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nomenclature

nomenclature

nomenclature Sentence Examples

  • The committee of the Royal Geographical Society settled the existing nomenclature of the three great oceans.

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  • In the time of Alexander the nomenclature was reversed, the right arm being known as Pallacopas.

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  • The nomenclature of acids follows the same general lines as that for binary compounds.

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  • The first sufficient explorations for cartographical record were made by John Smith in 1614, and his map was long the basis - particularly in its nomenclature - of later maps.

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  • To follow Baeyer's results we must explain his nomenclature of the reduced benzene derivatives.

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  • Although for the purposes of geographical nomenclature, boundaries formed by a coast-line - that is, by depressions of the earth's solid crust below the ocean level - are most easily recog- Political nized and are of special convenience; and although such divisions.

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  • For the rest, as regards the question of nomenclature, Reid everywhere unites common sense and reason, making the former "only another name for one branch or degree of reason."

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  • More than half the nomenclature of the map is derived from Orosius, an annotated Anglo-Saxon version of which had been produced by King Alfred (871-901).

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  • Under the empire the nomenclature continued with some changes.

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  • Supan published a chart of the oceans' with a suggested nomenclature based on these principles; and the larger forms in the Prince of Monaco's great chart also are named in accordance with the rule.

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  • Supan published a chart of the oceans' with a suggested nomenclature based on these principles; and the larger forms in the Prince of Monaco's great chart also are named in accordance with the rule.

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  • The use of language and nomenclature during the time of Norman rule in the two countries forms a remarkable contrast, and illustrates the circumstances of the two as they have just been sketched.

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  • But progress was made difficult, in consequence of the clumsy and irregular nomenclature employed.

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  • This example is similar to cases among the Polychaeta where a true nephridium is provided with a large funnel, a coelomostome, according to the nomenclature of Lankester.

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  • This nomenclature was adopted by P. A.

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  • The nomenclature or " lettering " of maps is a subject deserving special attention.

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  • The old town lies low, and it is traversed by a great number of narrow canals or " fleets " (Fleeten) - for the same word which has left its trace in London nomenclature is used in the Low German city - which add considerably to the picturesqueness of the meaner quarters, and serve as convenient channels for the transport of goods.

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  • Naturalists who deal specially with museum collections have been compelled, it is true, for other reasons to attach an increasing importance to what is called the type specimen, but they find that this insistence on the individual, although invaluable from the point of view of recording species, is unsatisfactory from the point of view of scientific zoology; and propositions for the amelioration of this condition of affairs range from a refusal of Linnaean nomenclature in such cases, to the institution of a division between master species for such species as have been properly revised by the comparative morphologist, and provisional species for such species as have been provisionally registered by those working at collections.

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  • In Britain it seems to have been positively unknown until quoted some years after its completion by a cataloguecompiler on account of some peculiarities of nomenclature which it presented.

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  • Comyn partly explored the northern and western affluents of the Ghazal, and threw some light on the puzzling hydrography and nomenclature of those tributaries.

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  • In the Lavoisierian nomenclature acids were regarded as binary oxygenated compounds, the associated water being relegated to the position of a mere solvent.

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  • It is almost certain that the distal of these two segments really belongs to the thigh, but the ordinary nomenclature will be used in the present article, as this character is of great importance in discriminating families, and the two segments in question are referred to the trochanter by most systematic writers.

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  • arbitrari, to examine or judge), a term derived from the nomenclature of Roman law, and applied to an arrangement for taking, and abiding by, the judgment of a selected person in some disputed matter, instead of carrying it to the established courts of justice.

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  • We find a distinct and organized profession; we find a system of treatment, especially in regard to injuries, which it must have been the work of long experience to frame; we meet with a nomenclature of parts of the body substantially the same (according to Daremberg) as that employed long afterwards in the writings of Hippocrates; in short, we find a science and an organization which, however imperfect as compared with those of later times, are yet very far from being in their beginning.

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  • We find a distinct and organized profession; we find a system of treatment, especially in regard to injuries, which it must have been the work of long experience to frame; we meet with a nomenclature of parts of the body substantially the same (according to Daremberg) as that employed long afterwards in the writings of Hippocrates; in short, we find a science and an organization which, however imperfect as compared with those of later times, are yet very far from being in their beginning.

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  • South of Oristano and west of the districts last described, and traversed by the railway from Oristano to Cagliari, is the Campidano (often divided in ordinary nomenclature into the Campidano of Oristano and the Campidano of Cagliari), a low plain, the watershed of which, near S.

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  • If we are to accept and profit by Dorpfeld's nomenclature, we must be satisfied that, in their later historic habitats, both Lycians and Carians showed unmistakable signs of having formerly possessed the civilizations attributed to them in prehistoric times - signs which research has hitherto wholly failed to find.

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  • In the first of these books his nomenclature is unfortunate; his division of ethical theories into the " unpsychological," " idiopsychological," and the " hetero-psychological," is incapable of historical justification; his exposition of single ethical systems is, though always interesting and suggestive, often arbitrary and inadequate, being governed by dialectical exigencies rather than historical order and perspective.

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  • The two appendixes attached to the upper lobe or lobus pyramidalis, and known in modern nomenclature as processus pyramidalis and processus papillaris, were described respectively as the "finger" of the liver and as the "offshoot."

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  • European geographers have been accustomed to divide the islands into three groups for purposes of nomenclature, calling the northern group the Parry Islands, the central the Beechey Islands and the southern the Coffin or Bailey Islands.

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  • Beechey's nomenclature, it may be added that he called a large bay on the south of Peel Island Fitton Bay, and a bay on the south-west of Buckland Island Walker Bay.

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  • But it seems possible that the tradition of marine nomenclature had never perished; that the 'AyaOov SaL�ovos vijvos was really a misunderstanding of some form like Agdaman, while Ni crot Bapouavac survived as Lanka Balus, the name applied by the Arabs to the Nicobars.

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  • Unfortunately he was too soon in the field to avail himself, even had he been so minded, of the convenient mode of nomenclature brought into use by Linnaeus.

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  • The classification was modified, chiefly on the old lines of Willughby and Ray, and certainly for the better; but no scientific nomenclature was adopted, which, as the author subsequently found, was a change for the worse.

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  • Hence it is that Gmelin appears as the authority for so much of the nomenclature now in use.

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  • 4 These are, according to modern nomenclature, Tyrannus carolinensis and (as before mentioned) T.

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  • But the appeal to the verbally inspired Bible was stronger than that to a church hopelessly divided; the Bible, and not the consent of the universal church, became the touchstone of the reformed orthodoxy; in the nomenclature of the time, " evangelical " arose in contradistinction to " Catholic," while, in popular parlance, the " protest " of the Reformers against the " corruptions of Rome " led to the invention of the term " Protestant," which, though nowhere assumed in the official titles of the older reformed churches, was early used as a generic term to include them all.

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  • During the administration of Miguel Tacon Havana was improved by many important public works; his name is frequent in the nomenclature of the city.

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  • It would seem then, (1) that popular nomenclature included under the term " sophist " all teachers - whether professors, or like Socrates, amateurs - who communicated, not artistic skill, nor philosophical theory, but a general or liberal education; (2) that, of those who were commonly accounted sophists, some professed culture, some forensic rhetoric, some political rhetoric, some eristic, some (i.e.

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  • But more than this: whereas in the nomenclature of Plato's contemporaries Protagoras, Gorgias, Socrates, Dionysodorus and Isocrates were all of them sophists, Plato himself, in his careful investigation summarized above, limits the meaning of the term so that it shall include the humanists and the eristics only.

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  • The system of partitioning, and also the nomenclature, vary in the different provinces; but generally it may be said that the subdivision or tahsil is the ultimate unit of administration.

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  • It is true that in nomenclature the word " servi" is not infrequently used (e.g.

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  • But in 1877, in the M athematische Annalen, xii., he gave a paper " On the Place of Quaternions in the Ausdehnungslehre," in which he condemns, as far as he can, the nomenclature and methods of Hamilton.

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  • The peoples of the south (Lucanians, Bruttians, Mamertines) show a Greek principle of nomenclature (Mommsen, Unterital.

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  • Its scanty nomenclature is almost wholly derived from the " Historiae adversum paganos " of Paulus Orosius (418).

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  • It seems that confusion and trouble will be best avoided by abstaining from the introduction of the non-evident somites, the ocular and the praegenital, into the numerical nomenclature of the component somites of the three great body regions.

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  • Like that of other Byzantine writers, Chalcondyles' chronology is defective, and his adherence to the old Greek geographical nomenclature is a source of confusion.

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  • He acted as president of the International Congress held at Geneva in 1892 for revising the nomenclature of the fatty acid series.

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  • Having regard to the destruction of visible evidences of antiquity in London, both through accidental agencies such as the great fire, and through inevitable modernizing influences, it is well that historical associations in nomenclature are preserved in a great measure unimpaired.

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  • Havana cigars are, as regards form, classification, method of putting up and nomenclature, the models followed by manufacturers of all classes of the goods.

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  • The question of the nomenclature of the group of roads between the Via Ardeatina and the Via Ostiensis is somewhat difficult, and much depends on the view taken as to the site of Laurentum.

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  • Although put forward by the highest international authority recognized by geographers the system of nomenclature has not been adopted universally.

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  • For the sake of uniformity it is to be hoped that the system of nomenclature recommended by the International Geographical Congress will ultimately be adopted.

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  • The nomenclature assigned to these two principal divisions of the Sporozoa by different writers has varied according to the particular character on which they have primarily based the arrangement.

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  • 26), who had seen a specimen in the Lisbon museum; and, though knowing it had already been received into scientific nomenclature, he called it anew Microdactylus marcgravii.

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  • Whether the division of the lobus dexter into two divisions - (i) lobus dexter proper and (2) lobus quadratus, as in modern anatomical nomenclature - was also assumed in Babylonian hepatoscopy, is not certain, but the groove separating the right lobe into two sections - the fossa venae umbilicalis - was recognized and distinguished by the designation of "river of the liver."

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  • C. Fraser's Gifford Lectures, or in earlier times in the writings of Christian Wolff, whose sciences, according to the slightly different nomenclature which Kant imposed on them, were " rational psychology," " rational cosmology," and " rational theology."

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  • Flahault and Schroter, Phytogeographicol Nomenclature: reports and propositions (Zurich, 1910).

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  • It is true indeed that in zoological nomenclature some of these are distinguished as "voles," but this is not in accord with popular usage, where such creatures - come under the designation either of water-rats or field-mice.

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  • Apart from its intrinsic merits as a learned and valuable addition to classification, this work is interesting in the history of ornithology because of the wholesale changes of nomenclature it introduced as the result of much diligence and zeal in the application of the strict rule of priority to the names of birds.

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  • The triple summit of Beacon Hill, of which no trace remains to-day (or possibly a reference to the three hills of the then peninsula, Beacon, Copp's and Fort) led to the adoption of the name Trimountaine for the peninsula,-a name perpetuated variously in present municipal nomenclature as in Tremont; but on the 17th of September 1630, the date adopted for anniversary celebrations, it was ordered that " Trimountaine shall be called Boston," after the borough of that name in Lincolnshire, England, of which several of the leading settlers had formerly been prominent citizens.'

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  • The diversity of nomenclature indicated above 1 Referring to the Japanese custom of employing a go-between to arrange a marriage.

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  • But to use such terms for what is not only an independent, but also an older, orographical formation than the Caucasus tends to perpetuate confusion in geographical nomenclature.

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  • Ray was the first to formulate that definite conception of the species which was adopted by Linnaeus and emphasized by his binominal nomenclature.

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  • Otherwise, not one single name in the entourage of our Vishtaspa can be brought into harmony with historical nomenclature.

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  • The essential elements are five 1: diluvial plains, coast marshes, prairies, " bluffs " and " pine-hills " (to use the local nomenclature).

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  • The " parishes " date from 1807; they were based on an earlier Spanish division for religious purposes - whence the names of saints in parish nomenclature.

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  • A good deal of confusion has arisen in the discussions of this latter topic, owing to defective nomenclature.

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  • They were not the same as the medieval gates which have left the record of their names in modern London nomenclature.

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  • I), but the official name Neapolis or Flavia Neapolis, so called to commemorate its restoration by Vespasian (Titus Flavius Vespasianus), soon became universal, and is still preserved in the modern name Nablus - a signal exception to the general rule that the place-names of Palestine, whenever disturbed by foreign influence, usually revert in time to the old Semitic nomenclature.

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  • The principal group of tribes is called the ChaharAimak, or " four races," the constituent parts of which, however, are variously stated by different authorities both as to strength and nomenclature.

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  • 403), which might be of doubtful application, but also from the remains of olive presses and peculiarities in the local nomenclature.

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  • We find in him other corrections or new presentations of views previously accepted, and some useful suggestions for the improvement of nomenclature.

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  • We owe to its realization by them the constitution and nomenclature of the twelve signs of the zodiac. Assyrian cylinders and inscriptions indicate for the familiar series of our text-books an antiquity of some four thousand years.

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  • The struggle of rival systems of nomenclature, from which our zodiacal series resulted, is plainly visible in their alternations; and the claims of the competing signs were long sought to be conciliated by representing the Balance as held between the claws of the €corpion.

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  • The nomenclature not only of the hours of the day and of their minutest intervals was supplied by it, but of the months of the year, of the years in the Oriental sixty-year cycle, and of the days in the " little cycle " of twelve days.

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  • The nomenclature of the Hindu signs of the zodiac, save as regards a few standard asterisms, such as Agvini and Krittikä, was far from uniform.

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  • The nomenclature of the numerous ranges in this part of the Kuen-lun is extremely confusing, owing to different travellers having applied the same name to different ranges and to different travellers have applied different names to what is probably often identically the same range.

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  • In this article the nomenclature adopted is that employed by the latest, and probably the most thorough, explorer of this part of Central Asia, namely, Sven Hedin.

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  • Zoological Nomenclature >>

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  • Moreover, rivalry between contemporary explorers of different nationalities sometimes caused them to ignore each other's work, and added to the confusion of nomenclature among the islands.

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  • There is a somewhat vague dividing line, in popular nomenclature, between "shrubs" and "trees," the former term being usually applied to plants with several stems, of lower height, and bushy in growth.

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  • To judge from analogous instances of a double nomenclature, the two names revert to two different centres for the cult of a storm-god, though it must be confessed that up to the present it has been impossible to determine where these centres were.

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  • This is exactly the nomenclature system laid down by Owen, Cope, Marsh and others, although established without any understanding of the law of mutation.

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  • This doubtless would be an advantage morphologically, though for human descriptive anatomy the present nomenclature is not likely to be altered.

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  • to a line passing through the northern portions of Pierce, Wayne, Liberty, Bryan 1 According to the usual nomenclature, the branch flowing S.W.

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  • Some diversity of view obtains among naturalists with regard to the classification of the order; the scheme here followed being the one adopted (with some modifications of nomenclature) by Professor Max Weber in his Sliugethiere.

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  • Moreover, a false impression is conveyed by the nomenclature, as the second subordinate series is much more closely related to the principal series than the first subordinate series.

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  • Just the same rough and ready nomenclature was applied to communities conquered on foreign soil; the 17rapTCaTac became Spartani, the /vpaK60-tot Syracusani, and the 'AataTLKoL Asiani, and so on.

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  • In the matter of nomenclature these animals have been singularly unfortunate.

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  • We will now give the nomenclature of the Roman Congregations, as they were until 1908, and mentioning the modifications made by Pius X.

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  • Livingston (1746-1825), who had become pastor of the New York City church in 1770, on the basis of a plan drafted by the Classis of Amsterdam Coetus and Conferentie were reunited with a substantial independence of Amsterdam, which was made complete in 1792 when the Synod (the nomenclature of synod and classis had been adopted upon the declaration of American Independence) adopted a translation of the eighty-four Articles of Dort on Church Order with seventy-three "explanatory articles."' In 1800 there were about forty ministers and one hundred churches.

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  • Following the nomenclature usual in connexion with dynamos we may speak of the conductors which carry the initial charges as the field plates, and of the moving conductors on which are induced the charges which are subsequently added to those on the field plates, as the carriers.

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  • Nomenclature.

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  • Of the monastic buildings of medieval Copenhagen various traces are preserved in the present nomenclature of the streets.

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  • Linnaeus' invention of binomial nomenclature for designating species served systematic biology admirably, but at the same time, by attaching preponderating importance to a particular grade in classification, crystallized the doctrine of fixity.

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  • Ray Lankester, have urged that the word is so firmly asssociated with historical implications of fixity which are now incongruous with its application, that it ought to be discarded from scientific nomenclature.

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  • It is undesirable to base the main division of our subject on an adventitious circumstance, and especially so when the nomenclature thus introduced (it is not found in the books themselves) cuts right across the true line of division.

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  • RAs became a proper name as the standing nomenclature of the celebrated amora, Abba Arika.

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  • But more than this: whereas in the nomenclature of Plato's contemporaries Protagoras, Gorgias, Socrates, Dionysodorus and Isocrates were all of them sophists, Plato himself, in his careful investigation summarized above, limits the meaning of the term so that it shall include the humanists and the eristics only.

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  • The system of partitioning, and also the nomenclature, vary in the different provinces; but generally it may be said that the subdivision or tahsil is the ultimate unit of administration.

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  • It is true that in nomenclature the word " servi" is not infrequently used (e.g.

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  • But in 1877, in the M athematische Annalen, xii., he gave a paper " On the Place of Quaternions in the Ausdehnungslehre," in which he condemns, as far as he can, the nomenclature and methods of Hamilton.

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  • Its nomenclature, like that of many lesser streams in the plateau region, is somewhat confusing; for while the Spanish colonists were settling beside its headwaters the mid-stream was hardly known except to the native Indians, and the lower reaches were frequented by buccaneers, often of British or Dutch origin.

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  • For the sake of uniformity in nomenclature this nerve-cord may be called the neurochord.

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  • To Turner's name, repeated by Gesner and other authors, we owe the introduction by Linnaeus of Sterna into scientific nomenclature.

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  • The second and third species so closely resemble each other, except in size, that their distinctness was for many years unperceived, and in consequence their nomenclature is an almost bewildering puzzle.

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  • In not a few instances modern English nomenclature has supplanted the old Welsh placenames in popular usage, although the town's original appellation is retained in Welsh literature and conversation, e.g.

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  • A notable example of this curious nomenclature occurs in Bethesda, Carnarvonshire, where the name of the Congregational chapel erected early in the 10th century has altogether supplanted the original Celtic place-name of Cilfoden.

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  • d irpEov, oyster, so called from its shell, 66TEOV, bone, shell) in zoological nomenclature; there are no genera so similar to Ostrea as to be confounded with it in ordinary language.

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  • their coinage with its Greek inscriptions and nomenclature; their Attic standard of currency; and, doubtless, a great part of their administration also.

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  • It will be observed that the nomenclature of Portuguese folk-lore suggests that the popular superstitions are of the most diverse origin - Latin, Greek, Arabic, native: lobishomem is the Latin lupus homo, wolf-man, sereia is the Greek aaprt y, bruxa is Arabic, feitireira and fada Portuguese.

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  • In 1785 he declared himself an adherent of the Lavoisierian school, though he did not accept Lavoisier's view of oxygen as the only and universal acidifying principle, and he took part in the reform in chemical nomenclature carried out by Lavoisier and his associates in 1787.

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  • Similarly, the earthelementals or earth-spirits were in Paracelsus's nomenclature, "gnomes" (Gr.

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  • The whole of the place nomenclature of Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Nottinghamshire and Northern Northamptonshire is Scandinavian rather than native English, and in the remaining districts of the Danelagh a goodly proportion of Danish place-names may be found.

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  • - The above is a particular case of the method called practice, but the nomenclature of the method is confusing.

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  • According to Domesday, Streatham included several manors, two of which, Tooting and Balham (to follow the modern nomenclature), belonged to the abbot of St Mary de Bec in Normandy.

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  • There are in some cases points termed centres, or singular or multiple foci (the nomenclature is unsettled), which are the intersections of improper tangents from the two circular points respectively; thus, in the circular cubic, the tangents to the curve at the two circular points respectively (or two imaginary asymptotes of the curve) meet in a centre.

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  • It is sometimes convenient to refer to all the seven cheek-teeth as members of a single continuous series (which they undoubtedly are), and for this purpose the following nomenclature has been proposed: Upper Jaw.

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  • " Inedia," as it is called in the nomenclature of diseases by the London College of Physicians, is of two kinds, arising from want of food and from want of water.

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  • Some discussion took place about the nomenclature of the new divisions of time.

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  • Another commission was also appointed to draw up a system of weights and measures based on the length of the metre and to fix the nomenclature, which on the report of the commission was established in 1795.

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  • 270 B.C.), provided all the leading features of modern stellar nomenclature.

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  • Subsequent investigations naturally modified the numerical values upon which this nomenclature was based, but without altering the order of the periods.

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  • The Pathans are split up into different tribes, each tribe into clans, and each clan into sections, so that the nomenclature is often very puzzling.

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  • Many authors who have devoted special attention to questions of nomenclature therefore think Reptilia and Batrachia the correct names of the two great classes into which the Linnaean Amphibia have been divided, and consider that the latter term should be reserved for the use of those who, like that great authority, the late Professor Peters, down to the time of his death in 1883, would persist in regarding reptiles and batrachians as mere sub-classes (1).

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  • The Latin form being the only one entitled to recognition in zoological nomenclature, it follows that the last-mentioned names should be adopted for the three orders into which recent batrachians are divided.

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  • clockwise rotation of x degrees, the nomenclature is C n where n is 360 / x.

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  • note In organic replacement nomenclature the final " a " of the replacement prefix is not elided (ref.

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  • nomenclature of glycoproteins, glycopeptides and peptidoglycans has been available hitherto.

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  • Among the established methods of systematic nomenclature of organic chemistry, skeletal replacement (" a ") nomenclature of organic chemistry, skeletal replacement (" a ") nomenclature (refs.

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  • More controversial, and not likely to be fully acceptable, was the hope that maybe we could standardize nomenclature as well.

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  • Journals We are very pleased that the Lancet has joined the growing number of journals which support the use of approved nomenclature.

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  • Eukaryotic DNA polymerases: proposal for a revised nomenclature.

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  • APC is invited to recommend that Senatus formally approves the proposed nomenclature.

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  • nomenclature used on canals, which has been deemed to be unacceptable.

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  • Some of the ideas behind systematic hierarchical nomenclature for gene families are explained in the links from the other webpage.

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  • I agree that a unified nomenclature of human ABC transporters would be very useful.

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  • biological nomenclature is of central importance to the recovery and establishment of links between data from different sources and of different types.

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  • Principle XI: consistent nomenclature is required " The nomenclature of postgraduate qualifications should be consistent across the UK.

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  • We should take care in getting correct nomenclature, historically and as used by the local community.

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  • Note In organic replacement nomenclature the final " a " of the replacement prefix is not elided (ref.

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  • nomenclature committee to keep them informed about what we are doing.

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  • nomenclature issues or just to say hello!

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  • This also proved a valuable forum to raise the profile of approved gene nomenclature with all the organizations present.

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  • Beilstein too has had to extend and develop fusion nomenclature.

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  • Some of the recommendations have been used in enzyme nomenclature [1] .

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  • LGC is ready to advise on all aspects of chemical nomenclature.

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  • oligosaccharide structures Using the condensed system of carbohydrate nomenclature [Ref.

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  • For a clockwise rotation of x degrees, the nomenclature is C n where n is 360 / x.

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  • unfortunate side-effect of its nomenclature.

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  • South of Oristano and west of the districts last described, and traversed by the railway from Oristano to Cagliari, is the Campidano (often divided in ordinary nomenclature into the Campidano of Oristano and the Campidano of Cagliari), a low plain, the watershed of which, near S.

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  • Without accepting this proposed change in nomenclature, which is liable to lead to confusion without any coinpensating advantage, it may be suggested that the blotched tabby type represents Dr Nehring's presumed Chinese element in the cat's parentage, and that the missing wild stock may be one of the numerous phases of the leopard-cat (F.

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  • But progress was made difficult, in consequence of the clumsy and irregular nomenclature employed.

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  • 26), who had seen a specimen in the Lisbon museum; and, though knowing it had already been received into scientific nomenclature, he called it anew Microdactylus marcgravii.

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  • Whether the division of the lobus dexter into two divisions - (i) lobus dexter proper and (2) lobus quadratus, as in modern anatomical nomenclature - was also assumed in Babylonian hepatoscopy, is not certain, but the groove separating the right lobe into two sections - the fossa venae umbilicalis - was recognized and distinguished by the designation of "river of the liver."

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  • The two appendixes attached to the upper lobe or lobus pyramidalis, and known in modern nomenclature as processus pyramidalis and processus papillaris, were described respectively as the "finger" of the liver and as the "offshoot."

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  • European geographers have been accustomed to divide the islands into three groups for purposes of nomenclature, calling the northern group the Parry Islands, the central the Beechey Islands and the southern the Coffin or Bailey Islands.

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  • Beechey's nomenclature, it may be added that he called a large bay on the south of Peel Island Fitton Bay, and a bay on the south-west of Buckland Island Walker Bay.

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  • The diversity of nomenclature indicated above 1 Referring to the Japanese custom of employing a go-between to arrange a marriage.

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  • C. Fraser's Gifford Lectures, or in earlier times in the writings of Christian Wolff, whose sciences, according to the slightly different nomenclature which Kant imposed on them, were " rational psychology," " rational cosmology," and " rational theology."

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  • But it seems possible that the tradition of marine nomenclature had never perished; that the 'AyaOov SaL�ovos vijvos was really a misunderstanding of some form like Agdaman, while Ni crot Bapouavac survived as Lanka Balus, the name applied by the Arabs to the Nicobars.

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  • Naturalists who deal specially with museum collections have been compelled, it is true, for other reasons to attach an increasing importance to what is called the type specimen, but they find that this insistence on the individual, although invaluable from the point of view of recording species, is unsatisfactory from the point of view of scientific zoology; and propositions for the amelioration of this condition of affairs range from a refusal of Linnaean nomenclature in such cases, to the institution of a division between master species for such species as have been properly revised by the comparative morphologist, and provisional species for such species as have been provisionally registered by those working at collections.

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  • Flahault and Schroter, Phytogeographicol Nomenclature: reports and propositions (Zurich, 1910).

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  • In the time of Alexander the nomenclature was reversed, the right arm being known as Pallacopas.

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  • The use of language and nomenclature during the time of Norman rule in the two countries forms a remarkable contrast, and illustrates the circumstances of the two as they have just been sketched.

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  • Although for the purposes of geographical nomenclature, boundaries formed by a coast-line - that is, by depressions of the earth's solid crust below the ocean level - are most easily recog- Political nized and are of special convenience; and although such divisions.

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  • For the rest, as regards the question of nomenclature, Reid everywhere unites common sense and reason, making the former "only another name for one branch or degree of reason."

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  • This example is similar to cases among the Polychaeta where a true nephridium is provided with a large funnel, a coelomostome, according to the nomenclature of Lankester.

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  • But to use such terms for what is not only an independent, but also an older, orographical formation than the Caucasus tends to perpetuate confusion in geographical nomenclature.

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  • That the proximate ends at which Bentham aimed are desirable hardly any one would deny, though the feasibility of the means by which he proposes to attain them may often be questioned, and much of the new nomenclature in which he thought fit to clothe his doctrines may be rejected as unnecessary.

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  • His earlier writings exhibit a lively and easy style, which gives place in his later treatises to sentences which are awkward from their effort after unattainable accuracy, and from the newly-invented technical nomenclature in which they are expressed.

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  • The word "pear" or its equivalent occurs in all the Celtic languages, while in Slavonic and other dialects different appellations, but still referring to the same thing, are found - a diversity and multiplicity of nomenclature which led Alphonse de Candolle to infer a very ancient cultivation of the tree from the shores of the Caspian to those of the Atlantic. A certain race of pears, with white down on the under surface of their leaves, is supposed to have originated from P. nivalis, and their fruit is chiefly used in France in the manufacture of Perry (see Cider).

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  • If we are to accept and profit by Dorpfeld's nomenclature, we must be satisfied that, in their later historic habitats, both Lycians and Carians showed unmistakable signs of having formerly possessed the civilizations attributed to them in prehistoric times - signs which research has hitherto wholly failed to find.

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  • The first of these, according to the nomenclature of the mid-gut from the stomodaeum and proctodaeum may be of Heymons (see fig.

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  • Still the practice introduced by him of assigning to each species, a diagnosis by which it ought in theory to be distinguishable from any other known species, and of naming it by two words - the first being the generic and the second the specific term, was so manifest an improvement upon anything which had previously obtained that the Linnaean method of differentiation and nomenclature established itself before long in spite of all opposition, and in principle became almost universally adopted.

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  • Unfortunately he was too soon in the field to avail himself, even had he been so minded, of the convenient mode of nomenclature brought into use by Linnaeus.

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  • The classification was modified, chiefly on the old lines of Willughby and Ray, and certainly for the better; but no scientific nomenclature was adopted, which, as the author subsequently found, was a change for the worse.

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  • Hence it is that Gmelin appears as the authority for so much of the nomenclature now in use.

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  • In Britain it seems to have been positively unknown until quoted some years after its completion by a cataloguecompiler on account of some peculiarities of nomenclature which it presented.

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  • 4 These are, according to modern nomenclature, Tyrannus carolinensis and (as before mentioned) T.

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  • He also carried to a very extreme limit his views of nomenclature, which were certainly not in accordance with those held by most zoologists,, though this is a matter so trifling as to need no details in illustration.

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  • Apart from its intrinsic merits as a learned and valuable addition to classification, this work is interesting in the history of ornithology because of the wholesale changes of nomenclature it introduced as the result of much diligence and zeal in the application of the strict rule of priority to the names of birds.

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  • But the appeal to the verbally inspired Bible was stronger than that to a church hopelessly divided; the Bible, and not the consent of the universal church, became the touchstone of the reformed orthodoxy; in the nomenclature of the time, " evangelical " arose in contradistinction to " Catholic," while, in popular parlance, the " protest " of the Reformers against the " corruptions of Rome " led to the invention of the term " Protestant," which, though nowhere assumed in the official titles of the older reformed churches, was early used as a generic term to include them all.

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  • The triple summit of Beacon Hill, of which no trace remains to-day (or possibly a reference to the three hills of the then peninsula, Beacon, Copp's and Fort) led to the adoption of the name Trimountaine for the peninsula,-a name perpetuated variously in present municipal nomenclature as in Tremont; but on the 17th of September 1630, the date adopted for anniversary celebrations, it was ordered that " Trimountaine shall be called Boston," after the borough of that name in Lincolnshire, England, of which several of the leading settlers had formerly been prominent citizens.'

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  • Ray was the first to formulate that definite conception of the species which was adopted by Linnaeus and emphasized by his binominal nomenclature.

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  • This section treats of such subjects as nomenclature, formulae, chemical equations, chemical change and similar subjects.

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  • The nomenclature of acids follows the same general lines as that for binary compounds.

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  • The importance of such groups as methyl, ethyl, &c. in attempting a nomenclature of organic compounds cannot be overestimated; these compound radicals, fre q uently termed alkyl radicals, serve a similar purpose to the organic chemist as the elements to the inorganic chemist.

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  • To follow Baeyer's results we must explain his nomenclature of the reduced benzene derivatives.

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  • The nomenclature or " lettering " of maps is a subject deserving special attention.

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  • Its scanty nomenclature is almost wholly derived from the " Historiae adversum paganos " of Paulus Orosius (418).

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  • More than half the nomenclature of the map is derived from Orosius, an annotated Anglo-Saxon version of which had been produced by King Alfred (871-901).

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  • Gastaldo (1548) presents us with a map of Italy, which, except as to nomenclature, differs but little from that of Ptolemy, although on the Portolano charts the peninsula had long since assumed its correct shape.

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  • Otherwise, not one single name in the entourage of our Vishtaspa can be brought into harmony with historical nomenclature.

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  • The essential elements are five 1: diluvial plains, coast marshes, prairies, " bluffs " and " pine-hills " (to use the local nomenclature).

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  • The " parishes " date from 1807; they were based on an earlier Spanish division for religious purposes - whence the names of saints in parish nomenclature.

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  • The old town lies low, and it is traversed by a great number of narrow canals or " fleets " (Fleeten) - for the same word which has left its trace in London nomenclature is used in the Low German city - which add considerably to the picturesqueness of the meaner quarters, and serve as convenient channels for the transport of goods.

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  • It is true indeed that in zoological nomenclature some of these are distinguished as "voles" (see VOLE), but this is not in accord with popular usage, where such creatures - come under the designation either of water-rats or field-mice.

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  • - It will suffice to consider two systems of quantities as the corresponding theory for three or more systems is obtainable by an obvious enlargement of the nomenclature and notation.

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  • According to the nomenclature adopted by the best modern authorities, a metal A is said to be thermoelectrically positive to another metal B when the thermo-current passes from A to B through the cold junction, and from B to A through the hot (see Thermo-Electricity).

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  • It seems that confusion and trouble will be best avoided by abstaining from the introduction of the non-evident somites, the ocular and the praegenital, into the numerical nomenclature of the component somites of the three great body regions.

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  • Like that of other Byzantine writers, Chalcondyles' chronology is defective, and his adherence to the old Greek geographical nomenclature is a source of confusion.

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  • A good deal of confusion has arisen in the discussions of this latter topic, owing to defective nomenclature.

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  • He acted as president of the International Congress held at Geneva in 1892 for revising the nomenclature of the fatty acid series.

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  • Having regard to the destruction of visible evidences of antiquity in London, both through accidental agencies such as the great fire, and through inevitable modernizing influences, it is well that historical associations in nomenclature are preserved in a great measure unimpaired.

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  • They were not the same as the medieval gates which have left the record of their names in modern London nomenclature.

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  • Comyn partly explored the northern and western affluents of the Ghazal, and threw some light on the puzzling hydrography and nomenclature of those tributaries.

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  • Havana cigars are, as regards form, classification, method of putting up and nomenclature, the models followed by manufacturers of all classes of the goods.

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  • I), but the official name Neapolis or Flavia Neapolis, so called to commemorate its restoration by Vespasian (Titus Flavius Vespasianus), soon became universal, and is still preserved in the modern name Nablus - a signal exception to the general rule that the place-names of Palestine, whenever disturbed by foreign influence, usually revert in time to the old Semitic nomenclature.

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  • In the first of these books his nomenclature is unfortunate; his division of ethical theories into the " unpsychological," " idiopsychological," and the " hetero-psychological," is incapable of historical justification; his exposition of single ethical systems is, though always interesting and suggestive, often arbitrary and inadequate, being governed by dialectical exigencies rather than historical order and perspective.

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  • In the Lavoisierian nomenclature acids were regarded as binary oxygenated compounds, the associated water being relegated to the position of a mere solvent.

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  • The principal group of tribes is called the ChaharAimak, or " four races," the constituent parts of which, however, are variously stated by different authorities both as to strength and nomenclature.

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  • It is almost certain that the distal of these two segments really belongs to the thigh, but the ordinary nomenclature will be used in the present article, as this character is of great importance in discriminating families, and the two segments in question are referred to the trochanter by most systematic writers.

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  • This nomenclature was adopted by P. A.

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  • The question of the nomenclature of the group of roads between the Via Ardeatina and the Via Ostiensis is somewhat difficult, and much depends on the view taken as to the site of Laurentum.

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  • 403), which might be of doubtful application, but also from the remains of olive presses and peculiarities in the local nomenclature.

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  • The committee of the Royal Geographical Society settled the existing nomenclature of the three great oceans.

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  • Although put forward by the highest international authority recognized by geographers the system of nomenclature has not been adopted universally.

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  • For the sake of uniformity it is to be hoped that the system of nomenclature recommended by the International Geographical Congress will ultimately be adopted.

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  • Under the empire the nomenclature continued with some changes.

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  • The nomenclature assigned to these two principal divisions of the Sporozoa by different writers has varied according to the particular character on which they have primarily based the arrangement.

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  • The first sufficient explorations for cartographical record were made by John Smith in 1614, and his map was long the basis - particularly in its nomenclature - of later maps.

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  • Ethnol.; also The Temples of the Cross and Mayan Nomenclature (Cambridge, Mass., 1906); David Boyle, Reports of the Provincial Museum of Toronto on Archaeology and Ethnology of Canada; D.

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  • We find in him other corrections or new presentations of views previously accepted, and some useful suggestions for the improvement of nomenclature.

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  • arbitrari, to examine or judge), a term derived from the nomenclature of Roman law, and applied to an arrangement for taking, and abiding by, the judgment of a selected person in some disputed matter, instead of carrying it to the established courts of justice.

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  • We owe to its realization by them the constitution and nomenclature of the twelve signs of the zodiac. Assyrian cylinders and inscriptions indicate for the familiar series of our text-books an antiquity of some four thousand years.

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  • The struggle of rival systems of nomenclature, from which our zodiacal series resulted, is plainly visible in their alternations; and the claims of the competing signs were long sought to be conciliated by representing the Balance as held between the claws of the €corpion.

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  • The nomenclature not only of the hours of the day and of their minutest intervals was supplied by it, but of the months of the year, of the years in the Oriental sixty-year cycle, and of the days in the " little cycle " of twelve days.

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  • The nomenclature of the Hindu signs of the zodiac, save as regards a few standard asterisms, such as Agvini and KrittikÃ, was far from uniform.

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  • The nomenclature of the numerous ranges in this part of the Kuen-lun is extremely confusing, owing to different travellers having applied the same name to different ranges and to different travellers have applied different names to what is probably often identically the same range.

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  • In this article the nomenclature adopted is that employed by the latest, and probably the most thorough, explorer of this part of Central Asia, namely, Sven Hedin.

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  • Zoological Nomenclature >>

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  • Moreover, rivalry between contemporary explorers of different nationalities sometimes caused them to ignore each other's work, and added to the confusion of nomenclature among the islands.

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  • There is a somewhat vague dividing line, in popular nomenclature, between "shrubs" and "trees," the former term being usually applied to plants with several stems, of lower height, and bushy in growth.

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  • To judge from analogous instances of a double nomenclature, the two names revert to two different centres for the cult of a storm-god, though it must be confessed that up to the present it has been impossible to determine where these centres were.

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  • Buckle has the idea that the two principal works of Smith, the Theory of Moral Sentiments and the Wealth of Nations, are mutually complementary parts of one great scheme, in which human nature is intended to be dealt with as a whole - the former exhibiting the operation of the benevolent feelings, the latter of what, by a singular nomenclature, inadmissible since Butler wrote, he calls "the passion of selfishness."

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  • This is exactly the nomenclature system laid down by Owen, Cope, Marsh and others, although established without any understanding of the law of mutation.

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  • This doubtless would be an advantage morphologically, though for human descriptive anatomy the present nomenclature is not likely to be altered.

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  • to a line passing through the northern portions of Pierce, Wayne, Liberty, Bryan 1 According to the usual nomenclature, the branch flowing S.W.

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  • Some diversity of view obtains among naturalists with regard to the classification of the order; the scheme here followed being the one adopted (with some modifications of nomenclature) by Professor Max Weber in his Sliugethiere.

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  • Moreover, a false impression is conveyed by the nomenclature, as the second subordinate series is much more closely related to the principal series than the first subordinate series.

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  • Just the same rough and ready nomenclature was applied to communities conquered on foreign soil; the 17rapTCaTac became Spartani, the /vpaK60-tot Syracusani, and the 'AataTLKoL Asiani, and so on.

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  • In the matter of nomenclature these animals have been singularly unfortunate.

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  • We will now give the nomenclature of the Roman Congregations, as they were until 1908, and mentioning the modifications made by Pius X.

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  • Livingston (1746-1825), who had become pastor of the New York City church in 1770, on the basis of a plan drafted by the Classis of Amsterdam Coetus and Conferentie were reunited with a substantial independence of Amsterdam, which was made complete in 1792 when the Synod (the nomenclature of synod and classis had been adopted upon the declaration of American Independence) adopted a translation of the eighty-four Articles of Dort on Church Order with seventy-three "explanatory articles."' In 1800 there were about forty ministers and one hundred churches.

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  • Following the nomenclature usual in connexion with dynamos we may speak of the conductors which carry the initial charges as the field plates, and of the moving conductors on which are induced the charges which are subsequently added to those on the field plates, as the carriers.

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  • Of the monastic buildings of medieval Copenhagen various traces are preserved in the present nomenclature of the streets.

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  • Linnaeus' invention of binomial nomenclature for designating species served systematic biology admirably, but at the same time, by attaching preponderating importance to a particular grade in classification, crystallized the doctrine of fixity.

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  • In modern practice (see Zoological Nomenclature) systematists no longer regard species as more than as an artificial rank in classification, to be applied chiefly for reasons of convenience, so that the word is reverting to its older logical significance.

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  • Ray Lankester, have urged that the word is so firmly asssociated with historical implications of fixity which are now incongruous with its application, that it ought to be discarded from scientific nomenclature.

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  • The proof is furnished on the one hand by the geographical and ethnographical nomenclature of a later period tions of MSS.

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  • The peoples of the south (Lucanians, Bruttians, Mamertines) show a Greek principle of nomenclature (Mommsen, Unterital.

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  • The number and nomenclature of the nomes were never absolutely fixed.

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  • It occupies the site of the ancient Menaenum, founded by Ducetius in 459 B.C. There is some doubt as to whether this town was also the birthplace of Ducetius, owing to confusions in nomenclature (see E.

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  • It is undesirable to base the main division of our subject on an adventitious circumstance, and especially so when the nomenclature thus introduced (it is not found in the books themselves) cuts right across the true line of division.

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  • RAs became a proper name as the standing nomenclature of the celebrated amora, Abba Arika.

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  • This part of the plain is (in European nomenclature) divided into two at about the latitude of Jaffa, that to the north being the plain of Sarona (Sharon), the southern half being the plain of the Philistines.

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  • The former, the old city, lying close to the harbour front, has streets as narrow as is consistent with wheel traffic. Obispo (Pi y Margall in the new republican nomenclature), O'Reilly and San Rafael are the finest retail business streets, and the Prado and the Cerro the handsomest residential streets in the city proper.

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  • Its nomenclature, like that of many lesser streams in the plateau region, is somewhat confusing; for while the Spanish colonists were settling beside its headwaters the mid-stream was hardly known except to the native Indians, and the lower reaches were frequented by buccaneers, often of British or Dutch origin.

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  • For the sake of uniformity in nomenclature this nerve-cord may be called the neurochord.

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  • To Turner's name, repeated by Gesner and other authors, we owe the introduction by Linnaeus of Sterna into scientific nomenclature.

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  • The second and third species so closely resemble each other, except in size, that their distinctness was for many years unperceived, and in consequence their nomenclature is an almost bewildering puzzle.

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  • In not a few instances modern English nomenclature has supplanted the old Welsh placenames in popular usage, although the town's original appellation is retained in Welsh literature and conversation, e.g.

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  • A notable example of this curious nomenclature occurs in Bethesda, Carnarvonshire, where the name of the Congregational chapel erected early in the 10th century has altogether supplanted the original Celtic place-name of Cilfoden.

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  • d irpEov, oyster, so called from its shell, 66TEOV, bone, shell) in zoological nomenclature; there are no genera so similar to Ostrea as to be confounded with it in ordinary language.

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  • their coinage with its Greek inscriptions and nomenclature; their Attic standard of currency; and, doubtless, a great part of their administration also.

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  • It will be observed that the nomenclature of Portuguese folk-lore suggests that the popular superstitions are of the most diverse origin - Latin, Greek, Arabic, native: lobishomem is the Latin lupus homo, wolf-man, sereia is the Greek aaprt y, bruxa is Arabic, feitireira and fada Portuguese.

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  • In 1785 he declared himself an adherent of the Lavoisierian school, though he did not accept Lavoisier's view of oxygen as the only and universal acidifying principle, and he took part in the reform in chemical nomenclature carried out by Lavoisier and his associates in 1787.

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  • Similarly, the earthelementals or earth-spirits were in Paracelsus's nomenclature, "gnomes" (Gr.

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  • It is known in different places under different names, and the same name being also often given to one or more of the coast ranges the nomenclature of the mountains is confusing (see the map).

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  • The whole of the place nomenclature of Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Nottinghamshire and Northern Northamptonshire is Scandinavian rather than native English, and in the remaining districts of the Danelagh a goodly proportion of Danish place-names may be found.

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  • - The above is a particular case of the method called practice, but the nomenclature of the method is confusing.

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  • According to Domesday, Streatham included several manors, two of which, Tooting and Balham (to follow the modern nomenclature), belonged to the abbot of St Mary de Bec in Normandy.

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  • There are in some cases points termed centres, or singular or multiple foci (the nomenclature is unsettled), which are the intersections of improper tangents from the two circular points respectively; thus, in the circular cubic, the tangents to the curve at the two circular points respectively (or two imaginary asymptotes of the curve) meet in a centre.

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  • It is sometimes convenient to refer to all the seven cheek-teeth as members of a single continuous series (which they undoubtedly are), and for this purpose the following nomenclature has been proposed: Upper Jaw.

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  • " Inedia," as it is called in the nomenclature of diseases by the London College of Physicians, is of two kinds, arising from want of food and from want of water.

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  • Some discussion took place about the nomenclature of the new divisions of time.

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  • Another commission was also appointed to draw up a system of weights and measures based on the length of the metre and to fix the nomenclature, which on the report of the commission was established in 1795.

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  • 270 B.C.), provided all the leading features of modern stellar nomenclature.

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  • Subsequent investigations naturally modified the numerical values upon which this nomenclature was based, but without altering the order of the periods.

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  • The Pathans are split up into different tribes, each tribe into clans, and each clan into sections, so that the nomenclature is often very puzzling.

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  • Many authors who have devoted special attention to questions of nomenclature therefore think Reptilia and Batrachia the correct names of the two great classes into which the Linnaean Amphibia have been divided, and consider that the latter term should be reserved for the use of those who, like that great authority, the late Professor Peters, down to the time of his death in 1883, would persist in regarding reptiles and batrachians as mere sub-classes (1).

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  • The Latin form being the only one entitled to recognition in zoological nomenclature, it follows that the last-mentioned names should be adopted for the three orders into which recent batrachians are divided.

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  • Such is the poverty of our nomenclature.

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  • It also perpetuates the idea that things are laid out in a " table ", which is an unfortunate side-effect of its nomenclature.

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  • Perhaps, all this nomenclature is unnecessary since these products are very tightly related.

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  • "New nomenclature and DNA testing guidelines for myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1)."

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  • The ingredient names on personal care products, including hair care products, are part of a naming convention known as the International Nomenclature of Cosmetic Ingredients, or INCI for short.

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    0
  • The proof is furnished on the one hand by the geographical and ethnographical nomenclature of a later period tions of MSS.

    0
    1
  • The number and nomenclature of the nomes were never absolutely fixed.

    0
    1
  • This part of the plain is (in European nomenclature) divided into two at about the latitude of Jaffa, that to the north being the plain of Sarona (Sharon), the southern half being the plain of the Philistines.

    0
    1
  • The former, the old city, lying close to the harbour front, has streets as narrow as is consistent with wheel traffic. Obispo (Pi y Margall in the new republican nomenclature), O'Reilly and San Rafael are the finest retail business streets, and the Prado and the Cerro the handsomest residential streets in the city proper.

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    1
  • During the administration of Miguel Tacon Havana was improved by many important public works; his name is frequent in the nomenclature of the city.

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    1
  • It would seem then, (1) that popular nomenclature included under the term " sophist " all teachers - whether professors, or like Socrates, amateurs - who communicated, not artistic skill, nor philosophical theory, but a general or liberal education; (2) that, of those who were commonly accounted sophists, some professed culture, some forensic rhetoric, some political rhetoric, some eristic, some (i.e.

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    1
  • He also carried to a very extreme limit his views of nomenclature, which were certainly not in accordance with those held by most zoologists,, though this is a matter so trifling as to need no details in illustration.

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  • Gastaldo (1548) presents us with a map of Italy, which, except as to nomenclature, differs but little from that of Ptolemy, although on the Portolano charts the peninsula had long since assumed its correct shape.

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