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nomination

nomination

nomination Sentence Examples

  • His services were acknowledged by a nomination as C.B.

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  • In 1834 he received the Whig nomination for governor, but was defeated by William L.

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  • Nomination is by the king for life.

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  • With the approach of the presidential election of 1908, President Roosevelt reiterated his pledge not to accept another nomination, and threw his immense influence in favour of Mr Taft.

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  • The prefect supervises the execution of the laws; has wide authority in regard to policing, public hygiene and relief of pauper children; has the nomination of various subordinate officials; and is in correspondence with the subordinate functionaries in his department, to whom he transmits the orders and instructions of the government.

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  • The assizes may speak of patriarch and king as conjoint seigneurs in Jerusalem; but as a matter of fact the king could secure the nomination of his own patriarch, and after Dagobert the patriarchs are, with the temporary exception of Stephen in 1128, the confidants and supporters of the kings.

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  • received a kingdom - first Chalcis, and then the tetrarchies of Philip and Lysanias - but, though he had the oversight of the Temple and the nomination of the high priest, and enjoyed a reputation for knowledge of Jewish customs and questions, he was unable to check the growing power of the Zealots.

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  • On the 26th of that month the nomination of Prince George of Greece as high commissioner of the powers in Crete for a period of three years (renewed in 1901) was formally announced, and on the 21st of December the prince landed at Suda and made his public entry into Canea amid enthusiastic demonstrations.

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  • On the 26th of that month the nomination of Prince George of Greece as high commissioner of the powers in Crete for a period of three years (renewed in 1901) was formally announced, and on the 21st of December the prince landed at Suda and made his public entry into Canea amid enthusiastic demonstrations.

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  • He was cordially received, but in February learned that his nomination had been rejected by the Senate on the 25th of January.

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  • From the French governor of Corsica, the comte de Marbeuf, he procured many favours, among them being the nomination of the young Napoleon to the military school at Brienne in the east of France.

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  • Improving upon the procedure of the Convention in Vendemiaire 1795, Bonaparte procured the nomination of three consuls in an article of the new constitution; they were Bonaparte (First Consul), Cambaceres and Lebrun.

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  • He reached Goa in February 1 55 2, and obtained from the viceroy consent to the plan of a Chinese embassy and to the nomination of Pereira as envoy.

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  • After the nomination, the imperium of the dictator was confirmed by a lex curiata.

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  • He reached Goa in February 1 55 2, and obtained from the viceroy consent to the plan of a Chinese embassy and to the nomination of Pereira as envoy.

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  • At the Democratic Convention for the nomination of a presidential candidate held at Baltimore in 1912, he led on 27 ballots, and had a clear majority on eight, but he was finally defeated by Woodrow Wilson of New Jersey.

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  • He did not derive much profit from this new favour, as he died on the 29th of June following, without his nomination having been sanctioned by the pope.

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  • The decisions of the conference, moderate though they were, in the end requiring merely the nomination of an international commission to investigate the state of the European provinces of Turkey, and the appointment by the sultan, with the approval of the powers, of governors-general for five years, were rejected by the Porte.

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  • The ordinary use of "hustings" at the present day for the platform from which a candidate speaks at a parliamentary or other election, or more widely for a political candidate's election campaign, is derived from the application of the word, first to the platform in the Guildhall on which the London court was held, and next to that from which the public nomination of candidates for a parliamentary election was formerly made, and from which the candidate addressed the electors.

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  • He did not derive much profit from this new favour, as he died on the 29th of June following, without his nomination having been sanctioned by the pope.

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  • To accomplish this end it was necessary to unite among themselves, and union could only be secured by the nomination of some one who offended nobody.

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  • On the duke of Buckingham's nomination, Wesley was for six years a pupil at Charterhouse.

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  • In August 1532 Archbishop Warham died, and the king almost immediately afterwards intimated to Cranmer, who had accompanied the emperor in his campaign against the Turks, his nomination to the vacant see.

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  • But here as elsewhere the senate asserted its authority over the magistrates, and the view was finally held that the senate should not only suggest the need of nomination but also the name of the nominee.

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  • Four legati juridici (or simply juridici) of consular rank were appointed for Italy, who took over certain important judicial functions formerly exercised by local magistrates (cases of fideicommissa, the nomination of guardians).

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  • In the 14th century it passed to the Courtenays, and in 1698 Sir William Courtenay was confirmed in the right of holding court leet, view of frankpledge and the nomination of a portreeve, these privileges having been surrendered to James II.

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  • While in exile he was elected supreme commander of the Knights of the Golden Circle in Ohio and received the Democratic nomination for governor of Ohio, but was defeated.

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  • Muraviev, who already carried his nomination in his pocket, resented this condescension, and relegated Isvolsky to Belgrade and to Munich, where he had the rank of a minister plenipotentiary.

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  • He opposed the nomination of Mr. Taft in 1912, but did not bolt his party.

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  • The agent chosen to preside at the nomination ceremony was Mr (afterwards Sir) Theophilus Shepstone, who was in charge of native affairs in Natal and had won in a 1 Bishop Schreuder, a Norwegian missionary long resident in Zululand, gave Sir Bartle Frere the following estimate of the three brothers who successively reigned over the Zulu: " Chaka was a really great man, cruel and unscrupulous, but with many great qualities.

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  • Not only was his stipend as Repetent discontinued, but his nomination to the office of professor extraordinarius, which had already been signed by the minister Karl Altenstein, was withheld.

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  • BONIFACE pope from S30 to 532, was by birth a Goth, and owed his election to the nomination of his predecessor, Felix IV., and to the influence of the Gothic king.

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  • In the beginning of 1772 his ambition was stimulated by the nomination to the 'second place in council in Bengal with a promise of the reversion of the governorship when Mr Cartier should retire.

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  • The pope preserved the right to nominate to vacant benefices in curia and to certain benefices of the chapters, but all the others were in the nomination of the bishops or other inferior collators.

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  • Its main features were strictly Presbyterian, but the minister was greatly superior to the elder, and the state had wide powers especially in the nomination of higher officers.

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  • The second was the nomination of Dr Miguel Juarez Celman for the presidential term commencing in October 1886.

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  • The nomination was brought about by the Cordoba clique, and Roca lacked the moral courage to oppose the decision.

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  • William, however, whose position had been strengthened by his nomination to the post of ruwaard of Brabant, determined to welcome Matthias and use him for his own purposes.

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  • As the recognized leader of the new party, his nomination by the Republicans for the presidency in 1856 and in 1860 was regarded as certain; but in each instance he was put aside for another.

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  • In 1886 he was elected mayor of New York City, his nomination having been forced upon the Democratic Party by the strength of the other nominees, Henry George and Theodore Roosevelt; his administration (1887-1888) was thoroughly efficient and creditable, but he broke with Tammany, was not renominated, ran independently for re-election, and was defeated.

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  • For some time after the occupation of Rome the pope, in order to substantiate the pretence that his spiritual freedom had been diminished, avoided the creation of cardinals and the nomination of bishops.

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  • The emperor granted the petition, which indeed the procurator had permitted them to make, and further transferred the nomination of the high priest and the supervision of the temple from the procurator to Agrippa's brother, Herod of Chalcis.

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  • He himself declared that he did not desire nomination, but later agreed to take the Republican nomination if it should be offered him.

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  • Four years later his party passed him by for William Henry Harrison, the hero of Tippecanoe, and Webster refused the proffered nomination for vice-president.

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  • In June 1775, with a view to promoting the union of the colonies, he seconded the nomination of Washington as commander-in-chief of the army.

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  • The law does not make the nomination of candidates for the United States Senate by this method mandatory nor such choice binding upon the General Assembly.

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  • It provided for municipal elections in January; for the election of a mayor for four years; for his recall at the end of two years if a majority of the registered voters so vote in the state election in November in the second year of his term; for the summary removal for cause by the mayor of any department head or other of his appointees; for a city council of one chamber of nine members, elected at large each for three years; for nomination by petition; for a permanent finance commission appointed by the governor; for the confirmation of the mayor's appointments by the state civil service commission; for the mayor's preparation of the annual budget (in which items may be reduced but not increased by the council), and for his absolute veto of appropriations except for school use.

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  • On the eighth ballot he received 1331 votes, on the ninth 3742 votes, and on the tenth he secured the nomination with 6922 votes, the result being due largely to the support of certain influential U.S. Senators, delegates to the convention, who hoped that as president he would be amenable to the Senate.

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  • From 1868 until his death he was put forward for nomination for the presidency at every Democratic convention save that of 1872.

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  • Both in 1876 and 1884, after his failure to receive the nomination for the presidency, he was nominated by the Democratic National Convention for vice-president, his nomination in each of these conventions being made partly, it seems, with the hope of gaining "greenback" votes - Hendricks had opposed the immediate resumption of specie payments.

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  • This speech made him the idol of the "silver" majority of the convention and brought him the Democratic nomination for the presidency on the following day.

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  • In 1904 although not actively a candidate for the Democratic nomination (which eventually went to Judge Parker), he was to the very last considered a possible nominee; and he strenuously opposed in the convention the repudiation by the conservative element of the stand taken in the two previous campaigns.

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  • To these Septimius Severus added the centurionship. Nomination to the militiae equestres was in the hands of the emperor.

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  • In 1855 Gauss died and was succeeded by Dirichlet, who along with others made an effort to obtain Riemann's nomination as extraordinary professor.

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  • In the Republican national convention of 1876 Conkling sought nomination for the presidency, and after the disputed election of this year he took a prominent part in devising and securing the passage of a bill creating an electoral commission.

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  • He evaded the clause in the constitution prohibiting the election of a president for successive terms of office by invariably arranging for the nomination of some adherent of his own as chief of the executive, and then pulling the strings behind this figurehead.

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  • The Zulu country continued, however, excited and disturbed until the government of Natal in 1861 obtained the formal nomination of a successor to Panda; and Cetywayo was appointed.

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  • The nomination was brought about by the Cordoba clique, and Roca lacked the moral courage to oppose the decision.

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  • The law does not make the nomination of candidates for the United States Senate by this method mandatory nor such choice binding upon the General Assembly.

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  • Both in 1876 and 1884, after his failure to receive the nomination for the presidency, he was nominated by the Democratic National Convention for vice-president, his nomination in each of these conventions being made partly, it seems, with the hope of gaining "greenback" votes - Hendricks had opposed the immediate resumption of specie payments.

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  • To these Septimius Severus added the centurionship. Nomination to the militiae equestres was in the hands of the emperor.

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  • Much change was due to the efforts of William Jennings Bryan, who received the Democratic Party nomination for president three times, in 1896, 1900, and 1908.

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  • All bishoprics, abbeys and priories were in the royal nomination, the canonical institution belonging to the pope.

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  • He took part in the nomination of the counts and dukes; in the king's absence he presided over the royal tribunal; and he often commanded the armies.

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  • On the other hand, mayors like Flaochat (in Burgundy) and Erkinoald (in Neustria) stirred up the great nobles, who claimed the right to take part in their nomination, against the king.

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  • The declaration is to the effect that the clergyman has not received the presentation in consideration of any sum of money, reward, gift, profit or benefit directly or indirectly given or promised by him or any one for him to any one; that he has not made any promise of resignation other than that allowed by the Clerical Resignation Bonds Act 1828; that he has not for any money or benefit procured the avoidance of the benefice; and that he has not been party to any agreement invalidated by sec. 3 sub-sec. 3 of the act which invalidates any agreement for the exercise of a right of patronage in favour or on the nomination of any particular person, and any agreement on the transfer of a right of patronage (a) for the retransfer of the right, or (b) for postponing payment of any part of the consideration for the transfer until a vacancy or for more than three months, or (c) for payment of interest until a vacancy or for more than three months, or (d) for any payment in respect of the date at which a vacancy occurs, or (e) for the resignation of a benefice in favour of any person.

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  • On the other hand, mayors like Flaochat (in Burgundy) and Erkinoald (in Neustria) stirred up the great nobles, who claimed the right to take part in their nomination, against the king.

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  • He alone could ratify treaties of peace and alliance, and on his nomination fifty-four senators were added to the senate, which thereafter numbered one hundred and twenty members appointed by him alone.

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  • chance he might have had in that year of receiving the presidential nomination.

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  • The Ballot Act of 1872 did away with this public declaration of the nomination.

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  • Jackson in December 1829 had already made known his own wish that Van Buren should receive the nomination.

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  • He confidently expected to be nominated for president in 1844, and his famous letter of the 27th of April, in which he frankly opposed the immediate annexation of Texas, though doubtless contributing greatly to his defeat, was not made public until he felt practically sure of the nomination.

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  • In 1802 he entered parliament through the duke of Norfolk's nomination as member for Thetford, and married a widow with six children, Mrs Ord, who had a life interest in a comfortable income.

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  • In 1880 and 1888 he aspired actively to the Republican nomination for the presidency, but failed to obtain the requisite support in the Convention.

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  • General Caceres secured the nomination of the vicepresident Borgono as chief of the executive for the unexpired portion of the term of the late president Bermudez.

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  • A faction among the managers of the Republican party attempted to secure his nomination for a third term as president, and in the convention at Chicago in June 1880 he received a vote exceeding 300 during 36 consecutive ballots.

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  • So early as 1841 his reputation in this department was sufficient to secure for him the government nomination to the newly founded chair of Biblical criticism in the university of Edinburgh.

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  • The nomination at Oxford took place on the 29th of July, and at the close of the poll Sir Robert Inglis stood at the head, with Gladstone as his colleague.

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  • His chance for securing the nomination, however, was materially lessened by persistent charges which were brought against him by the Democrats that as a member of Congress he had been guilty of corruption in his relations with the Little Rock & Fort Smith and the Northern Pacific railways.'

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  • At the Democratic National Convention in 1920 he had from the beginning strong support for the presidential nomination.

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  • Following his nomination he " stumped " the country, making the League of Nations the prominent issue but was overwhelmingly defeated by Warren G.

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  • to swamp the liberal majority in the upper house by the nomination of twenty-seven new peers; he availed himself of the temporary popularity of the monarchy after the Spanish campaign to summon a new Chamber of Deputies.

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  • could hardly do otherwise than ignore Errington's nomination, as he also ignored the nomination of Clifford, bishop of Clifton, and of Grant, bishop of Southwark; and, by what he humorously described as "the Lord's own coup d'etat," he appointed Manning to, the archiepiscopal see.

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  • He accepted, however, the Republican nomination as vice-president on a ticket headed by General Grant, and was elected; but he failed in 1872 to secure renomination.

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  • During the latest and darkest years of Domitian he deemed it prudent to withdraw from public affairs, but his financial abilities were recognized by his nomination in 94 or 95 to the praefectura aerarii militar y (ix.

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  • The formal oration of thanks for this nomination, described by Pliny himself as his gratiarum actio (iii.

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  • C., in 1860 he was the Virginia delegation's choice as candidate for the presidency of the United States, but was defeated for the nomination by Stephen A.

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  • This right was exercised to secure the nomination of Canon Caruana and later of Monsignor Pace.

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  • Nomination or presentation on the part of the patron of the benefice is thus the first requisite in order that a clerk should become legally entitled to a benefice.

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  • He supported Suffolk over the king's marriage with Margaret of Anjou; but afterwards there arose some difference between them, due in part to a dispute about the nomination of the cardinal's nephew, Thomas Kempe, to the bishopric of London.

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  • Later, on the recommendation of Mercy and Vermond, she supported the nomination of Lomenie de Brienne in 1787, an appointment which, though widely approved at the time, was laid to the queen's blame when it ended in failure.

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  • In 1873 President Grant nominated him for chief justice of the United States, but in spite of his great learning and eminence at the bar, his ante-war record and the feeling of distrust experienced by many members of the senate on account of his inconsistency, aroused such vigorous opposition that his nomination was soon withdrawn.

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  • There is no longer a Charles X.," and it was he who secured the nomination of Louis Philippe as lieutenant-general of the kingdom.

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  • In 1896 he was a candidate for the presidential nomination in the Republican national convention.

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  • He was very popular with his associates and at the age of 29 was offered the Democratic nomination for the N.Y.

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  • In the autumn of 1852 he was an unsuccessful candidate for nomination for the presidency by the Whig National Convention, and he went out of office on the 4th of March 1853.

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  • In February 1856, while he was travelling abroad, he was nominated for the presidency by the American or Know Nothing party, and later this nomination was also accepted by the Whigs; but in the ensuing presidential election, the last in which the Know Nothings and the Whigs as such took any part, he received the electoral votes of only one state, Maryland.

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  • Three months after his nomination he forbade anything of any kind whatever to be printed concerning his administration, thus refusing advice as well as censure.

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  • In 1880 he received sixty-five votes on the first ballot for the presidential nomination at the Democratic National Convention at Cincinnati.

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  • The Republican party in the state was at that time weakened by the quarrels between the " Stalwart " and " Halfbreed " factions within its ranks; and the Democrats were thus given an initial advantage which was greatly increased by the Republicans' nomination for governor of Charles J.

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  • But the cry of Federal interference was raised as a result of the methods employed in securing his nomination, and this, together with the party division and the popularity of Cleveland, brought about Cleveland's election by the unprecedented plurality of 192,854.

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  • v.) of Maine, had received the nomination only after a contest in which violent personal animosities were aroused.

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  • In the same year he was elected parish priest of Glarus, in spite of the pope's nomination of Heinrich Goldli, an influential pluralist of Zurich, whom Zwingli found it necessary to buy off at an expense of more than a hundred gulden.

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  • He never held political office, although he was a candidate for the Republican senatorial nomination against Senator Thomas C. Platt in 1897.

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  • The split broke up the rule of the "regency," Marcy accepting the " Hunker " support and a seat in Polk's cabinet, while Wright, Butler and Van Buren joined the " Barnburners," a step preliminary to Van Buren's acceptance of the " Free Soil " nomination for president in the campaign of 1848.

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  • When, on the 2nd of May 1840, some time after the nomination by the Whig party of William Henry Harrison for the Presidency, Greeley began the publication of a new weekly campaign paper, The Log Cabin, it sprang at once into a great circulation; 40,000 copies of the first number were sold, and it finally rose to 80,000.

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  • His active hostility to Seward did much to prevent the success of that statesman, and to bring about instead the nomination of Abraham Lincoln.

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  • He expected their support, on account of his attitude toward the South and hostility to Grant, but he thought it a mistake to give him their formal nomination.

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  • attention for its vigour and courage advocated the nomination of Senator George F.

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  • After Mr Blaine's nomination, however, he supported him in the campaign as the chosen candidate of the party, in spite of the fact that an important wing of the Republican party "bolted" the nomination and espoused the candidacy of Grover Cleveland, who was elected president.

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  • It was very commonly believed at the time that this nomination for the vice-presidency was participated in and heartily approved of by the machine politicians or "bosses" of the State of New York in their belief that it would result in his elimination from active political life.

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  • Immediately after Ms election he publicly declared that he would not accept the nomination for the presidency in 1908, and he adhered to that pledge in spite of great popular pressure brought to bear upon him to accept the nomination of the party for another term.

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  • The nomination and election of President Taft, who had been a member of Mr Roosevelt's cabinet, was very largely due to the latter's great influence in the party.

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  • Blaine in 1884, when he had vigorously opposed his nomination in the convention on moral grounds.

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  • The reply to this criticism is that Mr Blaine was the choice of the majority of the party, and that while Mr Roosevelt felt free to fight within the party vigorously for reform, he did not feel that the nomination justified a schism like that which occurred in the Democratic party over the free silver issue in 1896 - a schism which remained afterwards a hopeless weakness in that party.

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  • His record in the war for efficiency and personal gallantry no doubt contributed largely to his nomination and election as governor of the state of New York; but he attained the governorship not on this ground alone.

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  • Formerly, where no oversman was named in the submission, and no power given to the arbiters to name one, the proceedings were abortive if the arbiters disagreed, unless the parties consented to a nomination.

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  • They proposed the impeachment of the minister responsible for the nomination of the chiefs of the districts, and declared that they would take no part in revising the constitution.

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  • A primary law enacted in 1905 authorizes the county convention of any party to provide for the nomination of candidates for county offices and the state legislature by direct vote.

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  • He was a prominent candidate for the Republican presidential nomination in 1876.

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  • In 1892 he was instrumental in bringing about the third nomination of Mr Cleveland, and took an influential part in the ensuing presidential campaign; but in 1896, disapproving of the "free-silver" agitation, he refused to support his party's candidate, Mr W.

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  • On the 29th of November 1609 Pieter Both was chosen by the states-general, on the nomination of the Dutch East India Company, as first governor-general of Netherlands India.

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  • After his arrival in Basel, he received a complimentary answer, together with the nomination to the deanery of Deventer, the income of which was reckoned at 600 ducats.

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  • This nomination was accompanied with an intimation that more was in store for him, and that steps would be taken to provide for him the income, viz., 3000 ducats, which was necessary to qualify for the cardinal's hat.

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  • Claudius Glicia, but the nomination was at once overruled.

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  • In 1908 the General Assembly passed a law providing for annual direct primary elections (outside of Baltimore; and making the Baltimore special primary law applicable to state as well as city officials), but, as regards state officers, making only a slight improvement upon previous conditions inasmuch as the county or district is the unit and the vote of county or district merely " instructs " delegates to the party's state nominating convention, representation in which is not strictly in proportion to population, the rural counties having an advantage over Baltimore; no nomination petition is required.

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  • In the same year a separate law was passed providing for primary elections for the choice of United States senators; but here also the method is not that of nomination by a plurality throughout the state, but by the vote of counties and legislative districts, so that this measure, like the other primary law, is not sufficiently direct to give Baltimore a vote proportional to its population.

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  • At an early age he was left a penniless orphan, and his education was acquired in a small country school until he procured, mainly by his own energy, a nomination to the Military Academy.

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  • In 1872 he was nominated for the presidency by the "Bourbon" Democrats, who refused to support Horace Greeley, awl by the "Labour Reformers"; he declined the nomination but received 21, 559 votes.

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  • He resigned the governorship in 1905 on being elected to the U.S. Senate, and was reelected for two succeeding terms. He was an unsuccessful candidate for the presidential nomination at the Republican National Convention in 1908.

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  • They were formerly given on the nomination of fellows.

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  • In 1845 he declined the Democratic nomination for governor, and also an appointment to the seat in the United States Senate made vacant by the resignation of Judge Levi Woodbury.

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  • When the Democratic national convention met at Cincinnati in June 1856, Pierce was an avowed candidate for renomination, but as his attitude on the slavery question, and especially his subserviency to the South in supporting the pro-slavery party in the Territory of Kansas, had lost him the support of the Northern wing of his party, the nomination went to James Buchanan.

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  • The president is given a free hand in choosing his cabinet ministers; but for most other appointments, whether or not they are by law in his sole gift, the senators belonging to the presidents party have practically controlled the selections for offices lying within their respective states, and a nomination made by the president against the will of the senator concerned will generally be disapproved by the Senate.

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  • As the desire to dominate primaries was found to lead to many abuses, both in the way of manipulating the lists of party voters and in the unfair management of the primary meetings themselves, a movement was started for reforming the system, which, beginning soon after 1890, gathered so much support that now in the large majority of the states laws have been enacted for regulating the proceedings at primary nomination meetings.

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  • It then proceeds to receive the nomination of various aspirants to the position of party candidate for the presidency.

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  • In 1873 he removed from Cincinnati to Fremont, his intention being to withdraw from public life; but in 1875 the Republican party in Ohio once more selected him as its candidate for the governorship. He accepted the nomination with great reluctance.

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  • The "sound-money campaign" in Ohio having attracted the attention of the whole country, Hayes was marked out as a candidate for the presidency, and he obtained the nomination of the Republican National Convention of 1876, his chief competitor being James G.

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  • Nominated chief justice of the Supreme Court of the United States in 1795, he presided during the August term, but the Senate refused to confirm the nomination, apparently because of his opposition to the Jay Treaty.

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  • Apart from his personal expenses such as postage, travelling expenses, &c., a candidate is prohibited from spending anything himself to promote either his nomination or his election, but he is allowed to contribute to the treasury of the political committee.

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  • In 1860, not being quite ready to ally himself wholly with the Republican party, he declined to be a candidate for the Republican nomination for the vice-presidency, and supported the Bell and Everett ticket.

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  • In 1903 he secured the nomination of George B.

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  • Thereupon William Jennings Bryan, who had looked with favour upon Clark, declared that he would not support him so long as he was backed by Tammany, threw his influence on the side of Woodrow Wilson and secured his nomination.

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  • Cox secured the nomination.

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  • Practical Save in its own metropolitan province, it took no Applica- part in the nomination of bishops; the provincial tions of the or regional councils were held without its authori- Theory, zation; their judgments and regulations were carried out without any suggestion that they should be ratified by Rome.

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  • The practice of the nomination of bishops by the Curia and of papal recommendation to prebends and benefices of every kind grew daily more general, and the number of appeals to Rome and exemptions granted to abbeys and even to simple churches increased continually.

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  • The religious affairs of England especially engaged his attention; and the nomination of Cardinal Pole as his legate to that country, on the death of Edward VI.

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  • In 1839 he made an unsuccessful contest for the United States senatorship. In December of that year the Whigs, relying upon his record in Congress as a sufficient declaration of political faith, nominated him for vice-president on the ticket with William Henry Harrison, expecting that the nomination would win support for the party in the South.

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  • The majority of the annexationists, however, would not support him, and he had further to meet the opposition of Van Buren, who had failed to secure the nomination in the regular Democratic convention, and of James K.

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  • Tyler accepted the Baltimore nomination, but on the 20th of August withdrew from the contest.

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  • He was about to go on leave of absence in order to be married in Baltimore when he received his nomination to the command of the Army of the Tennessee, Grant's and Sherman's old army, which was to take part under Sherman's supreme command in the campaign against Atlanta (1864).

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  • This nomination was made by Sherman and entirely approved by Grant, who had the highest opinion of McPherson's military and personal qualities.

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  • In France, under the Concordat, the sovereign - and under the republic the president - had the right of nomination.

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  • In 1905 the latter was nominated grand master, but the pope reserves the joint right of nomination.

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  • Gresham was a candidate for the Republican presidential nomination in 1884 and 1888, in the latter year leading for some time in the balloting.

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  • In common with the rest of the "Stalwarts," he worked hard for the nomination of Gen.

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  • His nomination was coldly received by the public; and when, after his election and accession, he actively engaged on behalf of Conkling in the great conflict with Garfield over the New York patronage, the impression was widespread that he was unworthy of his position.

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  • In 1855 he took a prominent part in organizing the Republican party in Pennsylvania, and in 1856 was a delegate to the Republican National Convention, in which he opposed the nomination of John C. Fremont.

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  • Consequently where the right of patronage (the right of the patron to present to the bishop the person whom he has nominated to become rector or vicar of the parish to the benefice of which he claims the right of advowson) remains attached to the manor, it is called an advowson appendant, and passes with the estate by inheritance The distinction between nomination to a living and presentation is to be noted.

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  • Nomination is the power, by virtue of a manor or otherwise, to appoint a clerk to the patron of a benefice, to be by him presented to the ordinary.

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  • Nomination and presentation, though generally used in law for the same thing, must be so distinguished, for it is possible that the rights of nomination may be in one person, and the rights of presentation in another.

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  • Sandys, Constitution of Athens c. 8 note 1, c. 22 § 5, note); in fact, at a date not known the mixed system of Aristides gave place to double sortition, in which the first nomination also was by lot.

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  • In 1824 he failed to secure re-election, and occupied himself with his judicial duties until his nomination as councillor of state in 1827.

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  • The succession is vested in the heirs male of Leopold I., and should they ever make complete default the throne will be declared vacant, and a national assembly composed of the two chambers elected in double strength will make a fresh nomination.

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  • In 1894" a new article numbered 61 was inserted in the constitution providing that " in default of male heirs the king can nominate his successor with the assent of the two chambers, and if no such nomination has been made the throne shall be vacant," when the original procedure of the constitution would be followed.

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  • Meanwhile from 1692 onwards brighter prospects were opened out to the unfortunate Belgians by the nomination by the Spanish king of Maximilian Emanuel, elector of Bavaria, to be governorgeneral with well-nigh sovereign powers.

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  • In 1896 he became vicar of Portsea, when his success in administering a large working-class parish led in 1901 to his nomination as bishop suffragan of Stepney in the East End of London.

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  • In 1331 he likewise declined the nomination of the Massachusetts Democrats for secretary of state.

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  • In 1842 he declined a renomination to the state legislature and attempted unsuccessfully to secure a nomination to Congress.

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  • The Illinois State Convention of the Republican party, held at Decatur on the 9th and 10th of May 1860, amid great enthusiasm declared Abraham Lincoln its first choice for the presidential nomination, and instructed the delegation to the National Convention to cast the vote of the state as a unit for him.

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  • On the third ballot the 502 votes formerly given to Simon Cameron' were given to Lincoln, who received 2312 votes to 180 for Seward, and without taking another ballot enough votes were changed to make Lincoln's total 354 (2 33 being necessary for a choice) and the nomination was then made unanimeus.

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  • the placetum regium, recursus ab abusu, nominatio regia, afid that of vetoing the nomination of personae minus gratae.

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  • Although, with the exception of Seward, he was the most prominent Republican in the country, and had done more against slavery than any other Republican, he failed to secure the nomination for the presidency in 1860, partly because his views on the question of protection were not orthodox from a Republican point of view, and partly because the old line Whig element could not forgive his coalition with the Democrats in the senatorial campaign of 1849; his uncompromising and conspicuous anti-slavery record, too, was against him from the point of view of "availability."

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  • Toward the end of his life he gradually drifted back toward his old Democratic position, and made an unsuccessful effort to secure the nomination of the Democratic party for the presidency in 1872.

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  • He was a candidate for the Republican nomination for the presidency in 1876, and at the national convention of his party received 124 votes on the first ballot; the nomination, however, finally went to Rutherford B.

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  • At the Democratic National Convention in 1920 he had strong support for the presidential nomination, standing second on the first six ballots.

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  • The three officials of importance whose nomination is mentioned by the historians in addition to that of the governor were the commander of the bodyguard, the minister of finance and the judge.

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  • His power was now already considerable; and in 1788 he added to it by securing his nomination to the pashalik of Iannina by a characteristic trick.

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  • The Bondevenlige, or philo-peasant party, which objected to the king's right of nomination and preferred a one-chamber system, now separated from the National Liberals on this point.

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  • Some five years later, on the nomination of the duke of Wellington, William Broughton was sent out to work in this enormous jurisdiction as archdeacon of Australia.

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  • He nominates the Sheikh ul-Islam or mufti (q.v.) of Constantinople (grand mufti), who is his representative in the imamate and issues judgments in points of faith and law from which there is no appeal; but the nomination must fall on one of the mollahs, 2 who form the upper stratum of the hierarchy of ulema.

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  • Being an ardent expansionist, he voted for the recognition of the independence of Texas in 1837 and for the joint annexation resolution of 1845, and advocated the nomination and election of James K.

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  • The Germans of Wisconsin unsuccessfully urged his nomination for governor by the Republican party in 1859.

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  • Seward; he was on the commi ttee which drew up the platform and served on the committee which announced his nomination to Abraham Lincoln.

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  • In 1884 he was a leader in the Independent (or Mugwump) movement against the nomination of James G.

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  • He succeeded Curtis as editorial writer for Harper's Weekly in 1892-1898, in which he did much for civil service reform and for Cleveland's nomination and election in 1892.

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  • In one instance a certain clan has the right to nominate the principal chief over an entire district; though it is known as the ruling clan, its rule is mainly confined to this nomination, and to decision for or against war.

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  • A common practice is for the holder of a high title to nominate a successor; and his nomination is generally confirmed by the chiefs, or heads of households, with whom the right of election rests.

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  • In his thirteenth year his father died, leaving the family well-to-do; the home at Woodford was broken up, as being unnecessarily large; and in 1848 William Morris went to Marlborough, where his father had bought him a nomination.

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  • The direct primary law, however, which was passed immediately afterwards by the legislature, was declared unconstitutional by the supreme court of the state, as were a second law of the same sort passed soon afterwards and a third law of 1908, which provided for direct nominations of all officers and an "advisory" nomination of United States senators.

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  • After strong opposition the nomination was confirmed, on the r 5th of March 1836, by the Senate.

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  • He was trained, partly at Paris, for the profession of architect, but his opportune assistance to two German nobles in a tavern brawl obtained for him a nomination to the military school of Munich.

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  • They provided (inter alia) for a non-official majority in all of the provincial councils, but not in that of the governor-general; for an elaborate system of election of members by organized constituencies; for nomination where direct election is not appropriate; and for the separate representation of Mahommedans and other special interests.

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  • In 1854, having failed to secure the nomination for senator from the "Know-Nothing" Party, which he had recently joined, he became a leader of the "People's Party," as the Republican Party was at first called in Pennsylvania.

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  • His prominence as a candidate first for the presidential and then for the vice-presidential nomination in the Republican national convention of 1860 led to his being selected by President Lincoln as secretary of war.

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  • In the Republican national convention of 1876 he took an influential part in preventing the nomination of James G.

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  • The most modest and one of the most illustrious of the founders of modern palaeontology, Lartet's work had previously been publicly recognized by his nomination as an officer of the Legion of Honour; and in 1848 he had had the offer of a political post.

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  • Moreover, it was an affront, in particular, for the sons of Walid I., who already had considered the nomination of Yazid II.

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  • As time went on, nomination to an office was more and more generally considered a step to wealth.

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  • His opposition to slavery, however, together with his popularity - won by the successes, hardships and dangers of his exploring expeditions, and by his part in the conquest of California - led to his nomination, largely on the ground of "availability," for the presidency in 1856 by the Republicans (this being their first presidential campaign), and by the National Americans or "Know-Nothings."

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  • The only certain fact is that Madison, whatever were his personal feelings in this matter, acted according to the wishes of a majority of the Republicans; but whether in doing so he was influenced by the desire of another nomination is largely a matter of conjecture.

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  • It was not, however, until 1896, when he personally managed the canvass that resulted in securing the Republican presidential nomination for William McKinley at the St Louis Convention (at which he was a delegate), that he became known throughout the United States as a political manager of great adroitness, tact and resourcefulness.

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  • In the older and larger towns it soon went beyond what the bishops thought proper to tolerate; conflicts ensued; and in the 13th century several bishops obtained decrees in the imperial court, either to suppress the Rat altogether, or to make it subject to their nomination, and more particularly to abolish the Ungeld, as detrimental to episcopal finances.

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  • The campaign for his nomination was conducted with the greatest adroitness by his friend, Marcus A.

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  • The National Democratic Convention declared for the immediate opening of the mints to the free and unlimited coinage of silver at the ratio with gold of 16 to 1; and it nominated for the presidency William Jennings Bryan of Nebraska, who also received the nomination of the People's party and of the National Silver party.

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  • In the same year he brought to an end the investiture struggle in England, in which Anselm, archbishop of Canterbury, had been engaged with King Henry I., by retaining himself exclusive right to invest with the ring and crozier, but recognizing the royal nomination .to vacate benefices and oath of fealty for temporal domains.

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  • The public service is recruited by nomination by the court of directors.

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  • In 1920 he was a prominent candidate for the presidential nomination at the Republican National Convention.

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  • His acceptance of the nomination, however, earned him the enmity of the southern Democrats, who prevented his appointment by Pierce as secretary of state and as minister to France in 1853.

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  • When Bute retired and George Grenville accepted the cares of official life, the higher post of first lord of the admiralty fell to Townshend's lot, but with his usual impetuosity he presumed to designate one of his satellites, Sir William Burrell (1732-1796), to a place under him at the board, and the refusal to accept the nomination led to his exclusion from the new administration.

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  • Pillow, Polk's intimate friend, did much to bring about the nomination.

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  • He refused a nomination to be United States minister to Japan, and through his friendship with Cornelius and William H.

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  • In 1888 in the National Republican convention he was a candidate for the presidential nomination, but withdrew his name in favour of Benjamin Harrison, whose offer to him in 1889 of the portfolio of state he refused.

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  • In 1839 he was a candidate for the Whig nomination, but by a secret ballot his enemies defeated him in the party convention, held in December of that year, and nominated William Henry, Harrison.

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  • In 1848, Zachary Taylor, a Mexican War hero, and hardly even a convert to the Whig party, defeated Clay for the nomination, Kentucky herself deserting her "favourite son."

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  • the royal family, and contributors of £50o or more to the funds), of the council of almoners (which administers the endowments), or of certain of the city companies; (2) by competition, on the nomination of a donation governor (for boys only), or from public elementary schools in London, certain city parishes and certain endowed schools elsewhere.

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  • At last, when the competition for the Grand Prix came on, Delaroche gave Millet to understand that he intended to secure the nomination of another, and thereupon Millet withdrew himself, and with his friend Marolle started in a little studio in the Rue de 1'Est.

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  • His attitude on this question made him very popular in America, and he was a strong, but unsuccessful, candidate for the Democratic nomination for the presidency in 1844.

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  • In the national Republican nominating conventions of 1880 and 1884 he was a candidate for the presidential nomination.

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  • While both sides were preparing for extremities, Balmaceda administered the government under dictatorial powers with a congress of his own nomination.

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  • In March 1849 he became secretary of state in the cabinet of President Zachary Taylor, to whose nomination and election his influence had contributed.

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  • Charles expressed his willingness to consent to the handing over of the administration to the control of a Protestant, in the case of a Roman Catholic sovereign, but the Opposition insisted on Charles's nomination of Monmouth as his successor, and the parliament was accordingly once more (28th of March) dissolved by Charles, while a royal proclamation ordered to be read in all the churches proclaimed the ill-deeds of the parliament and the king's affection for the Protestant religion.

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  • In the nomination of life peers, and in certain administrative matters the sovereign was advised by a council of state, whose twelve members were nominated for life and were principally past or present ministers.

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  • His nomination to the papacy by Henry, at Mainz, in September 1054, was made at the instance of a Roman deputation headed by Hildebrand, whose policy doubtless was to detach from the imperial interest one of its ablest supporters.

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  • The nomination of officers left to the Crown was reserved to the agents.

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  • (For the ancient magisterial office of consul see separate article above.) A consul, as such, is not invested with any diplomatic character, and he cannot enter on his official duties until a rescript, termed an exequatur (sometimes a mere countersign endorsed on the commission), has been delivered to him by the authorities of the state to which his nomination has been communicated by his own government.

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  • Pitt continued at his post; and at the general election which took place during the year he even accepted a nomination for the duke's pocket borough of Aldborough.

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  • Several fruitless conferences between the governor and the Indian chiefs, who were believed to be encouraged by the British, resulted in Harrison's advance with a force of militia and regulars to the Tippecanoe river, where (near the present Lafayette, Ind.) on the 7th of November 1811 he won over the Indians a victory which established his military reputation and was largely responsible for his subsequent nomination and election to the presidency of the United States.

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  • In 1828 after unsuccessful efforts to secure for him the command of the army, upon the death of Major-General Jacob Brown, and the nomination for the vice-president, on the ticket with John Quincy Adams, his friends succeeded in getting Harrison appointed as the first minister of the United States to Colombia.

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  • The majority of the city lictors were freedmen; they formed a corporation divided into decuries, from which the lictors of the magistrates in office were drawn; provincial officials had the nomination of their own.

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  • Yet it required four ballots in the national convention to overcome the reluctance of Webster's, Clay's and Scott's followers and secure the party nomination.

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  • The agricultural classes of the West regarded this as a means of relief, and Pendleton became their recognized leader and a candidate for the Democratic nomination to the presidency in 1868, but he failed to receive the requisite two-thirds majority.

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  • In 1903 a law (revised in 1908) was passed providing for the conduct at public cost of primary elections for the nomination of nearly all elective officers, and for the nomination of delegates to party nominating conventions; nominations for primary elections are made by petitions signed by at least ten voters (except in very small election districts) who make affidavit as to their party affiliations; the nominee thus indorsed must file a letter of acceptance.

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  • Under this act a " political party " is one which polled at least one-twentieth of the total number of votes cast in the next preceding election in the area for which the nomination is made; and in party conventions there must be one delegate from each election district, and one delegate for each Zoo votes cast by the party in the next preceding gubernatorial election.

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  • In 1882 he was elected mayor of Elmira, and in the same year was chosen lieutenant-governor of the state, having been defeated for nomination as governor by Grover Cleveland.

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  • During these years, and in 1892, when he tried to get the presidential nomination, he was prominent in working against Cleveland.

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  • Bryan; in the National Convention of 1900, however, the free-silver issue having been subordinated to anti-imperialism, he seconded Bryan's nomination.

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  • Candidates are nominated in writing by a nomination paper signed by a proposer and seconder, and subscribed by eight other assenting county electors of the division; and in the event of there being more valid nominations than vacancies a poll has to be taken in the manner prescribed by the Ballot Act 1872.

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  • The majority of the members of the committee are appointed by the council, usually out of their own body, and the remainder are appointed by the council on the nomination or recommendation of other bodies.

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  • The nomination and election of candidates and the procedure at the election are the same as have already been described in the case of the election of county councillors.

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  • In that of 1860 at Charleston he advocated the nomination of Jefferson Davis and opposed Stephen A.

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  • As presidential nominee of the Greenback and Anti-Monopolist parties, he polled 175,370 votes in 1884, when he had bitterly opposed the nomination by the Democratic party of Grover Cleveland, to defeat whom he tried to "throw" his own votes in Massachusetts and New York to the Republican candidate.

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  • In June 1908, by the nomination of his grandson, Lij Yasu (b.

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  • He had hoped to be made minister of finance, and was disappointed by the nomination of Necker, of whom he became a bitter opponent.

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  • His nomination by Lord John Russell to the vacant see of Hereford in December 1847 was again the signal for a violent and organized opposition; and his consecration in March 1848 took place in spite of a remonstrance by many of the bishops and the resistance of Dr John Merewether, the dean of Hereford, who went so far as to vote against the election when the conge d'elire reached the chapter.

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  • He was offered, but declined, a second nomination.

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  • Supported at Constantinople by two influential personages, Sigismund Bathory, prince of Transylvania (1581-98 and 1601-2), and the English ambassador, Edward Barton, and aided by a loan of 200,000 florins, Michael succeeded in procuring from the Divan the deposition of his enemy and his own nomination.

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  • The voivodes owed their nomination entirely to the Porte, and the great officers of the realm were appointed at their discretion.

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  • Prince Charles was an officer in the Prussian army, twenty-seven years of age, and was related to the French imperial family as well as to the royal house of Prussia: his nomination obtained not only the tacit consent and approval of his friend and kinsman King William of Prussia, but also the warm and more open support of Napoleon III.

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  • In 1847 the vigour with which Sumner denounced a Boston congressman's vote in favour of the Mexican War Bill made him the logical leader of the " Conscience Whigs," but he declined to accept their nomination for Congress.

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  • He took an active part in the organizing of the Free Soil party, in revolt at the Whigs' nomination of a slave-holding southerner for the presidency; and in 18 4 8 was defeated as a candidate for the national House of Representatives.

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  • In the Democratic convention at Baltimore, in 1852, Marcy was a prominent candidate for the presidential nomination, and from 1853 to 1857 he was secretary of state in the cabinet of President Pierce.

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  • The chief thing to note is the existence, for these countries, of a civil-ecclesiastical to law, that is to say, a body of regulations made by the - civil authority, with the consent, more or less explicit, co of the Church, about ecclesiastical matters, other than spiritual; these dispositions are chiefly concerned with the nomination or confirmation by the state of ecclesiastics to the most important benefices, and with the administration of the property of the Church; sometimes also with questions of jurisdiction, both civil and criminal, concerning the persons or property of the Church.

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  • Popes and sovereigns gradually encroached on the rights of the monks, until in Italy the pope had usurped the nomination of all abbots, and the king in France, with the exception of Cluny, Premontre and other houses, chiefs of their order.

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  • but declined the nomination in 1916.

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  • But, with a scruple which illustrated his character, he refused government nomination from Mole, and was defeated.

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  • In 1908 a direct primary law was passed applicable to all nominations except for presidential electors, school district officers and officers in cities of less than 5000 inhabitants; like public elections the primaries are made a public charge; nomination is by petition signed by a certain percentage (for state office, at least 1%; for district office, at least 2%; for sub-district or county office, at least 3%) of the party vote; the direct nominating system applies to the candidates for the United States Senate, the nominee chosen by the direct primaries of each party being the nominee of the party.

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  • The question of the nomination of this council at once drew the whole question within the domain of party politics.

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  • 2 Since 2905 there has been a direct nomination system of primaries for all officers except delegates to national nominating conventions.

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  • His war record and his great personal following, especially in the Grand Army of the Republic, contributed to his nomination for Vice-President in 1884 on the ticket with James G.

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  • In 1781 he became chief of the council of finance, and in 1783 he supported the nomination of Calonne as controller general.

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  • He was influential in securing the nomination of John C. Fremont at the June convention (1856), and of Abraham Lincoln in 1860.

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  • In 1860 he took an active part in the presidential campaign in behalf of Lincoln, in whose cabinet he was postmaster-general from 1861 until September 1864, when he resigned as a result of the hostility of the Radical Republican faction, who stipulated that Blair's retirement should follow the withdrawal of Fremont's name as a candidate for the presidential nomination in that year.

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  • He was an ardent supporter of the candidacy of Theodore Roosevelt for the Republican presidential nomination in 1912, and was in charge of the contests for seating the Roosevelt delegates in the national convention.

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  • He accepted the nomination as Vice-President in 1896, on the ticket with President McKinley, and was elected; but while still in office he died at Paterson, N.

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  • The nomination of Law to the controller-generalship, re-established for his benefit on the resignation of DArgenson (January 5, 1720), let loose still wilder speculation; till the day came when he could no longer face the terrible difficulty of meeting both private irredeemable shares with ~ variable return, and the credit notes redeemable at sight and guaranteed by the state.

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  • In 1852, and again in 1856, he was a candidate for the presidential nomination in the national Democratic convention, and though on both occasions he was unsuccessful, he received strong support.

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  • Through the death of his father in July of that year family cares and responsibilities devolved upon him, and thus his nomination to the chair of mathematics at the university of Padua, secured by the influence of the Marchese Guidubaldo with the Venetian senate, was welcome both as affording a relief from pecuniary embarrassment and as opening a field for scientific distinction.

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  • His discovery of the "Medicean Stars" was acknowledged by his nomination (July 1610) as philosopher and mathematician extraordinary to the grand-duke of Tuscany.

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  • One of the first measures adopted by them in Castile, before the union with Aragon, was to stop the nomination of foreigners to Spanish benefices by the pope.

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  • There had been much speculation as to what his post would be, and his nomination to the colonial office, then considered one of secondary rank, excited some surprise; but Mr Chamberlain himself realized how important that department had become.

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  • The secret ballot was adopted in 1891; the use of the voting machines was authorized in 1899; and the nomination of candidates by primaries was made mandatory in 1907.

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  • In 1907, under a direct primary law, the nomination of candidates for United States senator was transferred from the party convention directly to the people; and in 1909 the " Oregon plan " was adopted, whereby each candidate for the legislature must go on record as promising, or not, always to vote for the people's choice for United States senator; on the ballot which bears the name of each candidate for the legislature there appears a statement that he " promises," or that he " will not promise," to vote for the " people's choice."

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  • In the same year the state enacted a law providing for the non-partisan nomination of all judges, of all superintendents of public instruction and of regents of the state university; nominations are by petition, and there is a separate " official non-partisan ballot " bearing the names and addresses of the nominees and the titles of the office for which they are nominated.

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  • His nomination by President Wilson to the permanent rank of general was confirmed unanimously by the U.S. Senate Sept.

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  • Staveley selected Gordon, who had been made a brevet-major in December 1862 for his previous services, and the nomination was approved by the British government.

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  • The executive and legislative officials are chosen by the electors for a term of two years; the attorney general for four years; the judges of the supreme court of errors and the superior court, appointed by the general assembly on nomination by the governor, serve for eight, and the judges of the courts of common pleas (in Hartford, New London, New Haven, Litchfield and Fairfield counties) and of the district courts, chosen in like manner, serve for four years.

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  • academy award nomination.

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  • In 1976 Church sought the nomination for the democratic candidacy for president.

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  • commissary appointed in writing, shall preside at the Diocesan Nomination Board and have a casting vote.

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  • Upon learning the results of the eviction nomination, which placed Anthea Turner and himself in jeopardy, Eubank was characteristically ebullient.

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  • Bush also faces the prospect of a democratic filibuster in the Senate to block his latest nomination to the Supreme Court, Samuel Alito.

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  • Damon also garnered an Academy Award nomination for Best Actor for his work in the title role.

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  • unions may submit as many nominations as they wish, but each nomination must be signed by the union's General Secretary.

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  • Grammy nomination for the group from this album.

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  • Mr Wolfowitz is one of a small number of people being considered for the US nomination, administration insiders said.

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  • If you do not make a nomination we will pay the lump sum to your estate.

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  • In our opinion, Young's most recent masterwork is undoubtedly " The Shipping News " which won him a Golden Globe nomination.

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  • Students could receive a nomination for the Star Award in each lesson.

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  • The man who ran against Bill Clinton for the democratic nomination in 1992 now wants to be California's attorney general.

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  • In 1884 Blaine at last won the Republican Party presidential nomination.

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  • Pat Robertson used them to try to win the republican nomination for the presidency of the United States, but failed.

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  • nomination form please use the link below.

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  • nomination committees.

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  • nomination deadline for the NEC positions will be Friday 19 May at 5.00pm.

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  • Application Form for nomination of an Adjudicator Application form for nomination of an adjudicator.

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  • nomination for any election which arises during a meeting.

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  • nomination for Best actress.

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  • Oscar nomination for this - he was superb!

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  • Huffman won an Oscar nomination for her performance, and tho I've never been a pre-op male-to-female transsexual, it seemed persuasive enough.

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  • BONIFACE pope from S30 to 532, was by birth a Goth, and owed his election to the nomination of his predecessor, Felix IV., and to the influence of the Gothic king.

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  • In the beginning of 1772 his ambition was stimulated by the nomination to the 'second place in council in Bengal with a promise of the reversion of the governorship when Mr Cartier should retire.

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  • All bishoprics, abbeys and priories were in the royal nomination, the canonical institution belonging to the pope.

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  • The pope preserved the right to nominate to vacant benefices in curia and to certain benefices of the chapters, but all the others were in the nomination of the bishops or other inferior collators.

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  • He took part in the nomination of the counts and dukes; in the king's absence he presided over the royal tribunal; and he often commanded the armies.

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  • Its main features were strictly Presbyterian, but the minister was greatly superior to the elder, and the state had wide powers especially in the nomination of higher officers.

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  • In 1876, 1880 and 1884 he was a candidate for the presidential nomination, and in 1888 was nominated for vice-president on the ticket with Grover Cleveland, but was defeated in the election.

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  • The second was the nomination of Dr Miguel Juarez Celman for the presidential term commencing in October 1886.

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  • The prefect supervises the execution of the laws; has wide authority in regard to policing, public hygiene and relief of pauper children; has the nomination of various subordinate officials; and is in correspondence with the subordinate functionaries in his department, to whom he transmits the orders and instructions of the government.

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  • William, however, whose position had been strengthened by his nomination to the post of ruwaard of Brabant, determined to welcome Matthias and use him for his own purposes.

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  • In 1834 he received the Whig nomination for governor, but was defeated by William L.

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  • As the recognized leader of the new party, his nomination by the Republicans for the presidency in 1856 and in 1860 was regarded as certain; but in each instance he was put aside for another.

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  • In the interval between his nomination as Protector and the summoning of his first parliament in September 1654, Cromwell was empowered together with his council to legislate by ordinances; and eighty-two were issued in all, dealing meat of with numerous and various reforms and including the reorganization of the treasury, the settlement Lilburne and the anabaptists, and John Rogers and the Fifth Monarchy men, were prosecuted only on account of their direct attacks upon the government, and Cromwell in his broadminded and tolerant statesmanship was himself in advance of his age and his administration.

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  • In 1886 he was elected mayor of New York City, his nomination having been forced upon the Democratic Party by the strength of the other nominees, Henry George and Theodore Roosevelt; his administration (1887-1888) was thoroughly efficient and creditable, but he broke with Tammany, was not renominated, ran independently for re-election, and was defeated.

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  • Nomination is by the king for life.

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  • For some time after the occupation of Rome the pope, in order to substantiate the pretence that his spiritual freedom had been diminished, avoided the creation of cardinals and the nomination of bishops.

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  • The improvement thus signalized in the relations between Quirinal and Vatican was further exemplified on the 18th of October 1878, when the Italian government accepted a papal formula with regard to the granting of the royal exequatur for bishops, whereby they, upon nomination by the Holy See, recognized state control over, and made application for, the payment of their temporalities.

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  • In August 1532 Archbishop Warham died, and the king almost immediately afterwards intimated to Cranmer, who had accompanied the emperor in his campaign against the Turks, his nomination to the vacant see.

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  • With the approach of the presidential election of 1908, President Roosevelt reiterated his pledge not to accept another nomination, and threw his immense influence in favour of Mr Taft.

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  • For not only did the nomination of O'Neill's reputed son Matthew as his heir with the title of baron of Dungannon by the English king conflict with the Irish custom of tanistry which regulated the chieftainship of the Irish clans, but Matthew, if indeed he was O'Neill's son at all, was illegitimate; while Shane, Conn's eldest legitimate son, was not the man to submit tamely to any invasion of his rights.

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  • The emperor granted the petition, which indeed the procurator had permitted them to make, and further transferred the nomination of the high priest and the supervision of the temple from the procurator to Agrippa's brother, Herod of Chalcis.

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  • received a kingdom - first Chalcis, and then the tetrarchies of Philip and Lysanias - but, though he had the oversight of the Temple and the nomination of the high priest, and enjoyed a reputation for knowledge of Jewish customs and questions, he was unable to check the growing power of the Zealots.

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  • He himself declared that he did not desire nomination, but later agreed to take the Republican nomination if it should be offered him.

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  • But here as elsewhere the senate asserted its authority over the magistrates, and the view was finally held that the senate should not only suggest the need of nomination but also the name of the nominee.

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  • After the nomination, the imperium of the dictator was confirmed by a lex curiata (see CoMITIA).

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  • In the 14th century it passed to the Courtenays, and in 1698 Sir William Courtenay was confirmed in the right of holding court leet, view of frankpledge and the nomination of a portreeve, these privileges having been surrendered to James II.

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  • Four years later his party passed him by for William Henry Harrison, the hero of Tippecanoe, and Webster refused the proffered nomination for vice-president.

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  • chance he might have had in that year of receiving the presidential nomination.

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  • From the French governor of Corsica, the comte de Marbeuf, he procured many favours, among them being the nomination of the young Napoleon to the military school at Brienne in the east of France.

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  • Improving upon the procedure of the Convention in Vendemiaire 1795, Bonaparte procured the nomination of three consuls in an article of the new constitution; they were Bonaparte (First Consul), Cambaceres and Lebrun.

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  • He alone could ratify treaties of peace and alliance, and on his nomination fifty-four senators were added to the senate, which thereafter numbered one hundred and twenty members appointed by him alone.

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  • In June 1775, with a view to promoting the union of the colonies, he seconded the nomination of Washington as commander-in-chief of the army.

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  • It provided for municipal elections in January; for the election of a mayor for four years; for his recall at the end of two years if a majority of the registered voters so vote in the state election in November in the second year of his term; for the summary removal for cause by the mayor of any department head or other of his appointees; for a city council of one chamber of nine members, elected at large each for three years; for nomination by petition; for a permanent finance commission appointed by the governor; for the confirmation of the mayor's appointments by the state civil service commission; for the mayor's preparation of the annual budget (in which items may be reduced but not increased by the council), and for his absolute veto of appropriations except for school use.

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  • Raymund of Provence refused to accept their nomination, nominally on the pious ground that he did not wish to reign where Christ had suffered on the cross; though one may suspect that the establishment of a principality in Tripoli - in which he had been interrupted by the pressure of the pilgrims - was still the first object of his ambition.

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  • The assizes may speak of patriarch and king as conjoint seigneurs in Jerusalem; but as a matter of fact the king could secure the nomination of his own patriarch, and after Dagobert the patriarchs are, with the temporary exception of Stephen in 1128, the confidants and supporters of the kings.

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  • Four legati juridici (or simply juridici) of consular rank were appointed for Italy, who took over certain important judicial functions formerly exercised by local magistrates (cases of fideicommissa, the nomination of guardians).

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  • He still toiled on unofficially until, the objection of the senate having been met by the appointment of a new secretary of the treasury, his second nomination was approved, and he was able to proceed with direct negotiations, The English and American commissioners finally met at Ghent, and in the tedious and irritating discussions which ensued Gallatin took the leading part.

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  • From 1868 until his death he was put forward for nomination for the presidency at every Democratic convention save that of 1872.

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  • At the Democratic Convention for the nomination of a presidential candidate held at Baltimore in 1912, he led on 27 ballots, and had a clear majority on eight, but he was finally defeated by Woodrow Wilson of New Jersey.

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  • To accomplish this end it was necessary to unite among themselves, and union could only be secured by the nomination of some one who offended nobody.

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  • On the duke of Buckingham's nomination, Wesley was for six years a pupil at Charterhouse.

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  • The decisions of the conference, moderate though they were, in the end requiring merely the nomination of an international commission to investigate the state of the European provinces of Turkey, and the appointment by the sultan, with the approval of the powers, of governors-general for five years, were rejected by the Porte.

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  • The ordinary use of "hustings" at the present day for the platform from which a candidate speaks at a parliamentary or other election, or more widely for a political candidate's election campaign, is derived from the application of the word, first to the platform in the Guildhall on which the London court was held, and next to that from which the public nomination of candidates for a parliamentary election was formerly made, and from which the candidate addressed the electors.

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  • The Ballot Act of 1872 did away with this public declaration of the nomination.

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  • Jackson in December 1829 had already made known his own wish that Van Buren should receive the nomination.

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  • He was cordially received, but in February learned that his nomination had been rejected by the Senate on the 25th of January.

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  • Charged with being "a Northern man with Southern principles," he was frequently interrogated during the campaign, and his nomination obviously failed to arouse enthusiasm or even inspire confidence.

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  • He confidently expected to be nominated for president in 1844, and his famous letter of the 27th of April, in which he frankly opposed the immediate annexation of Texas, though doubtless contributing greatly to his defeat, was not made public until he felt practically sure of the nomination.

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  • The declaration is to the effect that the clergyman has not received the presentation in consideration of any sum of money, reward, gift, profit or benefit directly or indirectly given or promised by him or any one for him to any one; that he has not made any promise of resignation other than that allowed by the Clerical Resignation Bonds Act 1828; that he has not for any money or benefit procured the avoidance of the benefice; and that he has not been party to any agreement invalidated by sec. 3 sub-sec. 3 of the act which invalidates any agreement for the exercise of a right of patronage in favour or on the nomination of any particular person, and any agreement on the transfer of a right of patronage (a) for the retransfer of the right, or (b) for postponing payment of any part of the consideration for the transfer until a vacancy or for more than three months, or (c) for payment of interest until a vacancy or for more than three months, or (d) for any payment in respect of the date at which a vacancy occurs, or (e) for the resignation of a benefice in favour of any person.

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  • His services were acknowledged by a nomination as C.B.

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  • He opposed the nomination of Mr. Taft in 1912, but did not bolt his party.

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  • This speech made him the idol of the "silver" majority of the convention and brought him the Democratic nomination for the presidency on the following day.

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  • In 1904 although not actively a candidate for the Democratic nomination (which eventually went to Judge Parker), he was to the very last considered a possible nominee; and he strenuously opposed in the convention the repudiation by the conservative element of the stand taken in the two previous campaigns.

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  • In 1855 Gauss died and was succeeded by Dirichlet, who along with others made an effort to obtain Riemann's nomination as extraordinary professor.

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  • In the Republican national convention of 1876 Conkling sought nomination for the presidency, and after the disputed election of this year he took a prominent part in devising and securing the passage of a bill creating an electoral commission.

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  • He evaded the clause in the constitution prohibiting the election of a president for successive terms of office by invariably arranging for the nomination of some adherent of his own as chief of the executive, and then pulling the strings behind this figurehead.

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  • The Zulu country continued, however, excited and disturbed until the government of Natal in 1861 obtained the formal nomination of a successor to Panda; and Cetywayo was appointed.

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  • The agent chosen to preside at the nomination ceremony was Mr (afterwards Sir) Theophilus Shepstone, who was in charge of native affairs in Natal and had won in a 1 Bishop Schreuder, a Norwegian missionary long resident in Zululand, gave Sir Bartle Frere the following estimate of the three brothers who successively reigned over the Zulu: " Chaka was a really great man, cruel and unscrupulous, but with many great qualities.

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  • Not only was his stipend as Repetent discontinued, but his nomination to the office of professor extraordinarius, which had already been signed by the minister Karl Altenstein, was withheld.

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  • While in exile he was elected supreme commander of the Knights of the Golden Circle in Ohio and received the Democratic nomination for governor of Ohio, but was defeated.

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  • Muraviev, who already carried his nomination in his pocket, resented this condescension, and relegated Isvolsky to Belgrade and to Munich, where he had the rank of a minister plenipotentiary.

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  • In 1802 he entered parliament through the duke of Norfolk's nomination as member for Thetford, and married a widow with six children, Mrs Ord, who had a life interest in a comfortable income.

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  • In 1880 and 1888 he aspired actively to the Republican nomination for the presidency, but failed to obtain the requisite support in the Convention.

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  • General Caceres secured the nomination of the vicepresident Borgono as chief of the executive for the unexpired portion of the term of the late president Bermudez.

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  • A faction among the managers of the Republican party attempted to secure his nomination for a third term as president, and in the convention at Chicago in June 1880 he received a vote exceeding 300 during 36 consecutive ballots.

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  • So early as 1841 his reputation in this department was sufficient to secure for him the government nomination to the newly founded chair of Biblical criticism in the university of Edinburgh.

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  • The nomination at Oxford took place on the 29th of July, and at the close of the poll Sir Robert Inglis stood at the head, with Gladstone as his colleague.

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  • His chance for securing the nomination, however, was materially lessened by persistent charges which were brought against him by the Democrats that as a member of Congress he had been guilty of corruption in his relations with the Little Rock & Fort Smith and the Northern Pacific railways.'

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  • By the majority of Republicans, at least, he was considered to have cleared himself completely, and in the Republican national convention he missed by only twenty-eight votes the nomination for president, being finally beaten by a combination of the supporters of all the other candidates.

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  • At the Democratic National Convention in 1920 he had from the beginning strong support for the presidential nomination.

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  • Following his nomination he " stumped " the country, making the League of Nations the prominent issue but was overwhelmingly defeated by Warren G.

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  • to swamp the liberal majority in the upper house by the nomination of twenty-seven new peers; he availed himself of the temporary popularity of the monarchy after the Spanish campaign to summon a new Chamber of Deputies.

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  • could hardly do otherwise than ignore Errington's nomination, as he also ignored the nomination of Clifford, bishop of Clifton, and of Grant, bishop of Southwark; and, by what he humorously described as "the Lord's own coup d'etat," he appointed Manning to, the archiepiscopal see.

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  • He accepted, however, the Republican nomination as vice-president on a ticket headed by General Grant, and was elected; but he failed in 1872 to secure renomination.

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  • During the latest and darkest years of Domitian he deemed it prudent to withdraw from public affairs, but his financial abilities were recognized by his nomination in 94 or 95 to the praefectura aerarii militar y (ix.

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  • The formal oration of thanks for this nomination, described by Pliny himself as his gratiarum actio (iii.

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  • C., in 1860 he was the Virginia delegation's choice as candidate for the presidency of the United States, but was defeated for the nomination by Stephen A.

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  • Nomination or presentation on the part of the patron of the benefice is thus the first requisite in order that a clerk should become legally entitled to a benefice.

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  • He supported Suffolk over the king's marriage with Margaret of Anjou; but afterwards there arose some difference between them, due in part to a dispute about the nomination of the cardinal's nephew, Thomas Kempe, to the bishopric of London.

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  • Later, on the recommendation of Mercy and Vermond, she supported the nomination of Lomenie de Brienne in 1787, an appointment which, though widely approved at the time, was laid to the queen's blame when it ended in failure.

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  • In 1873 President Grant nominated him for chief justice of the United States, but in spite of his great learning and eminence at the bar, his ante-war record and the feeling of distrust experienced by many members of the senate on account of his inconsistency, aroused such vigorous opposition that his nomination was soon withdrawn.

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  • There is no longer a Charles X.," and it was he who secured the nomination of Louis Philippe as lieutenant-general of the kingdom.

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  • In 1896 he was a candidate for the presidential nomination in the Republican national convention.

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  • He was very popular with his associates and at the age of 29 was offered the Democratic nomination for the N.Y.

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  • In the autumn of 1852 he was an unsuccessful candidate for nomination for the presidency by the Whig National Convention, and he went out of office on the 4th of March 1853.

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  • In February 1856, while he was travelling abroad, he was nominated for the presidency by the American or Know Nothing party, and later this nomination was also accepted by the Whigs; but in the ensuing presidential election, the last in which the Know Nothings and the Whigs as such took any part, he received the electoral votes of only one state, Maryland.

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  • Three months after his nomination he forbade anything of any kind whatever to be printed concerning his administration, thus refusing advice as well as censure.

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  • In 1880 he received sixty-five votes on the first ballot for the presidential nomination at the Democratic National Convention at Cincinnati.

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  • The Republican party in the state was at that time weakened by the quarrels between the " Stalwart " and " Halfbreed " factions within its ranks; and the Democrats were thus given an initial advantage which was greatly increased by the Republicans' nomination for governor of Charles J.

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  • But the cry of Federal interference was raised as a result of the methods employed in securing his nomination, and this, together with the party division and the popularity of Cleveland, brought about Cleveland's election by the unprecedented plurality of 192,854.

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  • v.) of Maine, had received the nomination only after a contest in which violent personal animosities were aroused.

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  • In the same year he was elected parish priest of Glarus, in spite of the pope's nomination of Heinrich Goldli, an influential pluralist of Zurich, whom Zwingli found it necessary to buy off at an expense of more than a hundred gulden.

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  • He never held political office, although he was a candidate for the Republican senatorial nomination against Senator Thomas C. Platt in 1897.

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  • The split broke up the rule of the "regency," Marcy accepting the " Hunker " support and a seat in Polk's cabinet, while Wright, Butler and Van Buren joined the " Barnburners," a step preliminary to Van Buren's acceptance of the " Free Soil " nomination for president in the campaign of 1848.

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  • When, on the 2nd of May 1840, some time after the nomination by the Whig party of William Henry Harrison for the Presidency, Greeley began the publication of a new weekly campaign paper, The Log Cabin, it sprang at once into a great circulation; 40,000 copies of the first number were sold, and it finally rose to 80,000.

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  • His active hostility to Seward did much to prevent the success of that statesman, and to bring about instead the nomination of Abraham Lincoln.

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  • He expected their support, on account of his attitude toward the South and hostility to Grant, but he thought it a mistake to give him their formal nomination.

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  • He had resigned his editorship of The Tribune immediately after the nomination; he now resumed it cheerfully; but it was soon apparent that his powers had been overstrained.

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  • In the convention he opposed the nomination of Mr Blaine, and in a speech which attracted considerable Claas Martenszen van Roosevelt (or Rosenvelt) settled in New Amsterdam in 1649; his son Claas (or Nicholas) in 1700 - I was a New York alderman of the Leislerian party; in the next three generations, Johannes, Cornelius and Jacobus (James) were merchants and (in 1748-67,1785-1801and 1797-99 and 1809, respectively) aldermen of New York; in the third generation the family became allied with the Schuylers.

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  • attention for its vigour and courage advocated the nomination of Senator George F.

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  • After Mr Blaine's nomination, however, he supported him in the campaign as the chosen candidate of the party, in spite of the fact that an important wing of the Republican party "bolted" the nomination and espoused the candidacy of Grover Cleveland, who was elected president.

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  • It was very commonly believed at the time that this nomination for the vice-presidency was participated in and heartily approved of by the machine politicians or "bosses" of the State of New York in their belief that it would result in his elimination from active political life.

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  • Immediately after Ms election he publicly declared that he would not accept the nomination for the presidency in 1908, and he adhered to that pledge in spite of great popular pressure brought to bear upon him to accept the nomination of the party for another term.

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  • The nomination and election of President Taft, who had been a member of Mr Roosevelt's cabinet, was very largely due to the latter's great influence in the party.

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  • Blaine in 1884, when he had vigorously opposed his nomination in the convention on moral grounds.

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  • The reply to this criticism is that Mr Blaine was the choice of the majority of the party, and that while Mr Roosevelt felt free to fight within the party vigorously for reform, he did not feel that the nomination justified a schism like that which occurred in the Democratic party over the free silver issue in 1896 - a schism which remained afterwards a hopeless weakness in that party.

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  • His record in the war for efficiency and personal gallantry no doubt contributed largely to his nomination and election as governor of the state of New York; but he attained the governorship not on this ground alone.

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  • Formerly, where no oversman was named in the submission, and no power given to the arbiters to name one, the proceedings were abortive if the arbiters disagreed, unless the parties consented to a nomination.

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  • They proposed the impeachment of the minister responsible for the nomination of the chiefs of the districts, and declared that they would take no part in revising the constitution.

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  • A primary law enacted in 1905 authorizes the county convention of any party to provide for the nomination of candidates for county offices and the state legislature by direct vote.

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  • He was a prominent candidate for the Republican presidential nomination in 1876.

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  • In 1892 he was instrumental in bringing about the third nomination of Mr Cleveland, and took an influential part in the ensuing presidential campaign; but in 1896, disapproving of the "free-silver" agitation, he refused to support his party's candidate, Mr W.

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  • On the 29th of November 1609 Pieter Both was chosen by the states-general, on the nomination of the Dutch East India Company, as first governor-general of Netherlands India.

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  • After his arrival in Basel, he received a complimentary answer, together with the nomination to the deanery of Deventer, the income of which was reckoned at 600 ducats.

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  • This nomination was accompanied with an intimation that more was in store for him, and that steps would be taken to provide for him the income, viz., 3000 ducats, which was necessary to qualify for the cardinal's hat.

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  • Claudius Glicia, but the nomination was at once overruled.

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  • In 1908 the General Assembly passed a law providing for annual direct primary elections (outside of Baltimore; and making the Baltimore special primary law applicable to state as well as city officials), but, as regards state officers, making only a slight improvement upon previous conditions inasmuch as the county or district is the unit and the vote of county or district merely " instructs " delegates to the party's state nominating convention, representation in which is not strictly in proportion to population, the rural counties having an advantage over Baltimore; no nomination petition is required.

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  • In the same year a separate law was passed providing for primary elections for the choice of United States senators; but here also the method is not that of nomination by a plurality throughout the state, but by the vote of counties and legislative districts, so that this measure, like the other primary law, is not sufficiently direct to give Baltimore a vote proportional to its population.

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  • At an early age he was left a penniless orphan, and his education was acquired in a small country school until he procured, mainly by his own energy, a nomination to the Military Academy.

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  • In 1872 he was nominated for the presidency by the "Bourbon" Democrats, who refused to support Horace Greeley, awl by the "Labour Reformers"; he declined the nomination but received 21, 559 votes.

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  • He resigned the governorship in 1905 on being elected to the U.S. Senate, and was reelected for two succeeding terms. He was an unsuccessful candidate for the presidential nomination at the Republican National Convention in 1908.

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  • They were formerly given on the nomination of fellows.

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  • In 1845 he declined the Democratic nomination for governor, and also an appointment to the seat in the United States Senate made vacant by the resignation of Judge Levi Woodbury.

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  • When the Democratic national convention met at Cincinnati in June 1856, Pierce was an avowed candidate for renomination, but as his attitude on the slavery question, and especially his subserviency to the South in supporting the pro-slavery party in the Territory of Kansas, had lost him the support of the Northern wing of his party, the nomination went to James Buchanan.

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  • The president is given a free hand in choosing his cabinet ministers; but for most other appointments, whether or not they are by law in his sole gift, the senators belonging to the presidents party have practically controlled the selections for offices lying within their respective states, and a nomination made by the president against the will of the senator concerned will generally be disapproved by the Senate.

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  • As the desire to dominate primaries was found to lead to many abuses, both in the way of manipulating the lists of party voters and in the unfair management of the primary meetings themselves, a movement was started for reforming the system, which, beginning soon after 1890, gathered so much support that now in the large majority of the states laws have been enacted for regulating the proceedings at primary nomination meetings.

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  • It then proceeds to receive the nomination of various aspirants to the position of party candidate for the presidency.

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  • In 1873 he removed from Cincinnati to Fremont, his intention being to withdraw from public life; but in 1875 the Republican party in Ohio once more selected him as its candidate for the governorship. He accepted the nomination with great reluctance.

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  • The "sound-money campaign" in Ohio having attracted the attention of the whole country, Hayes was marked out as a candidate for the presidency, and he obtained the nomination of the Republican National Convention of 1876, his chief competitor being James G.

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  • Nominated chief justice of the Supreme Court of the United States in 1795, he presided during the August term, but the Senate refused to confirm the nomination, apparently because of his opposition to the Jay Treaty.

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  • Apart from his personal expenses such as postage, travelling expenses, &c., a candidate is prohibited from spending anything himself to promote either his nomination or his election, but he is allowed to contribute to the treasury of the political committee.

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  • In 1860, not being quite ready to ally himself wholly with the Republican party, he declined to be a candidate for the Republican nomination for the vice-presidency, and supported the Bell and Everett ticket.

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  • In 1903 he secured the nomination of George B.

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  • Thereupon William Jennings Bryan, who had looked with favour upon Clark, declared that he would not support him so long as he was backed by Tammany, threw his influence on the side of Woodrow Wilson and secured his nomination.

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  • Cox secured the nomination.

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  • Practical Save in its own metropolitan province, it took no Applica- part in the nomination of bishops; the provincial tions of the or regional councils were held without its authori- Theory, zation; their judgments and regulations were carried out without any suggestion that they should be ratified by Rome.

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  • The practice of the nomination of bishops by the Curia and of papal recommendation to prebends and benefices of every kind grew daily more general, and the number of appeals to Rome and exemptions granted to abbeys and even to simple churches increased continually.

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  • The religious affairs of England especially engaged his attention; and the nomination of Cardinal Pole as his legate to that country, on the death of Edward VI.

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  • In 1839 he made an unsuccessful contest for the United States senatorship. In December of that year the Whigs, relying upon his record in Congress as a sufficient declaration of political faith, nominated him for vice-president on the ticket with William Henry Harrison, expecting that the nomination would win support for the party in the South.

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  • The majority of the annexationists, however, would not support him, and he had further to meet the opposition of Van Buren, who had failed to secure the nomination in the regular Democratic convention, and of James K.

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  • Tyler accepted the Baltimore nomination, but on the 20th of August withdrew from the contest.

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  • He was about to go on leave of absence in order to be married in Baltimore when he received his nomination to the command of the Army of the Tennessee, Grant's and Sherman's old army, which was to take part under Sherman's supreme command in the campaign against Atlanta (1864).

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  • This nomination was made by Sherman and entirely approved by Grant, who had the highest opinion of McPherson's military and personal qualities.

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  • In France, under the Concordat, the sovereign - and under the republic the president - had the right of nomination.

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  • In all cases the nomination or election is subject to confirmation by the Holy See.

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  • In 1905 the latter was nominated grand master, but the pope reserves the joint right of nomination.

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  • Gresham was a candidate for the Republican presidential nomination in 1884 and 1888, in the latter year leading for some time in the balloting.

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  • In common with the rest of the "Stalwarts," he worked hard for the nomination of Gen.

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  • His nomination was coldly received by the public; and when, after his election and accession, he actively engaged on behalf of Conkling in the great conflict with Garfield over the New York patronage, the impression was widespread that he was unworthy of his position.

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  • In 1855 he took a prominent part in organizing the Republican party in Pennsylvania, and in 1856 was a delegate to the Republican National Convention, in which he opposed the nomination of John C. Fremont.

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  • At the national convention held in Buffalo, N.Y., on the 9th and Toth of August 1848, they secured the nomination to the presidency of exPresident Martin Van Buren, who had failed to secure nomination by the Democrats in 1844 because of his opposition to the annexation of Texas, and of Charles Francis Adams, of Massachusetts, for the vice-presidency, taking as their "platform" a Declaration that Congress, having "no more power to make a slave than to make a king," was bound to restrict slavery to the slave states, and concluding, "we inscribe on our banner `Free Soil, Free Speech,Free Labor and Free Man,' and under it we will fight on and fight ever, until a triumphant victory shall reward our exertions."

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  • Consequently where the right of patronage (the right of the patron to present to the bishop the person whom he has nominated to become rector or vicar of the parish to the benefice of which he claims the right of advowson) remains attached to the manor, it is called an advowson appendant, and passes with the estate by inheritance The distinction between nomination to a living and presentation is to be noted.

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  • Nomination is the power, by virtue of a manor or otherwise, to appoint a clerk to the patron of a benefice, to be by him presented to the ordinary.

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  • Nomination and presentation, though generally used in law for the same thing, must be so distinguished, for it is possible that the rights of nomination may be in one person, and the rights of presentation in another.

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  • Sandys, Constitution of Athens c. 8 note 1, c. 22 § 5, note); in fact, at a date not known the mixed system of Aristides gave place to double sortition, in which the first nomination also was by lot.

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  • In 1824 he failed to secure re-election, and occupied himself with his judicial duties until his nomination as councillor of state in 1827.

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  • The succession is vested in the heirs male of Leopold I., and should they ever make complete default the throne will be declared vacant, and a national assembly composed of the two chambers elected in double strength will make a fresh nomination.

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  • In 1894" a new article numbered 61 was inserted in the constitution providing that " in default of male heirs the king can nominate his successor with the assent of the two chambers, and if no such nomination has been made the throne shall be vacant," when the original procedure of the constitution would be followed.

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  • Meanwhile from 1692 onwards brighter prospects were opened out to the unfortunate Belgians by the nomination by the Spanish king of Maximilian Emanuel, elector of Bavaria, to be governorgeneral with well-nigh sovereign powers.

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  • In 1896 he became vicar of Portsea, when his success in administering a large working-class parish led in 1901 to his nomination as bishop suffragan of Stepney in the East End of London.

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  • In 1331 he likewise declined the nomination of the Massachusetts Democrats for secretary of state.

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  • In 1842 he declined a renomination to the state legislature and attempted unsuccessfully to secure a nomination to Congress.

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  • The Illinois State Convention of the Republican party, held at Decatur on the 9th and 10th of May 1860, amid great enthusiasm declared Abraham Lincoln its first choice for the presidential nomination, and instructed the delegation to the National Convention to cast the vote of the state as a unit for him.

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  • On the third ballot the 502 votes formerly given to Simon Cameron' were given to Lincoln, who received 2312 votes to 180 for Seward, and without taking another ballot enough votes were changed to make Lincoln's total 354 (2 33 being necessary for a choice) and the nomination was then made unanimeus.

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  • the placetum regium, recursus ab abusu, nominatio regia, afid that of vetoing the nomination of personae minus gratae.

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  • Although, with the exception of Seward, he was the most prominent Republican in the country, and had done more against slavery than any other Republican, he failed to secure the nomination for the presidency in 1860, partly because his views on the question of protection were not orthodox from a Republican point of view, and partly because the old line Whig element could not forgive his coalition with the Democrats in the senatorial campaign of 1849; his uncompromising and conspicuous anti-slavery record, too, was against him from the point of view of "availability."

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  • Toward the end of his life he gradually drifted back toward his old Democratic position, and made an unsuccessful effort to secure the nomination of the Democratic party for the presidency in 1872.

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  • He was a candidate for the Republican nomination for the presidency in 1876, and at the national convention of his party received 124 votes on the first ballot; the nomination, however, finally went to Rutherford B.

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  • At the Democratic National Convention in 1920 he had strong support for the presidential nomination, standing second on the first six ballots.

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  • The three officials of importance whose nomination is mentioned by the historians in addition to that of the governor were the commander of the bodyguard, the minister of finance and the judge.

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  • His power was now already considerable; and in 1788 he added to it by securing his nomination to the pashalik of Iannina by a characteristic trick.

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  • The Bondevenlige, or philo-peasant party, which objected to the king's right of nomination and preferred a one-chamber system, now separated from the National Liberals on this point.

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  • Some five years later, on the nomination of the duke of Wellington, William Broughton was sent out to work in this enormous jurisdiction as archdeacon of Australia.

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  • He nominates the Sheikh ul-Islam or mufti (q.v.) of Constantinople (grand mufti), who is his representative in the imamate and issues judgments in points of faith and law from which there is no appeal; but the nomination must fall on one of the mollahs, 2 who form the upper stratum of the hierarchy of ulema.

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  • Being an ardent expansionist, he voted for the recognition of the independence of Texas in 1837 and for the joint annexation resolution of 1845, and advocated the nomination and election of James K.

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  • The Germans of Wisconsin unsuccessfully urged his nomination for governor by the Republican party in 1859.

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  • Seward; he was on the commi ttee which drew up the platform and served on the committee which announced his nomination to Abraham Lincoln.

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  • In 1884 he was a leader in the Independent (or Mugwump) movement against the nomination of James G.

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  • He succeeded Curtis as editorial writer for Harper's Weekly in 1892-1898, in which he did much for civil service reform and for Cleveland's nomination and election in 1892.

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  • In one instance a certain clan has the right to nominate the principal chief over an entire district; though it is known as the ruling clan, its rule is mainly confined to this nomination, and to decision for or against war.

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  • A common practice is for the holder of a high title to nominate a successor; and his nomination is generally confirmed by the chiefs, or heads of households, with whom the right of election rests.

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  • In his thirteenth year his father died, leaving the family well-to-do; the home at Woodford was broken up, as being unnecessarily large; and in 1848 William Morris went to Marlborough, where his father had bought him a nomination.

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  • The direct primary law, however, which was passed immediately afterwards by the legislature, was declared unconstitutional by the supreme court of the state, as were a second law of the same sort passed soon afterwards and a third law of 1908, which provided for direct nominations of all officers and an "advisory" nomination of United States senators.

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  • After strong opposition the nomination was confirmed, on the r 5th of March 1836, by the Senate.

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  • He was trained, partly at Paris, for the profession of architect, but his opportune assistance to two German nobles in a tavern brawl obtained for him a nomination to the military school of Munich.

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  • They provided (inter alia) for a non-official majority in all of the provincial councils, but not in that of the governor-general; for an elaborate system of election of members by organized constituencies; for nomination where direct election is not appropriate; and for the separate representation of Mahommedans and other special interests.

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  • In 1854, having failed to secure the nomination for senator from the "Know-Nothing" Party, which he had recently joined, he became a leader of the "People's Party," as the Republican Party was at first called in Pennsylvania.

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  • His prominence as a candidate first for the presidential and then for the vice-presidential nomination in the Republican national convention of 1860 led to his being selected by President Lincoln as secretary of war.

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  • In the Republican national convention of 1876 he took an influential part in preventing the nomination of James G.

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  • The most modest and one of the most illustrious of the founders of modern palaeontology, Lartet's work had previously been publicly recognized by his nomination as an officer of the Legion of Honour; and in 1848 he had had the offer of a political post.

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  • Moreover, it was an affront, in particular, for the sons of Walid I., who already had considered the nomination of Yazid II.

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  • As time went on, nomination to an office was more and more generally considered a step to wealth.

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  • Up to the time of his nomination for the presidency, the biographer of Jackson finds nothing to record but military exploits in which he displayed perseverance, energy and skill of a very high order, and a succession of personal acts in which he showed himself ignorant, violent, perverse, quarrelsome and astonishingly indiscreet.

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  • His opposition to slavery, however, together with his popularity - won by the successes, hardships and dangers of his exploring expeditions, and by his part in the conquest of California - led to his nomination, largely on the ground of "availability," for the presidency in 1856 by the Republicans (this being their first presidential campaign), and by the National Americans or "Know-Nothings."

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  • The only certain fact is that Madison, whatever were his personal feelings in this matter, acted according to the wishes of a majority of the Republicans; but whether in doing so he was influenced by the desire of another nomination is largely a matter of conjecture.

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  • It was not, however, until 1896, when he personally managed the canvass that resulted in securing the Republican presidential nomination for William McKinley at the St Louis Convention (at which he was a delegate), that he became known throughout the United States as a political manager of great adroitness, tact and resourcefulness.

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  • In the older and larger towns it soon went beyond what the bishops thought proper to tolerate; conflicts ensued; and in the 13th century several bishops obtained decrees in the imperial court, either to suppress the Rat altogether, or to make it subject to their nomination, and more particularly to abolish the Ungeld, as detrimental to episcopal finances.

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  • The campaign for his nomination was conducted with the greatest adroitness by his friend, Marcus A.

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  • The National Democratic Convention declared for the immediate opening of the mints to the free and unlimited coinage of silver at the ratio with gold of 16 to 1; and it nominated for the presidency William Jennings Bryan of Nebraska, who also received the nomination of the People's party and of the National Silver party.

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  • In the same year he brought to an end the investiture struggle in England, in which Anselm, archbishop of Canterbury, had been engaged with King Henry I., by retaining himself exclusive right to invest with the ring and crozier, but recognizing the royal nomination .to vacate benefices and oath of fealty for temporal domains.

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