Nonconformist sentence example

nonconformist
  • There are about thirty nonconformist chapels, in nearly a third of which the services are Welsh.
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  • The church of St Martin was built in 1879, and there are Nonconformist chapels.
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  • Where the tenets and authorities of a nonconformist body come in question, they must be proved by evidence.
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  • The Marriage Act 1898 dispensed with the necessity of the attendance of a registrar at marriages celebrated at a nonconformist place of worship, substituting in place thereof a person duly authorized by the trustees of the place of worship, if the persons intending to be married so desire; but the parties may, if they wish, still require the presence of the registrar.
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  • He laboured for the attainment of a united Nonconformist body, which should retain the cultured element without alienating the uneducated.
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  • No Puritan nonconformist name is so affectionately cherished as is that of Joseph Alleine.
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  • But his aunt was anxious for him to be a minister, as he himself desired, and therefore in 1752, when his health had improved, he went to Daventry to attend the Nonconformist academy formerly carried on by Dr P. Doddridge at Northampton.
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  • This question was settled after 1662 by the secession of the Nonconformist clergy, and no more was heard of the matter until the "Oxford movement" in the 10th century.
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  • It was Whig in politics and Nonconformist in theology.
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  • While, however, it is now not unusual to speak of "the Nonconformist.
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  • There are three Roman Catholic churches, a Free Kirk, an American mission, and several chapels belonging to Nonconformist sects.
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  • His pall-bearers comprised representatives of literature, of science, of both Houses of Parliament, of theology, Anglican and Nonconformist, and of the universities of Oxford and Cambridge.
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  • Binney was the pioneer in a much-needed improvement of the forms of service in Nonconformist churches, and gave a special impulse to congregational psalmody by the publication of a book entitled The Service of Song in the House of the Lord.
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  • He was Congregational minister at Ware (1831) and Leicester (1834), and in 1841 founded the Nonconformist, a weekly newspaper in which he advocated the cause of disestablishment.
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  • James Wood, who became Nonconformist minister in the chapel at Atherton in 1691, earned fame and the familiar title of "General" by raising a force from his congregation, uncouthly armed, to fight against the troops of the Pretender (1715).
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  • The priest is, unlike the nonconformist minister, regarded as being in holy orders.
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  • Still more recently the term "nonconformist" has in its turn, as the political attack on the principle of a state establishment of religion developed, tended to give place to the style of "Free Churches" and "Free Churchman."
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  • All three terms are now in use, "nonconformist" being the most usual, as it is the most colourless.
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  • Not only are such names as Horeb, Zion, Penuel, Siloh, &c., bestowed on Nonconformist chapels, but these Biblical terms have likewise been applied to their surrounding houses, and in not a few instances to growing towns and villages.
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  • There are a Nonconformist grammar school, a diocesan training college for mistresses, and other educational establishments.
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  • He had started in 1885 the Methodist Times, and rapidly made it a leading organ of Nonconformist opinion.
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  • Stead in 1885, as he had earlier supported Mrs Josephine Butler in a similar cause; he attacked the trade in alcohol; was an anti-vivisectionist; he advocated arbitration; and his vehement attacks on Sir Charles Dilke and Charles Stewart Parnell originated the phrase the "Nonconformist conscience."
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  • He differed strongly, however, from a large section of Nonconformist opinion in his defence of the South African War.
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  • His energies were largely devoted to co-operation among the various Nonconformist bodies, and he was one of the founders and most energetic members of the National Council of the Evangelical Free Churches.
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  • Home-controversy engaged him again, and he prepared his Fresh Suit against Ceremonies - the book`which made Richard Baxter a Nonconformist.
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  • There are 26 other churches and io mission rooms belonging to the Church of England, besides 2 Roman Catholic churches, a synagogue and 84 Nonconformist chapels (31 Welsh and 53 English) and zo mission rooms, but all are modern buildings.
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  • The more important nonconformist churches are fully dealt with under their several headings.
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  • The above table, however, based on that in the Statesman's Year-Book for 1908, and giving the comparative statistics of the chief nonconformist churches, may be useful for purposes of comparison.
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  • As a preacher, writer, propagandist and ardent Liberal politician, he became a power in the Nonconformist body.
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  • About 1890 the proposal that there should be a Nonconformist Church Congress analogous to the Anglican Church Congress was seriously considered, and the first was held in Manchester on the 7th of November 1892.
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  • He would have thought it a sin to borrow any time from the serious business of his life, from his expositions, ' His formal pardon is dated the 13th of September 1672; but five months earlier he had received a royal licence to preach, and acted for the next three years as pastor of the nonconformist body to which he belonged, in a barn on the site of which stands the present Bunyan Meeting.
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  • The Rev. Stephen Bachiler, an Oxford man and a Churchman, who became a Nonconformist and emigrated to Boston in 1632, was one of her forebears and also an ancestor of Daniel Webster.
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  • His sincere piety made him the intimate friend of Isaac Barrow, Archbishop Tillotson, Bishop Wilkins and Bishop Stillingfleet, as well as of the Nonconformist leader, Richard Baxter.
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  • In current usage the term" nonconformist " is applied in Great Britain to any member of a church not conforming to the ceremonies, worship and doctrines (" forms ") of the Church of England, but is generally used of a member of the so-called Free Churches, or Protestant Dissenters, and is not usually applied to Roman Catholics.
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  • Aberdare, with the ecclesiastical parishes of St Fagan's (Trecynon) and Aberaman carved out of the ancient parish, has some twelve Anglican churches, one Roman Catholic church (built in 1866 in Monk Street near the site of a cell attached to Penrhys Abbey) and over fifty Nonconformist chapels.
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  • In 1669 he resigned his parish to become professor of divinity in the university of Glasgow, and in the same year he published an exposition of his ecclesiastical views in his Modest and Free Conference between a Conformist and a Nonconformist (by "a lover of peace").
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  • From school at Sleaford in Lincolnshire he passed at the age of sixteen to the nonconformist academy at Northampton, of which Dr Doddridge was then president.
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  • The Irish bishops remained silent, while in England the " Nonconformist conscience " revolted.
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  • He had to choose between the Nonconformist vote and the Irish leader, and he preferred the former.
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  • In 1870 he was elected a member of the first school board for Birmingham; and for the next six years, and especially after 1873, when he became leader of a majority and chairman, he actively championed the Nonconformist opposition to denominationalism.
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  • Landlords could also refuse to let their tenants have land on which to build nonconformist chapels and meeting houses.
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  • Where were the Nonconformist organs, and the anxious seekers after divine light in creed and rationality in church polity?
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  • His Friendly Debate between a Conformist and a Nonconformist was a controversial tract which excited considerable feeling at the time of its publication in 1668, but he lived long enough to soothe by his moderation and candour the exasperation it had caused.
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  • Since the beginning of the 19th century dissent has been strongly represented in the Principality, the combined numbers of the various Nonconformist bodies far outstripping the adherents of the Church.
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  • After a few years the father quarrelled with the Russian government, and went to England, where he obtained a professorship of natural history and the modern languages at the famous nonconformist academy at Warrington.
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  • In the summer of 1864 a sermon which he preached and printed on Baptismal Regeneration (a doctrine which he strenuously repudiated, maintaining that immersion was only an outward and visible sign of the inward conversion) led to a difference with the bulk of the Evangelical party, both Nonconformist and Anglican.
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  • Nonconformist priest Avvakum 2 following in chains the ex ploring party of Pashkov on the Amur.
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  • The scriptural name is due, as often in Wales, to the village or hamlet taking its title from the Nonconformist church.
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  • John Hodgson (1779-1845), the historian of Northumberland, in a short memoir published in 1831, held that he was born in 1685, at Pinkie House, in the parish of Inveresk, Midlothian, and that his father was a Northumberland Nonconformist, who had migrated to Scotland, but returned to England soon after the Revolution of 1688.
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  • The dates of his chief works are as follows: 1842, Letters to the Nonconformist, "The Proper Sphere of Government."
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  • He was a zealous advocate of the doctrine of passive obedience, and strongly opposed the Toleration Act, declaiming in unmeasured terms against the various Nonconformist sects.
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  • In England the rivalry was not between Catholic and Reformer, but between Anglican and Nonconformist, or, if we may use the wide but less correct term, Puritan.
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  • The Savoy Declaration of 1658 defines the theory and practice of the older English Nonconformist churches in the section on the "Institution of Churches and the Order appointed in them by Jesus Christ" (xix.).
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  • It came into being in 1817 and gradually gained the position of a tolerated nonconformist church (1845 being the date of its complete recognition by the state).
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  • This was the source of his intense dislike of the Puritan and Nonconformist conception of the church, which afforded no tangible or definite form.
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  • The use of "chapel" as a common term for all Nonconformist places of worship was general through most of the 19th century, so that "church and chapel" was the usual phrase to mark the distinction between members of the established Church and those of Nonconformist bodies.
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  • Most of the recent buildings for worship erected by Nonconformist bodies will be found to be styled Wesleyan, Congregational, &c., churches.
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  • By Lord Lyndhurst's act, the Nonconformist Chapels Act 1844, where no particular religious doctrine or mode of worship has been prescribed by the deed or instrument of trust the usage of the congregation for twenty-five years is to be taken as conclusive evidence of the doctrine and worship which may be properly observed in such meeting-houses.
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  • Similar matters arising in nonconformist bodies can only be tried by the ordinary secular courts, and generally depend upon the question whether a minister has done any act which is not in accordance with the rules governing the particular body of which he is a minister.
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  • A nonconformist body is in law nothing more than a voluntary association, whose members may enforce discipline by any tribunal assented to by them, but must be subject in the last degree to the courts of the realm.
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  • By that act the ceremony of marriage might be performed in a nonconformist place of worship, but it must be after due notice to the superintendent registrar and in his presence or in that of a registrar, and the building must be one that is duly certified for marriages.
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  • The objections raised from the Nonconformist point of view were numerous and varied, but they were thoroughly discussed between the first meeting on the 15th of April and the last on the 24th of July 1661; the bishops agreeing to meet the Puritan wishes on a few minor points but on none of fundamental importance.
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  • His Vindiciae Pietatis (which first appeared in 1660) was refused licence by Archbishop Sheldon, and was published, in common with other nonconformist books, without it.
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  • The Anglican societies and the regular and older Nonconformist societies (Methodist, Baptist, Presbyterian and the London Missionary Society, which is virtually Congregationalist) have shared in these humbler recruits; but a large proportion of them have joined several younger " non-denominational " or " interdenominational " missions.
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  • But the Church of England has not yet put missions in the prominent place they occupy in the Nonconformist denominations.
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  • In 1729, at a general meeting of Nonconformist ministers, he was chosen to conduct the academy established in that year at Market Harborough.
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  • The "three hours" service, borrowed from Roman Catholic usage and consisting of prayers, addresses on the "seven last words from the cross" and intervals for meditation and silent prayer, has become very popular in the Anglican Church, and the observance of the day is more marked than formerly among Nonconformist bodies, even in Scotland.
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  • He could not, however, be called more than a moderate Nonconformist; and such he continued to be throughout his life.
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  • He was an ardent Nonconformist, proud to number among his ancestors John Gratton, a friend of George Fox, and one of the persecuted and imprisoned preachers of the Society of Friends.
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  • In the new parliament, as in the previous session, he opposed legislation restricting the hours of labour, and, as a Nonconformist, spoke against clerical control of national education.
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  • He came of a middle-class Yorkshire family of pronounced Liberal and Nonconformist views, and was educated under Dr Edwin Abbott at the City of London school, from which he went as a scholar to Balliol, Oxford; there he had a distinguished career, taking a first-class in classics, winning the Craven scholarship and being elected a fellow of his college.
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  • The majority of the population is Nonconformist in religion, the chief denominations being the Baptists, Calvinistic Methodists and Congregationalists.
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