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noise

noise

noise Sentence Examples

  • It was a pleasant escape from the dust and noise of the building going on above them.

  • The noise from the machine that circulated the oxygen frightened her.

  • A grinding noise jerked her attention back to the car.

  • And yet, its little engine hummed along with a surprising lack of noise.

  • She made a soft noise, cuddling closer to her father.

  • Maybe a little noise would frighten the animal away.

  • They moved off and their voices faded into the noise of the waking town.

  • Her bare feet made no noise as she moved across the room toward him, so when she reached his side he glanced up sharply.

  • Due to the closeness of the neighbors, I was fearful of noise causing Howie problems.

  • Sometimes he has trouble sleeping and it takes very little noise to wake him.

  • We had two runaways in a row followed by a location Howie couldn't find and a wake-up interruption from outside noise.

  • Maybe I'll get a room in a high rise hotel, away from street noise.

  • Before I could say more, I heard the telltale noise of breaking glass from the far side of the house!

  • There was a noise in the background.

  • I'm sure Brennen was confused by my sharp response and background noise but once girls and dog had left we settled down to business.

  • Bumpus got loose when something made a noise in the woods.

  • The more noise you make, the worse I make it for you.

  • While the rush of air in the topless Jeep hindered communication, they usually managed to chatter away in spite of the noise.

  • It was then they heard the first noise.

  • A small rock trickled down, bouncing and skipping before stopping by Dean's shoe—the slight noise was a rumble in the mountain stillness.

  • While everyone heard the same noise, their reactions differed.

  • As if in celebration, the fireworks ended in a fury of light and muffled noise.

  • Dean sniffed the gun and opened the chamber, careful to not make a noise.

  • Then she added, Every volunteer fire buck and EMT has a noise on his wheels.

  • While sleep was only partially suspended and Dean's fantasy returned, morning brought the news that the noise had been real—Pumpkin Green had left in the night, bumping his shopping cart down the stairs to a clandestine exit.

  • There was a noise and she looked at her hip.

  • It was an hour later when the noise distracted them.

  • Deidre struggled to take in everything around her, bombarded by the noise, smells and activity.

  • He'd been in the middle of deciding which of his collection of knives he was going to use to kill the goddess once and for all when the noise started.

  • Careful not to let the heels of his boots make noise in the hallway, he headed for the living room.

  • We can watch as long as we stay back a ways and don't make noise.

  • In other words, making noise through your larynx isn't something you have to learn to do.

  • I started making noise by coughing.

  • Then I started letting the noise come out of my throat with my breath.

  • The creaky bed protested as she sat, and she tried hard not to make more noise and wake Toby.

  • "If it is some form of code, it must have been the devil to write," Dean said but before his wife could answer, there was a noise on the stairs.

  • Just as the glue was drying on the small wooden cross, a noise at the front door announced the arrival of the sisters from Boston.

  • There was a noise at the back door and Fred O'Connor entered.

  • Cynthia must have finally slept because the noise in the hall startled her to full wakefulness, her husband as well.

  • It's early morning now and the noise of the loading of the pack animals down at Ashenfelter's stables has woken me.

  • There was a noise on the stairs and they all turned to see Edith descending.

  • Dead bodies don't make much noise.

  • He lay there, trying to comprehend if the noise were in his mind's fantasies or in the real world of Bird Song.

  • There was time for quiet evenings, some jazz and classical music in the Dean's quarters, country and western in Fred's and some totally incomprehensible noise from the small room where Martha Boyd and her boom box now dwelt.

  • The noise at the locked front door I heard when Edith was in my room wasn't Franny going out for a smoke as I'd assumed at the time.

  • It was the noise from the falling chair that woke me up.

  • Jackson heard a noise and motioned to Sarah to silence herself.

  • The music still played throughout the house, and the studio was far enough away from the living room so noise wasn't an issue.

  • What was all the noise last night?

  • Yes, and you better not embarrass them when they come down, or you and I won't be making noise for quite some time.

  • Let's go make some noise.

  • He almost nodded off, but a noise outside alerted him.

  • Alex leaned down, resting a hand on her waist as he tried to separate her words from the noise of the feeding goats.

  • She waited breathlessly, straining to hear the least noise.

  • Was it possible that Josh had heard the noise and was checking?

  • "He heard the noise and came down," she added quickly.

  • He shook it then set it down when it made no noise.

  • Nor had Burgess heard any noise or conversation from apart­ment C to indicate there was anyone there—much less more than one person.

  • Cynthia Byrne clutched the armrest firmly during take off and landing, reacting to each noise anew.

  • At last he heard a noise off to his right, a sigh or a moan in the blackness.

  • At 11:00 Dean had given up waiting for the old man's phone call and was ready for bed when he heard a noise at the door.

  • When the road straightened once more, he heard a noise behind him and a dozen daredevils in the tuck posi­tion sped on by him with a wave and a rush of air.

  • The thick log walls insulated them from some of the noise, but the storm was fierce.

  • It was a few minutes before she realized the pounding noise was someone knocking at the door.

  • Her knock stimulated a little noise inside and he opened the door.

  • His curiosity satisfied and the hunt over, he was ready to leave the noise of the club for the peace of his condo.

  • Even the splash of the anchor in the water, and the noise of the cable running out through the hawse-hole, in no way disturbed them at their occupation, or caused them to evince the slightest curiosity.

  • But, secondly, the pneumatic utterances technically known as speaking with tongues failed to reach this level of intelligibility; for Paul compares "a tongue" to a material object which should merely make a noise, to a pipe or harp twanged or blown at random without tune or time, to a trumpet blaring idly and not according to a code of signal notes.

  • In this experiment a great noise was produced, corresponding to a loss of energy, and Joule endeavoured to determine the amount of energy necessary to produce an equal amount of sound from the string of a violoncello and to apply a corresponding correction.

  • The toothed wheels give a slightly better efficiency, but the worm gear is somewhat smoother in its action and entirely silent; the noise of gearing can, however, be considerably reduced by careful machining of the teeth, as is now always done, and also by the use of pinions made of rawhide leather or other non-resonant material.

  • Hence, by inserting a break-and-make key in the circuit of the battery, coil or dynamo, the uniform noise or hum in the telephone can be cut up into periods of long and short noises, which can be made to yield the signals of the Morse alphabet.

  • Hughes, while engaged in experiments upon a Bell telephone in an electric circuit, discovered that a peculiar noise was produced whenever two hard electrodes, such as two wires, were - drawn across each other, or were made to touch each other with a variable degree of firmness.

  • The reason that the source of the noise is such an enigma is that no one ever traced the sound when they heard it.

  • Examples are- guruh, a rumbling noise, gumuruh, to make such a noise; tunjuk, to point, telunjuk, the forefinger; chuchuk, to pierce, cheruchuk, a stockade.

  • 4 a moaning noise or the sharp twang of a harp-string.

  • The latter work appears to have been based on the story of the drum which was alleged to have been heard every night in a house in Wiltshire (Tedworth, belonging to a Mr Mompesson), a story which made much noise in the year 1663, and which is supposed to have furnished Addison with the idea of his comedy the Drummer.

  • In spite of his doctrinal writings - which at the time made no little noise, so that his Compendium of Dogmatic (1760) was confiscated in Sweden, and the knighthood of the North Star was afterwards given him in reparation - it was the natural side of the Bible that really attracted him, and no man did more to introduce the modern method of studying Hebrew antiquity as an integral part of ancient Eastern life.

  • Near the mouth, where the lake narrows to a strait, are the rapids which Ossian called the Falls of Lora, the ebbing and flowing tides, as they rush over the rocky bar, creating a roaring noise audible at a considerable distance.

  • Scorpions of various species have been observed to make a hissing noise when disturbed, or even when not disturbed.

  • This discharge, which is identical with the " brush " discharge of laboratory experiments, usually appears as a tip of light on the extremities of pointed objects such as church towers, the masts of ships, or even the fingers of the outstretched hand: it is commonly accompanied by a crackling or fizzing noise.

  • The upper fall is known as the Rumbling Bridge from the fact that the stream pours with a rumbling noise through a deep narrow gorge in which a huge fallen rock has become wedged, forming a rude bridge or arch.

  • A tin ingot is distinctly crystalline; hence the characteristic crackling noise, or "cry" of tin, which a bar of tin gives out when being bent.

  • A like deviation from the ordinary character is found in the allied genus Chiromachaeris, comprehending seven species, and Sclater is of the opinion that it enables them to make the singular noise for which they have long been noted, described by O.

  • The noise of the ship's guns, as the company sails off, wakes the poet to the real pleasures of a May morning.

  • On the 4th of September 1665 Pepys writes an interesting letter to Lady Carteret from Woolwich: " I have stayed in the city till above 7400 died in one week, and of them about 6000 of the plague, and little noise heard day or night but tolling of bells."

  • til finally When this occurs, strained pillars begin to crack and splinter with a noise like musketry firing, and the roof of the mine shows signs of subsidence.

  • Receive antennas may differ in their noise rejection properties.

  • Strabo describes a river which he terms Catarractes as a large stream falling with a great noise over a lofty cliff.

  • The largest known species is the drummer of the West Indies (Blabera gigantea), so called from the tapping noise it makes on wood, sufficient, when joined in by several individuals, as usually happens, to break the slumbers of a household.

  • Sometimes, especially at early dawn, there is a musical noise in the desert, like the sound of distant drums, which is caused by the eddying of grains of sand in the heated atmosphere, on the crests of the medanos.

  • In Ezekiel the throne of Yahweh is borne up on Cherubim, the noise of whose wings is like thunder.

  • It was probably the noise of these sermons that caused the friar's temporary removal from Florence at the instance of Piero de' Medici.

  • 2 45, 1874) in proper meaning is noise, clamour, the season being one of rejoicing at the turning of the year among Scandinavian peoples before Christian times.

  • NOISE (a word of doubtful origin; O.

  • By the common law of England freedom from noise is essential to the full enjoyment of a dwelling house, and acts which affect that enjoyment may be actionable as nuisances.

  • The noise must be exceptional and unreasonable.

  • In disposition they are quiet and gentle, and do not show much intelligence; they are also less noisy than the true lemurs, only when alarmed or angered making a noise which has been compared to the clucking of a fowl.

  • A mere noise is an irregular disturbance.

  • A noise such as the roar due to traffic in a town may correspond physically in that it could probably be resolved into a nearly continuous series of wave-lengths, but psychically it is of no interest.

  • We do not use such noise, but rather seek to avoid it.

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