Nicaragua sentence example

nicaragua
  • Belt, A Naturalist in Nicaragua; H.
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  • LEON, the capital of the department of Leon, Nicaragua, an episcopal see, and the largest city in the republic, situated midway between Lake Managua and the Pacific Ocean, 50 m.
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  • Enterprises: (1) Foreign missions in Labrador, Alaska, Canada, California, West Indies, Nicaragua, Demerara, Surinam, Cape Colony, Kaffraria, German East Africa, North Queensland, West Himalaya.
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  • DOUROUCOULI, apparently the native name (perhaps derived from their cries) of a small group of American monkeys ranging from Nicaragua to Amazonia and eastern Peru, and forming the genus Nyctipithecus.
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  • The loss of Nicaragua rubber in drying is estimated at 15%.
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  • A.) Mosquito Coast And Reserve (MosQuIT1A or RESERvA Mosquita), a division of the republic of Nicaragua, officially styled the department of Zelaya.
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  • Although its name is sometimes applied to the whole eastern seaboard of Nicaragua - and even to Mosquitia in Honduras, i.e.
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  • It is the seat of a Moravian mission, and has a good harbour, with regular steamship services to Greytown in Nicaragua, and to New Orleans.
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  • This caused great dissatisfaction among the Indians, who shortly afterwards revolted; and on the 28th of January 1860 Great Britain and Nicaragua concluded the treaty of Managua, which transferred to Nicaragua the suzerainty over the entire Caribbean coast from Cape Gracias a Dios to Greytown, but granted autonomy to the Indians in the more limited Mosquito Reserve (the area described above).
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  • But on his death in 1864 Nicaragua refused to recognize his successor.
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  • The reserve nevertheless continued to be governed by an elected chief, aided by an administrative council, which met in Bluefields; and the Indians denied that the suzerainty of Nicaragua connoted any right of interference with their internal affairs.
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  • The question was referred for arbitration to the emperor of Austria, whose award published in 1880, upheld the contention of the Indians, and affirmed that the suzerainty of Nicaragua was limited by their right of self-government.
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  • After enjoying almost complete autonomy for fourteen years, the Indians voluntarily surrendered their privileged position, and on the 10th of November 1894 their territory was formally incorporated in that of the republic of Nicaragua, as the department of Zelaya.
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  • See "A Bibliography of the Mosquito Coast of Nicaragua," by Courtney de Kalb, in Bulletin of the American Geog.
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  • The former is found in Mexico, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Panama; the latter in Guatemala, Nicaragua and Costa Rica.
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  • About 1530 he appears to have revisited the Spanish court, but on what precise errand is not known; the confusion concerning this period of his life extends to the time when, after visits to Mexico, Nicaragua, Peru and Guatemala, he undertook an expedition in 1537 into Tuzulutlan, the inhabitants of which were, chiefly through his tact, peaceably converted to Christianity, mass being celebrated for the first time amongst them in the newly founded town of Rabinal in 1538.
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  • CHINANDEGA, or Chinendega, the capital of the department of Chinandega in western Nicaragua, 10 m.
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  • by Nicaragua, E.
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  • of the southern shores of the river San Juan and of Lake Nicaragua, terminates at Salinas Bay on the Pacific; its southern frontier skirts the valley of the Sixola or Tiliri, strikes south-east along the crests of the Talamanca Mountains as far as 9° N., and then turns sharply south, ending in Burica Point.
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  • The transcontinental railway from Limon to Puntarenas was begun in 1871, and forms the nucleus of a system intended ultimately to connect all the fertile parts of the country, and to join the railways of Nicaragua and Panama.
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  • In 1897 the state joined the Greater Republic of Central America, established in 1895 by Honduras, Nicaragua and Salvador, but dissolved in 1898.
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  • The boundary question between Costa Rica and Nicaragua was referred to the arbitration of the president of the United States, who gave his award in 1888, confirming a treaty of 1858; further difficulties arising from the work of demarcation were settled by treaty in 1896.
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  • The investigations made by Dr Walter Lehmann in Central America (1907-1909), prove that these Mexican elements were extended through Guatemala, Salvador, a small part of Nicaragua (the territory of the Nicaraos) and on several places in the peninsula of Nicoya (Costa Rica) amongst the autochthonous Chorotega or Mangue.
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  • In the nearly unexplored central part of Nicaragua Dr Lehmann found fragments of painted polychrome clay pottery similar to objects known from the Ulloa Valley (Honduras) amongst other ceramic pieces which seem to have been left by the ancestors of the Sumo Indians, now extinct in that territory.
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  • It is possible that these remains of Mayan pottery came into central Nicaragua as articles of commerce.
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  • It is significant that Mayan civilization cannot be traced in any other part of Nicaragua or Costa Rica.
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  • The Sumo-Misquito Indians occupied the Atlantic coast and the interior of Nicaragua and Honduras, where they still live in small tribes; a dialect of the hitherto unknown Sumo languages.
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  • is the Matagalpan, now extinct in Nicaragua, and nearly identical with the Matagalpan is the language spoken by the Indians of Cacaopera in Salvador (Ultra-Lempa territory).
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  • A linguistic relationship can be established between all the Indian languages spoken on the Atlantic coast and in the interior of Nicaragua and Honduras.
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  • It may be possible either that these tribes are the autochthonous inhabitants who dwelt in Guatemala, Salvador, Honduras and Nicaragua before the immigration of the prehistoric Maya peoples; or else that they invaded this region after it had been deserted by a prehistoric oriental branch of the Maya family.
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  • The Chorotega race had its centre in Nicaragua (Pacific coast) and at one time extended thence as far as Guanacaste (Costa Rica); at another time it extended as far as Honduras (actual department of Choluteca) and into eastern Salvador as far as the state of Chiapas in Mexico, where the Chorotega penetrated amongst the Mixe.
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  • If we can be sure - and the linguistic evidence admits of no doubt - that the Chorotega had their centre in Nicaragua and thence extended north-westwards, it may be hoped that Chorotegan remains will be found in the vast territory occupied for many centuries by the Maya peoples in the Pacific part of Guatemala.
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  • 1854).1 Two filibustering expeditions at this time - one by William Walker, afterwards notorious in Nicaragua, in tower California 1 Santa Anna tried to get back to politics in Mexico after Maximilian's fall, without success.
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  • As an avowed expansionist, Pierce sympathized with the filibuster government set up in Nicaragua by William Walker, and finally accorded it recognition.
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  • GUATEMALA (sometimes incorrectly written Guatimala), a name now restricted to the republic of Guatemala and to its chief city, but formerly given to a captaincy-general of Spanish America, which included the fifteen provinces of Chiapas, Suchitepeques, Escuintla, Sonsonate, San Salvador, Vera Paz and Peten, Chiquimula, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Totonicapam, Quezaltenango, Sololá, Chimaltenango and Sacatepeques, - or, in other words, the whole of Central America (except Panama) and part of Mexico.
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  • Honduras now joined with Salvador, and Nicaragua and Costa Rica with Guatemala.
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  • Ocos was captured by his lieutenant, General Castillo, and the revolution speedily became a war, in which Honduras, Costa Rica and Salvador were openly involved against Guatemala, while Nicaragua was hostile.
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  • Its terms were embodied in a treaty signed (28th of September) by representatives of the four belligerent states, Nicaragua taking no part in the negotiations.
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  • The third Pan-American Conference was held in the months of July and August 1906, and was attended by the United States, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Salvador and Uruguay.
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  • For example between Costa Rica and Nicaragua by a treaty of the 15th of April 1858 the parties agreed that " on no account whatever, not even in case of war," should " any act of hostility be allowed between them in the port of San Juan del Norte nor on the river of that name nor on Lake Nicaragua " (art.
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  • Nicaragua, June 28, 1909.
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  • Nicaragua, July 17, 1909.
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  • GRANADA, the capital of the department of Granada, Nicaragua; 32 m.
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  • Granada is built on the north-western shore of Lake Nicaragua, of which it is the principal port.
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  • Belt, The Naturalist in Nicaragua (2nd ed.
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  • Of the various states of Central and South America, Nicaragua has the American Order of San Juan or Grey Town, founded in 1857, in three classes; and Venezuela that of the Bust of Bolivar, 1854, five classes; the ribbon is yellow, blue and red.
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  • Amongst Cycads, Zamia is confined to the New World, and amongst Conifers, Araucaria, limited to the southern hemisphere, has scarcely less antiquity; Pinus reaches as far south as Cuba and Nicaragua.
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  • Leon, Nicaragua >>
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  • America its natural occurrence appears to be limited to west of the Andes, but the tree is abundant in Mexico, Guatemala and Nicaragua.
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  • In Nicaragua the latex is collected in April, when the old leaves begin to fall and the new ones are appearing, during which time the latex is richest.
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  • Granada, Nicaragua >>
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  • The most important streams are those of the Atlantic seaboard, notably the San Juan, which drains Lake Nicaragua.
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  • Six small streams and one large river, the Rio Frio, flow across the northern frontier into Lake Nicaragua.
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  • Some Central-American peoples - were actually Mexican in their language and culture, American especially the Pipils and a large part of the population of Nicaragua.
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  • Dr Lehmann's archaeological and linguistic researches, especially in Salvador and Nicaragua, also enabled him to prove another very important fact, viz.
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  • The contest was finally settled in favour of Carrera, who besieged and occupied San Salvador and made himself dominant also in Honduras and Nicaragua.
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  • President Zaldivar, of Salvador, had been his friend, but after the issue of the decree of union he entered into a defensive alliance with Costa Rica and Nicaragua.
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  • NICARAGUA, a republic of Central America, bounded on the N.
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  • Nicaragua forms an irregular equilateral triangle with its base stretching for 280 m.
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  • along the Caribbean Sea from Cape Gracias a Dios southwards to the San Juan delta, and its apex at the Coseguina volcano, on the Bay of Fonseca, which separates Nicaragua on the Pacific side from Salvador.
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  • of the San Juan river and Lake Nicaragua, ` as far as a point parallel to the centre of the western shore of the lake.
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  • The coasts of Nicaragua are strikingly different in configuration.
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  • Between these two extremes the chief cones, proceeding southwards, are: the Maribios chain, comprising El Viejo (5840 ft.), Santa Clara, Telica, Orota, Las Pilas,'Axosco, Momotombo (4127 ft.), all crowded close together between the Bay of Fonesca and Lake Managua; Masaya or Popocatepac (which was active in 1670, 1782, 1857 and 5902, and attains a height of 2972 ft.), and Mombacho (4593 ft.), near Granada; lastly, in Lake Nicaragua the two islands of Zapatera and Ometepe or Omotepec with its twin peaks Ometepe (5 6 43 ft.) and Madera.
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  • In the great lacustrine depression of Nicaragua is collected all the drainage from the eastern versant of the volcanic mountains, from the sheer western escarpment of the main cordillera, and from a large area of northern Costa Rica.
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  • The accumulated waters which pour down into the depression are gathered into the two basins of Lake Managua and Lake Nicaragua.
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  • After the rains a portion of its overflow escapes southwards into the lower and larger Lake Nicaragua, through the Panaloya channel.
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  • The surface of Lake Nicaragua after the rains is 135 ft.
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  • Under the influence of the intermittent trade-winds Lake Nicaragua rises and falls regularly, whence the popular notion that it was a tidal lake.
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  • It is often asserted that these rapids were artificially formed by the Spaniards themselves to prevent the buccaneers from penetrating to Lake Nicaragua.
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  • But the evidence for past continuity is inconclusive, while there can be no doubt about the present severance of the two mountain systems. The main cordillera bears different names in different parts of Nicaragua.
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  • On the east, the main cordillera abuts upon the region of plateaus and savannas, which occupies nearly half of the area of Nicaragua.
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  • The hydrography of Nicaragua is curious in two respects: as in the Amazonian region all the large rivers flow east, none escaping to the Pacific; and the main watershed does not correspond with the main cordillera, which is inferior in this particular both to the volcanic mountains and to the plateau region.
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  • Nicaragua comes within the zone of the wet northeast trade-winds, which sweep inland from the Atlantic. The rainfall is heavy along the west side of the lacustrine basin, with an annual mean at Rivas of 102 in., but this figure is sometimes greatly exceeded on the east coast, where rain is common even in the dry season.
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  • Earthquakes are felt at times on the Pacific slope, but in Nicaragua they are less violent than in the neighbouring countries.
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  • The development of Nicaragua, unlike that of.
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  • At the beginning of the 10th century, Nicaragua had few good roads, and none at all east of the main cordillera.
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  • of private railway near the mouth of the Rio Grande, and private steam tramways on the western shore of Lake Nicaragua.
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  • Nicaragua joined the postal union in 1882, and the western provinces have a fairly complete telegraphic and telephonic system.
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  • of Lake Nicaragua for the purpose of colonization.
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  • Copper, coal, petroleum, silver and precious stones are also found, and there seems little reason to doubt that the mineral resources of Nicaragua, though undeveloped, are nearly as rich as those of Honduras.
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  • The history of the Mosquito Reserve and of the relations between Nicaragua and Great Britain is told in full under Mosquito Coast.
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  • The country is said to take its name from Nicaras or Nicaragua (also written Micaragua), a powerful Cholutec chief, ruling over most of the land between the lakes and the Pacific, who received Davila in a friendly spirit and accepted baptism at his hands.
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  • Nicaragua's capital seems to have occupied the site of the present town of Rivas.
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  • Hence, during the Spanish tenure, the history of Nicaragua is merged in that of the surrounding region.
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  • In 1823 Nicaragua joined the Federal Union of the five Central American states, which was dissolved in 1839.
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  • While it lasted Nicaragua was the scene of continual bloodshed, caused partly by its attempts to secede from the confederacy, partly by its wars with Costa Rica for the possession of the disputed territory of Guanacaste between the great lake and the Gulf of Nicoya, partly also by the bitter rivalries of the cities of Leon and Granada, respective headquarters of the Liberal and Conservative parties.
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  • The independent government of Nicaragua was afterwards distinguished almost beyond all other Spanish-American states by an uninterrupted series of military or popular revolts, by, which the whole people was impoverished and debased.
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  • The German government asserted that one of its consuls had been insulted, and demanded an indemnity of $30,000 (about L2800), a demand to which Nicaragua only submitted after all her principal ports had been blockaded.
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  • The successor of President Chamorro was General Zavala, whose administration brought Nicaragua to a higher degree of prosperity than she had ever known.
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  • He was succeeded in 1883 by Dr Cardenas, during whose presidency the attempt of General Barrios to unite the five Central American states was a cause of war between Guatemala and Honduras on one side, and Salvador, Nicaragua, and Costa Rica on the other.
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  • Under Carazo i s administration the boundary question between Nicaragua and Costa Rica had been settled by arbitration, the president of the United States acting as arbitrator.
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  • The president of Nicaragua adhered to this treaty, but the National Congress refused to ratify it.
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  • Under his government the incorporation of the Mosquito Reserve into the territory of Nicaragua took place.
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  • For this action Nicaragua was required to pay an indemnity of $15,000.
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  • In 1907 he carried to a successful issue the war which broke out in that year between Nicaragua and Honduras (q.v.).
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  • The execution (after alleged torture) of two citizens of the United States named Grace and Cannon, who were said to have fought in the revolutionary army under General Estrada, led to the despatch of United States warships to Nicaragua; but in the absence of full evidence President Zelaya's responsibility for the execution could not be proved.'
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  • On the 1st of December the United States broke off diplomatic relations with Nicaragua, and in an official note Secretary Knox described the Zelayan administration as a "blot on the history" of the republic. Fighting at Bluefields was prevented by the U.S. cruiser "Des Moines" (r8th December), an example followed at Greytown by the British cruiser "Scylla"; but elsewhere along the Atlantic coast the insurgents gained many victories.
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  • - For a general account of Nicaragua, see F.
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  • Squier, Nicaragua, &c. (2nd ed., London, 1871); J.
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  • Belt, The Naturalist in Nicaragua (London, 1888); A.
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  • Niederlein, The State of Nicaragua (Philadelphia, 1898); A.
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  • P. Davis, Hydrography of Nicaragua (U.S.A. Geological Survey report, No.
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  • 20) (1900); C. Medina, Le Nicaragua en 1900 (Paris, 1900); J.
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  • Walker, Ocean to Ocean: an Account, Personal and Historical, of Nicaragua and its People (Chicago, 1902).
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  • Pector, Etude economique sur la republique de Nicaragua (Neuchatel, 1893); Bulletins of the Bureau of American Republics (Washington); U.S.A. Consular and British Foreign Office Reports; official reports issued periodically at Managua, in Spanish.
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  • de Peralta, Nicaragua y Panama en el siglo X VI (Madrid, 1883); J.
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  • Gamez, Archivo historico de la Republica de Nicaragua (Managua, 1896); F.
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  • Ortega, Nicaragua en los primeros anos de su emancipacion politica (Paris, 1894); D.
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  • Lucas, Nicaragua: War of the Filibusters (Richmond, Va., 1896); C. Bovallius, Nicaraguan Antiquities (Stockholm, 1886).
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  • It is the natural outlet for the commerce of some of the richest parts of Honduras, Nicaragua and Salvador; and during the 19th century it exported large quantities of gold, silver and other ores, although its progress was retarded by the delay in constructing a transcontinental railway from Puerto Cortes.
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  • MANAGUA, the capital of Nicaragua, and of the department of Managua; on the southern shore of Lake Managua, and on the railway from Diriamba to El Viejo, 65 m.
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  • MASAYA, the capital of the department of Masaya, Nicaragua, 13 m.
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  • of Lake Nicaragua and the city of Granada, on the eastern shore of Lake Masaya, and on the Granada-Managua railway.
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  • Lake Masaya occupies an extinct crater; the isolated volcano of Masaya (3000 ft.) on the opposite side of the lake was active at the time of the conquest of Nicaragua in 1522, and the conquerors, thinking the lava they saw was gold, had themselves lowered into the crater at the risk of their lives.
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  • North-west of Colombia in the Caribbean Sea are several small islands belonging to the republic, two of which (Great and Little Corn Is.) lie very near the coast of Nicaragua.
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  • In 1854 Marcy had to deal with the complications growing out of the bombardment of San Juan del Norte (Greytown), Nicaragua, by the United States sloop-of-war " Cyane " for insults offered the American minister by its inhabitants and for their refusal to make restitution for damages to American property.
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  • The expedition of William Walker to Nicaragua in 1855 further complicated the Central American question.
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  • and a minimum, at the Culebra Pass, of 290 ft., the lowest point, except the interoceanic water-parting in Nicaragua, which is 153 ft., in the western continental system.
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  • Columbus in 1502 coasted along from Almirante Bay to Porto Bello Bay, where he planted a colony (Nombre de Dios) in November; the Indians destroyed it almost immediately; it was re-established in 1510, by Diego de Nicuessa, governor of the newly established province of Castilla del Oro, which included what is now Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Panama.
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  • CORINTO, a seaport on the Pacific coast of Nicaragua, in the department of Chinandega, built on the small island of Asserradores or Corinto, at the entrance to Realejo Bay, 65 m.
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  • The town, which was founded in 1849, and first came into prominence as a port in 1863, has a spacious and sheltered harbour, the best in Nicaragua.
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  • Coffee, gold, mahogany, rubber and cattle are largely exported; and more than half the foreign trade of Nicaragua passes through this port, which has completely superseded the roadstead of Realejo, now partly filled with sandbanks, but from 1550 to 1850 the principal seaport of the country.
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  • CAPUCHIN MONKEY, the English name of a tropical American monkey scientifically known as Cebus capucinus; the plural, capuchins, is extended to embrace all the numerous species of the same genus, whose range extends from Nicaragua to Paraguay.
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  • He wrote some Fragments historiques, studies on the sugarquestion, on the construction of a canal through Nicaragua, and on the recruiting of the army, and finally, in the Progres du Pas-de-Calais, a series of articles on social questions which were later embodied in his Extinction du pauperisme (1844).
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  • iguana farming in Nicaragua.
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  • restitution of land, cultural artifacts and even cultural knowledge are now common-place from Canada to Nicaragua to Australia.
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  • A makeshift tent in a roadside camp of jobless coffee workers near Matagalpa, northern Nicaragua.
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  • Most of Nicaragua's Caribbean lowlands area was inhabited by tribes that migrated north from what is now Colombia.
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  • Until 1855 Leon was the capital of Nicaragua, although its great commercial rival Granada contested its claim to that position, and the jealousy between the two cities often resulted in bloodshed.
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  • Leon was identified with the interests of the democracy of Nicaragua, Granada with the clerical and aristocratic parties.
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  • See Nicaragua; E.
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  • of the southern shores of the river San Juan and of Lake Nicaragua, terminates at Salinas Bay on the Pacific; its southern frontier skirts the valley of the Sixola or Tiliri, strikes south-east along the crests of the Talamanca Mountains as far as 9° N., and then turns sharply south, ending in Burica Point.
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  • GUATEMALA (sometimes incorrectly written Guatimala), a name now restricted to the republic of Guatemala and to its chief city, but formerly given to a captaincy-general of Spanish America, which included the fifteen provinces of Chiapas, Suchitepeques, Escuintla, Sonsonate, San Salvador, Vera Paz and Peten, Chiquimula, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Totonicapam, Quezaltenango, Sololá, Chimaltenango and Sacatepeques, - or, in other words, the whole of Central America (except Panama) and part of Mexico.
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  • The geology, fauna and flora of Nicaragua may be studied in connexion with those of the neighbouring countries (see Central America).
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  • First discovered by Columbus in 1502, Nicaragua was not regularly explored till 1522, when Gil Gonzalez Davila penetrated from the Gulf of Nicoya to the western provinces and sent his lieutenant Cordova to circumnavigate the great lake.
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  • The abrogation of the Clayton-Bulwer treaty in 1901, and the failure of the second French company to construct a canal between Colon and Panama (see Panama Canal) had, after many hesitations, induced the United States government to abandon the Nicaragua route and decide on adopting that of Panama.
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  • Claims for the restitution of land, cultural artifacts and even cultural knowledge are now common-place from Canada to Nicaragua to Australia.
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  • Nicaragua boasts Caribbean islands, 19 smoldering volcanoes and beautiful, unspoiled beaches.
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  • You can enjoy cigars from the Dominican Republic, Trinidad, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, Cameroon, and elsewhere.
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  • Lately, McConaughey has been accused of behaving less like an expectant dad and more like a single man during his recent trip to Nicaragua.
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  • Some of the service providers you'll find in the Americas include: Telcel (Mexico), Claro (Peru, Brazil), CTI Movil (Uruguay, Argentina, Paraguay), Porta (Ecuador), Claro Chile (Chile), Enitel (Nicaragua), and Comcel (Colombia).
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