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Nh sentence examples

nh
  • Grimaux by heating one part of glyoxylic acid with two parts of urea for ten hours at ioo° C.: 2CO(NH 2) 2 + CH(OH) 2 Oooh = 3h 2 O + C4H6N403.

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  • N:CH N N:C(CH3) N NH CO NH ' 'CH :CH CH NH2 C :CH C CH 3 CH :CH 0 Pyrimidine Cyanmethine Uracil

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  • the silver salt as being derived from the tautomeric imidobenzoic acid, C 6 1-1 5 C: (NH) -OH (J.

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  • The secondary and tertiary amides of the types (RCO) 2 NH and (RCO) 3 N may be prepared by heating the primary amides or the nitriles with acids or acid anhydrides to 200° C. Thiamides of the type R.

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  • Boron fluoride also combines with ammonia gas, equal volumes of the two gases giving a white crystalline solid of composition BF 3 NH 3 i with excess of ammonia gas, colourless liquids BF 3.2NH 3 and BF 3.3NH 3 are produced, which on heating lose ammonia and are converted into the solid form.

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  • It can also be prepared by heating borimide B2(NH)31 or by heating boron trioxide with a metallic cyanide.

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  • Borimide B 2 (NH) 3 is obtained on long heating of the compound B 2 S 3.6NH 3 in a stream of hydrogen, or ammonia gas at 115-120° C. It is a white solid which decomposes on heating into boron nitride and ammonia.

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  • 35, p. 7), who regard it as NO 2 -CH(CN) CO NH 2.

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  • Dibromcotinine on hydrolysis yields oxalic acid, methylamine and 0-methyl pyridyl ketone: C10H10Br2N20+3H20+0= H2C204-ECH 3 NH 2 +C 5 H 4 N 000H 3 +2HBr; whilst dibromticonine yields methylamine, malonic acid and nicotinic acid: C10H8Br2N202+ 4H20=CH 3 NH 2 +CH 2 (CO 2 H) 2 +C 5 H 4 N CO 2 H+2HBr, or if heated with zinc and caustic potash, methylamine and pyridyl-ay-dioxybutyric acid.

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  • The following formulae are important: N - CH C =CH/ - CH CH2 CH CH C/ NH CH / N CH2 N / N / N% CH CH H3C CH2 N-fl-Pyridylpyrrol, a0-pyridylpyrrol, nicotine.

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  • On the other hand, they were overcome by the Autariatae, an Illyrian tribe; the date of HO 2 C C =N NC 6 H 4 NH 2 NH.

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  • Silberrad (Ber., to be a dihydro HC NH N --> 1V NH CH.

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  • Carbon bisulphide combines with primary amines to form alkyl dithiocarbamates, which when heated lose sulphuretted hydrogen and leave a residue of a dialkyl thio-urea, CS 2 +2R NH 2 - R NH CSS NH 3 RCS(NHR)2+H2S; or if the aqueous solution of the dithiocarbamate be boiled with mercuric chloride or silver nitrate solution, a mustard oil (q.v.) is formed, R.NH CSS NH3R+HgC12-Hg(R NH CSS)2->2RNCS-}-HgS+H2S.

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  • NH 2; secondary, R2: NH; and tertiary, R3: N; the oxamines, R 3 N :0, are closely related to the tertiary ammonias, which also unite with a molecule of alkyl iodide to form salts of quaternary ammonium bases, e.g.

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  • Considering derivatives primarily concerned with transformations of the hydroxyl group, we may regard our typical acid as a fusion of a radical R CO - (named acetyl, propionyl, butyl, &c., generally according to the name of the hydrocarbon containing the same number of carbon atoms) and a hydroxyl group. By replacing the hydroxyl group by a halogen, acid-haloids result; by the elimination of the elements of water between two molecules, acid-anhydrides, which may be oxidized to acid-peroxides; by replacing the hydroxyl group by the group. SH, thio-acids; by replacing it by the amino group, acid-amides (q.v.); by replacing it by the group - NH NH2, acid-hydrazides.

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  • OH; R.CO Cl; (R.CO)20; R.CO SH; acid; acid-chloride; acid-anhydride; thio-acid; R CO NH 2 i R CO NH NH2.

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  • Thus from the acid-amides, which we have seen to be closely related to the acids themselves, we obtain, by replacing the carbonyl oxygen by chlorine, the acidamido-chlorides, R CC1 2 NH 2, from which are derived the imido-chlorides, R CC1:NH, by loss of one molecule of hydrochloric acid.

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  • By replacing the chlorine in the imido-chloride by an oxyalkyl group we obtain the imido-ethers, R C(OR') :NH; and by an amino group, the amidines, R C(NH 2): NH.

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  • The carbonyl oxygen may also be replaced by the oxime group,: N OH; thus the acids yield the hydroxamic acids, R C(OH): NOH, and the acid-amides the amidoximes, R C(NH 2): NOH.

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  • aniline, C 6 H 5 NH 2, monomethyl aniline, C 6 H 5 NH CH 3, and dimethyl aniline, C 6 H 5 N(CH 3) 2, are in increasing order of basicity.

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  • Thus in the tri-substitution derivatives six isomers, and no more, are possible when two of the substituents are alike; for instance, six diaminobenzoic acids, C 6 H 3 (NH 2) 2 000H, are known; when all are unlike ten isomers are possible; thus, ten oxytoluic acids, C 6 H 3 -CH 3.

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  • The diaminobenzene resulting from two of these acids is the ortho-compound; from three, the meta-; and from one the para-; this is explained by the following scheme: CH NH, NH, NH., IAO NH, N / NH HooCCNH, Cooh Nh, W.

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  • Syntheses of the Benzene Ring.-The characteristic distinctions NH NH, r.-NH, [[Cooh Cooh, _ + Nh2 Nh, H., Cooh]] x x x Tri.

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  • The compounds so obtained, alicyclic-,-tetrahydronaphthylamine and alicyclic-atetrahydronaphthol, closely resemble f3-aminodiethylbenzene, C 6 H 4 (C 2 H C 2 H 4 NH 2, and 3-oxydiethylbenzene,C 6 H 4 (C 2 H 5) C2H40H.

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  • If a-naphthylamine and a-naphthol be reduced, the hydrogen atoms attach themselves to the non-substituted half of the molecule, and the compounds so obtained resemble aminodiethylbenzene, C 6 H 3 NH 2 (C 2 H 5) 21 and oxydiethylbenzene, C 6 H 3.

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  • The three primary members are furfurane, thiophene and pyrrol, each of which contains four methine or CH groups, and an oxygen, sulphur and imido (NH) member respectively; a series of compounds containing selenium is also known.

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  • N=CHN=N N = CH NH N = CH?NH Triazole.

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  • Typical formulae are (R denoting 0, S or NH): Isomers are possible, for the condensation may be effected on the two carbon atoms symmetrically placed to the hetero-atom; these isomers, however, are more of the nature of internal anhydrides.

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  • In the case of the amines he decides in favour of the formulae H2C: NH3 2C NH2 H 3 C. NH CH3 H primary, secondary, tertiary.

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  • (- NH 2) groups.

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  • Jacobson, Lehrbuch der organischen Chemie; Richter-Anschutz, Organische Chemie (I I th ed., K 2 S04 K2 S04 (NH 4) 2 SO 4 =o% SO 4 = coo FIG.

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  • PYRROL, C 4 H 5 N or C 4 H 4 NH, an organic base found in coaltar and Dippel's oil.

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  • 'Bell, ' Ber., 1880, 13, p. 877); by distilling calcium pyroglutaminate: HO 2 C' CH(NH 2)'CH 2 'CH 2 'CO 2 H = C 4 H 4 NH+ C02+2H20 (L.

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  • Zinc dust and hydrochloric acid reduce pyrrol to pyrrolin (dihydropyrrol), C 4 H 6 NH, a liquid which boils at 90° C. (748 mm.); it is soluble in water and has strongly basic properties and an alkaline reaction.

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  • Hydriodic acid at high temperature reduces pyrrol to pyrrolidine (tetra-hydropyrrol), C 4 H 8 NH.

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  • The chlorine atom in this compound is replaced by the cyano-group, which is then reduced to the CH 2 NH 2.

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  • Ch2.Ch(C02h) I Nh.

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  • Knorr, by the action of ammonia on aceto-acetic ester, obtained (3-imidobutyric ester, which with nitrous acid yields a-isonitroso-(3-imidobutyric ester, CH 3 C(:NH) C(:N OH) CO 2 C 2 H 5.

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  • He also found that diaceto succinic ester reacts with compounds of the type NH 2 R(R = H, CH 3, OH, NHC 6 H 5, &c.) to form pyrrol derivatives CH3 CO CH CO 2 R, C(CH3) :C C02R A NH 2 R -?- - RN(CH 3 CO CH CO 2 R C(CH3) :C C02R By using compounds of the type NH 2 R and acetophenone acetoacetic ester C 6 H 5 CO CH 2.

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  • Beckmann, Ber., 1886, 1 9, p. 9 8 9; 188 7, 20, p. 2580), yielding as final products an acid-amide or anilide, thus: RC(:N OH)R'-RC(OH) :NR' ---> As regards the constitution of the oximes, two possibilities exist, namely >C: NOH, or > C' ?, and the first of these is presumably correct, since on alkylation and subsequent hydrolysis an alkyl hydroxylamine of the type NH 2 OR is obtained, and consequently it is to be presumed that in the alkylated oxime, the alkyl group is attached to oxygen, and the oxime itself therefore contains the hydroxyl group. It is to be noted that the oximes of aromatic aldehydes and of unsymmetrical aromatic ketones frequently exist in isomeric forms. This isomerism is explained by the HantzschWerner hypothesis (Ber., 1890, 23, p. II) in which the assumption is made that the three valencies of the nitrogen atom do not lie in the same plane.

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  • It behaves as a powerful reducing agent, and on hydrolysis with dilute mineral acids is decomposed into formaldehyde and hydroxylamine, together with some formic acid and ammonia, the amount of each product formed varying with temperature, time of reaction, amount of water present, &c. This latter reaction is probably due to some of the oxime existing in the form of the isomeric formamide HCO NH 2.

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  • Wallach (Ann., 1900, 312, p. 171) has shown that the saturated cyclic ketones yield oximes which by an application of the Beckmann reaction are converted into isoximes, and these latter on hydrolysis with dilute mineral acids are transformed into acyclic amino-acids; thus from cyclohexanone, e-amidocaproic acid (e-leucine) may be obtained: CH2" C NOH C CH 2 CH 2 7: ?12?CH2 CH2 NH /CH2 CH2 C02H CH2', An ingenious application of the fact that oximes easily lose the elements of water and form nitriles was used by A.

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  • The reactions are represented as (I) N2+3H2+2C0 -1-2H 2 0=2H CO 2 NH 4 (Ammonium formate).

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  • CO 2 NH 4 (Ammonium carbonate).

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  • Nitrogen combines with hydrogen to form ammonia, NH 3, hydrazine, N 2 H 4, and azoimide, N 3 H (qq.v.); the other known hydrides, N 4 H 4 and N5H5, are salts of azoimide, viz.

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  • NH 4 N3 and N2H4 N3H.

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  • Soc., 188 9, 55, p. 760), or when benzsulphohydroxamic acid, C 6 H 5 SO 2 NH OH, is treated in the same manner (0.

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  • Nitramide, NH 2 NO 2, is obtained by the action of sulphuric and nitric acids on potassium imidosulphonate, or by the action of ice-cold sulphuric acid on potassium nitro-carbamate (J.

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  • Dry hydrochloric acid gives ammonia but no nitrogen; with ammonia it gives N:SNH 2 and S :S(NH 2) 2; and with secondary amines it forms thiodiamines, S(NR2)2, nitrogen and ammonia being liberated.

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  • These decomposition products include: glycocoll or aminoacetic acid, NH 2 CH 2 Oooh, alanine d ucts.

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  • or aminopropionic acid, CH 3 � CH(NH 2) � COOH, a-aminobutyric acid, a-aminovalerianic acid, leucin or isobutyla-aminoacetic acid, (CH 3) 2 CH � CH 2.

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  • CH(NH 2) � Cooh, isoleucin, probably 0-aminocaproic acid, serin or a-amino-(-hydroxy propionic acid, aspartic acid or aminosuccinic acid, HOOC�CH 2 �CH(NH 2)�Cooh, glutaminic acid or a-amino-n-glutaric acid,HOOC� (CH 2) � CH(NH 2) � Cooh, diaminoacetic acid, a-O-diaminopropionic acid, lysin.

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  • or a-E-diamino-n-caproic acid, NH 2 (CH 2) 4.

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  • CH(NH 2) � Cooh, arginin or guanidine-a-amino-n-valerianic acid, (NH)(NH2)C�NH� (CH 2) 3 �CH(NH 2)�Cooh, ornithin or aa-diamino valerianic acid, � (CH 2) 3 � CH(NH 2) � Coon, -(3-imidazol propionic acid, [[Hooc� Ch(Nh 2) �Ch 2 � C: Ch�N:Ch�Nh]], proline or a-pyrrolidin carboxylic acid, [[Hooc� Ch.

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  • Nh]]�CH2�CH2�CH2, hydroxyproline, phenyl alanine or phenyl-a-aminopropionic acid, C 6 H 5 � CH 2 � CH(NH 2) � Cooh, tyrosine or p-hydroxyphenyl-aaminopropionic acid, phenyl ethylamine, p-hydroxyphenyl ethylamine, tryptophane or indol aminopropionic acid, A.

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  • CH(NH 2)� Cooh) B.

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  • cystin (stone-cystin), or a-thio-/3-aminoglyceric acid " disulphide," (NH 2 � CH 2 � CH: S.

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  • Long digestion of the acid with excess of phosphorus pentachloride results in the formation of the acid chloride, C 6 (0001),, which crystallizes in needles, melting at 190° C. By heating the ammonium salt of the acid to 150-160° C. as long as ammonia is evolved, a mixture of CO paramide (mellimide), C6 (CO > NH) 3, and ammonium euchroate is obtained.

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  • If a suspension of lead dichloride in hydrochloric acid be treated with chlorine gas, a solution of lead tetrachloride is obtained; by adding ammonium chloride ammonium plumbichloride, (NH 4) 2 PbC1 6, is precipitated, which on treatment with strong sulphuric acid yields lead tetrachloride, PbC1 4, as a translucent, yellow, highly refractive liquid.

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  • Semioxamazid, NH �CO�CO�NH�NH, has also been employed for the identification of aldehydes (W.

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  • A percolumbic acid, HCb04 nH 2 O, has been prepared by P. Melikoff and L.

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  • Bamberger, Ber., 1903, 3 6, p. 3 8 5): ?C NH 2 ? ?

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  • It is probably a hydroxy-compound, since it gives a red-brown colour with ferric chloride, reacts with phenyl isocyanate and with phosphorus pentachloride, and with benzoyl chloride yields dibenzhydroxamic acid, C 6 H 5 CO NH O.

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  • RR': C(NO) NO 2 - ERR': C(NH OH) 2 - > RR': C: N 0H+NH20H.

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  • Thiele, Ann., 1898, 302, p. 299): HN:CC NH NH2 OC C 6 H 5 NH N + -> HN:CC C C6 H 5 NH 2 OC C6H5 N = C/-C6H5 Wolff has obtained a chloro-derivative by the action of potassium cyanide on diazoacetophenone and subsequent treatment with acid.

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  • Busch, Ber., 1899, 32, p. 2960): N C(SH):N C 6 H 5 /N C:NC6H5 C. 2 S 7Hs " H s d-H N NH C,H 7 C7 "N N C,H7 C. Harries (Ber., 1895, 28, p. 1223) has also shown that as-phenylhydrazino-acetic esters, when heated with formamide and substituted formamides under pressure, yield dihydrotriazines: CO 2 R CO-NR'-CH H2 N(C6H5)NH2 +R'NH CHO --> CH 2 N(C 6 H 5) IV The phen-a-triazines are yellow-coloured crystalline compounds of a somewhat basic character.

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  • Pinner, Ber., 1892, 25, p. 1624): / NH N C?CsH 5 2C61 - 15 C +(CH 3 C0) 2 0 -> C6H5 C N; NH 2 N :C?CH3 or by the condensation of aromatic nitriles with acid chlorides in the presence of aluminium chloride (Eitner and Krafft, Ber., 1892, 25, p. 2263).

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  • M 2 SnC1 61 analogous to the chloroplatinates; the salt (NH 4) 2 SnC1 6 is known industrially as - "pink salt" on account of its use as a mordant to produce a pink colour.

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  • Stannous salt solutions yield a brown precipitate of SnS with sulphuretted hydrogen, which is insoluble in cold dilute acids and in real sulphide of ammonium, (NH 4) 2 S; but the yellow, or the colourless reagent on addition of sulphur, dissolves the precipitate as SnS 2 salt.

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  • t' rhos, horse, o15pov, urine), benzoyl glycocoll or benzoyl amidoacetic acid, C 9 H 9 NO 3 or C 6 H 5 CO NH CH 2 CO 2 H, an organic acid found in the urine of horses and other herbivorae.

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  • Its ethyl ester reacts with hydrazine to form hippuryl hydrazine, C,H 5 CO NH CH 2 CO NH NH 2, which was used by Curtius for the preparation of azoimide.

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  • Bladin HC -N (Ber., 1892, 25, p. 183) by the action of acetic)NH anhydride on dicyanophenylhydrazine (formed N: CH from cyanogen and phenylhydrazine), the resulting acetyl derivative losing water and yielding phenylmethylcyanotriazole, which, on hydrolysis, gives the free acid.

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  • HC=N CO NH CO NH HN CO ›NH, N=CH?

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  • NH' NH CO ?

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  • NH.

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  • HC:N ›NH N:CH ›NH HC:CH" Osotriazole (aa').

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  • CYANAMIDE, NC NH 2j the amide of normal cyanic acid, obtained by the action of ammonia on cyanogen chloride, bromide or iodide, or by the desulphurization of thio-urea with, mercuric oxide; it is generally prepared by the latter process.

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  • It is readily decomposed by water: Si(NH 2) 4 +2H 2 O=4NH 3 +S10 2 Above o° C. it decomposes thus: Si(NH 2) 4 =2HN3-}-Si(NH)2.

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  • The ketone, dihydroxyacetone, CH 2 OH CO CH 2 OH, was obtained by Piloty by condensing formaldehyde with nitromethane, reducing to a hydroxylamino compound, which is oxidized to the oxime of dihydroxyacetone; the ketone is liberated by oxidation with bromine water: 3H CHO + CH 3 NO 2 -- (CH 2 OH) 3 C NO 2 - (CH 2 OH) 3 C NH OH -- (CH 2 OH) 2 C: NOH - > (CH20H)2CO.

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  • This followed from a study of the decomposition products, there being obtained hemipinic acid (CH 3 0) 2 C 6 H 2 (000H) 2, and a substance which proved to be co - amino - ethyl - piperonyl carboxylic acid, CH 2 O 2 :C 6 H 2 [[Cooh-Ch 2 Ch 2 Nh]] 2.

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  • The structural relations of these compounds may be shown thus: NH 3; NH2R; Ammonia; primary amine; NHR 2; NR3; NR41.

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  • OH NH(CH 3) 2.

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  • Methylamine, CH 3 NH 2, occurs in Mercurialis perennis, in bone-oil, and herring brine.

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  • Dimethylamine, (CH 3) 2 NH, is found in Peruvian guano.

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  • Tetramethylene diamine (putrescine), NH 2 � (CH2)4.

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  • Pentamethylene diamine (cadaverine), NH 2.

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  • With dry ammonia at 60° the metal forms strontium ammonium, which slowly decomposes in a vacuum at 20° giving Sr(NH 3) 2; with carbon monoxide it gives Sr(CO) 2; with oxygen it forms the monoxide and peroxide, and with nitric oxide it gives the hyponitrite (Roederer, Bull.

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  • Its ethyl ester, known as oxamaethane, crystallizes in rhombic plates which melt at 114-115° C. Phosphorus pentachloride converts it into cyan-carbonic ester, the ethyl oxamine chloride first formed being unstable: ROOC CONH2 -R000 C(C1 2) NH 2 --)CN COOR.

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  • Semioxamazide, H 2 N CO CO-NH NH 2, is prepared by the action of hydrazine hydrate on oxamaethane (W.

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  • With concentrated ammonia auric oxide forms a black, highly explosive compound of the composition AuN2H3.3H20, named " fulminating gold "; this substance is generally considered to be Au(NH 2)NH.

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  • 3H20, but it may be an ammine of the formula [Au(NH 3) 2 (OH) 2 ]OH.

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  • (K,Na,NH 4)H 5 (PO 4)2, are also known; these may be regarded as composed of a monometallic phosphate with phosphoric acid, thus M'H 2 PO 4 H 3 PO 4.

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  • Other precipitants of phosphoric acid or its salts in solution are: ammonium molybdate in nitric acid, which gives on heating a canary-yellow precipitate of ammonium phosphomolybdate, 12[M00 3] (NH 4) 3 PO 4, insoluble in acids but readily soluble in ammonia; magnesium chloride, ammonium chloride and ammonia, which give on standing in a warm place a white crystalline precipitate of magnesium ammonium phosphate, Mg(NH 4)PO 4.6H 2 0, which is soluble in acids but highly insoluble in ammonia solutions, and on heating to redness gives magnesium pyrophosphate, Mg 2 P 2 0 7; uranic nitrate and ferric chloride, which give a yellowish-white precipitate, soluble in hydrochloric acid and ammonia, but insoluble in acetic acid; mercurous nitrate which gives a white precipitate, soluble in nitric acid, and bismuth nitrate which gives a white precipitate, insoluble in nitric acid.

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  • microcosmic salt: MH 2 PO 4 = MP0 3 +H 2 0, (NH 4) NaHPO 4 = NaP03+NH3+H20; they may also be obtained by acting with phosphorus pentoxide on trimetallic orthophosphates: Na3P04+P205 = 3NaP0 3.

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  • As regards its constitution, it has been given at different times the formulae NI 3, NHI 2, NH 2 I, N 2 H 3 I 3, &c., these varying results being due to the impurities in the substance, owing to the different investigators working under unsuitable conditions, and also to the decomposing action of light.

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  • Silberrad assigns the formula NH 3 �NI 3 to the compound, and explains the decomposition as taking place, 2NH3�N13+ 6Zn (C2H5)2 = 6ZnC 2 H 5 �I+2NH 3 +2N(C 2 H 5) 3.

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  • The aqueous solution of ammonia is very basic in its reactions, and since it is a weak electrolyte, one must assume the solution to contain a certain amount of ammonium hydroxide NH 4 OH, although it is probably chiefly composed of a solution of ammonia in water.

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  • The salts produced by the action of ammonia on acids are known as the ammonium salts and all contain the compound radical ammonium (NH 4).

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  • Ammonium chloride, NH 4 C1.

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  • Ammonium iodide, NH 4 I, can be prepared by the action of hydriodic acid on ammonia.

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  • Ammonium chlorate, NH 4 C10 3, is obtained by neutralizing chloric acid with either ammonia or ammonium carbonate, or by precipitating barium, strontium or calcium chlorates with ammonium carbonate.

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  • Ammonia gas passed into a strong aqueous solution of the sesquicarbonate converts it into normal ammonium carbonate, (NH 4) 2 CO 3, which can be obtained in the crystalline condition from a solution prepared at about 30° C. This compound on exposure to air gives off ammonia and passes back to ammonium bicarbonate.

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  • Ammonium bicarbonate, NH 4 �HCO 3, is formed as shown above and also by passing carbon dioxide through a solution of the normal compound, when it is deposited as a white powder, which has no smell and is only slightly soluble in water.

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  • Ammonium nitrate, NH 4 NO 3, is prepared by neutralizing nitric acid with ammonia, or ammonium carbonate, or by double decomposition between potassium nitrate and ammonium sulphate.

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  • Ammonium nitrite, NH 4 NO 2, is formed by oxidizing ammonia with ozone or hydrogen peroxide; by precipitating barium or lead nitrites with ammonium sulphate, or silver nitrite with ammonium chloride.

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  • The normal phosphate, (NH4)3P04,is obtained as a crystalline powder, on mixing concentrated solutions of ammonia and phosphoric acid, or on the addition of excess of ammonia to the acid phosphate (NH 4) 2 HPO 4.

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  • It is soluble in water, and the aqueous solution on boiling loses ammonia and the acid phosphate NH 4 H 2 PO 4 is formed.

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  • Diammonium hydrogen phosphate, (NH 4) 2 HPO 4, is formed by evaporating a solution of phosphoric acid with excess of ammonia.

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  • Ammonium dihydrogen phosphate, NH 4 �H 2 PO 4, is formed when a solution of phosphoric acid is added to ammonia until the solution is distinctly acid.

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  • Ammonium sulphide, (NH 4) 2 S, is obtained, in the form of micaceous crystals, by passing sulphuretted hydrogen mixed with a slight excess of ammonia through a well-cooled vessel; the hydrosulphide NH 4 �HS is formed at the same time.

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  • p. 283), if sulphuretted hydrogen is passed into strong aqueous ammonia at ordinary temperature, the compound (NH 4) 2 S�2NH 4 HS is obtained, which, on cooling to o C. and passing more sulphuretted hydrogen, forms the compound (NH4)2S� i 2NH 4 HS.

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  • On boiling with water, it is converted, first into the disulphonate NH(SO 3 K) 2 thus, N(S03K)3+H20=NH(S03K)2+KHS04, and ultimately into the monosulphonate NH 2 �S0 3 K.

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  • It unites directly with ammonia gas to form ammonium carbamate, NH 2 00ONH 4.

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  • Potassamide, NH 2 K, discovered by Gay-Lussac and Thenard in 1871, is obtained as an olive green or brown mass by gently heating the metal in ammonia gas, or as a white, waxy, crystalline mass when the metal is heated in a silver boat.

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  • Reduction of orthonitrocinnamic acid gives orthoaminocinnamic acid, C 6 H 4 (NH 2)CH:CH 000H, which is of theoretical importance, as it readily gives a quinoline derivative.

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  • ALLOXAN, or Mesoxalyl Urea, C 4 H 2 N 2 0 4 or CO NCO an oxidation product of uric acid, being NNH - CO/ obtained from it by the action of cold nitric acid, C 5 H 4 N 4 03 -}- H 2 O + 0= C4H2N204 -FCO(NH 2) 2.

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  • Ammonium cyanide, NH 4 NC, a white solid found to some slight extent in illuminating gas, is easily soluble in water and alcohol, and is very poisonous.

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  • It is obtained by passing ammonia gas over hot coal; by subliming a mixture of ammonium chloride and potassium cyanide; by passing a mixture of ammonia gas and chloroform vapour through a red hot tube; and by heating a mixture of ammonia and carbon monoxide: CO+2NH 3 = NH 4 NC+H 2 0.

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  • 935 0 - 2 (1900)] pass ammonia over a mixture of alkali or alkaline carbonate and charcoal, first at a dull red heat and then at a bright red heat: KHO + NH 3 + C = KNC + H 2 O.

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  • They behave in most respects as unsaturated compounds; they combine with hydrogen to form amines; with water to form acidamides; with sulphuretted hydrogen to form thio-amides; with alcohols, in the presence of acids, to form imido-ethers R C(:NH) OR'; with ammonia and primary amines to form amidines R C(:NH) NH 2 i and with hydroxylamine to form amidoximes, R C(:NOH) NH 2.

    0
    0
  • The reactions may probably be represented as follows: C 2 H5NC+C 2 H51+4C2H50H=C2H5NH2 HI+HC02C2H5+2 (C2H5)20, C 2 H 5 NC C2H5N(C2H5 I)C(+3C2H50H) -> (C 2 H 5) 2 NH HI-{- H C02C2H5 + (C2H5)20.

    0
    0
  • In many of these salts one finds that the elements of water are frequently found in combination with the metal, and further, that the ammonia molecule may be replaced by such other molecular groups as - N02, &c. Of the types studied the following may be mentioned: the diammine chromium thiocyanates, M[Cr(NH3)2 (SCN)4], the chloraquotetrammine chromic salts, R 1 2 [Cr(NH 3) 4 H 2 0 C1], the aquopentammine or roseo-chromium salts,R 1 3 [Cr(NH 3) 6.

    0
    0
  • H 2 0],thechlorpentammine or purpureo-chromium salts, R 1 2 [Cr(NH 3) 5 Cl], the nitrito pentammine or xanthochromium salts, R 1 2[N02 (NH3)5 Cr], the luteo or hexammine chromium salts, R 1 3[(NH3) 6 Cr], and the rhodochromium salts: where R 1 = a monovalent acid radical and M = a monovalent basic radical.

    0
    0
  • Their configuration was determined by their relationship to their oxalo-derivatives; the cis-dichloro chloride, [CrC 2 H 4 (NH 2) 2 C1 2 ]Cl-H 2 0, compound with potassium oxalate gave a carmine red crystalline complex salt, [Cr{C2H4(NH2)2}C204][CrC2H4(NH2)2-(C204)2]12H20, while from the trans-chloride a red complex salt is obtained containing the unaltered trans-dichloro group [CrC2H4(NH2)2 C12]

    0
    0
  • Amino-azo-benzene, C6H5 N2 C 6 H 4 NH 2, crystallizes in yellow plates or needles and melts at 126° C. Its constitution is determined by the facts that it may be prepared by reducing nitro-azo-benzene by ammonium sulphide and that by reduction with stannous chloride it yields aniline and.

    0
    0
  • C 6 H 5 N 2 C 6 H 3 (NH 2) 2, first prepared by O.

    0
    0
  • Triamino-azo-benzene: (meta-aminobenzene-azo-meta-phenylene diamine or Bismarck brown, phenylene brown, vesuvine, Manchester brown), NH 2.

    0
    0
  • as being quinone hydrazones, type R NH N: R l: 0.

    0
    0
  • Bamberger (Ber., 1898, 31, p. 455) has shown that the nitro-alkyl derivatives behave as though they possess the constitution of hydrazones, for on heating with dilute alkalies they split more or less readily into an alkaline nitrite and an acid hydrazide: C 6 H 5 NH N: C(N02)CH3+NaOH=NaN02+C6H5NH NH CO CH3.

    0
    0
  • On standing with 60% sulphuric acid for some time, it is converted into the isomeric acetaldehyde-phenylhydrazone, C 6 H 5 NH N: CH CH 3 (Ber., 1896, 2 9, P. 794).

    0
    0
  • H 3 C CO NH 3 CO CH 3 H3C C - NH - C CH3 On nitration it yields chiefly meta-nitro-benzaldehyde, crystallizing in needles which melt at 58° C. The ortho-compound may be obtained by oxidizing ortho-nitrocinnamic acid with alkaline potassium permanganate in the presence of benzene; or from ortho - nitrobenzyl chloride by condensing it with aniline, oxidizing the product so obtained to ortho-nitrobenzylidine aniline, and then hydrolysing this compound with an acid (Farben fabrik d.

    0
    0
  • To obtain the anhydrous salt, the double magnesium ammonium chloride, MgCl2 NH 4 C1.6H 2 O, is prepared by adding ammonium chloride to a solution of magnesium chloride.

    0
    0
  • Hofmann having previously shown that oxidation of pure aniline alone or of pure toluidine yielded no fuchsine, whilst oxidation of a mixture of aniline and para-toluidine gave rise to the fine red dyestuff para-fuchsine (pararosaniline hydrochloride) CH 3 C 6 H 4 NH 2 +2C 6 H 5 NH 2 +30 = HOC(C 6 H 4 NH 2) 3 +2H20.

    0
    0
  • HO C(C 6 H 4 NH 2) 3 HC1=H 2 0+(H 2 N C 6 H 4) 2 C: C 6 H 4: NH2C1.

    0
    0
  • Pararosaniline was reduced to the corresponding leuco compound (paraleucaniline), from which by diazotization and boiling with alcohol, the parent hydrocarbon was obtained (H 2 N C 5 H 4) 2 C:C 6 H 4 :NH 2 Cl - HC(C6H4NH2 HCl)3 - >HC(C6H4N2C13) Pararosaniline hydrochloride.

    0
    0
  • When heated with hydrazine hydrate at 150° C. it gives a-naphthyl hydrazine, C 1 oH 7 NH NH 2 Hoffmann, Ber., 1898, 31, p. 2909).

    0
    0
  • Replacement of - NH 2 by - NO 2 :-A well - cooled concentrated solution of potassium mercuric nitrate is added to a cooled solution of benzene diazonium nitrate, when the crystalline salt 2C6H5N2 N03, Hg(N02)2 is precipitated.

    0
    0
  • Replacement of - NH 2 by hydrogen :-This exchange is brought about, in some cases, by boiling the diazonium salt with alcohol; but I.

    0
    0
  • Bamberger (Ber., 18 94, 27, p. 9 1 4) obtained the diazoic acids, R NH NO 2, substances which he had previously prepared by similarly oxidizing the diazonium salts, by dehydrating the nitrates of primary amines with acetic anhydride, and by the action of nitric anhydride on the primary amines.

    0
    0
  • Phenyl nitramine, C 6 H S NH N02, is a colourless crystalline solid, which melts at 46° C. Sodium amalgam in alkaline solution reduces it to phenylhydrazine.

    0
    0
  • It is reduced by sodium amalgam (in alcoholic solution) to methylhydrazine, CH 3 NH NH 2.

    0
    0
  • The most simple case is presented by the two platinum compounds PtC12(NH3)2, the platosemidiammine chloride of Peyrone, and the platosammine chloride of Jules Reiset, the first formed according to the equation PtC1 4 K 2 + 2NH 3 = PtCl 2 (NH 3) 2 + 2KC1, the second according to Pt(NH 3) 4 C1 2 =PtC1 2 (NH 3) 2 +2NH 3, these compounds differing in solubility, the one dissolving in 33, the other in 160 parts of boiling water.

    0
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  • Jorgensen in the second dinitrotetramminecobalt chloride, [Co(NO 2) 2 (NH 3) 4 ]Cl, designated as flavo - whereas the older isomer of Gibbs was distinguished as croceo-salt.

    0
    0
  • C: (NH).

    0
    0
  • NH 2, which may be considered as derived from the acid-amides by replacement of oxygen by the divalent imino (= NH) group. They may be prepared by the action of ammonia or amines on imide chorides, or on thiamides (0.

    0
    0
  • When warmed with sulphuretted hydrogen they yield thiamides, R C: (NH) �NHR-+-H 2 S = R�C(NH 2)(SH)NHR=R�[[Csnh 2 +Nh 2 �R]] or RCS�NHR+NH3.

    0
    0
  • Acetamidine, CH 3 C: (NH)�NH 2, is alkaline in reaction, and readily splits up into acetic acid and ammonia when warmed with acids.

    0
    0
  • C: (NH) NH 2, forms colourless crystals which melt at 75-80° C. When warmed it breaks down into ammonia and cyanphenine (s-triphenyl triazine).

    0
    0
  • nh wz, mb.

    0
    0
  • Urea chloride, NH 2 CO C1 (L.

    0
    0
  • Nitrourea, H 2 N CO NH NO 2, prepared by adding urea nitrate to wellcooled concentrated sulphuric acid (J.

    0
    0
  • Amidourea, or semicarbazide, NH 2 CO NH NH 2, is best prepared from hydrazine sulphate and potassium cyanate (J.

    0
    0
  • Hydroxy-urea, N H2 CO NH OH, is produced from hydroxylamine and cyanic acid (W.

    0
    0
  • For example, aa-dimethyl urea is sweet, aß-dimethyl urea is tasteless; p-phenetol carbamide or dulcin, NH 2 CO NH C 6 H 4.0C 2 H 51 is sweet, while the di-p-phenetol carbamide, CO(NH C 6 H 4.0C 2 H 5) 21 is tasteless.

    0
    0
  • Acetyl urea, NH 2 CO NH 000H 31 formed by the action of acetic anhydride on urea, crystallizes in needles which melt at 212° C. and, on heating, strongly decomposes into acetamide and cyanuric acid.

    0
    0
  • Bromural or a-bromisovaleryl urea, NH 2 C0 NH C0 CHBr CH(CH 3) 2, has been introduced as an hypnotic; its action is mild, and interfered with by the presence of pain, cough or delirium.

    0
    0
  • Parabanic acid (oxalyl urea), C0[NH C0] 21 is formed by oxidizing uric acid; or by condensing oxalic acid and urea in the presence of phosphorus oxychloride.

    0
    0
  • Nh Co.

    0
    0
  • Nh Conh]] 2.

    0
    0
  • Tartronyl urea (dialuric acid), C0[NH CO]CH OH, formed by the reduction of alloxan (J.

    0
    0
  • Allophanic acid, NH 2 C0 NH CO 2 H, is not known in the free state, as when liberated from its salts, it is decomposed into urea and carbon dioxide.

    0
    0
  • Biuret (allophanamide), NH 2 CO NH CO NH 2, is formed by heating urea; by the action of ammonia on allophanic ester; and by heating urea to 140° C. and passing chlorine into the melt at 140-150° C. (J.

    0
    0
  • Hofmann, Ber., 1867, I, p. 27): [[Csnr+Nh 3 =Nh 2 Cs Nhr]]; [[Csnr+Nh2r=R Nh Cs Nhr]],.

    0
    0
  • or by heating the amide salts of the alkyl dithio-carbaminic acids, viz., NR CS S(NH 3 R).

    0
    0
  • Thiourea and many of its unsymmetrical derivatives have marked physiological action; thiourea causes a slowing of the pulse and respiration, cardiac failure, and death in convulsions; phenyl-, ethyland acetyl-thiourea are actively toxic. The most important derivative pharmacologically is allyl-thiourea, also known as thiosinamine or rhodallin, NH2 CS NH CH2 CH:CH2.

    0
    0
  • Thiosemicarbazide, NH 2 CS NH NH 2, prepared from hydrazine sulphate, potassium carbonate and thiocyanate (N.

    0
    0
  • The hydrochloride with potassium cyanate C(NH 2): N gives hydrazothio-carbonamide, NH2 C0 NH NH CS NH2.

    0
    0
  • It crystallizes (from water) in glistening leaflets which melt at 130° C. and boil at 288° C. Its silver salt behaves as if it were the salt of an imido benzoic acid, since it yields benzimido ethyl ether C 6 H 5 C(:NH) OC 2 H 5 with ethyl iodide (J.

    0
    0
  • Ortho-amino-benzoic acid, C 6 H 4 NH 2 000H (anthranilic acid), is closely related to indigo.

    0
    0
  • Ammonium Permanganate, NH 4 Mn0 4, explodes violently on rubbing, and its aqueous solution decomposes on boiling (W.

    0
    0
  • GUANIDINE, CN 3 H 5 or HN: C(NH 2) 2j the amidine of amidocarbonic acid.

    0
    0
  • It may be obtained synthetically by the action of ammonium iodide on cyanamide, CN NH2+ NH 4 I=CN 3 H 5 HI

    0
    0
  • By direct union with glycocoll acid, it yields glycocyamine, NH2 (HN): C NH CH 2 CO 2 H, whilst with methyl glycocoll (sarcosine) it forms creatine, NH2 (NH): C N(CH3) CH2 C02H.

    0
    0
  • By the action of nitric acid on guanidine in the presence of sulphuric acid, nitroguanidine, HN: C(NH 2) NH NO 2 (a substance possessing acid properties) is obtained; from which, by reduction with zinc dust, amidoguanidine, HN :C(NH 2) NH NH 2, is formed.

    0
    0
  • This amidoguanidine decomposes on hydrolysis with the formation of semicarbazide, NH 2 CO NH NH 21 which, in its turn, breaks down into carbon dioxide, ammonia and hydrazine.

    0
    0
  • On oxidation with potassium permanganate, it gives azodicarbondiamidine nitrate, NH 2 (HN) C N: N C:(NH) NH 2 2HNO 3, which, when reduced by sulphuretted hydrogen, is converted into the corresponding hydrazodicarbondiamidine, NH 2 (HN):C NH NH C:(NH) NH 2.

    0
    0
  • By the action of nitrous acid on a nitric acid solution of amidoguanidine, diazoguanidine nitrate, NH 2 (HN): C NH N 2 NO 3, is obtained.

    0
    0
  • This diazo compound is decomposed by caustic alkalis with the formation of cyanamide and hydrazoic acid, CH4N3 N03=N3H+CN NH2+ HN03, whilst acetates and carbonates convert it into amidotetra zotic acid, H2N C?NH - N.

    0
    0
  • By fusing guanidine with urea, dicyandiamidineH 2 N (HN): C NH CO NH 21 is formed.

    0
    0
  • The temperature must not be allowed to rise beyond a certain point, for the reaction NaC1+ NH 4 HC03= NaHCO 3 4-NH 4 C1 is reversible, and at a temperature of about 60° or 70° C. it is in fact practically going the wrong way, viz.

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  • They Also Indicate That It Is Much Larger, And Increases Considerably With Rise Of Temperature, In The Case Of More Condensible Vapours, Such As C1 2J Br 2, Or More Complicated Molecules, Such As Co 2, N 2 0, Nh 3, C 2 H 4.

    0
    0
  • nH 2 O (J.

    0
    0
  • Of the phosphotungstic acids the most important is phosphoduodecitungstic acid, H 3 PW, 2040 nH 2 O, obtained in quadratic pyramids by crystallizing mixed solutions of orthophosphoric and metatungstic acids.

    0
    0
  • Na2HPW12040 nH 2 O and Na3PW12040 nH20, are obtained by heating sodium hydrogen phosphate with a tungstate.

    0
    0
  • A OA, AN, NH, or OA, OB, OC, in C M the figure.

    0
    0
  • Voiceless nasals: mh; nh; ngh.

    0
    0
  • nh in inhale; r is trilled as in Italian.

    0
    0
  • (2) After nasals p, t, c, b, d, g became respectively mh, nh, ngh, m, n, ng; thus 2mperator gave ymherawdr, and ambactos (evidently a Brythonic as well as a Gaulish word) gave amaeth (m, though etymologically double, is written single).

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  • The above types of compounds may be represented by the following formulae: - N = CH N =C(NH2) NH - CH2 CH2 C >O' > O, H 2 CH2 - CH 2 CH2 - CH2 oxazoline aminooxazoline oxazolidines.

    0
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  • Prince Nh IL, who ascended the throne in 976 (365 All.).

    0
    0
  • Barium amide, Ba(NH 2) 2, is obtained from potassammonium and barium bromide.

    0
    0
  • Hantzsch (Ann., 1882, 215, p. I; Ber., 1882, 15, p. 2914) which consists in the condensation of two molecules of aceto-acetic ester with one of an aldehyde and one of ammonia: RO 2 C CH 2 R' CHO CH 2 CO 2 R RO 2 C C CHR' C C02R CH 3 CO + NH 3 + CO CH 3 -' CH3 C-NH-C CH3 The resulting dihydro-compound is then oxidized with nitrous acid, the ester hydrolysed and the resulting acid heated with lime; carbon dioxide is eliminated and a trisubstituted pyridine of the type CH C(CH3) is obtained.

    0
    0
  • (R'02C)2C:CR CH(C02R')2-> R'O 2 C C:CR CH C02R' H C:CR C H OC NH.

    0
    0
  • At 125-130° C. the compound C6H5C Cl:N(CH2)5 CI is obtained; this with water yields benzoylamidochloramylamine, C 6 H 5 CONH(Ch 2) 5 C1, which when heated with hydrochloric acid to 170-180° C. furnishes e-chloramylamine, NH 2 (CH 2) 5 C1.

    0
    0
  • I nh 'il

    0
    0
  • Lea clien - r -t.Ma rav Ra nh .o pewin ton Fave ? ?ittingbo? ?

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    0
  • BENZIDINE (DIPARA-DIAMINO-DIPHENYL),NH 2 C 6 H 4 C 6 H 4 NH2, a chemical base which may be prepared by the reduction of the corresponding dinitro-diphenyl, or by the reduction of azobenzene with tin and hydrochloric acid.

    0
    0
  • Structurally we have: NH, -NH NH- --> NH 2 - Hydrazohenzene.

    0
    0
  • NH2 or -??NH 2, R

    0
    0
  • Cl, Br, I,NH 3j N 2 0, N02, H 2 S, SO 2, CS2,, CH 4, C 2 H 4, inhibit the phosphorescence.

    0
    0
  • When led with hydrogen into liquid ammonia it gives NH: PNH 2, which on elevation of temperature gives P 2 (NH) 3 (Joannis, Comptes rendus, 1904, 1 39, p. 364).

    0
    0
  • With liquid ammonia it gives P 2 S 5.7NH 31 which is a mixture of ammonium iminotrithiophosphate, P(SNH 4) 3: NH, and ammonium nitrilodithiophosphate, P(SNH 4) 2;N.

    0
    0
  • The diamide, PO (NH 2) (NH), results when the pentachloride is saturated with ammonia gas and the first formed chlorophosphamide, PC1 3 (NH 2) 2, is decomposed by water.

    0
    0
  • Jour., 18 93, 1 5, p. 198; 1894, 16, pp. 123, 154) has described PO(OH)2NH2 and PO(OH)(NH2)2, whilst the compound PO(OH)NH was obtained by Schiff (Ann., 1857, 103, p. 168) by acting with ammonia on the pentoxide.

    0
    0
  • The alkaloid is a strong base and is very readily oxidized; chromic acid converts it into normal butyric acid and ammonia; hydrogen peroxide gives aminopropylvalerylaldehyde, NH 2 CH(C 3 11 7) (CH2)3 CHO, whilst the benzoyl derivative is oxidized by potassium permanganate to benzoyl-a-aminovaleric acid, C 6 H 5 CO NH CH(C 3 H 7) (CH 2)3 COOH.

    0
    0
  • Canine is a secondary base, forming a nitroso derivative with nitrous acid, a urethane with chlorcarbonic ester and a tertiary base (methyl conine) with methyl iodide; reactions which point to the presence of the = NH group in the molecule.

    0
    0
  • `NH - CO N =C Cl N = CH and by the so-called "Skraup" reaction, which consists i111 oxidizing a mixture of aniline, glycerin and concentrated.

    0
    0
  • Potassium permanganate oxidizes it to acetylanthranilic acid, [[Hooc(') C 6 H 4 (2)Nh Coch]] 31 while chromic acid oxidizes it to quinaldic acid (quinoline-a-carboxylic acid).

    0
    0
  • At iio° C. aniline and acetoacetic ester condense to form anilido-acetoacetic ester, CH 3 C0 CH 2 C0 NH C 6 H 51 which is converted by concentrated acids into a-oxy-y-methylquinoline (L.

    0
    0
  • Bamberger, Ber., 94, 7, 1955), C,H 5 CH: CH CH: NOH --4[C 6 H 5 CH: CH NH COH] -*C,H,N; by the action of hydriodic acid on the oxydichlorisoquinoline formed when phosphorus pentachloride reacts with hippuric acid; by the distillation of homophthalimide over zinc dust (M.

    0
    0
  • The reaction is therefore: SO 2 + 0 + HNO 2 = SO 5 NH.

    0
    0
  • In 1906 Lunge (in a paper published with Bert) to some extent modified his views, by introducing an intermediate compound, sulphonitronic acid, SO 5 NH 2, which had been noticed by various chemists for some time through its property of imparting a deep blue colour to sulphuric acid.

    0
    0
  • The NO 2 (or NO + 0) reacts upon SO 2 + H20, forming SO 5 NH 21 which, being extremely unstable, is at once oxidized to SO 5 NH (nitroso-sulphuric acid).

    0
    0
  • The latter is now either converted by hydrolysis into sulphuric acid and nitrogen oxides: 2SO 5 NH + H 2 O = 2H 2 SO 4 + NO + N02, the latter acting as before: or it reacts with more S02, forming again sulphonitronic acid: 2SO 5 NH + SO 2 + 2H 2 O = H 2 SO 4 + 2SO 5 NH 2.

    0
    0
  • Senderens, Comptes rendus, 1901, 132, p. 210 seq.); and from hydrazines of the type CnH2,2_1 NH NH2 by oxidation with alkaline potassium ferricyanide (N.

    0
    0
  • Methyl granatoline on treatment with hydriodic acid and red phosphorus, followed by caustic potash, yields methyl granatinine, C 9 H 15 N, which when heated with hydriodic acid and phosphorus to 240° C. is converted into methyl granatanine, C 8 H 14 NCH 31 and granatanine, C 8 H 14 NH.

    0
    0
  • The Rot nh parliament orum end with Henry VII., but in 1509 begin the journals of the House of Lords, and in 1547 the journals of the House of Commons.

    0
    0
  • C ALLOXANTIN $ H 4 N 4 0 7.3H 2 0, a product obtained by the combination of alloxan and dialuric acid, probably possessing the constitution NH - CO CO - NH O - O - H NH - C CO - NH one of the three molecules of water being possibly constitutional.

    0
    0
  • It forms small hard prisms which become red on exposure to air containing ammonia, owing to the formation of murexide (ammonium purpurate),C $ 11 4 (NH 4)N 5 0 6.

    0
    0
  • When escaping from the acid tower, the gas contains about% NH 3, and has a temperature of about 80° C. and is saturated with aqueous vapour.

    0
    0
  • HYDROXYLAMINE, NH 2 OH, or hydroxy-ammonia, a compound prepared in 1865 by W.

    0
    0
  • Chem., 1908, 78, p. 289) regard it as acting with the formula NH 2.

    0
    0
  • OH towards bases, and as NH 3 :0 towards acids, the salts in the latter case being of the oxonium type.

    0
    0
  • Many substituted hydroxylamines are known, substitution taking a place either in the or a position (NH 2 OH).

    0
    0
  • Dihydroxy-ammonia or nitroxyl, NH(OH) 2, a very unstable and highly reactive substance, has been especially studied by A.

    0
    0
  • Thus: R�NH 2 (R1R2)NH (R1R2R3)N R�CH 2 OH (R,R2)CH�OH (R,R2R3)C�OH Primary.

    0
    0
  • Water decomposes it into arsenious oxide and ammonia, and when heated to 60° it loses ammonia and forms arsenimide, As2(NH)3 (C. Hugot, Compt.

    0
    0
  • Bromine and potash give anthranilic acid, C 6 H 4 (NH 2) (CO 2 H).

    0
    0
  • ANILINE, PHENYLAMINE, Or Aminobenzene, (C 6 H 5 Nh 2), an organic base first obtained from the destructive distillation of indigo in 1826 by O.

    0
    0
  • Sulphuric acid at 180 gives sulphanilic acid, NH 2 C 6 H 4 SO 3 H.

    0
    0
  • By distillation of the ammonium salt glutarimide, CH 2 (CH 2 CP) 2 NH, is obtained; it forms small crystals melting at 151° to 152° C. and sublimes unchanged.

    0
    0
  • NH 2 NH2 Diorthodiaminodiphenyl, -, isobtained bythe reduction of the corresponding nitro compound (obtained by the action of ethyl nitrite at o° C. on metadinitrobenzidine hydrochloride).

    0
    0
  • One of the most important derivatives of diphenyl, from the theoretical point of view, is diphenic acid or diorthodiphenyl carboxylic acid, which can be obtained from diparadiaminodiphenyldiorthocarboxylic acid, H2N NH 2, or from phenanthrene, the consti Hooc Cooh tution of which it determines.

    0
    0
  • Curtius found that benzoylglycollic acid gavebenzoyl hydrazine with hydrazine hydrate: C 6 H S 000 CH2000H -1-2N2H4 H20 = H20 +C6H 5CONH NH2+ NH2 NH CH2 COOH.

    0
    0
  • (Ethyl benzoate may be employed instead of benzoyl glycollic acid for this reaction.) This compound gave a nitroso compound with nitrous acid, which changed spontaneously into benzoylazoimide by loss of water: C 6 H 5 CO NH.

    0
    0
  • NH 2 +[[Hono =H20+C6h5co-N(No) Nh2.

    0
    0
  • C 6 H 5 Co N (No) Nh]] 2 = H20+-C6H5C0 N3.

    0
    0
  • An improved method of preparation was found in the use of hippuric acid, which reacts with hydrazine hydrate to form hippuryl hydrazine, C 6 H 5 [[Conh Ch 2 Conh Nh]] 2, and this substance is converted by nitrous acid into diazo-hippuramide, C 6 H 5 [[Conh Ch 2 Co Nh N 2.0h]], which is hydrolysed by the action of caustic alkalis with the production of salts of hydrazoic acid.

    0
    0
  • Grandmougin (Berichte, 1891, 24, p. 2546) obtained azoimide from dinitraniline, C 6 H 3 (NO 2) 2 NH 2j by diazotization and conversion of the diazo compound into the perbromide, (NO 2) 2 C 6 H 3 N 2 Br 3.

    0
    0
  • Ammonium azoimide, N 3 NH 4j may be prepared by boiling diazohippuramide with alcoholic ammonia, until no more ammonia escapes, the following reaction taking place: C,H 5 CO [[Nhch 2 Conh N 2.

    0
    0
  • Oh +2nh 3 =N3.Nh4+H20+ C 6 H 5 Co Nh Ch 2 Co]].

    0
    0
  • Usually the pH is made more alkaline by hydrolysis of urea (NH 2 CONH 2) in boiling aqueous solution.

    0
    0
  • Ammonia (NH 3) also dissolves in water to produce an ammonium hydroxide (NH 4 OH ), an alkaline solution.

    0
    0
  • For example, ammonia reacts with HBr to give ammonium bromide, NH 4 + Br - .

    0
    0
  • cake stall, the proceeds of which were donated to the ` Friends of NH ` .

    0
    0
  • NH: Well no, ' cause that would be so insincere.

    0
    0
  • The Marple Methodist Ladies Association ran a cake stall, the proceeds of which were donated to the ` Friends of NH ` .

    0
    0
  • Double chlorides of composition CoC1 2 NH 4 C1.6H 2 O; CoC1 2 SnCl 4.6H 2 0 and CoC1 2.2CdC1 2.12H 2 O are also known.

    0
    0
  • Triammine Series, [Co(NH 3)3]X3.

    0
    0
  • This group may be divided into the Praseo-salts [R 2 Co(NH 3) 4 ]X, where X = Cl.

    0
    0
  • Fuseo-salts [Co(NH 3)4]OH X2.

    0
    0
  • Pentammine purpureo-salts [R Co(NH 3) 5 ]X 2 where X = Cl, Br, N03, N02, 1S04, &c.

    0
    0
  • Pentammine roseo-salts [Co(NH 3) 6 H 2 O] X2.

    0
    0
  • The pentammine nitrito salts are known as the xanthocobalt salts and have the general formula [NO 2 Co (NH 3) 3]X2.

    0
    0
  • The aqueous solution, however, does not show the ordinary reactions of cobalt or of ammonia, and so it is to be presumed that the salt ionizes into [Co(NH 3) 6] and 3C1'.

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  • The oxycobaltammines are a series of compounds of the general type [Co 20341 2 (NH 3) 1 o]X 4 first observed by L.

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  • Grimaux by heating one part of glyoxylic acid with two parts of urea for ten hours at ioo° C.: 2CO(NH 2) 2 + CH(OH) 2 Oooh = 3h 2 O + C4H6N403.

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  • The dihydro derivatives are most probably those compounds which are formed in the condensation of acidyl derivatives of acetone, with urea, guanidine, &c. Tetrahydropyrimidines are obtained by the action of amidines on trimethylene bromide: Br(CH 2) 3 Br+C 6 H 5 C (:NH) NH 2 = 2HBr+C 4 H 7 N 2 (C 6 H 5) [2].

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  • It yields a silver salt which with ethyl iodide forms benzimido-- ethyl ether, C 6 H 5 C: (NH) �OC 2 H 5, a behaviour which points to.

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  • The secondary and tertiary amides of the types (RCO) 2 NH and (RCO) 3 N may be prepared by heating the primary amides or the nitriles with acids or acid anhydrides to 200° C. Thiamides of the type R.

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  • Borimide B 2 (NH) 3 is obtained on long heating of the compound B 2 S 3.6NH 3 in a stream of hydrogen, or ammonia gas at 115-120° C. It is a white solid which decomposes on heating into boron nitride and ammonia.

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  • If the two circuits are in tune so that the numerical product of capacity and inductance of each circuit is the same or C L, = C L +CL and if k is the coefficient of coupling then the natural frequency of each circuit is n = I /2w / (CL), and when coupled two oscillations are set up in the secondary circuit having frequencies n and n2 such that n = n0/ (i - k) and n = nh,/ (I +k).

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  • OH NH 2 (1.3),and dimethyl meta-aminophenol,C 6 H 4.

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  • Rouge de Ruthene, Ru 2 (OH) 2 C1 4 (NH 4) 7, is obtained from ammonia and ruthenium sesquichloride at 40° C., the product being purified by crystallization from ammonia.

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  • (The term radical is given to a group of atoms which persist in chemical changes, behaving as if the group were an element; the commonest is the ammonium group, NH 4, which forms salts similar to the salts of sodium and potassium.) If the acid contains no oxygen it is a hydracid, and its systematic name is formed from the prefix hydro- and the name of the other element or radical, the last syllable of which has been replaced by the termination -ic. For example, the acid formed by hydrogen and chlorine is termed hydrochloric acid (and sometimes hydrogen chloride).

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  • Thus with hydroxylamine aldehydes yield aldoximes, R CH: N OH, and ketones, ketoximes, R 2 C: N OH (see Oximes), while phenyl hydrazine gives phenylhydrazones, R 2 C:N NH C 6 H 5 (see Hydrazones).

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  • Zinc dust and hydrochloric acid reduce pyrrol to pyrrolin (dihydropyrrol), C 4 H 6 NH, a liquid which boils at 90° C. (748 mm.); it is soluble in water and has strongly basic properties and an alkaline reaction.

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  • It is also prepared by heating ammonium nitrite (or a mixture of sodium nitrite and ammonium chloride): NH 4 NO 2 =2H20+N21 by heating a mixture of ammonium nitrate and chloride (the chlorine which is simultaneously produced being absorbed by milk of lime or by a solution of sodium hydroxide): 4NH4N03+2NH4C1=5N2 +C1 2 +12H 2 O; by heating ammonium dichromate (or a mixture of ammonium chloride and potassium dichromate): (NH4)2Cr207 = Cr203+4H20+ N2; by passing chlorine into a concentrated solution of ammonia (which should be present in considerable excess): 8NH3+3C12=6NH4C1-F-N2; by the action of hypochlorites or hypobromites on ammonia: 3NaOBr-+2NH 3 =3NaBr+3H 2 OH-N 2; and by the action of manganese dioxide on ammonium nitrate at 180-20o° C. It is also formed by the reduction of nitric and nitrous oxides with hydrogen in the presence of platinized asbestos at a red heat (G.

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  • HO NH SO 3 Na, are hydrolysed by caustic alkalis (E.

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  • or aminopropionic acid, CH 3 � CH(NH 2) � COOH, a-aminobutyric acid, a-aminovalerianic acid, leucin or isobutyla-aminoacetic acid, (CH 3) 2 CH � CH 2.

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  • CH(NH 2) � Cooh, isoleucin, probably 0-aminocaproic acid, serin or a-amino-(-hydroxy propionic acid, aspartic acid or aminosuccinic acid, HOOC�CH 2 �CH(NH 2)�Cooh, glutaminic acid or a-amino-n-glutaric acid,HOOC� (CH 2) � CH(NH 2) � Cooh, diaminoacetic acid, a-O-diaminopropionic acid, lysin.

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  • CH(NH 2) � Cooh, arginin or guanidine-a-amino-n-valerianic acid, (NH)(NH2)C�NH� (CH 2) 3 �CH(NH 2)�Cooh, ornithin or aa-diamino valerianic acid, � (CH 2) 3 � CH(NH 2) � Coon, -(3-imidazol propionic acid, [[Hooc� Ch(Nh 2) �Ch 2 � C: Ch�N:Ch�Nh]], proline or a-pyrrolidin carboxylic acid, [[Hooc� Ch.

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  • Nh]]�CH2�CH2�CH2, hydroxyproline, phenyl alanine or phenyl-a-aminopropionic acid, C 6 H 5 � CH 2 � CH(NH 2) � Cooh, tyrosine or p-hydroxyphenyl-aaminopropionic acid, phenyl ethylamine, p-hydroxyphenyl ethylamine, tryptophane or indol aminopropionic acid, A.

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  • CH(NH 2)� Cooh) B.

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  • cystin (stone-cystin), or a-thio-/3-aminoglyceric acid " disulphide," (NH 2 � CH 2 � CH: S.

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  • Long digestion of the acid with excess of phosphorus pentachloride results in the formation of the acid chloride, C 6 (0001),, which crystallizes in needles, melting at 190° C. By heating the ammonium salt of the acid to 150-160° C. as long as ammonia is evolved, a mixture of CO paramide (mellimide), C6 (CO > NH) 3, and ammonium euchroate is obtained.

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  • Semioxamazid, NH �CO�CO�NH�NH, has also been employed for the identification of aldehydes (W.

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  • Bamberger, Ber., 1893, 26, p. 2786): CsH5N :N N :N jC COC6H5 - C6H5NH2+C6H4K C 6 H5 NH N N:C 0006H5; by the reduction of symmetrical acyl-ortho-nitrophenyl hydrazines (e.g.

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  • NO 2 C 6 H 4 NH NH CHO); or in the form of dihydro derivatives by the condensation of aldehydes with ortho-aminoazo compounds (H.

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  • Reissert, Ber., 18 99, 3 2, p. 782), the chief product in this latter reaction being an isoindazolone: // CH2 NHC6H5 /CH2 NH C6H5 /CH2 NC6H5 C6H4 - C6H4 - C6 H4 NH 2 HCI N :NCI N=N The best drawn series of the triazines is the symmetrical or cyanidine series, members of which result from the condensation of acid anhydrides with aromatic amidines (A.

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  • It crystallizes in needles which decompose at "4° C. Silicon amide, Si(NH 2) 4, is obtained as a white amorphous unstable solid by the action of dry ammonia on silicon chloride at -50° C. (E.

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  • It is readily decomposed by water: Si(NH 2) 4 +2H 2 O=4NH 3 +S10 2 Above o° C. it decomposes thus: Si(NH 2) 4 =2HN3-}-Si(NH)2.

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  • Chem., 1889 (2), 39, p. 8.) Trimethylene diamine, NH 2.

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  • NH 2, is prepared by the action of ammonia on trimethylene bromide (E.

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  • Tetramethylene diamine (putrescine), NH 2 � (CH2)4.

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  • NH 2, is prepared by reducing trimethylene cyanide in ether solution by zinc and hydrochloric acid (A.

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  • With dry ammonia at 60° the metal forms strontium ammonium, which slowly decomposes in a vacuum at 20° giving Sr(NH 3) 2; with carbon monoxide it gives Sr(CO) 2; with oxygen it forms the monoxide and peroxide, and with nitric oxide it gives the hyponitrite (Roederer, Bull.

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  • Its ethyl ester, known as oxamaethane, crystallizes in rhombic plates which melt at 114-115° C. Phosphorus pentachloride converts it into cyan-carbonic ester, the ethyl oxamine chloride first formed being unstable: ROOC CONH2 -R000 C(C1 2) NH 2 --)CN COOR.

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  • Oximide,[CO] 2 NH, produced by the action of a mixture of phosphorus pentachloride and oxychloride on oxamic acid (H.

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  • Thus the reactions NH 4 Cinh 3 +HC1, and PC PC13+C 12 are instances of the first type; N 2 O 4 2NO 2, of the second (see Chemical Action).

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  • Silberrad assigns the formula NH 3 �NI 3 to the compound, and explains the decomposition as taking place, 2NH3�N13+ 6Zn (C2H5)2 = 6ZnC 2 H 5 �I+2NH 3 +2N(C 2 H 5) 3.

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  • (See GAS: Manufacture.) Ammonium bromide, NH 4 Br, can be prepared by the direct action of bromine on ammonia.

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  • (See SAL-Ammoniac.) Ammonium fluoride, NH 4 F, may be obtained by neutralizing ammonia with hydrofluoric acid.

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  • The crude product is refined by sublimation, when it is obtained as a white fibrous mass, which consists of a mixture of hydrogen ammonium carbonate, NH 4 �HCO 3, and ammonium carbamate, NH 2 Ooonh 4, in molecular proportions; on account of its possessing this constitution it is sometimes called ammonium sesquicarbonate.

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  • Ammonia gas passed into a strong aqueous solution of the sesquicarbonate converts it into normal ammonium carbonate, (NH 4) 2 CO 3, which can be obtained in the crystalline condition from a solution prepared at about 30° C. This compound on exposure to air gives off ammonia and passes back to ammonium bicarbonate.

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  • Ammonium bicarbonate, NH 4 �HCO 3, is formed as shown above and also by passing carbon dioxide through a solution of the normal compound, when it is deposited as a white powder, which has no smell and is only slightly soluble in water.

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  • Ammonium dihydrogen phosphate, NH 4 �H 2 PO 4, is formed when a solution of phosphoric acid is added to ammonia until the solution is distinctly acid.

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  • Ammonium sulphide, (NH 4) 2 S, is obtained, in the form of micaceous crystals, by passing sulphuretted hydrogen mixed with a slight excess of ammonia through a well-cooled vessel; the hydrosulphide NH 4 �HS is formed at the same time.

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  • p. 283), if sulphuretted hydrogen is passed into strong aqueous ammonia at ordinary temperature, the compound (NH 4) 2 S�2NH 4 HS is obtained, which, on cooling to o C. and passing more sulphuretted hydrogen, forms the compound (NH4)2S� i 2NH 4 HS.

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  • On boiling with water, it is converted, first into the disulphonate NH(SO 3 K) 2 thus, N(S03K)3+H20=NH(S03K)2+KHS04, and ultimately into the monosulphonate NH 2 �S0 3 K.

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  • and III., pyrazine being I.: HC N CH HC NH CH HC N CH2 H2C NH CH2 HC N CH2 H2C NH H2 I (Pyrazine) II (1.4 dihydro) III (2.3 dihydro) IV (Piperazine).

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  • They may also be obtained by distilling a primary amine with alcoholic potash and chloroform: R NH 2 -{- CHC1 3 3KHO=3KC1 -}- 3H 2 O -}- R NC (A.

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  • ONH 4 +CO(NH 2) 2 = 2Hconh 2 + (NH 4) 2 C3 3; by heating ammonium formate in a sealed tube for some hours at 230° C., or by the action of sodium amalgam on a solution of potassium cyanate (H.

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  • Amino-azo-benzene, C6H5 N2 C 6 H 4 NH 2, crystallizes in yellow plates or needles and melts at 126° C. Its constitution is determined by the facts that it may be prepared by reducing nitro-azo-benzene by ammonium sulphide and that by reduction with stannous chloride it yields aniline and.

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  • It may also be prepared by oxidizing benzyl alcohol with concentrated nitric acid; by distilling a mixture of calcium benzoate and calcium formate; by the condensation of chlor-oxalic ester with benzene in the presence of aluminium chloride, the ester of the ketonic acid formed being then hydrolysed and the resulting acid distilled: C 6 H 6 +Cl CO Cooc 2 H 5 = C,H5co COOC2H5d-HC1, C 6 H 5 CO 000H =C6H5CHO+C02; by the action of anhydrous hydrocyanic acid and hydrochloric acid on benzene, an aldime being formed as an intermediate product: C 6 H 6 +HCN+HC1= C6H5CH :NH HC1, Benzaldine hydrochloride C 6 H 5 CH: NH HC1+H 2 O =NH4C1+C6H5CHO; and by the action of chromium oxychloride on toluene dissolved in carbon bisulphide (A.

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  • H 3 C CO NH 3 CO CH 3 H3C C - NH - C CH3 On nitration it yields chiefly meta-nitro-benzaldehyde, crystallizing in needles which melt at 58° C. The ortho-compound may be obtained by oxidizing ortho-nitrocinnamic acid with alkaline potassium permanganate in the presence of benzene; or from ortho - nitrobenzyl chloride by condensing it with aniline, oxidizing the product so obtained to ortho-nitrobenzylidine aniline, and then hydrolysing this compound with an acid (Farben fabrik d.

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  • It reacts with sodium ethylate to form ortho-formic ester, CH(OC 2 H 5) 3, and when heated with aqueous ammonia for some hours at 200-220° C. gives carbon monoxide and ammonium formate, 2CHC1 3 + 7N11 3 -13H 2 0= NH 4 HCO 2 + C0+6NH4C1 (G.

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  • When heated with hydrazine hydrate at 150° C. it gives a-naphthyl hydrazine, C 1 oH 7 NH NH 2 Hoffmann, Ber., 1898, 31, p. 2909).

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  • These compounds may be divided into two classes, namely, the true diazo compounds, characterized by the grouping -N=N-, and the diazonium compounds, characterized by the grouping N: N < The diazonium compounds were first discovered by P. Griess (Ann., 1858,, 06, pp. 123 et seq.), and may be prepared by the action of nitrous fumes on a well-cooled solution of a salt of a primary amine, C 6 H 5 NH 2 HNO 3 HNO 2 = C 6 H 5 N 2 .NO 3 2H20, or, as is more usually the case (since the diazonium salts themselves are generally used only in aqueous solution) by the addition of a well-cooled solution of potassium or sodium nitrite to a well-cooled dilute acid solution of the primary amine.

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  • Phenyl nitramine, C 6 H S NH N02, is a colourless crystalline solid, which melts at 46° C. Sodium amalgam in alkaline solution reduces it to phenylhydrazine.

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  • When warmed with sulphuretted hydrogen they yield thiamides, R C: (NH) �NHR-+-H 2 S = R�C(NH 2)(SH)NHR=R�[[Csnh 2 +Nh 2 �R]] or RCS�NHR+NH3.

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  • Formamidine, HC: (NH)NH 2, is only known in the form of its salts, the hydrochloride being obtained by the action of ammonia on the hydrochloride of formimido-ethyl ether (A.

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  • Acetamidine, CH 3 C: (NH)�NH 2, is alkaline in reaction, and readily splits up into acetic acid and ammonia when warmed with acids.

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  • C: (NH) NH 2, forms colourless crystals which melt at 75-80° C. When warmed it breaks down into ammonia and cyanphenine (s-triphenyl triazine).

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  • Baudrimant, Jahresb., 1880, p. 393); by the action of 50% sulphuric acid on cyanamide: CN NH2+H20= CO(NH 2) 2; by the action of mercuric oxide on oxamide (A.

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  • For example, aa-dimethyl urea is sweet, aß-dimethyl urea is tasteless; p-phenetol carbamide or dulcin, NH 2 CO NH C 6 H 4.0C 2 H 51 is sweet, while the di-p-phenetol carbamide, CO(NH C 6 H 4.0C 2 H 5) 21 is tasteless.

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  • Acetyl urea, NH 2 CO NH 000H 31 formed by the action of acetic anhydride on urea, crystallizes in needles which melt at 212° C. and, on heating, strongly decomposes into acetamide and cyanuric acid.

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  • Methyl acetyl urea, CH 3 NH CO NH000H 31 is formed by the action of potash on a mixture of bromine (I mol.) and acetamide (2 mols.) (A.

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  • Barbituric acid (malonyl urea), CH2[C0 NH]C0.2H20, formed by condensing malonic acid with urea (E.

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  • - Nh2c0 Nh C02r]]; by the action of chlorcarbonic esters on urea (H.

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  • Biuret (allophanamide), NH 2 CO NH CO NH 2, is formed by heating urea; by the action of ammonia on allophanic ester; and by heating urea to 140° C. and passing chlorine into the melt at 140-150° C. (J.

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  • Thiourea, or sulphocarbamide, CS(NH 2) 2, is formed by prolonged fusion of ammonium thiocyanate (E.

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  • It crystallizes (from water) in glistening leaflets which melt at 130° C. and boil at 288° C. Its silver salt behaves as if it were the salt of an imido benzoic acid, since it yields benzimido ethyl ether C 6 H 5 C(:NH) OC 2 H 5 with ethyl iodide (J.

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  • The temperature must not be allowed to rise beyond a certain point, for the reaction NaC1+ NH 4 HC03= NaHCO 3 4-NH 4 C1 is reversible, and at a temperature of about 60° or 70° C. it is in fact practically going the wrong way, viz.

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  • If we imagine 0 to recede to infinity in any direction we learn that a system of parallel forces proportional to nh, mi,.

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  • 1887, 20, p. 2576; 1888, 21, p. 2195) NH HO C R'N CR' R C, OH + Br CH - ' R C O CH ' by the action of concentrated sulphuric acid on nitriles and benzoin (F.

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  • Phosphorus pentachloride converts it into picryl chloride, C 6 H 2 C1(NO 2) 3, which is a true acid chloride, being decomposed by water with the regeneration of picric acid and the formation of hydrochloric acid; with ammonia it yields picramide, C 6 H 2 NH 2 (NO 2) 3.

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  • At 125-130° C. the compound C6H5C Cl:N(CH2)5 CI is obtained; this with water yields benzoylamidochloramylamine, C 6 H 5 CONH(Ch 2) 5 C1, which when heated with hydrochloric acid to 170-180° C. furnishes e-chloramylamine, NH 2 (CH 2) 5 C1.

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  • In this latter case hydrazo-benzene C 6 H 5 NH NH C 6 H 5 is first formed and then undergoes a peculiar re-arrangement into benzidine (see H.

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  • At iio° C. aniline and acetoacetic ester condense to form anilido-acetoacetic ester, CH 3 C0 CH 2 C0 NH C 6 H 51 which is converted by concentrated acids into a-oxy-y-methylquinoline (L.

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  • Popovici, Ber., 1892, 5, 733); by the action of concentrated sulphuric acid on benzyl amino-acetaldehyde, C 6 H 5 CH 2 NH CH 2 CHO (E.

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  • Methyl granatoline on treatment with hydriodic acid and red phosphorus, followed by caustic potash, yields methyl granatinine, C 9 H 15 N, which when heated with hydriodic acid and phosphorus to 240° C. is converted into methyl granatanine, C 8 H 14 NCH 31 and granatanine, C 8 H 14 NH.

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  • When escaping from the acid tower, the gas contains about% NH 3, and has a temperature of about 80° C. and is saturated with aqueous vapour.

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  • 0-phenylhydroxylamine, C 6 H 5 NH OH, is obtained in the reduction of nitrobenzene in neutral solution (e.g.

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  • Thus: R�NH 2 (R1R2)NH (R1R2R3)N R�CH 2 OH (R,R2)CH�OH (R,R2R3)C�OH Primary.

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  • Water decomposes it into arsenious oxide and ammonia, and when heated to 60° it loses ammonia and forms arsenimide, As2(NH)3 (C. Hugot, Compt.

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  • Within the word the same group and other groups also in which the second consonant is an 1 produce I mouillOe (Written ih, just as n mouillOe is written nh, as in Provenal): oveiha (0 V i c I a), veiho (*v e c 1 u s); and sometimes ch: fec/jo (f a cl urn), ancho (am plum).

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  • By distillation of the ammonium salt glutarimide, CH 2 (CH 2 CP) 2 NH, is obtained; it forms small crystals melting at 151° to 152° C. and sublimes unchanged.

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  • NH 2 NH2 Diorthodiaminodiphenyl, -, isobtained bythe reduction of the corresponding nitro compound (obtained by the action of ethyl nitrite at o° C. on metadinitrobenzidine hydrochloride).

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  • Note that American Express does not ship cards to addresses in CT, HI, NH, and VT due to local laws.

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  • NH: It depends on your individual agreement with your lender and contractor.

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  • NH: There are pros and cons to each approach.

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  • NH: The process of applying is very simple.

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  • NH: It's always a good idea to use caution when borrowing against your home.

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  • Some arcades are dedicated to housing nostalgic games, like the Funspot Arcade in Laconia, NH.

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  • PO Box 959, East Hampstead, NH 03826-0959.

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  • Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann Educational Books, 2003.

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  • He says, "In Portsmouth, NH at the annual Market Square Day festival, I was one of several psychics doing readings out of a shop.

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  • In the United States Louisiana and the northern New England states of Maine, NH and Vermont near the Canadian border have significant populations of people who speak French.

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  • Hofmann), CS 2 +2NH 3 -->NH 2.

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