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nigeria

nigeria

nigeria Sentence Examples

  • Nigeria rod.

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  • The population of Nigeria is estimated at 15,000,000.

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  • These native cloths are exceedingly durable, and many of them are ornamented by using dyed yarns and in other ways: Southern Nigeria (Lagos) and northern Nigeria are the most important cotton countries amongst the British possessions on the coast.

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  • Geographical Journal (London, 1904); A Tropical Dependency, by Lady Lugard (London, 1905); the Colonial Office Reports on Northern Nigeria from 1902 onward, and other works cited under NIGERIA.

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  • Calabar estuary is mainly formed by the Cross river (q.v.), but receives also the waters of the Calabar and other streams. The Rio del Rey creek at the eastern end of the estuary marks the boundary between (British) Nigeria and (German) Cameroon.

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  • In Nigeria the Hausa tribes are coming to be better known, and to respond to the Christian teaching.

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  • This officer reached Cape Coast from Nigeria on the 26th of May.

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  • The chief ports are Lagos (q.v.), capital of Southern Nigeria, with a population of about 50,000; Calabar (q.v.), pop. about 15,000, known as Old Calabar and Duke Town, on the Calabar river; Opobo, Bonny Town and Brass Town, all on the rivers of the same name.

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  • The administrative headquarters of Northern Nigeria are at Zungeru, on the Kaduna river, in 6° 09' 40" E., 9 0 48' 32" N.

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  • gauge was built (1901-1902)in Northern Nigeria between Barijuko on theKaduna and the capital, Zungeru, and proved most successful and lucrative.

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  • - Throughout Nigeria local trade is active and has shown rapid increase under British rule.

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  • This officer reached Cape Coast from Nigeria on the 26th of May.

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  • The chief ports are Lagos (q.v.), capital of Southern Nigeria, with a population of about 50,000; Calabar (q.v.), pop. about 15,000, known as Old Calabar and Duke Town, on the Calabar river; Opobo, Bonny Town and Brass Town, all on the rivers of the same name.

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  • Northern Nigeria contributes to the cotton exported from Lagos.

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  • CALABAR (or OLD Calabar), a seaport of West Africa in the British protectorate of Southern Nigeria, on the left bank of the Calabar river in 4° 56' N., 8° 18' E., 5 m.

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  • Northern Nigeria contributes to the cotton exported from Lagos.

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  • To attempt any complete list of the tribes inhabiting Northern Nigeria would be vain.

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  • by Bornu, which is partly in the British protectorate of Nigeria and partly in the German protectorate of Cameroon.

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  • Northern Nigeria is the seat of a very large native cotton industry, to supply the demand for cotton robes for the Mahommedan races inhabiting the country.

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  • In Southern Nigeria the association has met with only slight success; in Northern Nigeria, a working arrangement was entered into with the Niger Company, and a small ginning establishment was set to work in February 1906.

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  • Guggisberg since 1907 (1:125,000 and 1:200,000); southern and northern Nigeria are adequately represented on the maps of the general staff (1:250,000).

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  • Nigeria Protectorate.

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  • It is officially known as the Abeokuta province of the Southern Nigeria protectorate.

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  • For this reason, amongst others, no census had been taken up to 1906 of Northern Rhodesia, the British possessions and protectorates of eastern Africa, or, again, of Nigeria and the protectorates attached to the West African colonies of Gambia, Sierra Leone and Lagos.

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  • The value of the trade (imports and exports) of Southern Nigeria (exclusive of Lagos) increased from £1,566,000 in1894-1895to £3,464,000 in 1905.

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  • In Northern Nigeria up to the moment of the British occupation the foreign trade was chiefly in the hands of Tripoli Arabs whose caravans crossed the desert at great risk and expense, and carried to the markets of Kuka and Kano tea, sugar and other European goods, taking away the skins and feathers which constituted the principal articles of export to the Mediterranean coast.

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  • Inquiries made under the auspices of the British Cotton Growing Association have led to the conclusion that Northern Nigeria offers the most promising field contained within the empire for the growth of cotton required to render Lancashire looms independent of foreign supplies.

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  • Steps have been taken to stimulate the native industry, and it is hoped that cotton may take the place in Northern Nigeria which palm oil and kernels occupy in the coast zone.

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  • Major Dixon Denham and Captain Hugh Clapperton entered the country now known as Northern Nigeria from the north in 1823, crossing the desert from Tripoli.

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  • The principal treaties relating to the German frontiers were negotiated in 1886 and 1893: the Anglo-French treaties were more numerous, those of 1890 and 1898, which laid down the main lines of division between French and British possessions on the northern and western frontiers of Nigeria, having been supplemented by many lesser rectifications of frontier.

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  • In these circumstances it was judged advisable to place the territories of the Royal Niger Company, to which the general name of Nigeria had been given, under the direct control of the crown.

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  • On the contrary it was presumed with justice that their overthrow would be hailed Progress in Southern Nigeria, 1885= 1906.

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  • These conditions were that all rights of conquest acquired by the Fulani throughout Northern Nigeria passed to Great Britain, that for the future every sultan and emir and principal officer of state should be appointed by Great Britain, that the emirs and chiefs so appointed should obey the laws of the British government, that they should no longer buy and sell slaves, nor enslave people, that they should import no firearms, except flint-locks, that they should enforce no sentences in their courts of law which were contrary to humanity, and that the British government should in future hold rights in land and taxation.

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  • The defensive force - the Northern Nigeria Regiment of the West African Frontier Force - is constituted by law, and the proclamation contains a military code based on the Army Act with modifications necessary in local circumstances.

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  • This was followed in February 1906 by the amalgamation of the two administrations under the style of " the Colony and Protectorate of Southern Nigeria," with headquarters at Lagos town.

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  • Nigeria Protectorate.

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  • Robinson (London, 1896); Northern Nigeria, by Sir F.

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  • LOKOJA, a town of Nigeria, at the junction of the Niger and Benue rivers, founded in 1860 by the British consul, W.

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  • KANO, one of the most important provinces of the British protectorate of Northern Nigeria.

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  • After the occupation by the British in 1903 the province was organized for administration on the same system as that adopted throughout northern Nigeria.

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  • His mother, Lady Randolph Churchill, divorced her second husband, George Cornwallis-West, in 1913; and married in 1918, as her third husband, Montague Phippen Porch, formerly a Government official in Nigeria.

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  • In 1899 another South African mission was started, ultimately locating itself at Mashukulumbwe, and a few years later work was begun in Southern Nigeria.

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  • Nigeria.

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  • They brought horses and horned cattle, unknown in these regions until then, and they founded well-organized states, like that of Adamawa, now divided between Cameroon and the British protectorate of Nigeria.

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  • Banking is in the hands of the Bank of British West Africa and the Bank of Nigeria.

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  • The southern portion of the territories was amalgamated with the Niger Coast Protectorate, the whole district taking the name of the Protectorate of Southern Nigeria, while the northern portion, extending from a line drawn slightly above 7° N.

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  • to the frontier of the French possessions on the north and including the confluence of the Niger and the Benue at Lokoja, was proclaimed a protectorate under the name of Northern Nigeria.

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  • In Northern Nigeria in 1900 the establishment of British authority remained still to be effected.

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  • The transference of influence from the company to the government was officially effected on the 1st of January 1900, on which day the Union Jack was hoisted at Lokoja, and the Northern Nigeria formation of a local administration was entered upon.

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  • The emir of Sokoto held the position of religious as well as political head of all the lesser states of Northern Nigeria, and in response to friendly overtures on the part of the British administration had declared that between Sokoto and Great Britain there could be nothing but war.

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  • Throughout Northern Nigeria all chiefs, Mahommedan and Pagan, now hold their appointments under the British crown and take the oath of allegiance to the British sovereign.

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  • After the conquest of the Hausa States in1902-1903the king's writ ran - with the exception of a few districts inhabited by primitive savages - through the whole area known as Northern Nigeria.

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  • The political reasons which had resulted in the Nigerian territories being divided into three distinct administrations no longer existing, it was decided to unite them under one government, and as a first step in that direction Sir Walter (then Mr) Egerton was in 1904 appointed both governor of Lagos and high commissioner of Southern Nigeria.

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  • In Northern Nigeria, which continued for the time to be a separate protectorate, Sir Frederick Lugard was, at the beginning of 1907, succeeded as high commissioner by Sir Percy Girouard.

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  • In view of the approaching unification of Southern and Northern Nigeria, the money needed, about £1,250,000, was raised as a loan by Southern Nigeria.

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  • By this means the natives of Nigeria were secured in the possession of their land - the government imposing land taxes, which are the equivalent of rent.

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  • - Of early books dealing with large areas of Nigeria, H.

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  • See also Lady Lugard, A Tropical Dependency (London, 1905); Boyd Alexander, From the Niger to the Nile (London, 1907); C. Larymore, A Resident's Wife in Nigeria (London, 1908); the annual Reports on Southern and Northern Nigeria issued by the Colonial Office; E.

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  • Dayrell, Folk Stories from Southern Nigeria (London, 1910).

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  • Lugard, "Northern Nigeria," in Geographical Journal (July 1904); Grimal de Guirodon, Les Puls (1887); E.

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  • Brackenbury, A Short Vocabulary of the Fulani Language (Zungeru, 1907); the articles Nigeria and Sokoto and authorities there cited.

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  • Wallace in a report on Northern Nigeria ("Colonial Office" series, No.

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  • ILLORIN, a province of British West Africa in the protectorate of Nigeria.

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  • After the assumption of authority by the British government in 1900, Illorin was organized for administration on the same system as the remainder of northern Nigeria.

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  • The Ibani in Southern Nigeria recognized Adum the father-god, Okoba the mother-god and Eberebo the son-god.

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  • BIDA, a town and administrative district in the British protectorate of Northern Nigeria.

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  • (See also NIGERIA: History.)

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  • BAUCHI, a province in the highlands of the British protectorate of Northern Nigeria.

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  • They form the principal watershed not only of the province of Bauchi, but of the protectorate of Northern Nigeria.

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  • In 1904 the province was organized for administration on the same system as the rest of Northern Nigeria, and the reigning emir took the oath of allegiance to the British crown.

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  • Among the chief British protectorates are: The African groups, consisting of the western group - Gambia;; Sierra Leone; Ashanti (northern territory); Northern Nigeria; Southern Nigeria (with which is amalgamated Lagos).

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  • It is now divided between the British protectorate of Nigeria (which includes the chief town Yola, q.v.) and the German colony of Cameroon.

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  • BENIN, the name of a country, city and river of British West Africa, west of the main channel of the Niger, forming part of the protectorate of Southern Nigeria.

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  • In physical characteristics,my reccommend climate, flora and fauna, Benin in no way differs from the rest of the southern portion of Nigeria.

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  • The king and chiefs responsible for the massacre were placed on their trial by Sir Ralph Moor, high commissioner for Southern Nigeria; the king was deposed and deported to Calabar, and the chiefs, six in all, were executed.

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  • Bacon, Benin, the City of Blood (London, 1898), by a member of the punitive expedition of 1897; the annual Reports on Southern Nigeria, issued by the ' Colonial Office, London.

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  • BASSA, a province of the British protectorate of Northern Nigeria, occupying the angle made by the meeting of the Benue river with the Niger.

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  • by the frontier of Southern Nigeria, and E.

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  • Early in the 16th century the Igbira (Okpoto or Ibo) were one of the most powerful pagan peoples of Nigeria and had their capital at Iddah.

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  • The Bassas are a very remarkable pagan race who permeate the entire protectorate of Northern Nigeria, and are to be found in small colonies in almost every province.

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  • Spirits, of which the importation is forbidden in Northern Nigeria, are freely smuggled over the border from Southern Nigeria.

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  • IBADAN, a town of British West Africa, in Yorubaland, Southern Nigeria, 123 m.

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  • the eastern division forms the Borgu province of the British protectorate of Nigeria.

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  • Up to the period of inclusion within the protectorate of Nigeria little or nothing was known of the country, though there were interesting legends of the antiquity of its history.

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  • (See NIGERIA and BUSSA.)

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  • Brass, Nigeria >>

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  • Sixty miles lower down is the mouth of the (left hand) tributary the Kaduna, a river of some magnitude which gives access to Zungeru, the headquarters of the British administration in Northern Nigeria.

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  • 1 Captain Claud Alexander died of fever in northern Nigeria on the 30th of November 1904.

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  • Jackson, "The Anglo-German Boundary Expedition in Nigeria," Geo.

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  • The British Blue Books, Correspondence relating to Railway Construction in Nigeria (1905) and Further Correspondence, &c. (1909), contain information about the navigability of the lower Niger and of the Kaduna.

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  • Nigeria >>

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  • The second group of Sudanese states Em,YYWatker sc is almost entirely within the British protectorate of Northern Nigeria.

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  • SOKOTO, an important Fula state of west central Sudan, now a province of the British protectorate of Nigeria.

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  • The province has been organized on the same principle as the other provinces of Northern Nigeria.

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  • Robinson, Hausaland (London, 1896); The Annual Reports on Northern Nigeria, issued since 1900 by the Colonial Office, London; Sir F.

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  • Lugard, "Northern Nigeria," in Geo.

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  • , See also BORNEO; NIGERIA; BRIT.

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  • I rode shotgun in an ancient Ford with a flag of Nigeria painted on the dashboard while Howie hung over the seat amid a month's supply of fast food wrappers and not a few empty beer cans.

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  • The amount constitutes more than half of the total aid package announced for Nigeria.

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  • addressable market for Nigeria, a country with a much smaller overall population, is significantly larger.

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  • affidavit of claim from the High Court of Justice of Nigeria.

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  • affidavit of facts sworn to at the Federal High Court of Nigeria.

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  • In Nigeria, armed bandits - who have hit five vehicles - are a bigger threat.

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  • bio diesel is more destructive than crude oil from Nigeria.

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  • brutality of regimes like those in Congo, Gabon or Nigeria.

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  • In Burma and Nigeria today, civil resistance offers the one slim hope of avoiding all-out civil war and new killing fields.

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  • He died in a plane crash in 1996 in Nigeria.

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  • Stories have been set in Asia, Russia, Nigeria, a future dystopia, wartime London, and 19th Century New Zealand.

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  • He even ran for president of Nigeria in 1983, only to find himself banned from politics by government edict.

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  • ethnic groups in Nigeria.

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  • Sea Wing is the leading airfreight forwarder to Nigeria with guaranteed space allocations on cargo flights to Lagos and Port Harcourt.

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  • gum Arabic is the product of Acacia Senegal, abundant in dry tropical west Africa from Senegal to northern Nigeria.

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  • Physical centers for Braille reading The Inlaks library seems to be the model library for the visually handicapped in Nigeria.

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  • In Burma and Nigeria today, civil resistance offers the one slim hope of avoiding all-out civil war and new killing fields.

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  • My ' crime ' was to refuse to break the law by rigging Nigeria's Independence elections.

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  • My ' crime ' was to refuse to break the law by rigging Nigeria's Independence elections.

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  • There are 36 states in Nigeria and with a unicameral legislature.

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  • lingua franca of the technological world in which Nigeria is seeking to operate.

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  • oil multinationals Nigeria is rich and the Delta is truly opulent in terms of its raw materials and natural resources.

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  • I also think 5.1 is particularly obnoxious through its pretense to reach outwith the country of Nigeria.

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  • Undeterred, Macmillan re-read a life of Machiavelli, and turned his attention to Nigeria and its newly discovered oil fields.

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  • pheasant pluckers in Nigeria?

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  • plane crash in 1996 in Nigeria.

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  • maize porridge is the weaning food for babies in Nigeria.

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  • I nipped into the post office this morning and asked the postmistress about sending money via MoneyGram to Nigeria.

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  • restated the commitment of the Islamic Movement to the establishment of an " Islamic Republic of Nigeria.

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  • The centers may also help increase the number of business travelers who visit Nigeria.

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  • By this time the British had created a wasteland in Nigeria.

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  • by Bornu, which is partly in the British protectorate of Nigeria and partly in the German protectorate of Cameroon.

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  • KANO, one of the most important provinces of the British protectorate of Northern Nigeria.

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  • After the occupation by the British in 1903 the province was organized for administration on the same system as that adopted throughout northern Nigeria.

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  • (See NIGERIA: History; and SoKoTo.) Consult the Travels of Heinrich Barth (new ed., London, 1890); Hausaland, by C. H.

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  • Robinson (London, 1896); Northern Nigeria, by Sir F.

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  • Geographical Journal (London, 1904); A Tropical Dependency, by Lady Lugard (London, 1905); the Colonial Office Reports on Northern Nigeria from 1902 onward, and other works cited under NIGERIA.

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  • His mother, Lady Randolph Churchill, divorced her second husband, George Cornwallis-West, in 1913; and married in 1918, as her third husband, Montague Phippen Porch, formerly a Government official in Nigeria.

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  • These native cloths are exceedingly durable, and many of them are ornamented by using dyed yarns and in other ways: Southern Nigeria (Lagos) and northern Nigeria are the most important cotton countries amongst the British possessions on the coast.

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  • Northern Nigeria is the seat of a very large native cotton industry, to supply the demand for cotton robes for the Mahommedan races inhabiting the country.

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  • In Southern Nigeria the association has met with only slight success; in Northern Nigeria, a working arrangement was entered into with the Niger Company, and a small ginning establishment was set to work in February 1906.

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  • In 1899 another South African mission was started, ultimately locating itself at Mashukulumbwe, and a few years later work was begun in Southern Nigeria.

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  • Guggisberg since 1907 (1:125,000 and 1:200,000); southern and northern Nigeria are adequately represented on the maps of the general staff (1:250,000).

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  • It is officially known as the Abeokuta province of the Southern Nigeria protectorate.

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  • LOKOJA, a town of Nigeria, at the junction of the Niger and Benue rivers, founded in 1860 by the British consul, W.

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  • from the mouth of the Niger, and is of considerable commercial importance (see Nigeria and Kabba).

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  • For this reason, amongst others, no census had been taken up to 1906 of Northern Rhodesia, the British possessions and protectorates of eastern Africa, or, again, of Nigeria and the protectorates attached to the West African colonies of Gambia, Sierra Leone and Lagos.

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  • CALABAR (or OLD Calabar), a seaport of West Africa in the British protectorate of Southern Nigeria, on the left bank of the Calabar river in 4° 56' N., 8° 18' E., 5 m.

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  • (See Nigeria for trade returns.)

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  • Calabar estuary is mainly formed by the Cross river (q.v.), but receives also the waters of the Calabar and other streams. The Rio del Rey creek at the eastern end of the estuary marks the boundary between (British) Nigeria and (German) Cameroon.

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  • In Nigeria the Hausa tribes are coming to be better known, and to respond to the Christian teaching.

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  • He had done much to establish British influence on the Niger, but after his death the British government abolished the consulate (1866), and it was through private enterprise that some twenty years later the district where Baikie had worked so successfully was finally secured for Great Britain (see Nigeria).

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  • Nigeria rod.

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  • by British Nigeria, N.

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  • They brought horses and horned cattle, unknown in these regions until then, and they founded well-organized states, like that of Adamawa, now divided between Cameroon and the British protectorate of Nigeria.

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  • The temperature in the central part of the protectorate is much the same average as at the coast, but the range is far greater, varying from a shade minimum of 59° to a shade maximum of 107 0.1 The rainfall is much scantier on the plateaus than in the maritime regions, averaging in Northern Nigeria about 50 in.

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  • The population of Nigeria is estimated at 15,000,000.

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  • The most important race in Northern Nigeria is that of the Hausa (q.v.), among whom the superior classes adopted Mahommedanism in the 13th and 14th centuries.

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  • To attempt any complete list of the tribes inhabiting Northern Nigeria would be vain.

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  • above Lokoja, the river terminus of the Northern Nigeria railway; Egga, Mureji (at the Kaduna confluence), Jebba and Bussa.

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  • The administrative headquarters of Northern Nigeria are at Zungeru, on the Kaduna river, in 6° 09' 40" E., 9 0 48' 32" N.

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  • gauge was built (1901-1902)in Northern Nigeria between Barijuko on theKaduna and the capital, Zungeru, and proved most successful and lucrative.

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  • - Throughout Nigeria local trade is active and has shown rapid increase under British rule.

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  • Of palm kernels 1 See Colonial Office Reports, Northern Nigeria Mineral Survey 1906-1907; Southern Nigeria Mineral Survey 1905-1907 (Miscellaneous, Nos.

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  • The value of the trade (imports and exports) of Southern Nigeria (exclusive of Lagos) increased from £1,566,000 in1894-1895to £3,464,000 in 1905.

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  • In Northern Nigeria up to the moment of the British occupation the foreign trade was chiefly in the hands of Tripoli Arabs whose caravans crossed the desert at great risk and expense, and carried to the markets of Kuka and Kano tea, sugar and other European goods, taking away the skins and feathers which constituted the principal articles of export to the Mediterranean coast.

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  • Inquiries made under the auspices of the British Cotton Growing Association have led to the conclusion that Northern Nigeria offers the most promising field contained within the empire for the growth of cotton required to render Lancashire looms independent of foreign supplies.

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  • Steps have been taken to stimulate the native industry, and it is hoped that cotton may take the place in Northern Nigeria which palm oil and kernels occupy in the coast zone.

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  • Banking is in the hands of the Bank of British West Africa and the Bank of Nigeria.

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  • Major Dixon Denham and Captain Hugh Clapperton entered the country now known as Northern Nigeria from the north in 1823, crossing the desert from Tripoli.

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  • The principal treaties relating to the German frontiers were negotiated in 1886 and 1893: the Anglo-French treaties were more numerous, those of 1890 and 1898, which laid down the main lines of division between French and British possessions on the northern and western frontiers of Nigeria, having been supplemented by many lesser rectifications of frontier.

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  • (See Africa, § 5.) It was not until 1909 that the whole of the frontier between Nigeria and the French and German possessions had been definitely demarcated.

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  • In these circumstances it was judged advisable to place the territories of the Royal Niger Company, to which the general name of Nigeria had been given, under the direct control of the crown.

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  • The southern portion of the territories was amalgamated with the Niger Coast Protectorate, the whole district taking the name of the Protectorate of Southern Nigeria, while the northern portion, extending from a line drawn slightly above 7° N.

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  • to the frontier of the French possessions on the north and including the confluence of the Niger and the Benue at Lokoja, was proclaimed a protectorate under the name of Northern Nigeria.

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  • In Northern Nigeria in 1900 the establishment of British authority remained still to be effected.

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  • The transference of influence from the company to the government was officially effected on the 1st of January 1900, on which day the Union Jack was hoisted at Lokoja, and the Northern Nigeria formation of a local administration was entered upon.

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  • The emir of Sokoto held the position of religious as well as political head of all the lesser states of Northern Nigeria, and in response to friendly overtures on the part of the British administration had declared that between Sokoto and Great Britain there could be nothing but war.

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  • On the contrary it was presumed with justice that their overthrow would be hailed Progress in Southern Nigeria, 1885= 1906.

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  • These conditions were that all rights of conquest acquired by the Fulani throughout Northern Nigeria passed to Great Britain, that for the future every sultan and emir and principal officer of state should be appointed by Great Britain, that the emirs and chiefs so appointed should obey the laws of the British government, that they should no longer buy and sell slaves, nor enslave people, that they should import no firearms, except flint-locks, that they should enforce no sentences in their courts of law which were contrary to humanity, and that the British government should in future hold rights in land and taxation.

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  • Throughout Northern Nigeria all chiefs, Mahommedan and Pagan, now hold their appointments under the British crown and take the oath of allegiance to the British sovereign.

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  • After the conquest of the Hausa States in1902-1903the king's writ ran - with the exception of a few districts inhabited by primitive savages - through the whole area known as Northern Nigeria.

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  • The defensive force - the Northern Nigeria Regiment of the West African Frontier Force - is constituted by law, and the proclamation contains a military code based on the Army Act with modifications necessary in local circumstances.

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  • The political reasons which had resulted in the Nigerian territories being divided into three distinct administrations no longer existing, it was decided to unite them under one government, and as a first step in that direction Sir Walter (then Mr) Egerton was in 1904 appointed both governor of Lagos and high commissioner of Southern Nigeria.

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  • This was followed in February 1906 by the amalgamation of the two administrations under the style of " the Colony and Protectorate of Southern Nigeria," with headquarters at Lagos town.

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  • In Northern Nigeria, which continued for the time to be a separate protectorate, Sir Frederick Lugard was, at the beginning of 1907, succeeded as high commissioner by Sir Percy Girouard.

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  • In view of the approaching unification of Southern and Northern Nigeria, the money needed, about £1,250,000, was raised as a loan by Southern Nigeria.

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  • By this means the natives of Nigeria were secured in the possession of their land - the government imposing land taxes, which are the equivalent of rent.

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  • - Of early books dealing with large areas of Nigeria, H.

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  • See also Lady Lugard, A Tropical Dependency (London, 1905); Boyd Alexander, From the Niger to the Nile (London, 1907); C. Larymore, A Resident's Wife in Nigeria (London, 1908); the annual Reports on Southern and Northern Nigeria issued by the Colonial Office; E.

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  • Dayrell, Folk Stories from Southern Nigeria (London, 1910).

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  • The ruling caste in Nigeria, on the other hand, despise their pastoral brethren, and through generations of polygamy with the conquered tribes have become more Negroid in type, black, burly and coarse featured.

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  • Lugard, "Northern Nigeria," in Geographical Journal (July 1904); Grimal de Guirodon, Les Puls (1887); E.

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  • Brackenbury, A Short Vocabulary of the Fulani Language (Zungeru, 1907); the articles Nigeria and Sokoto and authorities there cited.

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  • Wallace in a report on Northern Nigeria ("Colonial Office" series, No.

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  • Trade is chiefly with Yola, a town on the Benue in British Nigeria, and with Khartum via Wadai.

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  • ILLORIN, a province of British West Africa in the protectorate of Nigeria.

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  • After the assumption of authority by the British government in 1900, Illorin was organized for administration on the same system as the remainder of northern Nigeria.

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  • (See also NIGERIA and LAGOS.)

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  • The Ibani in Southern Nigeria recognized Adum the father-god, Okoba the mother-god and Eberebo the son-god.

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  • BIDA, a town and administrative district in the British protectorate of Northern Nigeria.

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  • S.S.E., the river terminus of the Northern Nigeria railway.

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  • (See also NIGERIA: History.)

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  • BAUCHI, a province in the highlands of the British protectorate of Northern Nigeria.

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  • They form the principal watershed not only of the province of Bauchi, but of the protectorate of Northern Nigeria.

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  • In 1904 the province was organized for administration on the same system as the rest of Northern Nigeria, and the reigning emir took the oath of allegiance to the British crown.

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  • Among the chief British protectorates are: The African groups, consisting of the western group - Gambia;; Sierra Leone; Ashanti (northern territory); Northern Nigeria; Southern Nigeria (with which is amalgamated Lagos).

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  • It is now divided between the British protectorate of Nigeria (which includes the chief town Yola, q.v.) and the German colony of Cameroon.

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  • (See also CAMEROON and NIGERIA, and the bibliographies there given.)

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  • BENIN, the name of a country, city and river of British West Africa, west of the main channel of the Niger, forming part of the protectorate of Southern Nigeria.

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  • In physical characteristics,my reccommend climate, flora and fauna, Benin in no way differs from the rest of the southern portion of Nigeria.

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  • The king and chiefs responsible for the massacre were placed on their trial by Sir Ralph Moor, high commissioner for Southern Nigeria; the king was deposed and deported to Calabar, and the chiefs, six in all, were executed.

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  • Bacon, Benin, the City of Blood (London, 1898), by a member of the punitive expedition of 1897; the annual Reports on Southern Nigeria, issued by the ' Colonial Office, London.

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  • BASSA, a province of the British protectorate of Northern Nigeria, occupying the angle made by the meeting of the Benue river with the Niger.

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  • by the frontier of Southern Nigeria, and E.

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  • Early in the 16th century the Igbira (Okpoto or Ibo) were one of the most powerful pagan peoples of Nigeria and had their capital at Iddah.

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  • The Bassas are a very remarkable pagan race who permeate the entire protectorate of Northern Nigeria, and are to be found in small colonies in almost every province.

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  • Spirits, of which the importation is forbidden in Northern Nigeria, are freely smuggled over the border from Southern Nigeria.

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  • IBADAN, a town of British West Africa, in Yorubaland, Southern Nigeria, 123 m.

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  • the eastern division forms the Borgu province of the British protectorate of Nigeria.

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  • Up to the period of inclusion within the protectorate of Nigeria little or nothing was known of the country, though there were interesting legends of the antiquity of its history.

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  • (See NIGERIA and BUSSA.)

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  • Brass, Nigeria >>

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  • Sixty miles lower down is the mouth of the (left hand) tributary the Kaduna, a river of some magnitude which gives access to Zungeru, the headquarters of the British administration in Northern Nigeria.

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  • 1 Captain Claud Alexander died of fever in northern Nigeria on the 30th of November 1904.

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  • Jackson, "The Anglo-German Boundary Expedition in Nigeria," Geo.

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  • Talbot, "Survey Work by the Alexander Gosling Expedition: Northern Nigeria 1904-1905," idem (February 1906); Boyd Alexander, From the Niger to the Nile, vol.

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  • The British Blue Books, Correspondence relating to Railway Construction in Nigeria (1905) and Further Correspondence, &c. (1909), contain information about the navigability of the lower Niger and of the Kaduna.

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  • The second group of Sudanese states Em,YYWatker sc is almost entirely within the British protectorate of Northern Nigeria.

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  • It includes the sultanate of Sokoto and its dependent emirates of Kano, Bida, Zaria, &c., and the ancient sultanate of Bornu, which, with Adamawa, is partly within the German colony of Cameroon (see Nigeria and Cameroon).

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  • SOKOTO, an important Fula state of west central Sudan, now a province of the British protectorate of Nigeria.

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  • The province has been organized on the same principle as the other provinces of Northern Nigeria.

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  • (See also NIGERIA; FULA; and HAUSA.) See the Travels of Dr Barth (London 1857); Lady Lugard, A Tropical Dependency (London, 1905); P. L.

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  • Robinson, Hausaland (London, 1896); The Annual Reports on Northern Nigeria, issued since 1900 by the Colonial Office, London; Sir F.

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  • Lugard, "Northern Nigeria," in Geo.

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  • , See also BORNEO; NIGERIA; BRIT.

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  • He, however, restated the commitment of the Islamic Movement to the establishment of an Islamic Republic of Nigeria.

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  • The centers may also help increase the number of business travelers who visit Nigeria.

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  • By this time the British had created a wasteland in Nigeria.

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  • Sade was born Helen Folasade Adu on January 16, 1959, in Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria.

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  • Although albinism can affect all races, other parts of the world have a much higher rate; for example, albinism is found in about 20 out of every 100,000 people in southern Nigeria.

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  • Most of the remaining virus can be found on the Indian subcontinent and Nigeria.

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  • Attempts to immunize children in Indian have met with good results, but Nigeria halted their immunization sites due to rumors that Western donors had tampered with the vaccine to spread HIV and cause sterility in Muslim males.

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  • Following a ban on the vaccine that lasted nearly one year, the virus spread across Nigeria to 10 African countries that were previously polio-free.

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  • The Muslim leaders in Nigeria lifted the ban in summer 2004.

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  • Finding job openings in Nigeria can be difficult, especially if you don't already live there.

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  • Once your visa is granted, you are okay to travel to Nigeria.

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  • This basically means you must become a resident of Nigeria.

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  • For more information on becoming an expatriate, or foreign-born resident, of Nigeria, visit Nigeria Business Info or contact the Nigerian embassy in your home country.

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  • Nigeria is the most populous country on the African continent.

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  • Nigeria has an abundance of oil, but much of the country lives in poverty.

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  • Nigeria spent many years under military rulers who mishandled the country's finances.

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  • Due to ongoing political instability, your safety while working in Nigeria can be a concern.

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  • In October, 2007, the U.S. State Department issued a warning for those considering travel to Nigeria.

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  • You should carefully evaluate the risks to your safety before pursuing job openings in Nigeria.

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  • Nigeria is one of the largest scam capitals of the world.

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  • Even if you aren't planning to work in health care, the possibility that you will come in contact with someone else's blood is increased because of the high crime rate in Nigeria.

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  • Malaria, Meningitis and Hepatitis A are also prevalent in Nigeria.

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  • Reforms to the country's social policies opened opportunities for a variety of industries to base their operations in Nigeria.

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  • Banking is a fast-growing industry in Nigeria.

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  • If you've weighed all the pros and cons and you're ready to find job openings in Nigeria, there are some sites that can assist in your search.

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  • These sites list openings, links to companies hiring in Nigeria and helpful information for job seekers.

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  • International shipping is available to all countries except Venezuela, Guatemala, Nigeria and Zanzibar.

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  • Purported to be someone writing to you from Nigeria (or another country - the country doesn't matter), the writer tugs at your heart strings and asks for help.

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  • Onweagba grew up in Nigeria and was voted the "Face of Africa" at the age of 16.

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  • by British Nigeria, N.

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  • NIGERIA, a British protectorate in West Africa occupying the lower basin of the Niger and the country between that river and Lake Chad, including the Fula empire (i.e.

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  • The temperature in the central part of the protectorate is much the same average as at the coast, but the range is far greater, varying from a shade minimum of 59° to a shade maximum of 107 0.1 The rainfall is much scantier on the plateaus than in the maritime regions, averaging in Northern Nigeria about 50 in.

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  • The animals of Nigeria include the elephant, lion, leopard, giraffe, hyena, West-African buffalo, many kinds of antelope and gazelle and smaller game.

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  • The most important race in Northern Nigeria is that of the Hausa (q.v.), among whom the superior classes adopted Mahommedanism in the 13th and 14th centuries.

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  • above Lokoja, the river terminus of the Northern Nigeria railway; Egga, Mureji (at the Kaduna confluence), Jebba and Bussa.

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  • Of palm kernels 1 See Colonial Office Reports, Northern Nigeria Mineral Survey 1906-1907; Southern Nigeria Mineral Survey 1905-1907 (Miscellaneous, Nos.

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  • Trade is chiefly with Yola, a town on the Benue in British Nigeria, and with Khartum via Wadai.

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  • S.S.E., the river terminus of the Northern Nigeria railway.

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  • NIGERIA, a British protectorate in West Africa occupying the lower basin of the Niger and the country between that river and Lake Chad, including the Fula empire (i.e.

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  • The animals of Nigeria include the elephant, lion, leopard, giraffe, hyena, West-African buffalo, many kinds of antelope and gazelle and smaller game.

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    1
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