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newman

newman

newman Sentence Examples

  • Newman, Frances Power Cobbe, and others, for their more modern speculative belief in God, which, while non-Christian or at least non-orthodox, held to an immanent God, continually revealing himself - in the moral consciousness.

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  • Newman's Apologia pro vita sua (1864); or A.

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  • Newman - with modifications on becoming a Roman Catholic in the light of the church's decision in favour of Thomism.

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  • He was repelled from it by the conception he had formed of the character of Newman, whom he regarded as a mere antiquary.

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  • But he had, as Newman afterwards said of him, "struck into the movement at an angle."

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  • Ward left the Church of England in September 1845, and was followed by many others, including Newman himself.

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  • Newman in 1888.

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  • The use of the word "clergy" as a plural, though the New English Dictionary quotes the high authority of Cardinal Newman for it, is less rare than wrong; in the case cited "Some hundred Clergy" should have been "Some hundred of the Clergy."

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  • In 1831 Rennie brought out a modified edition of it (reissued in 1833), and Newman another in 1866 (reissued in 1883); but those who wish to know the author's views had better consult the original.

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  • Yet the idea of a " physiological " arrangement on the same kind of principle found another follower, or, as he thought, inventor, in Edward Newman, who in 1850 communicated N ewman.

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  • Newman, Blanco White and T.

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  • Of readable English books we may cite Ernest Newman, A Study of Wagner (1899); H.

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  • led some of the cardinals to vote for Pecci, since his age (within a few days of sixty-eight) and health warranted the expectation that his reign would be comparatively brief; but he had for years been known as one of the few "papable" cardinals; and although his long seclusion at Perugia had caused his name to be little known outside Italy, there was a general belief that the conclave had selected a man who was a prudent statesman as well as a devout churchman; and Newman (whom he created a cardinal in the year following) is reported to have said, "In the successor of Pius I recognize a depth of thought, a tenderness of heart, a winning simplicity, and a power answering to the name of Leo, which prevent me from lamenting that Pius is no longer here."

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  • The elevation of Newman to the college of Cardinals in 1879 was regarded with approval throughout the English-speaking world, both on Newman's account and also as evidence that Leo XIII.

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  • By September he had crossed the Rubicon, Henry Newman (his rector at Shepton Beauchamp and Sparkford) accompanying him on a tour in Carnarvonshire.

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  • Newman and his followers to the Church of Rome.

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  • Newman (1879).

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  • Certainly it was true of him, in a far higher degree than of John Henry Newman, that the being of God and himself were to his mind two absolutely self-luminous truths - though both his God and his self were almost infinitely remote from Newman's.

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  • Newman, whose mind Martineau said was " critical, not prophetic, since without immediateness of religious vision," and whose faith is " an escape from an alternative scepticism, which receives the veto not of his reason but of his will," 6 as men for whose teachings and methods he had a potent and stimulating antipathy.

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  • The philosophic principles and religious deductions of Dean Mansel he disliked as much as those of Newman, but he respected his arguments more.

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  • In England representative Anglican preachers were Newman (whose best preaching preceded his obedience to Rome), T.

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  • In 1842 he published a treatise on The Unity of the Church, and his reputation as an eloquent and earnest preacher being by this time considerable, he was in the same year appointed select preacher by his university, thus being called upon to fill from time to time the pulpit which Newman, as vicar of St Mary's, was just ceasing to occupy.

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  • This sermon had much annoyed Newman and his more advanced disciples, but it was a proof that at that date Manning was loyal to the Church of England as Protestant.

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  • Newman's secession in 1845 placed Manning in a position of greater responsibility, as one of the High Church leaders, along with Pusey and Keble and Marriott; but it was with Gladstone and James Hope (afterwards Hope-Scott) that he was at this time most closely associated.

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  • and the following winter he spent abroad, chiefly in Rome, where he saw Newman "wearing the Oratorian habit and dead to the world."

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  • He steadily opposed whatever might encourage the admission of Catholics to the national universities, and so put his foot down on Newman's project to open a branch house of the Oratory at Oxford with himself as superior.

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  • As viceprincipal of the theological college at Cuddesdon (1854-1859) he wielded considerable influence, and, on returning to Oxford as vice-principal of St Edmund's Hall, became a growing force among the undergraduates, exercising his influence in strong opposition to the liberal reaction against Tractarianism, which had set in after Newman's secession in 1845.

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  • of Montalembert) and English Monastic Life (1904); and Newman's two essays on the Benedictines, among the Historical Sketches.

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  • Newman's (1845).

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  • Meanwhile he had given up the Calvinistic views of his youth, and had become an enthusiastic follower of John Henry Newman.

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  • He founded a religious community at Birmingham, called Wilfridians, which was ultimately merged in the oratory of St Philip Neri, with John Henry Newman as Superior.

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  • Cardinal Newman admits that the latter woman " represents the church, this is the real or direct sense "; yet as her man-child is certainly the Messiah, this church must be the faithful Jewish church.

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  • He belonged to the High Church school, which was influenced by the teaching of Newman and Pusey and the Oxford teachers of their day; but he by no means slavishly followed them.

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  • Newman, afterwards cardinal, in his Lives of the English Saints.

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  • In a somewhat similar fashion, Lamennais (in the first stage of his speculations, represented by the Essai sur l'indiference en matiere religieuse, 1817-18 21) endeavoured to destroy all rational certitude in order to establish the principle of authority; and the same profound distrust of the power of the natural reason to-arrive at truth is exemplified (though the allegation has been denied by the author) in Cardinal Newman.

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  • Newman; the Rev. Samuel Newth (1821-1898), congregationalist, professor of ecclesiastical history at, and afterwards president of, New College, London; Dr A.

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  • Of these, Dr Thompson and Dr Newman declined to serve.

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  • Newman has edited the Politics in four volumes; Dr Ogle has translated the De Partibus Animalium, with notes; R.

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  • Among his publications are Characters and Characteristics of William Law (1893); Bunyan Characters (3 vols., 1894); Samuel Rutherford (1894); An Appreciation of Jacob Behmen (1895) Lancelot Andrewes and his Private Devotions (1895); Bible Characters (7 vols., 1897); Santa Teresa (1897); Father John of Cronstadt (1898); An Appreciation of Browne's Religio Medici (1898); Cardinal Newman, An Appreciation (1901).

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  • After he and those who adhered to him (describing themselves as of the Holy Catholic Apostolic Church) had in 1832 removed to a new building in Newman Street, he was in March 1833 deposed from the ministry of the Church of Scotland by the presbytery of Annan on the original charge of heresy.

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  • Newman (1801-1890), maintaining the authority of conscience and the probabilism of the understanding, concluded to the necessity of a higher authority in the primitive church.

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  • When the Irish university was started, with Newman, appointed by Cullen, at its head, the scheme was wrecked by the personal opposition to the archbishop of Dublin.

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  • For a time the Roman propaganda in England, which drew to itself High Churchmen like Newman and Manning, was viewed with apprehension; but though the Roman Catholic Church has grown greatly in influence in the country, the number of its adherents, in proportion to the growth of population, has not very greatly increased.

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  • Newman, which could not be content with a compromise with truth, but feared to face ultimate realities, the rigidly authoritative attitude of Rome made an irresistible appeal.

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  • Cardinal Newman's celebrated Arians of the Fourth Century is interesting more from the controversial than from the historical point of view.

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  • Newman, for whom he worked, helping in the translation of Thomas Aquinas's Catena Aurea, and writing in the British Critic and Christian Remembrances.

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  • He was at Oxford during the early years of the movement known as Puseyism, and was powerfully influenced by association with Newman, Pusey and Keble.

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  • In Macmillan's Magazine for January 1864 he asserted that truth for its own sake was not obligatory with the Roman Catholic clergy, quoting as his authority John Henry Newman.

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  • More weighty contributions are the anonymous theological discussion The Kernel and the Husk (1886), Philomythus (1891), his book on Cardinal Newman as an Anglican (1892), and his article "The Gospels" in the ninth edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica, embodying a critical view which caused considerable stir in the English theological world; he also wrote St Thomas of Canterbury, his Death and Miracles (1898), Johannine V ocabulary (1905), Johannine Grammar (1906).

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  • Newman from the Anglican Church, he used all his influence to protect from formal condemnation the leaders and tenets of the " Tractarian'.'

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  • Their effect was considerable; and at Pusey's request Newman reviewed them in the British Critic (December 1836), treating them for the most part with sympathy as a triumph over popular Protestantism.

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  • An article by him on the Donatist schism appearing in the Dublin Review in July 1839 made a great impression in Oxford, Newman and others seeing the force of the analogy between Donatists and Anglicans.

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  • Some words he quoted from St Augustine influenced Newman profoundly: " Quapropter securus judicat orbis terrarum bonos non esse qui se dividunt ab orbe terrarum."

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  • And preaching at the opening of St Mary's church, Derby, in the same year, he anticipated Newman's argument on religious development, published six years later.

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  • It was by his advice that Newman and his companions spent some time in Rome before undertaking clerical work in England.

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  • In July 1852 he presided at Oscott over the first provincial synod of Westminster, at which Newman preached his sermon on the " Second Spring "; and at this date Wiseman's dream of the rapid conversion of England to the ancient faith seemed not incapable of realization.

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  • Thus he had to condemn the Association for the Promotion of the Unity of Christendom, with which he had shown some sympathy in its inception in 1857; and to forbid Catholic parents to send their sons to Oxford or Cambridge, though at an earlier date he had hoped (with Newman) that at Oxford at least a college or hall might be assigned to them.

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  • Francis William Newman >>

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  • Zahm, Evolution and Dogma (1896); John Henry Newman, An Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine (1845); Edward Caird, The Evolution of Religion (1893); Otto Pfleiderer, Philosophy of Religion (Eng.

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  • trans., 1888, especially volumes 3 and 4); Newman Smyth, Old Faiths in New Lights (1879), Through Science to Faith (1902); Henry Drummond, The Ascent of Man (1894); William Ralph Inge, Christian Mysticism (Bampton Lectures, 1894); Wilhelm Herrmann, The Communion of the Christian with God (1895); George William Knox, Direct and Fundamental Proofs of the Christian Religion (1903); Albrecht Ritschl, Die christliche Lehre von der Rechtfertigung and Versohnung (1900).

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  • In a few years Leo had made peace with Austria, pacified Switzerland and Belgium, opened up negotiations with Russia; while his elevation of Newman to the cardinalate (1879) made a great impression in Great Britain.

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  • Copleston, Davison, Whately, were among the fellows who elected Keble; Arnold, Pusey, Newman, were soon after added to the society.

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  • Cardinal Newman writes, "On Sunday July 14, 1833, Mr Keble preached the assize sermon in the University pulpit.

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  • If Keble is to be reckoned, as Newman would have it, as the primary author of the movement, it was from Pusey that it received one of its best known names, and in Newman that it soon found its genuine leader.

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  • In 1841 the tracts were brought to an abrupt termination by the publication of Newman's tract No.

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  • No other public event ever affected Keble so deeply as the secession of Newman to the Church of Rome in 1845.

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  • Newman, A Manual of Church History (Philadelphia, 1900-1903); R.

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  • He was greatly influenced by the writings of Cardinal Newman, and early in 1879 entered the Roman Catholic Church.

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  • Besides the influence of Newman, the friendship and work of Robert Dolling made a great impression on him, and as he admitted, saved him from being contented with a merely academic and ecclesiastical type of religion.

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  • Newman, J.

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  • He took an active part in the Oxford movement, but could no more follow Newman into the Roman communion "than fly."

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  • Newman a protest that they took "a liberty which no Christian can tolerate," and carried him to "conclusions which were often heathen rather than Christian."

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  • She wrote, and published anonymously, an essay questioning the Morality of Tractarianism, which was attributed to John Henry Newman.

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  • In 1826 he was chosen fellow of Oriel and was ordained, among his friends and colleagues being Newman, Pusey and Keble.

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  • Newman declined further contributions from him to the British Critic, not deeming it advisable that they should longer "co-operate very closely."

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  • Among those upon whom Swift's influence has been most discernible may be mentioned Chesterfield, Smollett, Cobbett, Hazlitt, Scott, Borrow, Newman, Belloc.

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  • degree with first-class honours in both classics and mathematics in 1813, he next year obtained the chancellor's prize for a Latin essay, and shortly afterwards was elected to a fellowship in his college, Keble, Newman and Arnold being among his contemporaries.

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  • In the neighbourhood are the Alachua Sink, Payne's Prairie, Newman's Lake, the Devil's Mill Hopper and other objects of interest.

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  • Newman's retirement from the editorship; and in 1862 he merged this periodical in the Home and Foreign Review.

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  • H., afterwards Cardinal, Newman was the chief, but who numbered among their leaders Hurrell Froude, the brother of the historian, and Keble, the author of the Christian Yearendeavoured to prove that the doctrines of the Church of England were identical with those of the primitive Catholic Church, and that every Catholic doctrine might be held by those who were within its pale.

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  • The Tractarian movement was ultimately terminated by the secession of Newman and many of his associates from the Church of England, and,their admission to the Church of Rome.

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  • Newman), which throws so new a light upon the meaning of tradition, is a valuable support of the conception of a sovereign pontiff drawing out dogmas from implicit into explicit life.

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  • Newman, E.

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  • Newman).

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  • In conjunction with Sir George Newman he was mainly instrumental in securing the medical treatment of school children and State provision for medical research; and he was one of the few doctors of distinction who supported Mr. Lloyd George in his struggle with the profession over the Insurance Act (1912).

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  • Newman and John Keble.

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  • " He was not, however, fully associated in the movement till 1835 and 1836, when he published his tract on baptism and started the Library of the Fathers" (Newman's Apologia, p. 136).

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  • The immediate effect of his suspension was the sale of 18, 000 copies of the condemned sermon; its permanent effect was to make Pusey for the next quarter of a century the most influential person in the Anglican Church, for it was one of the causes which led Newman to sever himself from that communion.

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  • Wilson (5 vols., 1893-1899), Newman's Apologia, and other literature of the Oxford Movement.

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  • An English house, founded in 1847 at Birmingham, is celebrated as the place at which Cardinal Newman fixed his abode after his submission to the Roman Catholic Church.

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  • JOHN HENRY NEWMAN (1801-1890), English Cardinal, was born in London on the 21st of February 1801, the eldest son of John Newman, banker, of the firm of Ramsbottom, Newman and Co.

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  • Two of the three daughters, Harriett Elizabeth and Jemima Charlotte, married brothers, Thomas and John Mozley; and Anne Mozley, a daughter of the latter, edited in 1892 Newman's Anglican Life and Correspondence, having been entrusted by him in 1885 with an autobiography written in the third person to form the basis of a narrative of the first thirty years of his life.

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  • At the age of seven Newman was sent to a private school conducted by Dr Nicholas at Ealing, where he was distinguished by diligence and good conduct, as also by a certain shyness and aloofness, taking no part in the school games.

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  • On Trinity Sunday, 13th June 1824, Newman was ordained, and became, a t Pusey's suggestion, curate of St Clement's, Oxford.

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  • He broke with him in 1827 on the occasion of the re-election of Peel for the University, Newman opposing this on personal grounds.

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  • Froude, described by Newman as "one of the acutest, cleverest and deepest men" he ever met, was elected fellow.

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  • The year following Newman supported and secured the election of Hawkins as provost of Oriel in preference to Keble, a choice which he later defended or apologized for as having in effect produced the Oxford Movement with all its consequences.

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  • At this date, though still nominally associated with the Evangelicals, Newman's views were gradually assuming a higher ecclesiastical tone, and while local secretary of the Church Missionary Society he circulated an anonymous letter suggesting a method by which Churchmen might practically oust Nonconformists from all control of the society.

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  • On board the mail steamship "Hermes" they visited Gibraltar, Malta and the Ionian Islands, and subsequently Sicily, Naples and Rome, where Newman made the acquaintance of Dr Wiseman.

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  • From Rome Newman returned to Sicily alone, and was dangerously ill with fever at Leonforte, recovering from it with the conviction that he had a work to do in England.

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  • He was at home again in Oxford on the 9th of July, and on the 14th Keble preached at St Mary's an assize sermon on "National Apostasy," which Newman afterwards regarded as the inauguration of the Oxford Movement.

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  • In the words of Dean Church, it was "Keble who inspired, Froude who gave the impetus and Newman who took up the work"; but the first organization of it was due to H.

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  • It was in his rectory house at Hadleigh, Suffolk, that a meeting of High Church clergymen was held, 25th to 29th of July (Newman was not present), at which it was resolved to fight for "the apostolical succession and the integrity of the Prayer-Book."

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  • A few weeks later Newman started, apparently on his own initiative, the Tracts for the Times, from which the movement was subsequently named "Tractarian."

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  • The teaching of the tracts was supplemented by Newman's Sunday afternoon sermons at St Mary's, the influence of which, especially over the junior members of the university, was increasingly marked during a period of eight years.

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  • His Bampton Lectures (in the preparation of which Blanco White had assisted him) were suspected of heresy, and this suspicion was accentuated by a pamphlet put forth by Newman, Elucidations of Dr Hampden's Theological Statements.

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  • At this date Newman became editor of the British Critic, and he also gave courses of lectures in a side-chapel of St Mary's in defence of the via media of the Anglican Church as between Romanism and popular Protestantism.

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  • At this date Newman also resigned the editorship of the British Critic, and was thenceforth, as he himself later described it, "on his deathbed as regards membership with the Anglican Church."

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  • Popular Protestant feeling ran very high at the time, partly in consequence of the recent establishment of a Roman Catholic diocesan hierarchy by Pius IX., and criminal proceedings against Newman for libel resulted in an acknowledged gross miscarriage of justice.

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  • He was found guilty, and was sentenced to pay a fine of £loo, while his expenses as defendant amounted to about 14,000, a sum that was at once raised by public subscription, a surplus being spent on the purchase of Rednall, a small property picturesquely situated on the Lickey Hills, with a chapel and cemetery, where Newman now lies buried.

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  • In 1854, at the request of the Irish bishops, Newman went to Dublin as rector of the newly-established Catholic university there.

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  • But all this time (since 1841) Newman had been under a cloud, so far as concerned the great mass of cultivated Englishmen, and he was now awaiting an opportunity to vindicate his career; and in 1862 he began to prepare autobiographical and other memoranda for the purpose.

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  • The occasion came when, in January 1864, Charles Kingsley, reviewing Froude's History of England in Macmillan's Magazine, incidentally asserted that "Father Newman informs us that truth for its own sake need not be, and on the whole ought not to be, a virtue of the Roman clergy."

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  • After some preliminary sparring between the two - Newman's pamphlet, "Mr Kingsley and Dr Newman: a Correspondence on the Question whether Dr Newman teaches that Truth is no Virtue," published in 1864 and not reprinted, is unsurpassed in the English language for the vigour of its satire: the anger displayed was later, in a letter to Sir William Cope, admitted to have been largely feigned - Newman published in bi-monthly parts his Apologia pro vita sua, a religious autobiography of unsurpassed interest, the simple confidential tone of which "revolutionized the popular estimate of its author," establishing the strength and sincerity of the convictions which had led him into the Roman Catholic Church.

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  • But he made no sign of disapproval when the doctrine was defined, and subsequently, in a letter nominally addressed to the duke of Norfolk on the occasion of Mr Gladstone's accusing the Roman Church of having "equally repudiated modern thought and ancient history," Newman affirmed that he had always believed the doctrine, and had only feared the deterrent effect of its definition on conversions on account of acknowledged historical difficulties.

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  • In this letter, and especially in the postscript to the second edition of it, Newman finally silenced all cavillers as to his not being really at ease within the Roman Church.

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  • was encouraged by the duke of Norfolk and other distinguished Roman Catholic laymen to make Newman a cardinal, the distinction being a marked one, because he was a simple priest and not resident in Rome.

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  • The "creation" took place on 12th May, with the title of St George in Velabro, Newman taking occasion while in Rome to insist on the lifelong consistency of his opposition to "liberalism in religion."

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  • As cardinal Newman published nothing beyond a preface to a work by A.

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  • Newman's influence as controversialist and preacher (i.e.

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  • There is at Oxford a bust of Newman by Woolner.

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  • Outside the latter building, and facing the Brompton Road, there is a marble statue of Newman as cardinal.

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  • Hu.) The chief authorities for Newman's life are his Apologia and the Letters and Correspondence, edited by Miss Mozley, above referred to.

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  • The letters and memoranda dealing with the years1845-1890were entrusted by Newman to the Rev. W.

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  • The Anglican Career of Cardinal Newman, 2 vols.

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  • See also P. Thureau-Dangin, La Renaissqnce catholique: Newman et le mouvement d'Oxford (Paris, 1899); Lucie Felix-Faure, Newman, sa vie et ses oeuvres (ib.

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  • 1901); MacRae, Die religiose Gewissheit bei John Henry Newman (Jena, 1898); Grappe, John Henry Newman.

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  • Essai de psychologie religieuse (Paris, 1902); William Barry, Newman (London, 1903); Lady Blennerhassett, J.

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  • Kardinal Newman (Berlin, 1904); Bremond, Newman.

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  • Theophilus Eaton Francis Newman William Leete State Jonathan Trumbull Matthew Griswold Samuel Huntington Oliver Wolcott.

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  • Other institutions of higher learning, not under the control of the state, are: the University of Nashville (non-sect., 1785); Washington and Tusculum College (non-sect., 1794), at Greenville; Maryville College (Presbyterian, 1819), at Maryville; Cumberland University (Presbyterian, 1842), at Lebanon; Burritt College (non-sect., 1848), at Spencer; Hiwassee College (non-sect., 1849), at Sweetwater; Bethel College (Presbyterian 1850), at McKenzie; Carson and Newman College (Baptist, 1851), at Jefferson City; Walden University (Methodist, 1866), at Nashville; Fisk University (Congregational, 1866), at Nashville; University of Chattanooga (Methodist, 1867), at Chattanooga; University of the South (Protestant Episcopal, 1868), at Sewanee; King College (Presbyterian, 1869), at Bristol; Christian Brothers College (Roman Catholic, 1871), at Memphis; Knoxville College (United Presbyterian, 1875), at Knoxville; Milligan College (Christian, 1882), at Milligan; South-western Presbyterian College (1885), at Clarkville; and Lincoln Memorial University (non-sect., 1895), at Cumberland Gap.

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  • He wore an Alfred E. Newman smile and was dressed in a short-sleeved shirt without a tie.

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  • abattoir owner Jeremy Newman said: " They were wild!

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  • By Friday 7th Newman had read the outline and made handwritten annotations, before returning the synopsis to Wilson.

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  • bolstered by the addition of Doug Newman to the team.

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  • Making good use of Paul Newman's undoubted charisma, the film gives us a 'natural ' rebel.

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  • In 1889 he gave Edward a wedding gift: a copy of a poem by the great Catholic churchman, Cardinal John Henry Newman.

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  • Within these snow-beds the endemic Newman's lady fern Athyrium flexile occurs.

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  • Michael is not your average folkie, more a Randy Newman in blue suede shoes with a bit of cabaret thrown in!

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  • Robert Newman remains as gloomy as ever about the Barley Mow pub: ` Usually runs out of real ale before closing time.

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  • And then Newman uttered a quiet oath as he drew back from the binocular display of the stereo television camera.

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  • Newman portrays notorious outlaw Billy the Kid in director Arthur Penn's first feature, " The Left-Handed Gun " (1958 ).

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  • From 1916 until 1919 Newman undertook work related to the war, doing various jobs such as army paymaster and schoolmaster.

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  • Following Newman's example we must affirm the primacy of the love of God.

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  • Newman received his medical degree in 1970 from the University of Toronto, where he is now an assistant professor.

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  • G F Newman has written a series which pulls few punches.

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  • In the Grammar, Newman makes his case for a radically new understanding of human reason, rejecting both Cartesian rationalism and Lockean empiricism.

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  • Newman, who held the rectory 45 years, and died in 1837.

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  • In rabbits the same technique was unsuccessful, with denudation actually retarding recovery threefold (Buehler and Newman 1964 ).

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  • In Newman's time, the seeds were being sown of the denial of supernatural revelation.

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  • The hit also sparked a revival in Jimmy C Newman ' s own career.

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  • John Cant and John Boreham were charged with stealing a wether sheep the property of Rev Newman of Sudbury.

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  • John Newman, Consultant Orthopedic Surgeon is also an accomplished skier.

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  • Randy Newman later became a professional songwriter on a salary, turning out pop songs for others to sing.

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  • Wakefield, N.H., Newman, S.J. and Wilson, P.A. (2002) Helicopter flight around a ship's superstructure.

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  • wether sheep the property of Rev Newman of Sudbury.

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  • La vraie et la fausse infaillibilite, Paris, 1873), and by Cardinal Newman in his " Letter to the Duke of Norfolk," is the correct one, and this is clear from the fact that it has never been blamed by the ecclesiastical authority.

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  • Newman, Frances Power Cobbe, and others, for their more modern speculative belief in God, which, while non-Christian or at least non-orthodox, held to an immanent God, continually revealing himself - in the moral consciousness.

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  • Newman's Apologia pro vita sua (1864); or A.

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  • Newman - with modifications on becoming a Roman Catholic in the light of the church's decision in favour of Thomism.

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  • Abbott (Philomythus, and elsewhere) suspect Newman of a sceptical leaven and extend the criticism to Butler's doctrine of " probability."

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  • He was repelled from it by the conception he had formed of the character of Newman, whom he regarded as a mere antiquary.

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  • When, however, he was at length persuaded by a friend to go and hear Newman preach, he at once became a disciple.

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  • But he had, as Newman afterwards said of him, "struck into the movement at an angle."

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  • Ward left the Church of England in September 1845, and was followed by many others, including Newman himself.

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  • Newman in 1888.

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  • The use of the word "clergy" as a plural, though the New English Dictionary quotes the high authority of Cardinal Newman for it, is less rare than wrong; in the case cited "Some hundred Clergy" should have been "Some hundred of the Clergy."

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  • In 1831 Rennie brought out a modified edition of it (reissued in 1833), and Newman another in 1866 (reissued in 1883); but those who wish to know the author's views had better consult the original.

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  • Yet the idea of a " physiological " arrangement on the same kind of principle found another follower, or, as he thought, inventor, in Edward Newman, who in 1850 communicated N ewman.

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  • Newman, Blanco White and T.

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  • Of readable English books we may cite Ernest Newman, A Study of Wagner (1899); H.

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  • led some of the cardinals to vote for Pecci, since his age (within a few days of sixty-eight) and health warranted the expectation that his reign would be comparatively brief; but he had for years been known as one of the few "papable" cardinals; and although his long seclusion at Perugia had caused his name to be little known outside Italy, there was a general belief that the conclave had selected a man who was a prudent statesman as well as a devout churchman; and Newman (whom he created a cardinal in the year following) is reported to have said, "In the successor of Pius I recognize a depth of thought, a tenderness of heart, a winning simplicity, and a power answering to the name of Leo, which prevent me from lamenting that Pius is no longer here."

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  • The elevation of Newman to the college of Cardinals in 1879 was regarded with approval throughout the English-speaking world, both on Newman's account and also as evidence that Leo XIII.

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  • By September he had crossed the Rubicon, Henry Newman (his rector at Shepton Beauchamp and Sparkford) accompanying him on a tour in Carnarvonshire.

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  • At the outset the followers of Newman and Pusey were more concerned with doctrine than with ritual; but it was natural that a reassertion of Catholic teaching should be followed by a revival of Catholic practice, and by the middle of the century certain "Ritualists," pleading the letter of the Ornaments Rubric in the Prayer Book, had revived the use of many of the pre-Reformation vestments.

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  • Newman and his followers to the Church of Rome.

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  • Newman (1879).

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  • Certainly it was true of him, in a far higher degree than of John Henry Newman, that the being of God and himself were to his mind two absolutely self-luminous truths - though both his God and his self were almost infinitely remote from Newman's.

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  • Newman, whose mind Martineau said was " critical, not prophetic, since without immediateness of religious vision," and whose faith is " an escape from an alternative scepticism, which receives the veto not of his reason but of his will," 6 as men for whose teachings and methods he had a potent and stimulating antipathy.

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  • The philosophic principles and religious deductions of Dean Mansel he disliked as much as those of Newman, but he respected his arguments more.

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  • In England representative Anglican preachers were Newman (whose best preaching preceded his obedience to Rome), T.

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  • The lasting sadness that thus early overshadowed him tended to facilitate his acceptance of the austere teaching of the Oxford Tracts; and though he was never an acknowledged disciple of Newman, it was due to the latter's influence that from this date his theology assumed an increasingly High Church character, and his printed sermon on the "Rule of Faith" was taken as a public profession of his alliance with the Tractarians.

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  • In 1842 he published a treatise on The Unity of the Church, and his reputation as an eloquent and earnest preacher being by this time considerable, he was in the same year appointed select preacher by his university, thus being called upon to fill from time to time the pulpit which Newman, as vicar of St Mary's, was just ceasing to occupy.

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  • This sermon had much annoyed Newman and his more advanced disciples, but it was a proof that at that date Manning was loyal to the Church of England as Protestant.

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  • Newman's secession in 1845 placed Manning in a position of greater responsibility, as one of the High Church leaders, along with Pusey and Keble and Marriott; but it was with Gladstone and James Hope (afterwards Hope-Scott) that he was at this time most closely associated.

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  • and the following winter he spent abroad, chiefly in Rome, where he saw Newman "wearing the Oratorian habit and dead to the world."

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  • He steadily opposed whatever might encourage the admission of Catholics to the national universities, and so put his foot down on Newman's project to open a branch house of the Oratory at Oxford with himself as superior.

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  • The facts disclosed which mainly attracted attention were: (1) that Manning, while yet formally an Anglican, and while publicly and privately dissuading others from joining the Roman Catholic Church, was yet within a little convinced that it was his own duty and destiny to take that step himself; (2) that he was continually intriguing at the back-stairs of the Vatican for the furtherance of his own views as to what was desirable in matters ecclesiastical; (3) that his relations with Newman were very unfriendly; and (4) that, while for the most part he exhibited towards his own clergy a frigid and masterful demeanour, he held privately very cordial relations with men of diverse religions or of no theological beliefs at all.

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  • As viceprincipal of the theological college at Cuddesdon (1854-1859) he wielded considerable influence, and, on returning to Oxford as vice-principal of St Edmund's Hall, became a growing force among the undergraduates, exercising his influence in strong opposition to the liberal reaction against Tractarianism, which had set in after Newman's secession in 1845.

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  • of Montalembert) and English Monastic Life (1904); and Newman's two essays on the Benedictines, among the Historical Sketches.

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  • Newman's (1845).

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  • Meanwhile he had given up the Calvinistic views of his youth, and had become an enthusiastic follower of John Henry Newman.

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  • He founded a religious community at Birmingham, called Wilfridians, which was ultimately merged in the oratory of St Philip Neri, with John Henry Newman as Superior.

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  • Cardinal Newman admits that the latter woman " represents the church, this is the real or direct sense "; yet as her man-child is certainly the Messiah, this church must be the faithful Jewish church.

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  • He belonged to the High Church school, which was influenced by the teaching of Newman and Pusey and the Oxford teachers of their day; but he by no means slavishly followed them.

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  • Newman, afterwards cardinal, in his Lives of the English Saints.

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  • Newman held the view that many oak-galls are pseudobalani or false acorns: " to produce an acorn has been the intention of the oak, but the gall-fly has frustrated the attempt."

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  • In a somewhat similar fashion, Lamennais (in the first stage of his speculations, represented by the Essai sur l'indiference en matiere religieuse, 1817-18 21) endeavoured to destroy all rational certitude in order to establish the principle of authority; and the same profound distrust of the power of the natural reason to-arrive at truth is exemplified (though the allegation has been denied by the author) in Cardinal Newman.

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  • Newman; the Rev. Samuel Newth (1821-1898), congregationalist, professor of ecclesiastical history at, and afterwards president of, New College, London; Dr A.

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  • Of these, Dr Thompson and Dr Newman declined to serve.

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  • Newman has edited the Politics in four volumes; Dr Ogle has translated the De Partibus Animalium, with notes; R.

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  • Among his publications are Characters and Characteristics of William Law (1893); Bunyan Characters (3 vols., 1894); Samuel Rutherford (1894); An Appreciation of Jacob Behmen (1895) Lancelot Andrewes and his Private Devotions (1895); Bible Characters (7 vols., 1897); Santa Teresa (1897); Father John of Cronstadt (1898); An Appreciation of Browne's Religio Medici (1898); Cardinal Newman, An Appreciation (1901).

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  • After he and those who adhered to him (describing themselves as of the Holy Catholic Apostolic Church) had in 1832 removed to a new building in Newman Street, he was in March 1833 deposed from the ministry of the Church of Scotland by the presbytery of Annan on the original charge of heresy.

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  • With the sanction of the "power" he was now after some delay reordained "chief pastor of the church assembled in Newman Street," but unremitting labours and ceaseless spiritual excitement soon completely exhausted the springs of his vital energy.

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  • Newman (1801-1890), maintaining the authority of conscience and the probabilism of the understanding, concluded to the necessity of a higher authority in the primitive church.

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  • When the Irish university was started, with Newman, appointed by Cullen, at its head, the scheme was wrecked by the personal opposition to the archbishop of Dublin.

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  • For a time the Roman propaganda in England, which drew to itself High Churchmen like Newman and Manning, was viewed with apprehension; but though the Roman Catholic Church has grown greatly in influence in the country, the number of its adherents, in proportion to the growth of population, has not very greatly increased.

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  • Newman, which could not be content with a compromise with truth, but feared to face ultimate realities, the rigidly authoritative attitude of Rome made an irresistible appeal.

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  • Cardinal Newman's celebrated Arians of the Fourth Century is interesting more from the controversial than from the historical point of view.

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  • Newman, for whom he worked, helping in the translation of Thomas Aquinas's Catena Aurea, and writing in the British Critic and Christian Remembrances.

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  • Probably the truest idea of his monastic system may be derived from a correspondence between him and St Gregory Nazianzen at the beginning of his monastic life, the chief portions whereof are translated by Newman in the Church of the Fathers, " Basil and Gregory," §§ 4, 5.

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  • He was at Oxford during the early years of the movement known as Puseyism, and was powerfully influenced by association with Newman, Pusey and Keble.

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  • In Macmillan's Magazine for January 1864 he asserted that truth for its own sake was not obligatory with the Roman Catholic clergy, quoting as his authority John Henry Newman.

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  • More weighty contributions are the anonymous theological discussion The Kernel and the Husk (1886), Philomythus (1891), his book on Cardinal Newman as an Anglican (1892), and his article "The Gospels" in the ninth edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica, embodying a critical view which caused considerable stir in the English theological world; he also wrote St Thomas of Canterbury, his Death and Miracles (1898), Johannine V ocabulary (1905), Johannine Grammar (1906).

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  • Newman from the Anglican Church, he used all his influence to protect from formal condemnation the leaders and tenets of the " Tractarian'.'

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  • Their effect was considerable; and at Pusey's request Newman reviewed them in the British Critic (December 1836), treating them for the most part with sympathy as a triumph over popular Protestantism.

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  • An article by him on the Donatist schism appearing in the Dublin Review in July 1839 made a great impression in Oxford, Newman and others seeing the force of the analogy between Donatists and Anglicans.

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  • Some words he quoted from St Augustine influenced Newman profoundly: " Quapropter securus judicat orbis terrarum bonos non esse qui se dividunt ab orbe terrarum."

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  • And preaching at the opening of St Mary's church, Derby, in the same year, he anticipated Newman's argument on religious development, published six years later.

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  • It was by his advice that Newman and his companions spent some time in Rome before undertaking clerical work in England.

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  • In July 1852 he presided at Oscott over the first provincial synod of Westminster, at which Newman preached his sermon on the " Second Spring "; and at this date Wiseman's dream of the rapid conversion of England to the ancient faith seemed not incapable of realization.

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  • Thus he had to condemn the Association for the Promotion of the Unity of Christendom, with which he had shown some sympathy in its inception in 1857; and to forbid Catholic parents to send their sons to Oxford or Cambridge, though at an earlier date he had hoped (with Newman) that at Oxford at least a college or hall might be assigned to them.

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  • Francis William Newman >>

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  • Zahm, Evolution and Dogma (1896); John Henry Newman, An Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine (1845); Edward Caird, The Evolution of Religion (1893); Otto Pfleiderer, Philosophy of Religion (Eng.

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  • trans., 1888, especially volumes 3 and 4); Newman Smyth, Old Faiths in New Lights (1879), Through Science to Faith (1902); Henry Drummond, The Ascent of Man (1894); William Ralph Inge, Christian Mysticism (Bampton Lectures, 1894); Wilhelm Herrmann, The Communion of the Christian with God (1895); George William Knox, Direct and Fundamental Proofs of the Christian Religion (1903); Albrecht Ritschl, Die christliche Lehre von der Rechtfertigung and Versohnung (1900).

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  • In a few years Leo had made peace with Austria, pacified Switzerland and Belgium, opened up negotiations with Russia; while his elevation of Newman to the cardinalate (1879) made a great impression in Great Britain.

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  • Copleston, Davison, Whately, were among the fellows who elected Keble; Arnold, Pusey, Newman, were soon after added to the society.

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  • Cardinal Newman writes, "On Sunday July 14, 1833, Mr Keble preached the assize sermon in the University pulpit.

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  • If Keble is to be reckoned, as Newman would have it, as the primary author of the movement, it was from Pusey that it received one of its best known names, and in Newman that it soon found its genuine leader.

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  • In 1841 the tracts were brought to an abrupt termination by the publication of Newman's tract No.

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  • No other public event ever affected Keble so deeply as the secession of Newman to the Church of Rome in 1845.

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  • Newman, A Manual of Church History (Philadelphia, 1900-1903); R.

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  • He was greatly influenced by the writings of Cardinal Newman, and early in 1879 entered the Roman Catholic Church.

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  • Besides the influence of Newman, the friendship and work of Robert Dolling made a great impression on him, and as he admitted, saved him from being contented with a merely academic and ecclesiastical type of religion.

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  • Newman, J.

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  • He took an active part in the Oxford movement, but could no more follow Newman into the Roman communion "than fly."

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  • Newman a protest that they took "a liberty which no Christian can tolerate," and carried him to "conclusions which were often heathen rather than Christian."

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  • She wrote, and published anonymously, an essay questioning the Morality of Tractarianism, which was attributed to John Henry Newman.

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  • In 1826 he was chosen fellow of Oriel and was ordained, among his friends and colleagues being Newman, Pusey and Keble.

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  • Newman declined further contributions from him to the British Critic, not deeming it advisable that they should longer "co-operate very closely."

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  • Among those upon whom Swift's influence has been most discernible may be mentioned Chesterfield, Smollett, Cobbett, Hazlitt, Scott, Borrow, Newman, Belloc.

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  • degree with first-class honours in both classics and mathematics in 1813, he next year obtained the chancellor's prize for a Latin essay, and shortly afterwards was elected to a fellowship in his college, Keble, Newman and Arnold being among his contemporaries.

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  • In the neighbourhood are the Alachua Sink, Payne's Prairie, Newman's Lake, the Devil's Mill Hopper and other objects of interest.

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  • Newman's retirement from the editorship; and in 1862 he merged this periodical in the Home and Foreign Review.

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  • H., afterwards Cardinal, Newman was the chief, but who numbered among their leaders Hurrell Froude, the brother of the historian, and Keble, the author of the Christian Yearendeavoured to prove that the doctrines of the Church of England were identical with those of the primitive Catholic Church, and that every Catholic doctrine might be held by those who were within its pale.

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  • The Tractarian movement was ultimately terminated by the secession of Newman and many of his associates from the Church of England, and,their admission to the Church of Rome.

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  • Newman), which throws so new a light upon the meaning of tradition, is a valuable support of the conception of a sovereign pontiff drawing out dogmas from implicit into explicit life.

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  • Newman, E.

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  • In conjunction with Sir George Newman he was mainly instrumental in securing the medical treatment of school children and State provision for medical research; and he was one of the few doctors of distinction who supported Mr. Lloyd George in his struggle with the profession over the Insurance Act (1912).

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  • Newman and John Keble.

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  • " He was not, however, fully associated in the movement till 1835 and 1836, when he published his tract on baptism and started the Library of the Fathers" (Newman's Apologia, p. 136).

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  • The immediate effect of his suspension was the sale of 18, 000 copies of the condemned sermon; its permanent effect was to make Pusey for the next quarter of a century the most influential person in the Anglican Church, for it was one of the causes which led Newman to sever himself from that communion.

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  • Wilson (5 vols., 1893-1899), Newman's Apologia, and other literature of the Oxford Movement.

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  • An English house, founded in 1847 at Birmingham, is celebrated as the place at which Cardinal Newman fixed his abode after his submission to the Roman Catholic Church.

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  • JOHN HENRY NEWMAN (1801-1890), English Cardinal, was born in London on the 21st of February 1801, the eldest son of John Newman, banker, of the firm of Ramsbottom, Newman and Co.

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  • Two of the three daughters, Harriett Elizabeth and Jemima Charlotte, married brothers, Thomas and John Mozley; and Anne Mozley, a daughter of the latter, edited in 1892 Newman's Anglican Life and Correspondence, having been entrusted by him in 1885 with an autobiography written in the third person to form the basis of a narrative of the first thirty years of his life.

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  • At the age of seven Newman was sent to a private school conducted by Dr Nicholas at Ealing, where he was distinguished by diligence and good conduct, as also by a certain shyness and aloofness, taking no part in the school games.

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  • On Trinity Sunday, 13th June 1824, Newman was ordained, and became, a t Pusey's suggestion, curate of St Clement's, Oxford.

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  • He broke with him in 1827 on the occasion of the re-election of Peel for the University, Newman opposing this on personal grounds.

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  • Froude, described by Newman as "one of the acutest, cleverest and deepest men" he ever met, was elected fellow.

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  • The year following Newman supported and secured the election of Hawkins as provost of Oriel in preference to Keble, a choice which he later defended or apologized for as having in effect produced the Oxford Movement with all its consequences.

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  • At this date, though still nominally associated with the Evangelicals, Newman's views were gradually assuming a higher ecclesiastical tone, and while local secretary of the Church Missionary Society he circulated an anonymous letter suggesting a method by which Churchmen might practically oust Nonconformists from all control of the society.

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  • On board the mail steamship "Hermes" they visited Gibraltar, Malta and the Ionian Islands, and subsequently Sicily, Naples and Rome, where Newman made the acquaintance of Dr Wiseman.

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  • From Rome Newman returned to Sicily alone, and was dangerously ill with fever at Leonforte, recovering from it with the conviction that he had a work to do in England.

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  • He was at home again in Oxford on the 9th of July, and on the 14th Keble preached at St Mary's an assize sermon on "National Apostasy," which Newman afterwards regarded as the inauguration of the Oxford Movement.

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  • In the words of Dean Church, it was "Keble who inspired, Froude who gave the impetus and Newman who took up the work"; but the first organization of it was due to H.

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  • It was in his rectory house at Hadleigh, Suffolk, that a meeting of High Church clergymen was held, 25th to 29th of July (Newman was not present), at which it was resolved to fight for "the apostolical succession and the integrity of the Prayer-Book."

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  • A few weeks later Newman started, apparently on his own initiative, the Tracts for the Times, from which the movement was subsequently named "Tractarian."

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  • The teaching of the tracts was supplemented by Newman's Sunday afternoon sermons at St Mary's, the influence of which, especially over the junior members of the university, was increasingly marked during a period of eight years.

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  • His Bampton Lectures (in the preparation of which Blanco White had assisted him) were suspected of heresy, and this suspicion was accentuated by a pamphlet put forth by Newman, Elucidations of Dr Hampden's Theological Statements.

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  • At this date Newman became editor of the British Critic, and he also gave courses of lectures in a side-chapel of St Mary's in defence of the via media of the Anglican Church as between Romanism and popular Protestantism.

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  • At this date Newman also resigned the editorship of the British Critic, and was thenceforth, as he himself later described it, "on his deathbed as regards membership with the Anglican Church."

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  • Popular Protestant feeling ran very high at the time, partly in consequence of the recent establishment of a Roman Catholic diocesan hierarchy by Pius IX., and criminal proceedings against Newman for libel resulted in an acknowledged gross miscarriage of justice.

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  • He was found guilty, and was sentenced to pay a fine of £loo, while his expenses as defendant amounted to about 14,000, a sum that was at once raised by public subscription, a surplus being spent on the purchase of Rednall, a small property picturesquely situated on the Lickey Hills, with a chapel and cemetery, where Newman now lies buried.

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  • In 1854, at the request of the Irish bishops, Newman went to Dublin as rector of the newly-established Catholic university there.

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  • But all this time (since 1841) Newman had been under a cloud, so far as concerned the great mass of cultivated Englishmen, and he was now awaiting an opportunity to vindicate his career; and in 1862 he began to prepare autobiographical and other memoranda for the purpose.

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  • The occasion came when, in January 1864, Charles Kingsley, reviewing Froude's History of England in Macmillan's Magazine, incidentally asserted that "Father Newman informs us that truth for its own sake need not be, and on the whole ought not to be, a virtue of the Roman clergy."

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  • After some preliminary sparring between the two - Newman's pamphlet, "Mr Kingsley and Dr Newman: a Correspondence on the Question whether Dr Newman teaches that Truth is no Virtue," published in 1864 and not reprinted, is unsurpassed in the English language for the vigour of its satire: the anger displayed was later, in a letter to Sir William Cope, admitted to have been largely feigned - Newman published in bi-monthly parts his Apologia pro vita sua, a religious autobiography of unsurpassed interest, the simple confidential tone of which "revolutionized the popular estimate of its author," establishing the strength and sincerity of the convictions which had led him into the Roman Catholic Church.

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  • But he made no sign of disapproval when the doctrine was defined, and subsequently, in a letter nominally addressed to the duke of Norfolk on the occasion of Mr Gladstone's accusing the Roman Church of having "equally repudiated modern thought and ancient history," Newman affirmed that he had always believed the doctrine, and had only feared the deterrent effect of its definition on conversions on account of acknowledged historical difficulties.

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  • In this letter, and especially in the postscript to the second edition of it, Newman finally silenced all cavillers as to his not being really at ease within the Roman Church.

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  • was encouraged by the duke of Norfolk and other distinguished Roman Catholic laymen to make Newman a cardinal, the distinction being a marked one, because he was a simple priest and not resident in Rome.

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  • The "creation" took place on 12th May, with the title of St George in Velabro, Newman taking occasion while in Rome to insist on the lifelong consistency of his opposition to "liberalism in religion."

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  • As cardinal Newman published nothing beyond a preface to a work by A.

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  • Newman's influence as controversialist and preacher (i.e.

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  • There is at Oxford a bust of Newman by Woolner.

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  • Outside the latter building, and facing the Brompton Road, there is a marble statue of Newman as cardinal.

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  • Hu.) The chief authorities for Newman's life are his Apologia and the Letters and Correspondence, edited by Miss Mozley, above referred to.

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  • The letters and memoranda dealing with the years1845-1890were entrusted by Newman to the Rev. W.

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  • The Anglican Career of Cardinal Newman, 2 vols.

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  • See also P. Thureau-Dangin, La Renaissqnce catholique: Newman et le mouvement d'Oxford (Paris, 1899); Lucie Felix-Faure, Newman, sa vie et ses oeuvres (ib.

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  • 1901); MacRae, Die religiose Gewissheit bei John Henry Newman (Jena, 1898); Grappe, John Henry Newman.

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  • Essai de psychologie religieuse (Paris, 1902); William Barry, Newman (London, 1903); Lady Blennerhassett, J.

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  • Kardinal Newman (Berlin, 1904); Bremond, Newman.

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  • Theophilus Eaton Francis Newman William Leete State Jonathan Trumbull Matthew Griswold Samuel Huntington Oliver Wolcott.

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  • Other institutions of higher learning, not under the control of the state, are: the University of Nashville (non-sect., 1785); Washington and Tusculum College (non-sect., 1794), at Greenville; Maryville College (Presbyterian, 1819), at Maryville; Cumberland University (Presbyterian, 1842), at Lebanon; Burritt College (non-sect., 1848), at Spencer; Hiwassee College (non-sect., 1849), at Sweetwater; Bethel College (Presbyterian 1850), at McKenzie; Carson and Newman College (Baptist, 1851), at Jefferson City; Walden University (Methodist, 1866), at Nashville; Fisk University (Congregational, 1866), at Nashville; University of Chattanooga (Methodist, 1867), at Chattanooga; University of the South (Protestant Episcopal, 1868), at Sewanee; King College (Presbyterian, 1869), at Bristol; Christian Brothers College (Roman Catholic, 1871), at Memphis; Knoxville College (United Presbyterian, 1875), at Knoxville; Milligan College (Christian, 1882), at Milligan; South-western Presbyterian College (1885), at Clarkville; and Lincoln Memorial University (non-sect., 1895), at Cumberland Gap.

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  • G F Newman has written a series which pulls few punches.

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  • In the Grammar, Newman makes his case for a radically new understanding of human reason, rejecting both Cartesian rationalism and Lockean empiricism.

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  • Gareth Newman was our guru for this occasion, in a fine recital hall.

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  • Newman, who held the rectory 45 years, and died in 1837.

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  • In rabbits the same technique was unsuccessful, with denudation actually retarding recovery threefold (Buehler and Newman 1964).

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  • In Newman 's time, the seeds were being sown of the denial of supernatural revelation.

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  • The hit also sparked a revival in Jimmy C Newman ' s own career.

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  • John Cant and John Boreham were charged with stealing a wether sheep the property of Rev Newman of Sudbury.

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  • Randy Newman later became a professional songwriter on a salary, turning out pop songs for others to sing.

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  • Wakefield, N.H., Newman, S.J. and Wilson, P.A. (2002) Helicopter flight around a ship 's superstructure.

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  • Kim Newman approves Selected reviews Timecode Mike Figgis ' Timecode unfolds on four screens in real time.

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  • Green Mountain Coffee carries several different coffee brands including Newman's Own and Caribou.

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  • Newman's Own Organics is about 70% organic, and Karma is reported to be 95% organic according to a report in USA Today.

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  • Lynn' Newman, nutritionist and herbalist, provides guidance for those suffering from arthritis.

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  • Couch grass is useful for kidney health and, according to herbalist Lynn' Newman's booklet, Common Uses of Herbal Extracts, good for dissolving small kidney deposits.

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  • Joanne Woodward and Paul Newman - Newman and Woodward co-starred in the film The Long Hot Summer, which began filming in 1957.

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  • Only time will tell if they will turn into a 50-year Joanne Woodward-Paul Newman love story.

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  • Couples like Joanne Woodward and Paul Newman have defied the odds and are a great example for young Hollywood couples that many hope will also defy the odds and stay together for years to come.

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  • Ben Stiller's first short film was a spoof on The Color of Money, called The Hustler of Money and starred Stiller in the Tom Cruise role and Mahoney as the Paul Newman character.

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  • Actor and philanthropist Paul Newman died Friday night, September 26, 2008, at the age of 83.

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  • Last year, Newman announced that he was retiring from acting, stating that "I am not able to work anymore at the level I would want to."

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  • Newman's final pieces of work were in HBO's Empire Falls and as the voice of Doc Hudson in the film Cars.

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  • Friends, family and just about everyone in the entertainment industry have been coming out with statements regarding Newman's work as an actor and as a philanthropist.

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  • Professionally, every role Newman played was genius.

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  • Paul Newman is survived by his three daughters, Elinor, Melissa and Claire and his wife of over 50 years, actress Joanne Woodward.

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  • If you've never checked out one of Newman's films, you should.

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  • In this song he lists famous people that celebrate the Jewish holiday with lyrics such as, "Paul Newman's half Jewish; Goldie Hawn's half too."

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  • Newman's Own - This company makes 95% organic canned foods for both dogs and cats in chicken, turkey, beef and liver flavors.

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  • As the popularity of healthy and natural products grows, more and more people have asked where to buy Newman's Own organic products.

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  • By 1993, Newman's Own Organic became a division of Newman's Own and in 2001, Newman's Own Organic, a then division of Newman's Own expanded as a separate company with a motto that states, "Great Tasting Products That Happen to Be Organic."

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  • Every food and pet product produced by Newman's Own Organic is certified organic by Oregon Tilth, meaning they are free of artificial fertilizers and pesticides.

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  • Each product they sell comes in delightful packaging that features an American Gothic "Pa" Newman and his daughter Nell in costumes that reflect the era.

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  • There's no need for an Internet search to find Newman's Own Organic products.

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  • Simply visit, the Where to Buy web page to find every retail store that sells Newman's Own Organic products.

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  • Nell Newman has increased the product line over the years since 2001 where it started all with pretzels, Paul Newman's favorite snack!

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  • In the Signature Series, Newman's Own Organic offers 2.25 and 3.25 ounce sizes in six scrumptious varieties.

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  • Pop's Corn - Paul Newman's "Pop's Corn" came quickly after pretzels and cookies.

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  • Coffee - In a philanthropic joint venture with Vermont's Green Mountain Coffee Company, Nell Newman helps to promote Newman's coffees.

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  • All Newman's Own coffees are available through Vermont's Green Mountain Coffee website.

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  • Pet Food - Newman's Own Organic has also developed great organic pet food for both cats and dogs!

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  • For a complete list of all Newman's Own Organic products visit Nell Newman's Facts About Us web page.

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  • Don't forget to search the where to buy section to find out where to buy Newman's Own Organic products in your area.

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  • Newman's Own is a company dedicated to healthy eating for many groups, including pets.

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  • Some products such as Newman's Own contain human-grade chicken.

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  • Among the many brands carried by The Farmer's Pantry are Kashi, Nature's Path, Annie's, Amy's, Newman's Own, R.

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  • Click: In a role that stretches him just a touch beyond physical comedy, Adam Sandler plays workaholic architect Michael Newman.

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  • Her hairstyles have long appeared to be the naturally tousled and rolled out of bed look whether she was vamping it up by stealing Christine's husband or dressing for success at Newman Enterprises.

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  • His nuanced performances hit all the right notes whether he was feuding with Victor Newman, mourning the loss of his unborn child with Nikki or he was trying to live up to his father's hopes and dreams.

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  • It could be Noah Newman on Y&R or Spike Lavery and Ian Slater over on All My Children.

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  • Power struggles at Newman Enterprises are as enticing to fans as the love triangles, illegitimate children and affairs that also populate the landscape.

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  • Since the mid-1980s, the Abbott and Newman families have dominated the spoilers, central storytelling and fan interest.

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  • The rivalry between Victor Newman and Jack Abbott is of particular fan interest.

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  • One of the great spoilers of Y&R history dates back to the day that Victor Newman was struck down by a heart attack.

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  • More recently, Jack's taken former stepson Nicholas Newman's wife Sharon for his own while Nick is involved with Jack's ex-wife.

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  • A storyline that affects Victor Newman will undoubtedly have ripple effects on his ex-wife Nikki, children Victoria and Nicholas, their romantic partners and even his long-time nemesis Jack Abbot.

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  • Her hairstyles have long appeared to be the naturally tousled and rolled out of bed look whether she was vamping it up by stealing Christine's husband or dressing for success at Newman Enterprises.

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  • Since the 1980s, The Young and the Restless focuses on the lives, businesses and loves of the Abbott, Chancellor, Newman and Winters families.

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  • Victor Newman is a self-made millionaire with a dark background of family abandonment.

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  • Jack and Brad conspiring to take over Newman Enterprises.

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  • The compelling saga of Newman versus Abbott continues into another generation with Jack marrying Sharon (Victor's ex-daughter-in-law) and Nicholas' (Victor's son) affair with Jack's former wife Phyllis.

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  • For decades I've enjoyed the feud between Victor Newman and Jack Abbott.

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  • Fierce rivalries brewed at Newman Enterprises and Jabot Cosmetics.

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  • Whereas billionaire Victor Newman fights over Fortune 500 companies in the morning and frolics between the sheets after lunch, residents of the real Genoa City say they don't lead nearly as exciting lives.

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  • Toni's spoiler site one of the most popular websites catering to obsessed fans of the Abbott and Newman clans.

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  • For example, in May 2009, one of the most popular message board topics on Toni's Spoiler site was the shocking departure of Chris Engen, who played Victor "Adam" Wilson (né Victor Adam Newman, Jr).

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  • Davidson played Ashley when she went through with a painful abortion of Victor Newman's child because she was convinced he would never leave Nikki for her.

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  • While Ashley has been partnered with many characters over the years, it is Davidson's chemistry with Eric Braeden's Victor that has made Ashley, Nikki Newman's lifetime rival for Victor's affections.

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  • In 2008, Ashley Abbott and Eileen Davidson returned once more to Genoa City where her character reunited with Victor Newman once more.

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  • The role was not expected to be a long-term one, but the character soon caught the eye of business tycoon Victor Newman played by Eric Braeden.

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  • When the negotiations stalled, the writers were forced to write Nikki Newman off of the show because they plan storylines months in advance.

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  • SoapCentral.com was one of the first websites to set the record straight on rumors that Eric Braeden (who plays Victor Newman) had "pulled the plug" on his future with The Young and the Restless.

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  • The site is well known for its in-depth interviews with popular soap stars, such the Young and the Restless' Joshua Morrow, who plays Nick Newman.

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  • Ashley Abbott fell in love with Victor Newman, engaged in a very passionate affair with him, and became pregnant.

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  • Adam Newman, born Victor Newman Jr. and also known as Adam Wilson is the younger son of Victor Newman with former wife Hope Wilson.

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  • Adam's heinous actions in 2009 included taking over Newman Enterprises and firing his siblings, gas lighting Ashley Abbott Newman, his stepmother and conspiring with Jack Abbott to frame Victor for murder.

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  • His most recent relationship with former sister-in-law Sharon Newman and subsequent marriage is marred by his involvement with taking her child.

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  • Born Victor Adam Newman, Jr. in 1995, Adam was raised primarily by his mother Hope.

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  • When Victor was believed dead, Adam moved to take over his company, fired his siblings and other longtime Newman employees and destroying many of his father's things.

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  • In 2009, the news of Victor Newman leaving The Young and the Restless had fans in an uproar.

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  • Jess Walton (Jill Abbott) and Melody Thomas Scott (Nikki Newman) were the first two headliners to make waves on soap opera news sites as their contracts went down to the wire.

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  • The show bid farewell to Braeden by Victor Newman leaving Genoa City with ex-wife Nikki to spend time in a rehabilitation facility in Europe.

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  • In mid-January, 2010, Braeden's Victor Newman returned to Genoa City with ex-wife Nikki on his arm.

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  • For many, it is Victor Newman, a looming presence played by actor Eric Braeden.

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  • Normally described as overtly arrogant, extremely wealthy and impressively unsympathetic, Victor Newman is known as the number one villain on Y & R.

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  • Wonder how many times has Victor Newman been married?

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  • The two major loves of Victor's life are Nikki Reed Newman and Ashley Abbott Newman.

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  • Victor Newman is a powerful businessman with a reputation for getting what he wants.

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  • Women continue to respond to the mogul in spite of his reputation and no matter how many times has Victor Newman been married.

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  • Victor purchased what would become the Newman Ranch from Katherine Chancellor and installed Julia there to live.

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  • Leanna Love came to town at the behest of Jack Abbott to write an expose on Victor Newman.

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  • She chooses to divorce and returns to Kansas with their son, Victor Adam Newman, who she raises as Adam Wilson.

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  • In the meanwhile, Nikki Newman tells Victor she will always love him and leaves town.

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  • Victor Newman has had nine marriages in his thirty years in Genoa City.

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  • When Eric Braeden fell into contract disputes with Sony and CBS, he left the daytime drama with Melody Thomas Scott's Nikki Newman.

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  • Despite her bad girl ways, her relationship with Victor Newman reformed and elevated her to the high-society lady role she occupied after their marriage.

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  • Actress Michelle Stafford is best known for her role as Phyllis Summers Abbott Newman on The Young and the Restless.

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  • During one separation, Phyllis embarked on a tempestuous affair with Nick Newman (Joshua Morrow) who was mourning the loss of his daughter Cassie.

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  • Eileen Davidson originated the role of Ashley Abbott Lassiter Bladeson Howard Carlton Newman on The Young and the Restless in 1982.

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  • The actress spent six years in front burner storylines entangled in the war between characters Ashley Abbott and Victor Newman, leaving in 1988.

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  • During her tenure on Y& R, Davidson played out the controversial storyline wherein Ashley aborted lover Victor Newman's child when she believed he needed to be with wife Nikki.

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  • Melody Thomas Scott is best known for her role as Nikki Reed Newman Foster Bancroft DiSalvo Newman Abbott Landers Chow on The Young and the Restless.

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  • Scott debuted as Nikki in 1979 and would later be paired with Eric Braeden's Victor Newman in the early 1980s.

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  • Scott has developed a legacy as both Nikki Newman on screen and as a dedicated actress off screen.

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  • Eric Braeden originated the role of Victor Newman on The Young and the Restless in 1980.

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  • Victor Newman's arrival in Genoa City was not intended to be long-term, but the actor's charisma combined with the character's dangerous business tactics and rivalry with Jack Abbott struck a chord with the fans.

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  • Throughout his tenure in Genoa City, Victor Newman and Jack Abbott clashed time and again.

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  • Victor Newman was born Christian Miller.

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  • The experience forged Christian to becoming the man who would be Victor Newman.

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  • Victor built his company, Newman Enterprises, into a multi-billion dollar international corporation.

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  • Despite numerous other relationships, he's remained polarized by his feelings for Nikki Newman and Ashley Abbott.

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  • Victor Newman has never been a stranger to challenges, but since 2005, the challenges began coming from his children.

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  • Victor Newman's presence in Genoa City has become a legacy for The Young and the Restless.

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  • However, a resolution to the dispute was found and Victor Newman returned to Genoa City with more personal and professional drama than ever..

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  • Jack is Victor Newman's longtime nemesis.

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  • Sharon Abbott (Sharon Case): She's the mother of Noah and Faith Newman.

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  • Victor Newman (Eric Braeden): He's been married to eight different women, Victoria, Nicholas, Adam, and Abby are his children from these unions.

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  • He's the founder and CEO of Newman Enterprises.

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  • Nikki Newman (Melody Thomas Scott): She was once raped by her father Nick Reed and is the younger sister of Casey Reed.

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  • Victoria Newman Hellstrom (Amelia Heinle): She's the mother of Reed Hellstrom and works with Victor at Newman Enterprises.

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  • Phyllis Newman (Michelle Stafford): She's married and divorced from Jack Abbott and Nick Newman, and married Danny Romalotti after getting pregnant with Daniel (Michael Graziadei).

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  • Nicholas Newman (Joshua Morrow): Victor and Nikki's son, he was married to Sharon Collins Newman and Phyllis Summers.

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  • He's the father of Lily Winters and worked for Newman Enterprises for a long time before becoming CEO of Chancellor Industries.

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  • Such was the case of Cassie Newman, the daughter of Sharon and Nick.

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  • The Newman family quickly grew to adore Cassie.

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  • In 2000, Ashley Abbott impregnated herself with Victor Newman’s sperm.

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  • The Newman clan is extensive and many of the children were born (on screen) and later aged as they were sent off to boarding school.

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  • Unlike the Newman family, children have not been as plentiful for the Abbotts.

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  • In 2000, Jack’s former flame Diane Jenkins impregnated herself with sperm she believed to be Victor Newman’s and later learned was Jack’s.

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  • For the salad options, the lowest calorie dressing available at this time is Newman's Low Fat Balsamic with 40 calories and 3 grams of fat per 1.5 ounce portion.

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  • After the show Grimm's first single, a cover of Randy Newman's You Can Leave Your Hat On, just barely broke into the Top 200.

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  • Ron Newman's website, "The Church of Scientology vs. The Net" outlines the multitude of legal actions seeking to silence the free speech of former Scientology members and their sympathizers.

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