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nicol

nicol Sentence Examples

  • After an interval the polarization begins to be incomplete in the perpendicular direction, the light which reaches the eye when the nicol is set to minimum transmission being of a beautiful blue, much richer than anything that can be seen in the earlier stages.

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  • The "correctness" of his attitude on all public questions won for him the commendation of Catholic writers; he is not included in Nicol Burne's list of "periurit apostatis"; but his policy and influence were misliked by James VI., who, when the Assembly had elected Arbuthnot to the charge of the church of St Andrews, ordered him to return to his duties at King's College.

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  • Even Iranian kings in the last century B.C. found pleasure in composing, or listening to, Greek tragedies, and Herod the Great kept Greek men of letters beside him and had spasmodic ambitions to make his mark as an orator or author (Nicol.

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  • NICOL 1768-18511, Scottish physicist, was born about 1768, and died Edinburgh on the 2nd of September 1851.

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  • James Nicol (1769-1819), the poet, was minister of Traquair, and his son James Nicol (1810-1879), the geologist and professor of natural history in Aberdeen University, was born in the manse.

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  • In the early r6th century the use of the vernacular is extended, chiefly in the treatment of historical and polemical subjects, as in Murdoch Nisbet's version of Purvey (in MS. till 1901), a compromise between northern and southern usage; Gau's (q.v.) Richt Vay, translated from Christiern Pedersen; Bellenden's (q.v.) translation of Livy and Scottish History; the Complaynt of Scotlande, largely a mosaic of translation from the French; Ninian Winzet's (q.v.) Tractates; Lesley's (q.v.) History of Scotland; Knox's (q.v.) History; Buchanan's (q.v.) Chamaeleon; Lindesay of Pitscottie's (q.v.) History; and the tracts of Nicol Burne and other exiled Catholics.

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  • 729; Nicol.

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  • Nicol Saunderson (1682-1739), Euler and Lambert helped in developing the theory, and much was done by Lagrange in his additions to the French edition of Euler's Algebra (1795).

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  • ix.; Nicol.

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  • In a second type, called Nicol's prisms, one stream is removed by total reflection.

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  • In a Nicol's prism it is the extraordinary stream that passes; in a prism suggested by E.

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  • These prisms have the advantage of economy of material and of a greater field than the ordinary Nicol's prism, but a difficulty seems to be experienced in finding a suitable permanent cement.

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  • 30 a formed - the one from two parts of a rhomb of spar, the other from two portions of a Nicol's prism - the two halves of the field are analysed in slightly different planes; but these, though they have certain advantages, are now seldom employed, partly on account of a difficulty in their construction and partly because their sensitiveness cannot be adjusted.

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  • The more usual half-shade analyser is available for light of only one frequency, as it depends upon the action of a half-wave plate, in traversing which the plane of polarization is turned until it makes the same angle with the principal section as at first but on the opposite side: half the field is covered with the plate, to which is attached a Nicol's prism with its principal section inclined at a small angle to that of the plate.

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  • Of polarimeters for the study of rotary polarization there are three principal forms. In Wild's polaristrobometer, light from a soda flame, rendered parallel by a lens, is polarized by a Nicol's prism, and after traversing the space into which the active substance is to be inserted, falls on a Savart's plate placed in front of an astronomical telescope of low power, that contains in its eyepiece a Nicol's prism, which with the plate forms a Savart's analyser.

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  • Soda light, first sifted by passage through a plate of potassium bichromate, traverses in succession a lens, a Nicol's prism, and a glass plate half covered with a half-wave plate of quartz, that is cut parallel to the optic axis and has its principal section inclined at a small angle to that of the prism.

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  • This combination forms a halfshade polarizer, the sensitiveness of which can be varied by a slight adjustment that can be given to the Nicol.

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  • In order to correct this, the light after analysation is passed through another plate of quartz and then the sensitive tint may be more or less restored by cutting off some colour, the same for the whole field, by a Nicol's prism placed in the eyepiece of the telescope.

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  • James Nicol >>

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  • 1789), grandfather of Lord Macaulay, the historian, and the Rev. Donald M ` Nicol (1735-1802), who took up the defence of the Highlands against Dr Johnson, were ministers of Lismore.

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  • Nicol moved to game ball with a backhand drop and then Power put a backhand boast into the tin.

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  • Co-promoter Nicol said: " That was a tough match and the tournament schedule makes a brutal sport even more brutal.

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  • In the women's event, the top two seeds Nicol David and Rachael Grinham made their debuts after first round byes.

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  • The British champion from Eastbourne in Sussex brushed aside her sixth-seeded opponent in 37 minutes to set up a semi-final clash with Nicol David.

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  • seesaw battle followed as White started finding his power and had Nicol moving to the corners.

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  • semifinal match, they had played each other 36 times with Nicol holding a two-match edge.

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  • He had a fantastic opportunity to win the game but tinned the forehand volley with Nicol out of position.

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  • When quenched as far as possible by rotation of a nicol prism, it exhibits a residue of a more intense blue colour; and further it is found that the direction of the most nearly complete polarization becomes inclined to the direction of the primary rays.

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  • After an interval the polarization begins to be incomplete in the perpendicular direction, the light which reaches the eye when the nicol is set to minimum transmission being of a beautiful blue, much richer than anything that can be seen in the earlier stages.

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    0
  • The "correctness" of his attitude on all public questions won for him the commendation of Catholic writers; he is not included in Nicol Burne's list of "periurit apostatis"; but his policy and influence were misliked by James VI., who, when the Assembly had elected Arbuthnot to the charge of the church of St Andrews, ordered him to return to his duties at King's College.

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    0
  • Even Iranian kings in the last century B.C. found pleasure in composing, or listening to, Greek tragedies, and Herod the Great kept Greek men of letters beside him and had spasmodic ambitions to make his mark as an orator or author (Nicol.

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    0
  • NICOL 1768-18511, Scottish physicist, was born about 1768, and died Edinburgh on the 2nd of September 1851.

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    0
  • James Nicol (1769-1819), the poet, was minister of Traquair, and his son James Nicol (1810-1879), the geologist and professor of natural history in Aberdeen University, was born in the manse.

    0
    0
  • In the early r6th century the use of the vernacular is extended, chiefly in the treatment of historical and polemical subjects, as in Murdoch Nisbet's version of Purvey (in MS. till 1901), a compromise between northern and southern usage; Gau's (q.v.) Richt Vay, translated from Christiern Pedersen; Bellenden's (q.v.) translation of Livy and Scottish History; the Complaynt of Scotlande, largely a mosaic of translation from the French; Ninian Winzet's (q.v.) Tractates; Lesley's (q.v.) History of Scotland; Knox's (q.v.) History; Buchanan's (q.v.) Chamaeleon; Lindesay of Pitscottie's (q.v.) History; and the tracts of Nicol Burne and other exiled Catholics.

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  • 729; Nicol.

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    0
  • Nicol Saunderson (1682-1739), Euler and Lambert helped in developing the theory, and much was done by Lagrange in his additions to the French edition of Euler's Algebra (1795).

    0
    0
  • ix.; Nicol.

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    0
  • In a second type, called Nicol's prisms, one stream is removed by total reflection.

    0
    0
  • In a Nicol's prism it is the extraordinary stream that passes; in a prism suggested by E.

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    0
  • These prisms have the advantage of economy of material and of a greater field than the ordinary Nicol's prism, but a difficulty seems to be experienced in finding a suitable permanent cement.

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    0
  • Savart's analyser consists, of a Savart's plate (see above) connected to a Nicol's prism, the principal section of which bisects the angle between the principal.

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  • 30 a formed - the one from two parts of a rhomb of spar, the other from two portions of a Nicol's prism - the two halves of the field are analysed in slightly different planes; but these, though they have certain advantages, are now seldom employed, partly on account of a difficulty in their construction and partly because their sensitiveness cannot be adjusted.

    0
    0
  • The more usual half-shade analyser is available for light of only one frequency, as it depends upon the action of a half-wave plate, in traversing which the plane of polarization is turned until it makes the same angle with the principal section as at first but on the opposite side: half the field is covered with the plate, to which is attached a Nicol's prism with its principal section inclined at a small angle to that of the plate.

    0
    0
  • Of polarimeters for the study of rotary polarization there are three principal forms. In Wild's polaristrobometer, light from a soda flame, rendered parallel by a lens, is polarized by a Nicol's prism, and after traversing the space into which the active substance is to be inserted, falls on a Savart's plate placed in front of an astronomical telescope of low power, that contains in its eyepiece a Nicol's prism, which with the plate forms a Savart's analyser.

    0
    0
  • Soda light, first sifted by passage through a plate of potassium bichromate, traverses in succession a lens, a Nicol's prism, and a glass plate half covered with a half-wave plate of quartz, that is cut parallel to the optic axis and has its principal section inclined at a small angle to that of the prism.

    0
    0
  • This combination forms a halfshade polarizer, the sensitiveness of which can be varied by a slight adjustment that can be given to the Nicol.

    0
    0
  • In order to correct this, the light after analysation is passed through another plate of quartz and then the sensitive tint may be more or less restored by cutting off some colour, the same for the whole field, by a Nicol's prism placed in the eyepiece of the telescope.

    0
    0
  • James Nicol >>

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    0
  • 1789), grandfather of Lord Macaulay, the historian, and the Rev. Donald M ` Nicol (1735-1802), who took up the defence of the Highlands against Dr Johnson, were ministers of Lismore.

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  • Can Peter Nicol maintain his current rich vein of form to regain the title, or will Jonathon Power stop the Scot again?

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  • A seesaw battle followed as White started finding his power and had Nicol moving to the corners.

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  • Before this semifinal match, they had played each other 36 times with Nicol holding a two-match edge.

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  • He had a fantastic opportunity to win the game but tinned the forehand volley with Nicol out of position.

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