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nonconformity

nonconformity

nonconformity Sentence Examples

  • Independency, like Nonconformity, is primarily a negative term.

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  • Independency, like Nonconformity, is primarily a negative term.

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  • Erskine had little interest in the "historical criticism" of Christianity, and regarded as the only proper criterion of its truth its conformity or nonconformity with man's spiritual nature, and its adaptability or non-adaptability to man's spiritual needs.

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  • Erskine had little interest in the "historical criticism" of Christianity, and regarded as the only proper criterion of its truth its conformity or nonconformity with man's spiritual nature, and its adaptability or non-adaptability to man's spiritual needs.

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  • He was ejected for Nonconformity in 1662, and was so affected by the sight of the devastation caused by the great fire of London that he died shortly afterwards, on the 29th of October 1666.

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  • The Manchester Education Union and the Birmingham Education League had already formulated in the provinces the two opposing theories, the former standing for the preservation of denominational interests, the latter advocating secular rate-aided education as the only means of protecting Nonconformity against the Church.

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  • Rees, History of Protestant Nonconformity (1861).

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  • Davids, Annals of Evangelical Nonconformity in Essex (1863), R.

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  • Urwick, Nonconformity in Hertfordshire (1884); W.

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  • Perhaps no thinker has exerted so great an influence upon nonconformity as Baxter has done, and that not in one direction only, but in every form of development, doctrinal, ecclesiastical and practical.

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  • It is proposed here to note simply the present legal aspects of nonconformity apart from its history, that is, the matters in which the law as to nonconformists still differs from that applicable to members of the Church of England.

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  • He remained at Bridgnorth nearly two years, during which time he took a special interest in the controversy relating to Nonconformity and the Church of England.

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  • Middleton, with Archbishop Sharp, misgoverned the country, established a high court of commission, exiled the fiercest preachers to Holland, whence they worked endless mischief by agitation and a war of pamphlets; irritated the Covenanting shires, Fife and the south-west, by quartering troops on them to exact fines for Nonconformity, and so caused, during a war with Holland, the Pentland Rising (November 1666).

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  • In a parliament with Lauderdale as commissioner (1669-1673) " clanking acts " were passed against nonconformity, but the laws were too severe to be executed, save spasmodically, and were followed by a second indulgence (1672).

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  • His chief service to Nonconformity was in connexion with the improvement of congregational worship, and especially the service of praise.

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  • Cranmer, Ridley, Bucer and others urged him to submit in vain; confinement to his house by order of the Council proved equally ineffectual; and it was not until he had spent some weeks in the Fleet prison that the "father of nonconformity" consented to conform, and Hooper submitted to consecration with the legal ceremonies (March 8, 1551).

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  • It is proposed here to note simply the present legal aspects of nonconformity apart from its history, that is, the matters in which the law as to nonconformists still differs from that applicable to members of the Church of England.

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  • In dealing with nonconformity he was tolerant, and even advocated a revision of the Prayer Book if that would allay the scruples of dissenters.

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  • He had voted against the act of November 1549 for a reform of the canon law, and on a later occasion his nonconformity brought him into conflict with the Council; he was also the only bishop who satisfied Hooper's test of sacramental orthodoxy.

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  • it involves not only the story of Nonconformity and the growth of religious liberty, but also the whole development of modern England.

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  • But the Restoration soon changed matters, and by forcing Presbyterians and Congregationalists alike into Nonconformity, placed the former, instead of the latter, in the anomalous position.

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  • He held his seat successfully at the contests in 1892, 1895 and 1900, his reputation as a champion of Welsh nationalism, Welsh nonconformity and extreme Radicalism becoming thoroughly established both in parliament and in the country.

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  • It would appear that while the word "chapel" was not infrequent in the early history of Nonconformity, "meeting-house" was the more usual term.

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  • He had voted against the act of November 1549 for a reform of the canon law, and on a later occasion his nonconformity brought him into conflict with the Council; he was also the only bishop who satisfied Hooper's test of sacramental orthodoxy.

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  • it involves not only the story of Nonconformity and the growth of religious liberty, but also the whole development of modern England.

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  • But the Restoration soon changed matters, and by forcing Presbyterians and Congregationalists alike into Nonconformity, placed the former, instead of the latter, in the anomalous position.

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  • Miall saw that if the programme of Nonconformity was to be carried through it must have more effective representation in Parliament.

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  • Although a strong opponent of Laud's and Charles's ecclesiastical policy, Prichard lived unmolested, and even rose to be chancellor of St Davids; but the indiscreet Wroth, " the founder and father of nonconformity in Wales," being suspended in 1638 by Bishop Murray of Llandaff, founded a small community.

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  • In practice the Church of England is no longer regarded as coextensive with the state; nor is nonconformity any longer, as it once was, an offence against the law.

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  • Halley, Lancashire, its Puritanism and Nonconformity (1869); G.

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  • His liberality of view and breadth of ecclesiastical sympathy entitle him to rank on questions of Nonconformity among the most distinguished of the school of Richard Baxter; and he maintained friendly relations with many of the dignitaries of the Established Church.

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  • During the 17th century the country around Nizhniy became the seat of a vigorous religious agitation, and in its forests the Raskolniks established hundreds of their monasteries and communities, those of the Kerzhenets playing an important part in the history of Russian Nonconformity even to the present time.

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  • 1618), Puritan author, and of William Erbury, sometime vicar of St Mary's in the town, who, with his curate, Walter Cradock,were among the founders of Welsh nonconformity.

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  • He also undertook to assist Dr John Evans in writing a history of Nonconformity.

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  • He looks upon the form of church government as non-essential, but condemns Nonconformity.

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  • Law Relating To Nonconformity >>

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  • (1705-1783), who has been called "the father of Unitarian nonconformity."

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  • Paul's nonconformity is not ascetic (Col 2:23 ).

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  • The extent of popular support for Evangelical Nonconformity is evident in the unique religious census of 1851 of England and Wales.

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  • Protestant nonconformity has also been well-represented over the years.

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  • The Anglican Church, true to its evil traditions, cast out the Revivalists, and welsh nonconformity was born.

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  • Historians with left-of-centre outlooks preferred to research early trade unions or religious nonconformity.

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  • Protestant nonconformity TO 1689 Some separatist congregations of the early 17th century (fn.

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  • The extent of popular support for evangelical nonconformity is evident in the unique religious census of 1851 of England and Wales.

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  • Traditional approaches to early nonconformity have divided its history at the Toleration Act of 1689.

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  • Rees, History of Protestant Nonconformity (1861).

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  • 1618), Puritan author, and of William Erbury, sometime vicar of St Mary's in the town, who, with his curate, Walter Cradock,were among the founders of Welsh nonconformity.

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  • He also undertook to assist Dr John Evans in writing a history of Nonconformity.

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    0
  • In dealing with nonconformity he was tolerant, and even advocated a revision of the Prayer Book if that would allay the scruples of dissenters.

    0
    0
  • He was ejected for Nonconformity in 1662, and was so affected by the sight of the devastation caused by the great fire of London that he died shortly afterwards, on the 29th of October 1666.

    0
    0
  • Davids, Annals of Evangelical Nonconformity in Essex (1863), R.

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  • Halley, Lancashire, its Puritanism and Nonconformity (1869); G.

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    0
  • Urwick, Nonconformity in Hertfordshire (1884); W.

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  • He held his seat successfully at the contests in 1892, 1895 and 1900, his reputation as a champion of Welsh nationalism, Welsh nonconformity and extreme Radicalism becoming thoroughly established both in parliament and in the country.

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  • It would appear that while the word "chapel" was not infrequent in the early history of Nonconformity, "meeting-house" was the more usual term.

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  • NONCONFORMITY For the history of the gradual relief of nonconformists in England from their disabilities see English History, Baptists, Congregationalism, Methodism, Friends, Society Of, &C.; also Oath.

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  • He remained at Bridgnorth nearly two years, during which time he took a special interest in the controversy relating to Nonconformity and the Church of England.

    0
    0
  • Perhaps no thinker has exerted so great an influence upon nonconformity as Baxter has done, and that not in one direction only, but in every form of development, doctrinal, ecclesiastical and practical.

    0
    0
  • Middleton, with Archbishop Sharp, misgoverned the country, established a high court of commission, exiled the fiercest preachers to Holland, whence they worked endless mischief by agitation and a war of pamphlets; irritated the Covenanting shires, Fife and the south-west, by quartering troops on them to exact fines for Nonconformity, and so caused, during a war with Holland, the Pentland Rising (November 1666).

    0
    0
  • In a parliament with Lauderdale as commissioner (1669-1673) " clanking acts " were passed against nonconformity, but the laws were too severe to be executed, save spasmodically, and were followed by a second indulgence (1672).

    0
    0
  • His liberality of view and breadth of ecclesiastical sympathy entitle him to rank on questions of Nonconformity among the most distinguished of the school of Richard Baxter; and he maintained friendly relations with many of the dignitaries of the Established Church.

    0
    0
  • Miall saw that if the programme of Nonconformity was to be carried through it must have more effective representation in Parliament.

    0
    0
  • He looks upon the form of church government as non-essential, but condemns Nonconformity.

    0
    0
  • During the 17th century the country around Nizhniy became the seat of a vigorous religious agitation, and in its forests the Raskolniks established hundreds of their monasteries and communities, those of the Kerzhenets playing an important part in the history of Russian Nonconformity even to the present time.

    0
    0
  • His chief service to Nonconformity was in connexion with the improvement of congregational worship, and especially the service of praise.

    0
    0
  • Although a strong opponent of Laud's and Charles's ecclesiastical policy, Prichard lived unmolested, and even rose to be chancellor of St Davids; but the indiscreet Wroth, " the founder and father of nonconformity in Wales," being suspended in 1638 by Bishop Murray of Llandaff, founded a small community.

    0
    0
  • Cranmer, Ridley, Bucer and others urged him to submit in vain; confinement to his house by order of the Council proved equally ineffectual; and it was not until he had spent some weeks in the Fleet prison that the "father of nonconformity" consented to conform, and Hooper submitted to consecration with the legal ceremonies (March 8, 1551).

    0
    0
  • In practice the Church of England is no longer regarded as coextensive with the state; nor is nonconformity any longer, as it once was, an offence against the law.

    0
    0
  • The Manchester Education Union and the Birmingham Education League had already formulated in the provinces the two opposing theories, the former standing for the preservation of denominational interests, the latter advocating secular rate-aided education as the only means of protecting Nonconformity against the Church.

    0
    0
  • Law Relating To Nonconformity >>

    0
    0
  • (1705-1783), who has been called "the father of Unitarian nonconformity."

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  • Nonconformity (not going along with the majority) can also be a sign of creativity.

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  • NONCONFORMITY For the history of the gradual relief of nonconformists in England from their disabilities see English History, Baptists, Congregationalism, Methodism, Friends, Society Of, &C.; also Oath.

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