnshire, was formed into a dependent principality under his son Peada.

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  • Cohen faced a similar dilemma when his father, Peter, died tragically following an affray in the nightclub he ran in Northampton.

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  • At Northampton and at each successive show the audience seemed quite awed by this visual effect.

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  • She bought it from a shop which supplied the bargees, on the way to Northampton, you go through the village by road.

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  • Local environment Nestled in attractive countryside, the town of Northampton is an intriguing blend of history and modernity.

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  • cattle drovers on their way to Northampton Market.

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  • decapitated by a train near the headquarters of the Jesus Fellowship Church at Bugbrooke, near Northampton.

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  • During the 1800's the pub was a popular resting place for welsh cattle drovers on their way to Northampton Market.

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  • Northampton's Scott McGleish has been handed a two-year contract extension after firing the Cobblers into League One.

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  • fibula fracture sustained last April whilst making a tackle on Northampton's Ben Cohen.

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  • franklins solicitors employs over 140 staff at offices in Northampton and Milton Keynes.

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  • As Tresham died impenitent, his corpse was beheaded, and the head is to be set up at Northampton.

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  • His extensive library covered most of two rooms in his bungalow in Northampton.

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  • The program culminated on 5 May 2002 with the budding reporters ' coverage of London Wasps ' match against Northampton Saints at Loftus Road.

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  • Race, the floating signifier, Northampton, MA: The Media Education Foundation (video lecture ).

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  • CHAUNCEY WRIGHT (1830-1875), American philosopher and mathematician, was born at Northampton, Mass., on the 20th of September 1830, and died at Cambridge, Mass., on the.

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  • After the death of her brother William Parr, marquess of Northampton, his share of the barony called Marquis Fee reverted to Queen Elizabeth.

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  • It was no doubt because of this that, three days before the Yorkist attack at Northampton, he delivered the great seal to the king in his tent near Delapre abbey, a nunnery by Northampton, on the 7th of July 1460 (Rot.

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  • A very able speech in connexion with a famous forgery case having drawn attention to his talents, his success was from that time rapid, he was soon regarded as the leading counsel on the Midland circuit, and in 1796 became a K.C. Entering parliament for Northampton in April of that year, he distinguished himself by his speeches in support of the administration of Pitt.

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  • Very rich lodes of the metal have been found in the Northampton, Murchison and Champion Bay districts, and also in the country to the south of these districts on the Irwin river.

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  • Langton followed his sovereign to Northampton and persuaded him, at least for the present, to refrain from any serious measures of revenge.

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  • A patent of 1604 created Henry Howard (1540-1614), younger son of Surrey the poet, earl of Northampton, a peerage which ended with the death of this, the most unprincipled of his house.

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  • After graduating from Amherst in 1895 he studied law in an office at Northampton, Mass.

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  • He was mayor of Northampton, 1910 - TI, and sat in the state Senate from 1912 to 1915, being its president during his last year.

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  • direction from the Falls of Roanoke between Halifax and Northampton counties to Anson county on the South Carolina border and marks a rapid increase in elevation of about 200 ft.

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  • It was a borough by prescription as early as 1201, in which year King John granted the burgesses a charter of liberties according to the custom of the burgesses of Northampton.

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  • There he would be in close connexion with his friend and patron Spencer Compton, 2nd earl of Northampton.

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  • Jesus Christ, a book which was inspired, its author tells us, by his earlier intercourse with the earl of Northampton.

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  • This determination closes the first chapter of his life; the second, from 1304 to 1314, is occupied by his contest for the kingdom, which was really won at Bannockburn, though disputed until the treaty of Northampton in 1328; the last, from 1314 to his death in 1329, was the period of the establishment of his government and dynasty by an administration as skilful as his generalship. It is to the second of these that historians, attracted by its brilliancy even amongst the many romances of history and its importance to Scottish history, have directed most of their attention, and it is during it that his personal character, tried by adversity and prosperity, gradually unfolds itself.

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  • became king of England, and one of the first acts of the new reign, after a narrow escape of the young king from capture by Moray, was the treaty of York, ratified at Northampton in April 1328, by which it was agreed that "Scotland, according to its ancient bounds in the days of Alexander III., should remain to Robert, king of Scots, and his heirs free and divided from England, without any subjection, servitude, claim or demand whatsoever."

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  • But his aunt was anxious for him to be a minister, as he himself desired, and therefore in 1752, when his health had improved, he went to Daventry to attend the Nonconformist academy formerly carried on by Dr P. Doddridge at Northampton.

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  • His nephew and heir, Humphrey X., who inherited the earldom of Northampton from his father, was territorially the most important representative of the Bohuns.

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  • of Northampton.

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  • It is served by the Boston & Maine and the Central Vermont railways, and by interurban electric railways to Northampton, Holyoke, Sunderland and Pelham.

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  • In 1075 the king's attention was claimed by a conspiracy of the earls of Hereford and Norfolk, in which the Englishman Waltheof, earl of Northampton, was implicated to some degree.

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  • ALBAN BUTLER (1710-1773), English Roman Catholic priest and hagiologist, was born in Northampton on the 24th of October 1710.

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  • Here, in 1460, Margaret, wife of Henry VI., defeated at Northampton, took refuge.

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  • Northumberland House, from which is named Northumberland Avenue, opening upon Trafalgar Square, was built c. 1605 by Henry Howard, earl of Northampton, and was acquired by marriage by Algernon Percy, earl of Northumberland, in 1642.

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  • Parts of Northampton and Southampton were incorporated as the "district" of Easthampton in 1785; it became a township in 1809, and in 1841 and 1850 annexed parts of Southampton.

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  • Allentown was first settled in 1751; in 1762 it was laid out as a town by James Allen, the son of a chief-justice of the province, in honour of whose family the city is named; in 1811 it was incorporated as a borough and its name was changed to Northampton; in 1812 it was made the county-seat; in 1838 the present name was again adopted; and in 1867 the first city charter was secured.

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  • He bitterly resented the concession of independence to Scotland by the treaty of Northampton of 1328, and the death of Robert Bruce in 1329 gave him a chance of retrieving his position.

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  • But in the derivant valley peneplains developed in the present cycle of denudation, and there are residual summits also; in the Connecticut Valley trap ridges, of which Mt Tom and Mt Holyoke are the best examples; at Mt Holyoke, lava necks; occasionally in the lowlands, ridges of resistant sandstone, like Deerfield Mountain near Northampton; in the Berkshire Valley, summits of resistant schists, like Greylock, the highest summit in the state.

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  • Of various institutions for the education of women, Mount Holyoke (1837) at South Hadley, Smith College (1875) at Northampton, Wellesley College (1875) at Wellesley near Boston, Radcliffe College (1879) in connexion with Harvard at Cambridge and Simmons College (1899) at Boston, are of national repute.

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  • Under the supervision of the state board of insanity, and each under the government of a board of seven trustees (of whom two are women) are state hospitals for the insane at Worcester (1833), Taunton, Northampton, Danvers, Westboro and Medford, a state colony for the insane at Gardner, a state hospital for epileptics at Palmer, a state school for the feebleminded at Waltham (governed by six trustees), a state school at Wrentham, state " hospital cottages for children " (1882) at Baldwinville (governed by five trustees), and the Foxboro state hospital for dipsomaniacs and insane.

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  • The Horace Mann school in Boston, a public day school for the deaf, the New England industrial school for deaf mutes at Beverly and the Clarke school for the deaf at Northampton are maintained in part by the state.

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  • Encouraged by these and other conventions in order to obstruct the collection of debts and taxes, a mob prevented a session of the Court of Common Pleas and General Sessions of the Peace at Northampton on the 29th of August, and in September other mobs prevented the same court from sitting in Worcester, Middlesex and Berkshire counties.

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  • Warner, Picturesque Berkshire (also Franklin, Hampden, Hampshire, Northampton, 1890-1893); U.

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  • This wave of enthusiasm spread from Northampton, Mass., till it swept New England.

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  • JOHN WOOLMAN (1720-1772), American Quaker preacher, was born in Northampton, Burlington county, New Jersey, in August 17 20.

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  • of Northampton by a branch of the London & North-Western railway.

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  • Penry's press, now removed to Fawsley, near Northampton, produced a second tract by Martin, the Epitome, which contains more serious argument than the Epistle but is otherwise similar, and shortly afterwards, at Coventry, Martin's reply to the Admonition, entitled Hay any Worke for Cooper (March 1589).

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  • The Medico-Psychological Association of Great Britain and Ireland holds examinations and grants certificates in mental nursing; candidates must undergo three years' regular training, with instruction by lectures, &c., which may be obtained in a large number of public asylums by arrangement with the Association; one county asylum (Northampton) gives its own certificates after a three years' course.

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  • at Northampton by attacking the English possessions to the south of Scotland.

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  • He entered the academy of Dr Philip Doddridge at Northampton, became minister of a congregation formed by a fusion of Presbyterians and Independents at High Street Chapel, Shrewsbury (1741), received Presbyterian ordination there (1745), resigned in 1766 owing to ill-health, and lived in retirement at Kidderminster until his death.

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  • of Northampton, on the East & West Junction and the Northampton & Banbury Junction railways.

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  • The word "awakening" in this sense was frequently (and possibly first) used by Jonathan Edwards at the time of the Northampton revival of 1734-1735, which spread through the Connecticut Valley and prepared the way for the work in Rhode Island, Massachusetts and Connecticut (1740-1741) of GeorgeWhitefield, who had previously been preaching in the South, especially at Savannah, Georgia.

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  • EDWARD WASHBURN HOPKINS (1857-), American Sanskrit scholar, was born in Northampton, Massachusetts, on the 8th of September 18J7.

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  • On the 10th of July 1460 Henry was taken prisoner at Northampton, and forced to acknowledge York as heir, to the exclusion of his own son.

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  • Pennsylvania has extensive areas of limestone rock suitable for making cement, and in Northampton and Lehigh counties enormous quantities of it are used in this industry.

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  • Northampton, Lehigh and York counties contain the most productive slate quarries in the country, and in 1908 the value of their output was $3,902,958; the Northampton and Lehigh slate is the only kind in the United States used for school blackboards.

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  • Soapstone is quarried in Montgomery and Northampton counties, phosphate rock, in Juniata county; rocks from which mineral paints are made, in several counties, and there is some garnet in Delaware county.

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  • HENRY COMPTON (1632-1713), English divine, was the sixth and youngest son of the second earl of Northampton.

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  • As Beltz observes, the fame of Sir Reginald Cobham, Sir Walter Manny and the earls of Northampton, Hereford and Suffolk was already established by their warlike exploits, and they would certainly have been among the original companions had the order been then regarded as the reward of military merit only.

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  • In accordance with the terms of the treaty of Northampton he was married in July 1328 to Joanna (d.

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  • In the same year he received an invitation from the independent congregation at Northampton, which he accepted.

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  • In 1824 the Classis of Northampton, Pennsylvania (13 ministers and 80 congregations), became the Synod of Ohio, the parent Synod having refused to allow the Classis to ordain.

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  • He found the conventional atmosphere of Cambridge uncongenial, and with a friend he established the Round Hill school at Northampton, Mass.

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  • (1327) was followed by successful Scottish raids in the north, and in May 1328 the Treaty of Northampton sealed the triumph of Scotland.

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  • Anlaf took York, besieged Northampton and destroyed Tamworth, but was met by Edmund at Leicester.

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  • On his release Penry married a lady of Northampton, which town was his home for some years.

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  • It was successively located at East Moulsey (Surrey), Fawsley (Northampton), Coventry and other places in Warwickshire, and finally at Manchester, where it was seized in August 1589.

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  • In January 1590 his house at Northampton was searched and his papers seized, but he succeeded in escaping to Scotland.

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  • In addition he was lecturer on history in Smith College, Northampton, Massachusetts, in 1878-1881, and for many years took an active part in Chautauqua work.

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  • above the sea, with a station on the 1 Francis Bernard, whose project for a college at Northampton seemed to Mayhew and others a move to strengthen Anglicanism.

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  • In 1888 the gates of Wellington dock were widened to admit a larger type of Channel steamers; new coal stores were erected on the Northampton quay; the slipway was lengthened 40 ft., and widened for the reception of vessels up to 800 tons.

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  • SOUTH BETHLEHEM, a borough of Northampton (disambiguation)|Northampton county, Pennsylvania, U.S.A., on the Lehigh river, about 57 m.

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  • BETHLEHEM, a borough of Northampton and Lehigh counties, Pennsylvania, U.S.A., on the N.

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  • He was present with his brother Warwick at the battle of Northampton in July 1460, immediately after which the great seal was committed to his keeping.

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  • He obtained the archdeaconry of Northampton on the 26th of April, and resigned it on the 12th of June, having been promoted to that of Lincoln, the richest of all his preferments, on the 23rd of May.

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  • She was not present with her husband at Northampton on the 10th of July 1460.

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  • From Yorkshire to the flat indented sea-coast north of the Thames estuary, east of the Pennines and the slight hills indicated as the Northampton uplands, and in part demarcated southward by the East Anglian ridge in Huntingdonshire, Cambridgeshire and Suffolk, the land, although divided between a succession of river-systems, varies so little in level as to be capable of consideration as a single plain.

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  • The Jurassic belt is occupied by the counties of Gloucester, Oxford, Buckingham, Bedford, Northampton, Huntingdon, Rutland, Lincoln and the North Riding of Yorkshire.

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  • Bath, Gloucester, Oxford, Northampton, Bedford, Rugby, Lincoln and Scarborough are amongst the chief.

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  • Thence in the following July he accompanied them in their successful invasion of England, to be welcomed in London, and to share in the victory over the Lancastrians at Northampton.

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  • His mother, a daughter of the Rev. Solomon Stoddard, of Northampton, Mass., seems to have been a woman of unusual mental gifts and independence of character.

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  • On the 15th of February 1727 he was ordained minister at Northampton and assistant to his grandfather, Solomon Stoddard.

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  • In 1733 a revival of religion began in Northampton, and reached such intensity in the winter of 1734 and the following spring as to threaten the business of the town.

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  • The revival gave Edwards an opportunity of studying the process of conversion in all its phases and varieties, and he recorded his observations with psychological minuteness and discrimination in A Faithful Narrative of the Surprising Work of God in the Conversion of Many Hundred Souls in Northampton (1737).

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  • But the relapse was brief, and the Northampton revival, which had spread through the Connecticut valley and whose fame had reached England and Scotland, was followed in1739-1740by the Great Awakening, distinctively under the leadership of Edwards.

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  • To offset this feeling Edwards' preached at Northampton during the years 1742 and 174 3 a series of sermons published under the title of Religious Affections (1746), a restatement in a more philosophical and general tone of his ideas as to " distinguishing marks."

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  • In 1749 he published a memoir of David Brainerd; the latter had lived in his family for several months, had been constantly attended by Edwards's daughter Jerusha, to whom he had been engaged to be married, and had died at Northampton on the 7th of October 1747; and he had been a case in point for the theories of conversion held by Edwards, who had made elaborate notes of Brainerd's conversations and confessions.

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  • The church by a vote of more than 200 to 23 ratified the action of the council, and finally a town meeting voted that Edwards should not be allowed to occupy the Northampton pulpit, though he did this on occasion as late as May 1755.

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  • Jonathan Edwards' the younger (1745-1801), second son of 1 Besides the younger Jonathan many of Edwards's descendants the philosopher, born at Northampton, Massachusetts, on the 26th of May 1745, also takes an important place among his followers.

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  • in the First Church of Christ in Northampton, Massachusetts, on the One Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary of his Dismissal from the Pastorate of that Church, edited by H.

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  • Clerkenwell is a centre of the watch-making and jeweller's industries, long established here; and the Northampton Polytechnic Institute, Northampton Square, a branch of the City Polytechnic, has a department devoted to instruction in these trades.

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  • NORTHAMPTON, a city and the county-seat of Hampshire county, Massachusetts, U.S.A., situated on the Connecticut river, about 16 m.

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  • The chief village, Northampton, is on the New York, New Haven & Hartford, and the Boston & Maine railways.

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  • of Northampton is Mount Holyoke (954 ft.), which may be ascended by carriage road and mountain railway, and the summit of which commands a magnificent view.

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  • The city is the seat of a state hospital for the insane; of the Clarke School for the Deaf (1867, founded by John Clarke of Northampton); of Smith College, one of the foremost colleges for women in the country; of the Mary A.

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  • Besides the college library, there are in Northampton two public libraries, the Clarke (1850) and the Forbes (1894).

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  • Cable, who became a resident of Northampton in 1886.

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  • The Smith Charities is a peculiar institution, endowed by Oliver Smith (1766-1845) of Hatfield, who left an estate valued at $370,000, to be administered by a board of three trustees, chosen by electors representing the towns of Northampton, Hadley, Hatfield, Amherst and Williamsburg in Hampshire county and Greenfield and Whately in Franklin county - the beneficiaries of the will.

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  • Of this $30,000 was to found Smith's Agricultural School at Northampton, which opened for instruction in 1908; an income of $10,000 was to be paid to the American Colonization Society, but this society failed to comply with the restrictions imposed by the will, and the $Io,000 was incorporated with the Agricultural School fund; and $360,000 was devoted to indigent boys and girls, indigent young women and indigent wido«s.

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  • Northampton was first settled in 1654, became a township in 1656, and was incorporated as a city in 1883.

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  • Whitney were natives of Northampton.

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  • Trumbull, History of Northam p ton (2 vols., Northampton, 1898-1902).

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  • at Northampton and at Lewes, and was afterwards imprisoned for a short time in London.

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  • In the same year after a keen struggle all the Danes belonging to the "borough" of Northampton, as far north as the Welland (i.e.

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  • The business came up at the council of Northampton (October 1164), when the archbishop was tried for refusing to recognize the jurisdiction of the kings courts, and declared to have forfeited his movable goods.

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  • The fortune of war in- batons dined at first in favor of the royalists, who captured wan Northampton and Nottingham.

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  • The people called it the shameful peace of Northampton, and firmly believed that he had been bribed by the Scots.

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  • It was actually provoked by the unwise and unjust poll-tax of one shilling a head on all adult persons, voted by the parliament of Northampton in November 1380.

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  • the Lancastrians at Northampton before he had been Lancnsfifteen days on shore (July 10, 1460).

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  • the Yorkists, after Northampton, showed themselves by no means so merciful and scrupulous as in their earlier days.

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  • At the general election of 1880, the borough of Northampton, which of late years has shown an unwaveringpreference for Liberals of an advanced type,returned as its members Henry Labouchere and Charles Bradlaugh.

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  • The town of Wolverhampton (Handone, Wolvernehamptone, Wollernehampton) seems to have grown up round the church of St Mary, afterwards the royal free chapel of Wolverhampton, probably founded in 996 by Wulfruna, widow of the earl of Northampton, who in that year endowed it with extensive lands.

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  • SAMUEL PARKER (1640-1688), English bishop, wasborn at Northampton, and educated at Wadham College, Oxford.

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  • ASSIZE OF NORTHAMPTON, a short code of English laws issued in 1176, is drawn up in the form of instructions to six committees of three judges each, which were to visit the six circuits into which England was divided for the purpose.

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  • Northampton, Massachusetts >>

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  • From school at Sleaford in Lincolnshire he passed at the age of sixteen to the nonconformist academy at Northampton, of which Dr Doddridge was then president.

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  • Although his narrative is colourless, and although he was one of those who showed some sympathy for Becket at the council of Northampton (1164),(1164), the correspondence of Diceto shows that he regarded the archbishop's conduct as ill-considered, and that he gave advice to those whom Becket regarded as his chief enemies.

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  • In 1880 he again entered the House of Commons as Radical member for Northampton with Mr. Bradlaugh as his colleague, and this seat he retained until his retirement in 1905.

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  • Between 1214 and 1231 Grosseteste held in succession the archdeaconries of Chester, Northampton and Leicester.

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  • Araucarites Hudlestoni, described by Mr Carruthers from the Coralline Oolite rocks of Malton in Yorkshire; Araucarites sphaerocarpa from the Inferior Oolite of Somerset; also another cone found in the Northampton Sands, which is probably specifically identical with A.

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  • The kingdom of Middle Anglia, which appears to have included the counties of Northampton, Rutland, Huntingdon, and parts of Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire, Leicestershire and Lincolnshire, was formed into a dependent principality under his son Peada.

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  • The program culminated on 5 May 2002 with the budding reporters ' coverage of London Wasps ' match against Northampton Saints at Loftus Road.

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  • Race, the Floating Signifier, Northampton, MA: The Media Education Foundation (video lecture).

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  • Established in 1967, Northampton Community College offers career training and transfer programs, encompassing over 100 fields within the business, technology, education, healthcare, and recreation industries.

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  • Employing over 1,300 faculty and staff members, Northampton has served over 310,000 students since its inception.

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  • Northampton Community College prepares students for the real world, which is why more than 90 percent of their students find jobs within their specialty within one year.

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  • The Commission on Higher Education of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools accredits Northampton for their commitment to providing education for the masses.

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  • Northampton Community College is one of the only Pennsylvania community colleges to have on-site residence halls for its degree and certificate students.

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  • Northampton offers three convenient locations in and around the Bethlehem, PA region, including online courses and dozens of satellite facilities used for special events.

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  • The lumbering brick edifice called Northampton State Hospital warehoused mental patients for almost 200 years until it was finally closed in the late 1980s.

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  • The television show Scariest Places on Earth featured the Northampton State Hospital.

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