Norfolk sentence example

norfolk
  • Besides, the Norfolk cops said the guy had a snoot-full of booze.

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  • I'm flying to Norfolk.

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  • Later she received a telephone call from the Norfolk Police Department, but it only confirmed what Officer McCarthy had already told her.

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  • She was too upset to remember much of what was said and she'd not spoken directly with Norfolk since that first call.

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  • Phil Riley said the Norfolk police suggested Jeff was drunk.

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  • There was far more to learn about Jeffrey Byrne before he could report an informed opinion on the happenings in Norfolk two nights earlier.

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  • Tell me about this last trip—the one to Norfolk, Virginia.

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  • It was the usual swing down to Norfolk.

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  • Hated the hot and stickies of Norfolk weather and was always after me to transfer him back to Scranton—fat chance of that—or to some bread-bas­ket state out west.

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  • I transferred him to Norfolk but he didn't fit in there either and now he's gone.

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  • The vehicle was in police custody in Norfolk but the authorities there said it would be released to the World Wide local office shortly.

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  • Plane tickets for the next day's flight to Virginia were on Dean's desk with a list of the time he was to leave his house, where he should park at the airport and a description of Detective Norman Hunter whom he was to meet in Norfolk.

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  • Norfolk called to confirm Dean's flight, adding there was nothing much new on the case from their end.

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  • I'm going down to Norfolk tomorrow.

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  • He tried to snooze but only managed a wink or two before the plane began its descent into Norfolk.

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  • Although Hunter had been born in North Carolina—on 16 acres of red mud, as he described it—he'd moved to Norfolk in high school and never left.

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  • Dean explained he'd just arrived in Norfolk and there was nothing new in the search for her husband's body.

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  • According to Byrne's expense file, his prior trip to Norfolk had been in late January and, earlier, in October of last year.

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  • It was not unlike the Ocean Shore in Norfolk, only smaller and completely deserted.

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  • While Dean wanted the opportunity to speak with her in person after his Norfolk trip, he didn't feel in the best mood to do it after spending half the night and day coping with Vinnie Baratto and his sleazy friends.

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  • I know you want to discuss your trip to Norfolk and I hated to see the poor young man delayed.

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  • There was total absence of mention of the disappearance of Jeffrey Byrne, Dean's trip to Norfolk, or any real-life matters for the entire evening.

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  • Instead, he spent a half-hour in her driveway, discussing the Norfolk trip and the search for her miss­ing husband.

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  • He filled out the paperwork on his visit to Norfolk and answered some of his phone messages.

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  • I received a post card from Jeff—from Norfolk.

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  • Then he asked, Have you checked the items I brought back from Norfolk?

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  • Did he send one from Norfolk?

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  • Norfolk called but there aren't any details.

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  • Randy had been told before school about the telephone call from Norfolk and she had dismissed his offer to fly down with her.

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  • The rain was steadier and the day was darker as they moved from their arrival gate to find the connecting flight to Norfolk.

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  • The trip between Baltimore and Norfolk was in a much small­er aircraft than the first leg of the journey.

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  • The weather in Norfolk was frightful.

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  • There would be no chance of leaving Norfolk that evening.

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  • At least somebody else would get the distasteful task of telling a wailing Mrs. Wassermann one of her bouncing baby boys was stretched out on a marble slab in Norfolk, Virginia.

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  • Dean left word with the attendant that he would phone the coroner and the Norfolk police in the morning.

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  • He has to be out there, caught in the seaweed at the bottom of Chesapeake Bay, with the fish and crabs having a party, getting as bloated as the fat Wassermann twin lying on the slab at the Norfolk morgue.

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  • He was clearly embarrassed and apologized to Dean on behalf of everyone in the Norfolk Police Department, the City of Norfolk and the entire south.

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  • He tried to appease the Norfolk detective by saying no permanent harm had been done and even Mrs. Byrne seemed to have made it through the ordeal.

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  • Then he added, "We recognize it's Norfolk's case—we're just investigat­ing our end as a courtesy."

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  • Dean didn't go into any detail explaining why he had not gone to the Norfolk Police Station the prior evening—he just mumbled that he had a very distraught widow on his hands.

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  • Dean filled in to his lieutenant the details of the Norfolk trip, leaving out what he felt wasn't police business—a surprisingly large portion.

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  • I was with her in Norfolk when they popped the sheet on the wrong guy.

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  • The only halfway pleasant phone call came from Norm Hunter in Norfolk.

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  • Norfolk has closed their investigation too.

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  • He pledged to himself to refuse any further urge to "beat this dog," as his Norfolk detective friend had so aptly put it.

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  • Your friend Detective Hunter called from Norfolk.

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  • Can't the Norfolk police chase him down?

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  • It's Norfolk's case—not Parkside's or mine.

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  • He bought a motor home in Scranton and towed his company car down to Norfolk!

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  • Because he parked the motor home in some campground near Norfolk, then transferred the bike to his car, stashed the bike somewhere down the beach and used it the next morning, like you said, to get back to the motor home.

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  • I'm still frightened it will be the police in Norfolk even though I know that's silly.

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  • Norfolk had all but ceased trying to locate the ex-World Wide employee, but Dean still considered him a missing piece in the puzzle and wanted to talk to the man.

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  • Tracking him down would be difficult without stepping on the jurisdictional toes of the Norfolk Police Department.

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  • But Dean's denial of Cynthia's implication appeared well founded given her reaction to the discovery of the body in Norfolk.

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  • That would have accounted for her reaction in Norfolk.

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  • Dean remembered it from their trip to Norfolk two weeks earlier.

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  • The police aren't investigating any part of it—here or Norfolk.

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  • Detective Norman Hunter called Dean from Norfolk later the same week.

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  • Both recognized it as the same headgear Jeffrey Byrne was reported to have been wearing when he crossed the road to the beach in Norfolk.

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  • He drowned on May 4th in Norfolk, Virginia.

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  • Norfolk was too far from Scranton.

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  • So you followed Byrne to Norfolk and met with him.

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  • It is served by the Atlantic Coast Line, the Seaboard Air line, the Southern, the New York, Philadelphia & Norfolk, the Chesapeake & Ohio, the Norfolk & Western, the Norfolk & Southern and the Virginian railways, by many steamship lines, by ferry to Portsmouth (immediately opposite), Newport News, Old Point Comfort and Hampton, and by electric lines to several neighbouring towns.

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  • The Norfolk and Portsmouth Belt Line encircles the two cities, and connects the various trunk lines.

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  • Norfolk is the see of a Protestant Episcopal bishopric. The city has a public park of 110 acres and various smaller ones, and in the vicinity are several summer resorts, notably Virginia Beach, Ocean View, Old Point Comfort, Pine Beach and Willoughby Beach.

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  • The "Norfolk" navy yard is in the southern part of the city of Portsmouth.

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  • Norfolk is combined with Portsmouth in one customs district, the foreign trade of which in 1908 amounted to $11,326,817 in exports and $1,150,044 in imports.

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  • During the War of Independence Norfolk was bombarded on the 1st of January 1776 by the British under John Murray, 4th earl of Dunmore (1732-1809); much of the town was burned by the American troops to prevent Dunmore from establishing himself here.

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  • At the outbreak of the Civil War the city was abandoned, and the navy yard was burned by the Federals in April 1861; Norfolk was then occupied until the 9th of May 1862 by Virginia troops, first under General William Booth Taliaferro (1822-1898) and later under General Benjamin Huger (1806-1877).

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  • Five miles from Norfolk and with Norfolk as its headquarters was held from the 26th of April to the 30th of November 1907 the Jamestown Ter-Centennial Exposition, celebrating the first permanent English settlement in America at Jamestown, Virginia.

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  • Araucaria excelsa, the Norfolk Island pine, a native of Norfolk Island and New Caledonia, was discovered during Captain Cook's second voyage, and introduced into Britain by Sir Joseph Banks in 1793.

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  • His descendants held the borough and the manor of Horsham, and through them they passed to the family of Mowbray, afterwards dukes of Norfolk.

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  • Both cities are served by the Southern and the Norfolk & Western railways.

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  • The third descended to the earls of Arundel, falling to the share of the duke of Norfolk in 1415, and being divided in 1502 between the families of Howard and Berkeley.

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  • His refusal soon after his inauguration to honour the requisition of the governor of Virginia for three persons charged with assisting a slave to escape from Norfolk, provoked retaliatory measures by the Virginia legislature, in which Mississippi and South Carolina soon joined.

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  • His mother was descended from a family named Styward in Norfolk, which was not, however, connected in any way, as has been often asserted, with the royal house of Stuart.

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  • This stroke, which would most probably have given the victory to the king, was prevented by the "Eastern Association," a union of Norfolk, Suffolk, Essex, Cambridgeshire and Hertfordshire, constituted in December 1642 and augmented in 1643 by Huntingdonshire and Lincolnshire, of which Cromwell was the leading spirit.

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  • The following year an additional cable was laid from Bacton, in Norfolk, to Borkum, in Germany, at the joint expense of the British and German governments.

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  • Cromer is the best-known locality, but it occurs also on other parts of the Norfolk coast, as well as at Yarmouth, Southwold, Aldeburgh and Felixstowe in Suffolk, and as far south as Walton-on-the-Naze in Essex, whilst northwards it is not unknown in Yorkshire.

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  • The Suffolk beds have been worked since 1846; and immense quantities of coprolite have also been obtained from Essex, Norfolk and Cambridgeshire.

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  • Louis, the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis (Pennsylvania system), the Baltimore & Ohio, the Ohio Central, the Norfolk & Western, the Hocking Valley, and the Cleveland, Akron & Columbus (Pennsylvania system) railways, and by nine interurban electric lines.

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  • He corresponded frequently with Mary, but there being no hopes whatever of his restoration, and a new suitor being found in the duke of Norfolk, Mary demanded a divorce, on pleas which recall those of Henry VIII.

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  • Besides the three larger islands numerous satellites belong to the subregion, as Lord Howe, Norfolk and Kermadec islands, with the Chatham, Auckland and Macquarie groups.

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  • Its head, the duke of Norfolk, is the first of the dukes and the hereditary earl marshal of England, while the earls of Suffolk, Carlisle and Effingham and the Lord Howard of Glossop represent in the peerage its younger lines.

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  • Its founder was a Norfolk lawyer, William Howard or Haward, who was summoned to parliament as a justice in 1295, being appointed a justice of the common pleas in 1297.

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  • But out of the copies of Norfolk deeds and records collected for Thomas, earl of Arundel, in the early part of the 17th century, it seems clear enough that he sprang from a Norfolk family, several of whose members held lands at Wiggenhall near Lynn.

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  • Sir John Howard served in Edward II.'s wars in Scotland and Gascony, was sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk and governor of Norwich Castle.

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  • When he died in 1331 he was seised of many Norfolk manors.

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  • By the admiral's wife Alice, sister and heir of Sir Robert de Boys, the Howards had the Boys manor of Fersfield, near Diss, which is still among the possessions of the dukes of Norfolk.

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  • By his first wife, Margaret, daughter and heir of Sir John Plays, Sir John Howard had a son who died before him, leaving a daughter through whom descended to her issue, the Veres, earls of Oxford, the ancient Norfolk estates of the Howards at East Winch and elsewhere, with the lands of the houses of Scales, Plays and Walton, brought in by the brides of her forefathers.

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  • But his bride was Margaret Mowbray, daughter of the banished duke of Norfolk.

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  • Sir John Howard, only son of the match between Howard and Mowbray, took service with his cousin the third duke of Norfolk, who had him returned as knight of the shire for Norfolk, where, according to the Paston Letters, this Howard of the Essex branch was regarded by the gentry as a strange man.

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  • He followed the White Rose and was knighted at the crowning of King Edward IV., who pricked him for sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk.

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  • The last of the dukes of Norfolk had left a child heir, Anne Mowbray, married to the infant duke of York, the younger of the princes doomed by Richard in the Tower.

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  • A lion's share of the Mowbray estates, swollen by the great alliances of the house, heir of Breouse and Segrave, and, through Segrave, of Thomas of Brotherton, son of Edward I., fell to Howard, who, by a patent of June 28, 1483, was created duke of Norfolk and earl marshal of England with a remainder to the heirs male of his body.

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  • In his seventieth year, as lieutenant-general of the North, he led the English host on the great day of Flodden, earning a patent of the dukedom of Norfolk, dated 1 February 1513/4, and that strange patent which granted to him and his heirs that they should bear in the midst of the silver bend of their Howard shield a demi-lion stricken in the mouth with an arrow, in the right colours of the arms of the king of Scotland.

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  • This royal bride died of consumption, leaving no living child, and her husband took in 1513, as his second wife, Elizabeth Stafford, daughter of that duke of Buckingham upon whom the old duke of Norfolk, the tears upon his cheeks, was forced to pass sentence of death.

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  • Succeeding his father in 1524, Norfolk was created earl marshal in 1533.

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  • After three such good fortunes by marriage Norfolk in his folly looked for a crown with a fourth match, listening to the laird of Lethington when he set forth the scheme by which the duke was to marry a restored queen of Scots and rule Scotland with her who should be recognized as Elizabeth's successor.

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  • Ten months in the Tower under strong suspicion would have warned another man, but Norfolk was unstable and false.

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  • By his attainder the Norfolk titles were once more forfeited.

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  • In answer to his petition for the dukedom, the king had, on the 6th of June 1644, given him a patent of the earldom of Norfolk, in order, as it would seem, to flatter him by suggesting that the title of Norfolk would at least be refused to any other family.

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  • At his death in 1786 he was succeeded by his son Charles, the notorious "Jockey of Norfolk," the big, coarse, generous, slovenly, hard-drinking Whig of whom all the memoirwriters of his age have their anecdotes.

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  • This was the grandfather of the fifteenth duke, earl of Arundel, Surrey and Norfolk, and hereditary earl marshal of England.

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  • Thomas, son of the fourth duke of Norfolk's marriage with the daughter and heir of Thomas, Lord Audley of Walden, founded the line of the present earls of Suffolk and Berkshire and of the extinct Lords Howard of Escrick.

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  • The kingdom of East Anglia comprised the two counties of Norfolk and Suffolk.

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  • In January 1398 he quarrelled with the duke of Norfolk, who charged him with treason.

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  • Her uncle, the duke of Norfolk, whom she was reported to have treated "worse than a dog," reviled her, calling her a "grande putaine."

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  • The principal systems of railways are the Southern, the Atlantic Coast Line, the Norfolk & Southern and the Seaboard Air Line.

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  • The Atlantic & North Carolina, the second great internal improvement undertaken by the state, was chartered in 1853, and was opened from Goldsboro to Morehead City (95 m.) in 1858; it was in 1910 a part of the Norfolk & Southern system.

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  • His latter years were spent at Ditchingham, Norfolk, where he died Oct.

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  • Above the entrance are the arms of the Maxwells, earls of Nithsdale, to whose descendant, the duchess of Norfolk, it belongs.

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  • The spread of these principles in Norfolk made it, according to Arthur Young (writing in 1770), one of the best cultivated counties in England.

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  • Under the old Norfolk or four-course rotation (roots, barley, clover, wheat) land thus seeded with clover or grass seeds was intended to be ploughed up at the end of a year.

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  • Remarkable as Hellriegel's discovery was, it merely furnished the explanation of a fact which had been empirically established by the husbandman long before, and had received most intelligent application when the old four-course (or Norfolk) rotation was devised.

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  • He took advantage of the new reign to marry in June, 1547, before clerical marriages had been legalized by parliament and convocation, Margaret, daughter of Robert Harlestone, a Norfolk squire.

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  • It is served directly by the Chesapeake & Ohio railway, and indirectly by the New York, Philadelphia & Norfolk (Pennsylvania System), passengers and freight being carried by steamer from the terminus at Cape Charles; by steamboat lines connecting with the principal cities along the Atlantic coast, and with cities along the James river; by ferry, connecting with Norfolk and Portsmouth; and by electric railway (3 m.) to Hampton and (1 2 m.) to Newport News.

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  • No real second edition ever appeared, but in anticipation of it Sir Thomas Browne prepared in or about 1671 (?) his " Account of Birds found in Norfolk," of which the draft, now in the British Museum, was printed in his collected works by Wilkin in 1835.

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  • Considerable numbers of mackerel are taken off Norfolk and Suffolk in May and June, and also in September and October.

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  • It is served by the Chesapeake & Ohio (being a terminal of the Lexington and Big Sandy Divisions) and the Norfolk & Western railways, and is connected with Huntington, West Virginia, by an electric line.

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  • But irrepressibles like John Benton broke through the "non-mission law," and pressed forward through the "Adam Bede" country to Derby (which became the 2nd circuit in 1816); Nottingham, where a great camp-meeting on Whit Sunday 1816 was attended by 12,000 people; Leicestershire, where Loughborough became the 3rd circuit, with extensions into Rutland, Lincolnshire and Norfolk; and ultimately to Hull, which became the 4th circuit, and where a meeting which deserves to be called the First Conference was held in June 1819.

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  • N.E., which is served by the Norfolk & Western and the Tidewater & Western railways.

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  • In company, therefore, with the earl of Norfolk he refused to render foreign service in Gascony, on the plea that they were only bound to serve with the king, who was himself bound for Flanders.

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  • Four instances have, however, been recorded of its occurrence on the British coasts, one on the coast of Norfolk in 1588, one in the Firth of Forth in 1648, one near Boston in Lincolnshire in 1800, while a fourth entangled itself among rocks in the Sound of Weesdale, Shetland, in September 1808.

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  • He became a monk at St Albans, where he appears to have passed the whole of his monastic life except the six years between 1 394 and 1400 during which he was prior of another Benedictine house at Wymondham, Norfolk.

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  • The Clumber, Sussex, Norfolk and Cocker breeds are the best established.

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  • On a site of three acres stands the convalescent home of the Norfolk and Norwich hospital.

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  • Ruffo Scilla coming to London as special papal envoy, and the duke of Norfolk being received at the Vatican as the bearer of the congratulations of the queen of England.

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  • He then studied law for a short time at Wrentham, Massachusetts; was tutor in Latin and Greek (1820-1822) and librarian (1821-1823) at Brown University; studied during 1821-1823 in the famous law school conducted by Judge James Gould at Litchfield, Connecticut; and in 1823 was admitted to the Norfolk (Mass.) bar.

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  • In the interior there are a number of interesting monuments, among which the most noticeable are those of Thomas Howard, 3rd duke of Norfolk, and of Henry Howard, the famous earl of Surrey, who was beheaded by Henry VIII.

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  • Hugh, son of Roger, created earl of Norfolk in 1141, succeeded his father, and the manor and castle remained in the Bigod family until 1306, when in default of heirs it reverted to the crown, and was granted by Edward II.

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  • Town and castle followed the vicissitudes of the dukedom of Norfolk, passing to the crown in 1405, and being alternately restored and forfeited by Henry V., Richard III., Henry VII., Edward VI., Mary, Elizabeth and James I., and finally sold in 1635 to Sir Robert Hitcham, who left it in 1636 to the master and fellows of Pembroke Hall, Cambridge.

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  • Roanoke is served by the Virginian railway, by the main line and the Shenandoah and the Winston-Salem divisions of the Norfolk & Western railway, and by electric railway to Vinton and to Salem.

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  • Its railway car repair and construction shops, belonging to the Norfolk & Western railway, employed in that year 66.9% of the total number of factory wage-earners; pig-iron, structural iron, canned goods, bottles, tobacco, planing-mill products and cotton are among the manufactures.

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  • In 1843 he settled at Langham Manor, Norfolk.

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  • In 1075 the king's attention was claimed by a conspiracy of the earls of Hereford and Norfolk, in which the Englishman Waltheof, earl of Northampton, was implicated to some degree.

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  • In 1076 he invaded Brittany to get possession of the fugitive earl of Norfolk; but Philip of France came to the aid of the Bretons, and William gave way before his suzerain.

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  • The genus Pelecanus as instituted by Linnaeus included the 1 This caution was not neglected by the prudent, even so long ago as Sir Thomas Browne's days; for he, recording the occurrence of a pelican in Norfolk, was careful to notice that about the same time one of the pelicans kept by the king (Charles II.) in St James's Park, had been lost.

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  • Mr Arch nevertheless retained sufficient popularity to be returned to parliament for north-west Norfolk in 1885; and although defeated next year owing to his advocacy of Irish Home Rule, he regained his seat in 1892, and held it in 1895, retiring in 1900.

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  • His son Ralph fought on the Norman side at Hastings, and was made earl of Norfolk by William the Conqueror.

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  • The fishery is also carried on along the coast of Norfolk and Suffolk, where great quantities of the fish are caught with hook and line, and conveyed to market alive in "well-boats" specially built for this traffic. Such boats have been in use since the beginning of the '8th century.

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  • It is served by the Baltimore, Chesapeake & Atlantic (which has shops here), and the New York, Philadelphia && Norfolk railways, and by steamers on the Wicomico river, which has a channel 9 ft.

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  • In 1886 experiments were conducted, under certain restrictions, and the plant was grown in Norfolk, Kent and other counties with sufficient success to prove the entire practicability of raising tobacco as a commercial crop in England.

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  • In 1802 he entered parliament through the duke of Norfolk's nomination as member for Thetford, and married a widow with six children, Mrs Ord, who had a life interest in a comfortable income.

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  • It is an important highway of commerce, especially for the cities of Norfolk, Portsmouth and Newport News, and is the chief rendezvous of the United States navy.

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  • The "Monitor" withdrew in the confusion consequent upon the wounding of her commanding officer; and the "Merrimac" after a short wait for her adversary steamed back to Norfolk.

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  • After the evacuation of Norfolk by the Confederates on the 9th of May Commodore Josiah Tattnall, then in command of the "Merrimac," being unable to take her up the James, sank her.

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  • The river Ant provides a route southward to the Norfolk Broads.

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  • Bristol is served by the Holston Valley, the Southern, the Virginia & South-Western, and the Norfolk & Western railways, and is a railway centre of some importance.

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  • As if to show his entire confidence in both these noblemen, the king created the former duke of Hereford and the latter duke of Norfolk.

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  • This arbitrary sentence was obeyed in the first instance by both parties, and Norfolk never returned.

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  • He became assistant bishop of Virginia in 1829; was pastor of Christ Church, Norfolk, in 1834-1836; in 1841 became bishop of Virginia; and in1842-1862was president of the Protestant Episcopal Theological Seminary in Virginia, near Alexandria, delivering an annual course of lectures on pastoral theology.

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  • He received the rudiments of an excellent education at a free school in Dublin, and afterwards spent a year or two (1751-1752) under his father's roof at Skeyton rectory, Norfolk, and elsewhere, and for a short time he had Gibbon as a fellow-pupil.

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  • The Norfolk & Western has division terminals here.

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  • In 1075 he again took the field, leading with Bishop Odo a vast host against the rebel earl of Norfolk, whose stronghold at Norwich they besieged and captured.

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  • Gold has been found in small quantities in Middlesex, Norfolk and Plymouth counties.

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  • The Norfolk Island pine (Araucaria excelsa) is a magnificent tree, with a height sometimes exceeding 200 ft.

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  • A small species of palm is known as the Norfolk Island cabbage.

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  • Virginia, and with it the Federal navy yard at Norfolk and the arsenal at Harper's Ferry, was controlled by the rebels.

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  • In 1856 the whole of the islanders-60 married persons and 134 young men, women and children - were landed on Norfolk Island, but in 1858 two families chose to return, and their example was afterwards followed by a few others.

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  • Through his influence Henry Howard, duke of Norfolk, was induced to present the Arundel marbles to the university of Oxford (1667) and the valuable Arundel library to Gresham College (1678).

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  • In 1797 appeared his Apology for the Believers in the Shakespeare Papers which were exhibited in Norfolk Street, followed by other tracts on the same subject.

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  • The family is assumed to have sprung from Walsingham in Norfolk, but the earliest authentic traces of it are found in London in the first half of the 15th century; and it was one of the numerous families which, having accumulated wealth in the city, planted themselves out as landed gentry and provided the Tudor monarchy with its justices of the peace and main support.

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  • The Spanish ambassador in Paris declared in 1570 that he had been for two years engaged in collecting contributions from English churches for the assistance of the Huguenots in France; and he drew up a memorial depicting the dangers of Mary Stuart's presence in England and of the project for her marriage with Norfolk.

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  • In the west of England, the Thames valley, Cambridgeshire and Norfolk a "bolt" of green stuff measures 42 to 45 in.

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  • See Honore Mirabeau, Les Lettres de cachet et des prisons d'etat (Hamburg, 1782), written in the dungeon at Vincennes into which his father had thrown him by a lettre de cachet, one of the ablest and most eloquent of his works, which had an immense circulation and was translated into English with a dedication to the duke of Norfolk in 1788; Frantz Funck-Brentano, Les Lettres de cachet d Paris (Paris, 1904); and Andre Chassaigne, Les Lettres de cachet sous l'ancien regime (Paris, 1903).

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  • The best Cluniac. Cluniac houses in England are Castle Acre, preserved g, Norfolk, and Wenlock, Shropshire.

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  • Subsequently the earls of Leicester bought out the rights of the earls of Norfolk for ten knights' fees.

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  • As captain of the brig "Norfolk" of 18 guns, he was employed in cruising against the French, who were as aggressive against American commerce as the English.

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  • Newport News is served by the Chesapeake & Ohio railway, of which it is a terminus; by river boats to Richmond and Petersburg, Va.; by coastwise steamship lines to Washington, D.C., Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York, Boston and Providence; by foreign steamship lines to London, Glasgow, Liverpool, Dublin, Belfast, Rotterdam, Hamburg and other ports; and by electric lines to Old Point Comfort, Norfolk and Portsmouth.

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  • This elder Alan, whose name occurs in Breton documents before r080, went on crusade in 1097, and was apparently succeeded by his brother Flaald, whose son, the younger Alan, enjoyed the favour of Henry I., who bestowed on him Mileham and its barony in Norfolk, where he founded Sporle Priory.

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  • At the dissolution in 1774 he had been returned for Okehampton in Devonshire, and for Castle Rising in Norfolk, and selected the former constituency; on his promotion as leading law officer of the crown he returned to Bishop's Castle.

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  • In the southern part of the city is a United States navy yard and station, officially the Norfolk Yard (the second largest in the country), of about 450 acres, with three immense dry docks, machine shops, warehouses, travelling and water cranes, a training station, torpedoboat headquarters, a powder plant (20 acres), a naval magazine, a naval hospital and the distribution headquarters of the United State Marine Corps.

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  • Portsmouth and Norfolk form a customs district, Norfolk being the port of entry, whose exports in 1908 were valued at $11,326,817, and imports at $1,150,044.

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  • Though situated in Norfolk county, the city has been since its incorporation administratively independent of it.

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  • Two months later, on the 9th of May, the Confederates abandoned the navy yard and evacuated Norfolk and Portsmouth, and the "Virginia" was destroyed by her commander, Josiah Tattnall.

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  • The Isle of Dogs and Yarmouth, in Norfolk, are reported to be the chief of the English strongholds of the black rat.

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  • That known as the Norfolk breed is the smaller of the two, and is said to be the less hardy.

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  • In 1861 Patteson was consecrated bishop of Melanesia, and the Auckland training school was removed to Norfolk Island.

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  • Mary was already aware that the chief of the English commissioners, the duke of Norfolk, was secretly an aspirant to the peril of her hand; and on the 21st of October she gave the first sign of assent to the suggestion of a divorce from Bothwell.

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  • On the 26th of October the charge of complicity in the murder of Darnley was distinctly brought forward against her in spite of Norfolk's reluctance and Murray's previous hesitation.

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  • The detection of a plot, in which Norfolk was implicated, for the invasion of England by Spain on behalf of Mary, who was then to take him as the fourth and most contemptible of her husbands, made necessary the reduction of her household and the stricter confinement of her person.

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  • On the 28th of May 1572 a demand from both houses of parliament for her execution as well as Norfolk's was generously rejected by Elizabeth; but after the punishment of the traitorous pretender to her hand, on whom she had lavished many eloquent letters of affectionate protestation, !she fell into "a passion of sickness" which convinced her honest keeper of her genuine grief for the ducal caitiff.

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  • It is served by the Norfolk & Western railway.

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  • In the same year he was ordained deacon, and given charge of the parish of Reymerston, Norfolk, but he returned to Cambridge early in 1743.

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  • It is served by the Southern, the Seaboard Air Line, the Raleigh & Southport, and the Norfolk Southern railways.

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  • In 1569 he fell under suspicion during the duke of Norfolk's conspiracy in favour of Mary, and was imprisoned for a time at Windsor, but was not further proceeded against.

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  • Anne Boleyn fared no better than the Catholic martyrs; she failed to produce a male heir to the throne, and her conduct afforded a jury of peers, over which her uncle, the duke of Norfolk, presided, sufficient excuse for condemning her to death on a charge of adultery (1536).

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  • The new queen Catherine Howard represented the triumph of the reactionary party under Gardiner and Norfolk; but there was no idea of returning to the papal obedience, and even Catholic orthodoxy as represented by the Six Articles was only enforced by spasmodic outbursts of persecution and vain attempts to get rid of Cranmer.

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  • Gardiner had almost been sent to the Tower, and Norfolk and Surrey were condemned to death, while Cranmer asserted that it was Henry's intention to convert the mass into a communion service.

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  • He had been already some years archdeacon of Taunton, and the archdeaconry of Norfolk was added to it in March 1529, which two years later he resigned for that of Leicester.

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  • At the accession of Queen Mary, the duke of Norfolk and other state prisoners of high rank were in the Tower along with him; but the queen, on her first entry into London, set them all at liberty.

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  • Formerly Norfolk trotters held the first place in point of number, but their place has been taken in recent years by English thoroughbreds, Arabs, and especially Australians.

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  • Raja Dhuleep Singh received an allowance of £50,000 a year, on which he retired as a country gentleman to Norfolk in England.

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  • This plan had originated with Captain Maconochie, at one time superintendent in Norfolk Island, who had recommended that the punishment inflicted upon criminals should be measured, not by time, but by the amount of labour actually performed.

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  • The reactionary party, which, owing to the absence of Hertford and Lisle and to the presence of Gardiner, gained the upper hand in the council in the summer of 1546, were not satisfied with this repulse; they probably aimed at the leaders of the reforming party, such as Hertford and possibly Queen Catherine Parr, who were suspected of favouring Anne, and on the 18th of June 1546 Anne was again arraigned before a commission including the lord mayor, the duke of Norfolk, St John, Bonner and Heath.

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  • Durham is served by the Southern, the Seaboard Air Line, the Norfolk & Western, and the Durham & Southern railways, the last a short line at Apex and Dunn, N.C., connecting respectively with the main line of the Seaboard and the Atlantic Coast Line railways.

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  • In Norfolk the reeds of marshland are employed, and they constitute a durable thatch lasting from thirty to forty years or more.

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  • Steamboats ply daily from the foot of Seventh Street to Alexandria, Mt Vernon, Old Point Comfort and Norfolk, and at Old Point Comfort there is connexion with boats for New York.

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  • Hampton Roads at the mouth of the James river, which forms the harbour for the leading ports of the state, Norfolk and Newport News, affords one of the best anchorages of the Atlantic coast.

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  • There is a large foreign trade and a regular steamship service to Boston, Providence, New York, Philadelphia and Savannah from Norfolk, and there is a considerable traffic on Chesapeake Bay, the Rappahannock, York, James and Elizabeth rivers.

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  • Petersburg and Richmond on the James are connected with regular steamship lines with Norfolk, Richmond's water trade being chiefly in coal, oil, logs and fertilizer.

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  • Steamboats plying on Chesapeake Bay connect Alexandria with Norfolk.

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  • From the Elizabeth river on which Norfolk is situated lead the Albemarle & Chesapeake Canal and the Dismal Swamp Canal, which connect with the waters of Albemarle Sound.

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  • In 1779 Norfolk was again attacked, and great damage was also done to the neighbouring towns.

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  • The alliance was of value to Claudius, for the territory of the Iceni (Norfolk, Suffolk, and Cambridgeshire) lay immediately north of the new province and its capital town Colchester, and Prasutagus had loyally kept faith with Rome.

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  • Two specimens have been found, one at Matlask, Norfolk, and the other at Devizes, which from the character of the design appear to be English.

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  • The town hall is a castellated building, presented to the corporation by the duke of Norfolk.

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  • The chancel is the property of the duke of Norfolk and is screened from the rest of the building, although in 1880 this exercise of right by the owner was made the subject of an action at law and subsequent appeal.

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  • The Roman Catholic church of St Philip Neri was built by the duke of Norfolk (1873).

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  • For the most part they are linked together according to geographical distribution in associations, such as the "Metropolitan Association of Strict Baptist Churches," and the "Suffolk and Norfolk Association of Particular Baptist Churches."

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  • In the Annals and Magazine of Natural History for 1868 (p. 381) is a most interesting account, by Charles Buxton, of the naturalization of parrots at Northreps Hall, Norfolk.

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  • Attempts to naturalize that well-known Australian grass-parrakeet the budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus) in England have so far proved abortive, and none of the species experimented with in Norfolk and Bedfordshire effected a settlement.

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  • Wykeham's first benefice was the rectory of Pulham, the richest in Norfolk, worth X53 a year, or some £1600 of our money, to which he was presented on the 30th of November 1357.

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  • But the old baronies of Talbot, Strange of Blackmere, and Furnival had passed away in 1616 to the daughters of the 7th earl, of whom the youngest married Thomas (Howard) earl of Arundel, whose descendant, the duke of Norfolk, has the valuable Furnival estates.

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  • On the death of this cousin the descent of the title was for a short time in dispute, and the lands were claimed for Lord Edmund Howard (now Talbot), an infant son of the duke of Norfolk, under the will of the last earl; but the courts decided that, under a private act obtained by the duke of Shrewsbury shortly before his death, the title and bulk of the estates must go together, and the true successor to the earldom was found in Earl Talbot, the head of another line of the descendants of Sir Gilbert Talbot of Grafton, sprung from a second marriage of Sir Gilbert's son, Sir John Talbot of Albrighton.

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  • The lime sometimes acquires a great size; one is recorded in Norfolk as being 16 yds.

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  • On his way to Norfolk he stopped at Lyford in Berkshire, where he preached on the 14th of July and the following day, yielding to the foolish importunity of some pious women.

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  • Many thousand tons of mussels are wastefully employed as manure by the farmers on lands adjoining scalp-producing coasts, as in Lancashire and Norfolk, three half-pence a bushel being the price quoted in such cases.

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  • On the accession of Queen Mary, Foxe was deprived of his tutorship by the boys' grandfather, the duke of Norfolk, who was now released from prison.

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  • He lived for some time at Aldgate, London, in the house of his former pupil, Thomas Howard, now duke of Norfolk, who retained a sincere regard for his tutor and left him a small pension in his will.

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  • From this point as far south as the North Foreland of Kent the coast, like the land, is almost wholly low, though there are slight cliffs at some points, as along the coasts of Norfolk and Suffolk, on which the sea constantly encroaches.

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  • The Chalk country extends over part of Dorset, most of Wiltshire, a considerable portion of Hampshire and Oxfordshire, most of Hertfordshire and Cambridgeshire, the west of Norfolk and Suffolk, the east of Lincolnshire, and the East Riding of Yorkshire.

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  • The Fenland comprises a strip of Norfolk, a considerable part of Cambridgeshire, and the Holland district of Lincoln.

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  • It thus occupies parts of Wiltshire, Hampshire, Surrey, Kent, Berkshire, Hertfordshire, the whole of Middlesex, the county of London and Essex, and the eastern edge of Suffolk and Norfolk.

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  • Shallow lagoons formed along the lower courses of the rivers of Norfolk have given to that part of the country the name of the Broads, a district of low and nearly level land.

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  • Essex and Suffolk, Suffolk and Norfolk, Cornwall and Devon, Durham and Yorkshire, Lancashire and Cheshire, are all separated by rivers, while rivers form some part of the boundaries of almost every county.

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  • But in the eastern and southern counties the Chalk is covered by younger deposits of Tertiary age; the Pliocene Crags of Norfolk and Suffolk, the Lower London Tertiaries (London Clay, Woolwich and Reading Beds, &c.) of the London Basin comprising parts of Essex, Hertfordshire, Middlesex, Bucks and Berks, and northern Kent.

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  • Serving Essex, Suffolk, Cambridgeshire, Norfolk.

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  • In proportion to their area, the counties specially productive of wheat are Cambridgeshire, Huntingdonshire, Hertfordshire, Bedfordshire and Essex; and of barley, Norfolk, Suffolk and the East Riding of Yorkshire.

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  • In fruit-growing, Kent takes the first place, but a good quantity is grown in Cambridgeshire, Norfolk and Essex, in Worcestershire and other western counties, where, as in Herefordshire, Somerset and Devon, the apple is especially cultivated and cider is largely produced.

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  • Pigs are bred most extensively in Suffolk, Norfolk and Lincolnshire and in Somersetshire.

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  • But many of the midland, eastern and south-eastern rivers, the Norfolk Broads, &c., are noted for their coarse fish.

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  • Her husband Prasutagus ruled the Iceni (in what is now Norfolk) as an autonomous prince under Roman suzerainty.

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  • But the scantiness of Romano-British remains in Norfolk may be due to the severity with which the Iceni were crushed.

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  • The manor remained in his family until the death of John de Mowbray, duke of Norfolk, without issue male in 1475, and after passing through several families was finally sold in 1723 to Ralph Bell, whose descendants thereafter held the manor.

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  • In Cambridgeshire and on the Norfolk coast it is known as Shuck or Shock.

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  • He also projected a marriage for her with the duke of Norfolk, which ended in the execution of that nobleman.

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  • He also carried out considerable works in relation to the Nene Valley drainage and the reclamation of land at the Norfolk estuary.

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  • In the other horned breeds, the Dorset and Somerset, Limestone, Exmoor, Old Norfolk, and Western or Old Wiltshire, both sexes have horns.

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  • The Suffolk is another Down, which took its origin about 1790 in the crossing of improved Southdown rams with ewes of the old black-face Horned Norfolk, a breed still represented by a limited number of animals.

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  • Although it handles hard on the back when fat, no breed except the old Horned Norfolk equals it in producing a saddle cut of mutton with such an abundance of lean red meat in proportion to fat.

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  • Robert De Beaumont (1104-1168), justiciar of England, married a granddaughter of Ralph Guader, earl of Norfolk, and receiving his father's English fiefs in 1118 became earl of Leicester.

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  • He did not keep on good terms with William the Conqueror, and in 1075, disregarding the king's prohibition, married his sister Emma to Ralph Guader, earl of Norfolk, at the famous bridal of Norwich.

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  • But Roger, who was to bring his force from the west to join the earl of Norfolk, was held in check at the Severn by the Worcestershire fyrd which the English bishop Wulfstan brought into the field against him.

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  • Two of the greatest of his foreign magnates, Roger, earl of Hereford, and Ralph, earl of Norfolk, rose against him in I075, with no better cause than personal grievances and ambitions.

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  • At the sftme moment the king of Sects iflvadedNorthumberlund, and the earls of Norfolk, Chester and Leicester rose in the name of the younger Henry.

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  • At the same time the barons, headed by the earls of Norfolk and Hereford, raised the old grievance about feudal service beyond seas, which had been so prominent in the time of King John.

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  • Norfolk, who had been designated to lead the expedition to Guienne, declared that though he was ready to follow his master to Flanders in his capacity of marshal, he would not be drafted off to Gascony against his own will.

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  • Even then Norfolk and Hereford refused to sail; but the greater part of the minor magnates consented to serve as stipendiaries.

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  • It was called, and made a liberal grant for that purpose, but Archbishop Winchelsea and the earls of Norfolk and Hereford took advantage of their masters needs, and of his absence, to assert themselves.

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  • His dis again In- pleasure fell mainly on the archbishop and the earl vades of Norfolk, who had so long led the opposition.

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  • Norfolk, who was childless, was forced, to sign a grant by which his lands went to the king after his deatha harsh and illegal proceeding, for he had collateral heirs.

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  • The king knew how to yield, and even opponents like Winchelsea and the earls of Norfolk and Hereford respected him too much to drive him to an extremity.

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  • Hereford and Norfolk were now dead.

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  • But Arch bishop Winchelsea had returned from exile in a belli gerent mood, and the place of Norfolk and Hereford was taken by an ambitious prince of the royal house, Thomas, earl of Lancaster, the son of the younger brother of Edward I.

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  • Even the kings half-brother, the earl of and Norfolk, rallied to her banner.

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  • The other two lords appellant, Mowbray, duke of Norfolk, and Henry of Bolingbroke, the son of John of Gaunt, were dealt with a year later.

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  • It would be going too far to seek the origin of the Yorkist partyas some have donein the old enmity of the houses of March, Norfolk and Salisbury against Henry IV.

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  • There were, of course, many local feuds and riots which led to the destruction of property; well-known instances are the private war about Caister Castle between the duke of I Norfolk and the Pastons, and the battle of Nibley Green, near Bristol, between the Berkeleys and the Talbots.

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  • He paid his adherents lavishly for their support, making Lord Howard duke of Norfolk, and giving Buckingham enormous grants of estates and offices.

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  • Richard, however, refused to fly, and was slain, fighting to the last, along with the duke of Norfolk and a few other of his more desperate partisans.

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  • But Henrys doubts had been marvellously stimulated by the fact that he had become enamoured of another ladythe beautiful, ambitious and cunning Anne Boleyn, a niece of the duke of Norfolk, who had no intention of becoming merely the kings mistress, but aspired to be his consort.

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  • Annes marriage was declared null, and Henry found a fifth queen in Catherine Howard, a niece of Norfolk, a protge of Gardiner, and a friend of the Catholic church.

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  • The balance of parties which had existed since Cromwells fall had been destroyed in the last months of the reign by the attainder of Norfolk and his son Surrey, and the exclusion of Gardiner and Thiriby from the council of regency.

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  • The remedial measures which he favored failed; and the rising of Ket in Norfolk and others less important in nearly all the counties of England, made Somersets position impossible.

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  • Bedford and Herbert suppressed the rebellion in the west, Warwick that in Norfolk (JulyAugust 1549).

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  • She gathered her forces in Norfolk and Suffolk, Northumberland rode out from London to oppose her, but defection dogged his steps, and even in London Mary was proclaimed queen behind his back by his fellow-conspirators.

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  • Norfolk, however, played the coward; the bull came nearly a year too late, and the rebellion of the earls (1569) was easily crushed.

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  • It cost Norfolk Elizabeth.

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  • In his youth he learned practical agriculture in Norfolk and afterwards took an extensive farm in Suffolk.

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  • Norfolk was incorporated as a village in 1881 and chartered as a city in 1886; it became a city of the first class in 1909.

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  • He became AdjutantGeneral of Virginia after the peace of 1763, and took part in the movements which forced Lord Dunmore to leave Norfolk.

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  • In 1825 he was promoted to the rank of lieutenant, whilst serving in the navy yard at Norfolk, where, with some breaks in sea-going ships, he continued till 1832; he then served for a commission on the coast of Brazil, and was again appointed to the yard at Norfolk.

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  • When the war of secession broke out in 1861, he was "waiting orders" at Norfolk.

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  • By birth and marriage he was a Southerner, and the citizens of Norfolk counted on his throwing in his lot with them; but professional pride, and affection for the flag under which he had served for more than fifty years, held him true to his allegiance; he passionately rejected the proposals of his fellow-townsmen, and as it was more than hinted to him that his longer stay in Norfolk might be dangerous, he hastily quitted that place, and offered his services to the government at Washington.

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  • The Cape-Pigeon or Pintado Petrel, Daption capensis, is one that has long been well known to mariners and other wayfarers on the great waters, while those who voyage to or from Australia, whatever be the route they take, are 1 Thus Oestrelata haesitata, the Capped Petrel, a species whose proper home seems to be Guadeloupe and some of the neighbouring West-Indian Islands, has occurred in the State of New York, near Boulogne, in Norfolk, and in Hungary (Ibis, 1884, p. 202).

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  • It is served by the Norfolk & Western and the Virginian railways, and has electric railway connexion with Roanoke, about 6 m.

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  • In 1155 the manor was granted to the abbey of St John of Colchester, later to Cardinal Wolsey, and on his disgrace, to Thomas Howard, duke of Norfolk, to whom Elizabeth in 1567 granted a market on Saturday.

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  • The common statement that he derived his surname from Diss in Norfolk is a mere conjecture; Dicetum may equally well be a Latinized form of Dissai, or Dicy, or Dizy, place-names which are found in Maine, Picardy, Burgundy and Champagne.

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  • The deep bay between the coasts of Lincolnshire and Norfolk, called the Wash, is full of dangerous sandbanks and silt; the navigable portion off the Lincolnshire coast is known as the Boston Deeps.

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  • In 1790, a year before the Homer was published, commenced his friendship with his cousin John Johnson, known to all biographers of the poet as " Johnny of Norfolk."

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  • In the following year a removal took place into Norfolk under - the loving care of John Johnson.

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  • The breeding of hackneys is extensively pursued in the counties of Norfolk, Cambridge, Huntingdon, Lincoln and York, and in the showyard competitions a keen but friendly rivalry is usually to be noticed between the hackney-breeding farmers of Norfolk and Yorkshire.

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  • But he made no sign of disapproval when the doctrine was defined, and subsequently, in a letter nominally addressed to the duke of Norfolk on the occasion of Mr Gladstone's accusing the Roman Church of having "equally repudiated modern thought and ancient history," Newman affirmed that he had always believed the doctrine, and had only feared the deterrent effect of its definition on conversions on account of acknowledged historical difficulties.

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  • His portrait by Ouless is at the Birmingham Oratory, and his portrait by Millais is in the possession of the duke of Norfolk, a replica being at the London Oratory.

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  • The principal inlet is Storm Bay, which has three well-defined arms. The most easterly is Norfolk Bay, enclosed between Forestier's Peninsula and Tasman Peninsula.

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  • Some persons who had settled at Norfolk Island when that island became a penal depot were transferred to Van Diemen's Land in 1805.

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  • In 1828 the Van Diemen's Land Company commenced sheep-farming on a large scale in the north-west district of the island under a charter granted three years before, and in 1829 the Van Diemen's Land Establishment obtained a grant of 40,000 acres at Norfolk Plains for agriculture and grazing.

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  • The latest Pliocene, or pre-Glacial, flora of northern Europe is best known from the Cromer Forest-bed of Norfolk and Suffolk, a fluvio-marine deposit which lies beneath the whole of the Glacial deposits of these counties, and passes downwards into the Crag, many of the animals actually associated with the plants being characteristic Pliocene species which seem immediately afterwards to have been exterminated by the increasing cold.

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  • This is an assemblage that could not well be found under conditions differing greatly from those now holding in Norfolk; there is an absence of both Arctic and south European plants.

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  • Among the herbaceous plants we find, mingled with a number that still live in Norfolk, Hypecoum procumbens, the water-chestnut (Trapa natans), and Najas minor, none of which is now British.

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  • Tell me about this last trip—the one to Norfolk, Virginia.

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  • Hated the hot and stickies of Norfolk weather and was always after me to transfer him back to Scranton—fat chance of that—or to some bread-bas­ket state out west.

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  • Although Hunter had been born in North Carolina—on 16 acres of red mud, as he described it—he'd moved to Norfolk in high school and never left.

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  • Byrne disappeared in Norfolk's jurisdiction and if they're satisfied, let's drop it.

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  • I received a post card from Jeff—from Norfolk.

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  • Now that Jeffrey Byrne was still among the missing, Leland Anderson promised to send someone to the Byrne residence to let Randy know the body in Norfolk was not his father.

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  • Dean had been wrong about the efficiency of the Norfolk police.

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  • Then he added, "We recognize it's Norfolk's case—we're just investigat­ing our end as a courtesy."

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  • Dean didn't go into any detail explaining why he had not gone to the Norfolk Police Station the prior evening—he just mumbled that he had a very distraught widow on his hands.

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  • Dean filled in to his lieutenant the details of the Norfolk trip, leaving out what he felt wasn't police business—a surprisingly large portion.

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  • It's Norfolk's case—not Parkside's or mine.

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  • Where was Fletcher Brunel, the last person to meet with Byrne in Norfolk?

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  • The police aren't investigating any part of it—here or Norfolk.

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  • At first Dean didn't recognize the name but then remembered Fletcher Brunel as being the missing Norfolk employee of World Wide, one of the last people to speak with Jeffrey Byrne the day he disappeared.

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  • Brunel had a connection with Scranton and he skipped out of Norfolk without even filing his expense account.

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  • That's why I eliminated the World Wide guy Brunel in Norfolk from con­sideration in spite of the trouble I had running him down and the coincidence he's now in Colorado.

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  • In 1899 the first County Council elections were held in Norfolk and Philip Sewell was elected alderman.

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  • The retable is only part of a much larger altarpiece that probably once stood in the Priory at Thetford in Norfolk.

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  • The Boro of King's Lynn and West Norfolk was formed by the amalgamation of part of the.

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  • But there is enough in the book to keep audiences amused from Sutherland to Cornwall, Dyfed to Norfolk, for years to come.

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  • The session will be led by an archivist from the Norfolk Record Office.

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  • Norfolk County Council is trialing an ultra-bright belisha beacon designed to reduce accidents at crossings at two locations in the county.

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  • Less than 10% of your council tax bill is actually used to fund South Norfolk Council services.

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  • Greaves imagery received a further boost by his move to Norfolk in 19xx.

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  • Please don't send the gales to Norfolk, it's just been very breezy here so far.

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  • Visit our online shop to find out more about the Touch by Norfolk Lavender range or click here to request a brochure.

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  • Enjoy the area's quiet villages, parts of the Norfolk Broads and pretty coastal areas.

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  • In 1840, Maconochie was made commandant of Norfolk Island.

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  • Thanks to Beverley, her local community can continue to have direct access to Norfolk Police.

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  • Does my council tax all go on South Norfolk council tax all go on South Norfolk Council services?

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  • Mary Wright married Isaac Sewell on 15 th June 1819 at Lamas, Norfolk after a five year courtship.

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  • Unlike the Yorkshire style of chalices, those in Norfolk and Suffolk are invariably depicted with a wafer.

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  • Steven Miller Great Yarmouth, Norfolk Are you mentally deranged?

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  • The Pink Ladies are a unique funny camp comedy duo that are based in the Norfolk region... .

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  • The church sits at the far eastern end of the village green, hard against the Norfolk border.

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  • Norfolk Village Signs Considered to be the original home of the village sign, Norfolk has more than enough to satisfy the armchair enthusiast.

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  • To the south is the chalk escarpment, which runs from the south coast to Norfolk.

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  • Wymondham in Norfolk has a fine example of a market house.

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  • The otter was almost extinct in Norfolk by the early 1980s.

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  • Norfolk Chronicle - 11th July 1863 The mill's eventual fate seems to have been a removal and conversion to drainage use.

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  • That is message from a Norfolk " chippy " boss who has become a national figurehead for fish friers.

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  • A number of dragonfly species use the pools including the Norfolk and common hawker.

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  • It is an historic village in the agricultural heartland of North West Norfolk.

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  • Petch and Swann had the hellebore at the Bath Hills, Ditchingham, South Norfolk!

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