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nola

nola Sentence Examples

  • Naples Acerra, Ischia, Nola, Pozzuoli.

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  • St Cyprian, St Ambrose and St Augustine, St Paulinus of Nola and St John Chrysostom had practised law as teachers or advocates.

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  • In recognition of this and other brilliant services, he was elected consul in 88, and brought the revolt to an end by the capture of Nola in Campania.

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  • of the Greek Euchologion contain numerous prayers to be offered over animals sacrificed; and in the form of agape such sacrifices were common in Italy and Gaul on the natalis dies of a saint, and Paulinus of Nola, the friend of Augustine, in his Latin poems, describes them (c. 400) in detail.

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  • NOLA, a city and episcopal see of Campania, Italy, in the province of Caserta, pleasantly situated in the plain between Mount Vesuvius and the Apennines, 164 m.

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  • The more conspicuous buildings are the ancient Gothic cathedral (restored in 1866, and again in 1870 after the interior was destroyed by fire), with its lofty tower, the cavalry barracks, the ex-convent of the Capuchins at a little distance from the city, and the seminary in which are preserved the famous Oscan inscription known as the Cippus Abellanus (from Abella, the modern Avella, q.v.) and some Latin inscriptions relating to a treaty with Nola regarding a joint temple of Hercules.

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  • Two fairs are held in Nola, on the 14th of June and the 12th of November; and the 26th of July is devoted to a great festival in honour of St Paulinus, one of the early bishops of the city, who invented the church bell (campana, taking its name from Campania).

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  • There is a monument (restored in 1887) to Giordano Bruno, the free-thinker, who was born at Nola in 1548.

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  • Nola (Naa) was one of the oldest cities of Campania, variously said to have been founded by the Ausones, the Chalcidians and the Etruscans.

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  • The last-named were certainly in Nola about 500 B.C. At the time when it sent assistance to Neapolis against the Roman invasion (328 B.e.) it was probably occupied by Oscans in alliance with the Samnites.

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  • The Romans made themselves masters of Nola in 313 B.e., and it was thenceforth faithful to Rome.

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  • Whatever punishment Sulla may have inflicted, Nola, though it lost much of its importance, remained a municipium with its own institutions and the use of the Oscan language.

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  • It became a Roman colony under Augustus, who died at Nola.

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  • Sacked by Genseric in 4J5, and by the Saracens in 806 and 904, captured by Manfred in the 13th century, and damaged by earthquakes in the 15th and 16th, Nola lost much of its importance.

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  • The revolution of 1820 under General Pepe began at Nola.

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  • Nola lay on the Via Popillia from Capua to Nuceria and the south, and a branch road ran from it to Abella and Abellinum.

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  • 142) further states that roads must have run direct from Nola to Neapolis and Pompeii, but Kiepert's map annexed to the volume does not indicate them.

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  • Leone, De Nola (Venice, 1514).

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  • Saint Paulinus of Nola >>

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  • It was at this period, while present at a festival of St Felix of Nola, that he entered upon his lifelong devotion to the cult of that saint.

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  • In the following year he went into Italy, and after visiting Ambrose at Milan and Siricius at Rome - the latter of whom received him somewhat coldly - he proceeded into Campania, where, in the neighbourhood of Nola, he settled among the rude structures which he had caused to be built around the tomb and relics of his patron saint.

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  • With Therasia (now a sister, not a wife), while leading a life of rigid asceticism, he devoted the whole of his vast wealth to the entertainment of needy pilgrims, to payment of the debts of the insolvent, and to public works of utility or ornament; besides building basilicas at Fondi and Nola, he provided the latter place with a muchneeded aqueduct.

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  • At the next vacancy, not later than 409, he succeeded to the bishopric of Nola, and this office he held with ever-increasing honour until his death, which occurred shortly after that of Augustine, whose friend he was, in 431.

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  • Paulin von Nola Breslau, 1904) and other literature cited in Herzog-Hauck, Realencyk.

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  • GIORDANO BRUNO (c. 1548-1600), Italian philosopher of the Renaissance, was born near Nola in the village of Cicala.

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  • Bruno (Paris, 1846-1847); Domenico Berti, Giordano Bruno da Nola (2nd ed., 1889); H.

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  • It lay on the boundary of Campania and the territory of the Hirpini, at the junction of the roads from Nola (and perhaps also from Suessula) and Salernum to Beneventum.

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  • Here also the idea came to prevail that the body of the saint, or a portion of it,'was possessed of healing and protective power (Paulinus of Nola, Poem.

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  • On the outbreak of the persecution by Diocletian and Maximian, he was taken to Nola and brought before Timotheus, governor of Campania, on account of his profession of the Christian religion.

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  • While still a youth his talent became known to Sulpicius Severus, who had estates in that neighbourhood, and in 395 Sulpicius, who probably baptized him, sent him with letters to Paulinus of Nola, where he met with a friendly reception.

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  • It was found impossible to rebuild the town, and its territory was joined to that of Nola.

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  • The first-mentioned of the two principal streets was crossed, a little before it reached the forum, by the street which led directly to the gate of Nola (Strada delle Terme, della Fortuna, and di Nola).

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  • More considerable and important was a temple which stood at no great distance from the forum at the point where the so-called Strada di Mercurio was crossed by the wide line of thoroughfare (Strada della Fortuna) leading to the gate of Nola.

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  • It appears, however, that these two establishments were found inadequate to supply the wants of the inhabitants, and a third edifice of the same character, the socalled central baths, at the corner of the Strada Stabiana and the Strada di Nola, but on a still more extensive scale, intended for men only, while the other two had separate accommodation for both sexes, was in course of construction when the town was overwhelmed.

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  • Nola and Nuceria in Campania, Thurii and Metapontum in Lucania were sacked.

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  • Next to Rome the most popular religious resort was the tomb of Felix of Nola (August.

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  • Almost all that we know of Severus' life comes from a few allusions in his own writings, and some passages in the letters of his friend Paulinus, bishop of Nola.

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  • On his return he was forced by illness to stop at Nola, his father's old home.

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  • This agrees with his legend as known to Ambrose and Paulinus of Nola, and is the most probable in itself.

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  • Unfortunately, the remains of that civilization are very scanty, and our knowledge of the official alphabet outside Capua, and at a later period Pompeii, is practically confined to two important inscriptions, the tabula Agnonensis, now in the British Museum, and the Cippus Abellanus, which is now kept in the Episcopal Seminary at Nola.

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  • He set up (in 334) a school of rhetoric in his native place, which was largely attended, his most famous pupil being Paulinus,afterwards bishop of Nola.

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  • An important Oscan inscription relates to a treaty with Nola, regarding a joint temple of Hercules, attributable to the 2nd century B.C. Under the early empire it had already become a colony and had perhaps been one since the time of Sulla.

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  • It has remains of the walls of the citadel and of an amphitheatre, and lay on the road from Nola to Abellinum, which was here perhaps joined by a branch from Suessula.

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  • Paulinus of Nola (c. 490) alludes to the tonsure as in use among the (Western) monks; from them the practice quickly spread to the clergy.

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  • Sulla, who was then at Nola, immediately marched upon Rome.

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  • de Laudibus Theodori Martyris, c. 2) it is easy to see how the stories of recent martyrs would offer themselves as tempting subjects for the painter, and at the same time be considered to have received from him their best and most permanent expression; that this feeling was widespread is shown in many places by Paulinus of Nola (ob.

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  • Naples Acerra, Ischia, Nola, Pozzuoli.

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  • St Cyprian, St Ambrose and St Augustine, St Paulinus of Nola and St John Chrysostom had practised law as teachers or advocates.

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    0
  • In recognition of this and other brilliant services, he was elected consul in 88, and brought the revolt to an end by the capture of Nola in Campania.

    0
    0
  • of the Greek Euchologion contain numerous prayers to be offered over animals sacrificed; and in the form of agape such sacrifices were common in Italy and Gaul on the natalis dies of a saint, and Paulinus of Nola, the friend of Augustine, in his Latin poems, describes them (c. 400) in detail.

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  • NOLA, a city and episcopal see of Campania, Italy, in the province of Caserta, pleasantly situated in the plain between Mount Vesuvius and the Apennines, 164 m.

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    0
  • The more conspicuous buildings are the ancient Gothic cathedral (restored in 1866, and again in 1870 after the interior was destroyed by fire), with its lofty tower, the cavalry barracks, the ex-convent of the Capuchins at a little distance from the city, and the seminary in which are preserved the famous Oscan inscription known as the Cippus Abellanus (from Abella, the modern Avella, q.v.) and some Latin inscriptions relating to a treaty with Nola regarding a joint temple of Hercules.

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    0
  • Two fairs are held in Nola, on the 14th of June and the 12th of November; and the 26th of July is devoted to a great festival in honour of St Paulinus, one of the early bishops of the city, who invented the church bell (campana, taking its name from Campania).

    0
    0
  • There is a monument (restored in 1887) to Giordano Bruno, the free-thinker, who was born at Nola in 1548.

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    0
  • Nola (Naa) was one of the oldest cities of Campania, variously said to have been founded by the Ausones, the Chalcidians and the Etruscans.

    0
    0
  • The last-named were certainly in Nola about 500 B.C. At the time when it sent assistance to Neapolis against the Roman invasion (328 B.e.) it was probably occupied by Oscans in alliance with the Samnites.

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    0
  • The Romans made themselves masters of Nola in 313 B.e., and it was thenceforth faithful to Rome.

    0
    0
  • Whatever punishment Sulla may have inflicted, Nola, though it lost much of its importance, remained a municipium with its own institutions and the use of the Oscan language.

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    0
  • It became a Roman colony under Augustus, who died at Nola.

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  • Sacked by Genseric in 4J5, and by the Saracens in 806 and 904, captured by Manfred in the 13th century, and damaged by earthquakes in the 15th and 16th, Nola lost much of its importance.

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  • The revolution of 1820 under General Pepe began at Nola.

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    0
  • Nola lay on the Via Popillia from Capua to Nuceria and the south, and a branch road ran from it to Abella and Abellinum.

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  • 142) further states that roads must have run direct from Nola to Neapolis and Pompeii, but Kiepert's map annexed to the volume does not indicate them.

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  • Leone, De Nola (Venice, 1514).

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  • Saint Paulinus of Nola >>

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  • SAINT PAULINUS, OF Nola (353-431) Pontius Meropius Anicius Paulinus, who was successively a consul, a monk and a 4 See Fr.

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  • It was at this period, while present at a festival of St Felix of Nola, that he entered upon his lifelong devotion to the cult of that saint.

    0
    0
  • In the following year he went into Italy, and after visiting Ambrose at Milan and Siricius at Rome - the latter of whom received him somewhat coldly - he proceeded into Campania, where, in the neighbourhood of Nola, he settled among the rude structures which he had caused to be built around the tomb and relics of his patron saint.

    0
    0
  • With Therasia (now a sister, not a wife), while leading a life of rigid asceticism, he devoted the whole of his vast wealth to the entertainment of needy pilgrims, to payment of the debts of the insolvent, and to public works of utility or ornament; besides building basilicas at Fondi and Nola, he provided the latter place with a muchneeded aqueduct.

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    0
  • At the next vacancy, not later than 409, he succeeded to the bishopric of Nola, and this office he held with ever-increasing honour until his death, which occurred shortly after that of Augustine, whose friend he was, in 431.

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  • Paulin von Nola Breslau, 1904) and other literature cited in Herzog-Hauck, Realencyk.

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  • GIORDANO BRUNO (c. 1548-1600), Italian philosopher of the Renaissance, was born near Nola in the village of Cicala.

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  • Bruno (Paris, 1846-1847); Domenico Berti, Giordano Bruno da Nola (2nd ed., 1889); H.

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  • It lay on the boundary of Campania and the territory of the Hirpini, at the junction of the roads from Nola (and perhaps also from Suessula) and Salernum to Beneventum.

    0
    0
  • Here also the idea came to prevail that the body of the saint, or a portion of it,'was possessed of healing and protective power (Paulinus of Nola, Poem.

    0
    0
  • On the outbreak of the persecution by Diocletian and Maximian, he was taken to Nola and brought before Timotheus, governor of Campania, on account of his profession of the Christian religion.

    0
    0
  • While still a youth his talent became known to Sulpicius Severus, who had estates in that neighbourhood, and in 395 Sulpicius, who probably baptized him, sent him with letters to Paulinus of Nola, where he met with a friendly reception.

    0
    0
  • It was found impossible to rebuild the town, and its territory was joined to that of Nola.

    0
    0
  • The first-mentioned of the two principal streets was crossed, a little before it reached the forum, by the street which led directly to the gate of Nola (Strada delle Terme, della Fortuna, and di Nola).

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  • The temple was an extensive edifice, having a comparatively small cella, raised upon a podium, and standing in the midst of a wide space surrounded by a portico of _columns, (3) } (4; (_)_\---i' Porta di Nola (8) / .11 (2) Porta del Sar Porta marina ?

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  • More considerable and important was a temple which stood at no great distance from the forum at the point where the so-called Strada di Mercurio was crossed by the wide line of thoroughfare (Strada della Fortuna) leading to the gate of Nola.

    0
    0
  • It appears, however, that these two establishments were found inadequate to supply the wants of the inhabitants, and a third edifice of the same character, the socalled central baths, at the corner of the Strada Stabiana and the Strada di Nola, but on a still more extensive scale, intended for men only, while the other two had separate accommodation for both sexes, was in course of construction when the town was overwhelmed.

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  • Nola and Nuceria in Campania, Thurii and Metapontum in Lucania were sacked.

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  • Paulinus of Nola (d.

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  • Next to Rome the most popular religious resort was the tomb of Felix of Nola (August.

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  • Almost all that we know of Severus' life comes from a few allusions in his own writings, and some passages in the letters of his friend Paulinus, bishop of Nola.

    0
    0
  • On his return he was forced by illness to stop at Nola, his father's old home.

    0
    0
  • This agrees with his legend as known to Ambrose and Paulinus of Nola, and is the most probable in itself.

    0
    0
  • Unfortunately, the remains of that civilization are very scanty, and our knowledge of the official alphabet outside Capua, and at a later period Pompeii, is practically confined to two important inscriptions, the tabula Agnonensis, now in the British Museum, and the Cippus Abellanus, which is now kept in the Episcopal Seminary at Nola.

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  • Paulinus, bishop of Nola (d.

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  • He set up (in 334) a school of rhetoric in his native place, which was largely attended, his most famous pupil being Paulinus,afterwards bishop of Nola.

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    0
  • An important Oscan inscription relates to a treaty with Nola, regarding a joint temple of Hercules, attributable to the 2nd century B.C. Under the early empire it had already become a colony and had perhaps been one since the time of Sulla.

    0
    0
  • It has remains of the walls of the citadel and of an amphitheatre, and lay on the road from Nola to Abellinum, which was here perhaps joined by a branch from Suessula.

    0
    0
  • Paulinus of Nola (c. 490) alludes to the tonsure as in use among the (Western) monks; from them the practice quickly spread to the clergy.

    0
    0
  • Sulla, who was then at Nola, immediately marched upon Rome.

    0
    0
  • de Laudibus Theodori Martyris, c. 2) it is easy to see how the stories of recent martyrs would offer themselves as tempting subjects for the painter, and at the same time be considered to have received from him their best and most permanent expression; that this feeling was widespread is shown in many places by Paulinus of Nola (ob.

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  • Nola is a Louisiana based classified ads publication; another example of a great resource for local classified listings.

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  • Mary McDonnell: This Dances with Wolves star has also appeared in films like Blue Chips, and Nola.

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