Newfoundland sentence example

newfoundland
  • At St John's in Newfoundland he erected a temporary receiving antenna consisting of a wire 400 ft.
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  • I can find you a Newfoundland dog that will do as much.
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  • The French followed closely on the track of John Cabot, and Norman and Breton fishermen frequented the banks of Newfoundland at the beginning of the 16th century.
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  • Newfoundland 33% ad val.
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  • In 1534 Jacques Cartier set out to continue the discoveries of Verazzano, and visited Newfoundland and the Gulf of St Lawrence.
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  • Fishing for herring and mackerel is carried on and the town equips a large fleet for the codbanks of Newfoundland and Iceland.
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  • The great auk, once common on the British coasts, those of Denmark, the east coast of North America, then restricted to those of Newfoundland, Greenland and Iceland, has been killed by man, and the same fate has overtaken the Labrador duck, the Phillip Island parrot, Nestor productus, and the large cormorant of FIG.
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  • as East Main River; Hudson Strait and Ungava Bay on the N.; and with indefinite boundaries toward Quebec on the S., and the coast strip of Labrador belonging to Newfoundland on the E.
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  • A variety with lighter foliage and reddish bark is common in Newfoundland and some districts on the mainland adjacent.
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  • The difficulty between America and Newfoundland about fisheries was referred to the Hague Tribunal for final settlement.
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  • Dunkirk, Gravelines, Boulogne and Paimpol send considerable fleets to the Icelandic cod-fisheries, and St Malo, Fcainp, Granville and Cancale to those of Newfoundland.
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  • it merges with the " Telegraph Plateau," which extends across nearly the whole ocean from Ireland to Newfoundland.
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  • Timber is largely imported from the United States, Sweden and Russia; coal from Great Britain; dried codfish from Norway and Newfoundland.
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  • In everything which related to the continent of Europe and to the resumption of trade relations between Great Britain and France, Bonaparte had his way; and he abated his demands only in a few questions relating to India and Newfoundland.
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  • Scotland, Devonshire, Spain, Hanover, Archangel, Vitebsk, Athabasca, Mackenzie, Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, Newfoundland, New York, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Kentucky.
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  • Shropshire, Wales, Bohemia, Sweden, Esthonia, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, Newfoundland, New York, Pennsylvania [?], Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, Minnesota, Tennessee, Kentucky, Georgia, Alabama, Oklahoma, New Mexico, New Caledonia.
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  • Maps of Newfoundland, orographical as well as geological, scale I: 1, 584, 200, have been published.
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  • The precise species of dog that was cultivated in Greece at that early period cannot be affirmed, although a beautiful piece of sculpture in the possession of Lord Feversham at Duncombe Hall, representing the favourite dog of Alcibiades, differs but little from the Newfoundland dog of the present day.
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  • (e) Useful companions of man - the mastiff, the Newfoundland, the St Bernard dog, the bulldog, the bull terrier, terriers, sheepdogs, Pomeranian or Spitz, and Dalmatian dogs.
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  • Bulldog, bulldog (miniature), mastiff, Great Dane, Newfoundland (black, white and black, or other than black), St Bernard (rough and smooth), Old English sheepdog, collie (rough and smooth), Dalmatian, poodle, bull terrier, white English terrier, black and tan terrier, toy spaniel (King Charles or black and tan, Blenheim, ruby or red and tricolour), Japanese, Pekingese, Yorkshire terrier, Maltese, Italian greyhound, chowchow, black and tan terrier (miniature), Pomeranian, pug (fawn and black), Schipperke, Griffon Bruxellois, foreign dogs (bouledogues frangais, elk-hounds, Eskimos, Lhasa terriers, Samoyedes and any other varieties not mentioned under this heading).
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  • The breed is almost certainly derived from water-spaniels, with a strong admixture of Newfoundland blood.
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  • The Newfoundland is simply an enormous spaniel, and shows its origin by the facility with which it takes to water and the readiness with which it mates with spaniels and setters.
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  • The true Newfoundland is a very large dog and may reach 31 in.
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  • The Landseer Newfoundland is a black and white variety brought into notice by Sir Edwin Landseer, but the exact ancestry of which is unknown.
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  • The Labrador Newfoundland is a smaller black variety with a less massive head.
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  • It occurs both in Newfoundland and England, and has been used largely in producing crosses, being almost certainly one parent of the retriever.
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  • The last remains of these icebergs are met with in the Atlantic south of Newfoundland.
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  • It might be expected that there should be a decrease in the Greenland seal fisheries, caused by the European and American sealers catching larger quantities every year, especially along the coasts of Newfoundland and Labrador, and so actually diminishing the number of the animals in the Greenland seas.
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  • The long-standing Newfoundland fishery dispute with France (finally settled in 1904) is dealt with under Newfoundland.
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  • The most important codfishery in the world is that which has been prosecuted for centuries on the Newfoundland banks, where it is not uncommon for a single fisherman to take over Soo of these fish in ten or eleven hours.
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  • The parentage of the girl, whose name was Pamela (?1776-1831), is uncertain; but although there is some evidence to support the story of Madame de Geniis that Pamela was born in Newfoundland of parents called Seymour or Sims, the common belief that she was the daughter of Madame de Geniis herself by Philippe (Egalite), duke of Orleans, was probably well founded.
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  • Actively interested with Cyrus Field in the laying of the first Atlantic cable, he was president of the New York, Newfoundland & London Telegraph Company, and his frequent cash advances made the success of the company possible; he was president of the North American Telegraph Company also, which controlled more than one-half of the telegraph lines of the United States.
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  • Brett controlled the Newfoundland Telegraph Company on the other side of the ocean, Bright organized with them the Atlantic Telegraph Company in 1856 for the purpose of carrying out the idea, himself becoming engineer-in-chief.
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  • Newfoundland >>
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  • The influence of wind project for laying a telegraph cable between Ireland and on water-level is most remarkable in heavy storms on the flat Newfoundland.
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  • In the Atlantic it is the characteristic deposit of the slopes of continental shelves of western Europe and of New England, being largely mixed with ice-borne material to the south of Newfoundland.
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  • The Greenland icebergs are carried by the Labrador current across the great banks of Newfoundland, where they are often very numerous in the months from February to August, when they constitute a danger to shipping as far south as 40° N.
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  • The Newfoundland Bank fisheries were of greater economic importance and are still very important.
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  • Provisions taken to Newfoundland, poor fish to the West Indies, molasses to New England, rum to Africa and good cod to France and Spain, were the commonest ventures of foreign trade.
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  • In 1769 he was appointed governor of Newfoundland.
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  • The history of the venture is very obscure, but Cabot is thought to have reached Newfoundland and the mainland.
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  • In 1583 he perished in an effort to establish a colony in Newfoundland.
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  • The colony is ecclesiastically attached to the bishopric of Newfoundland.
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  • This he did at the end of 1597, after a vain attempt to find asylum under his country's flag' in Newfoundland.
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  • On the expiration of the charter of the New Netherland Company (1618) the StatesGeneral refused to grant a renewal, and only private ventures were authorized until 1621, when the West India Company was chartered for a term of twenty-four years; to this company was given a monopoly of Dutch trade with the whole American coast from Newfoundland to the Straits of Magellan.
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  • The Company promised to permit the patroons to engage in the fur trade, whenever it had no commissary of its own, subject to a tax of one guilder (40 cents) on each skin, and to engage in other trade along the coast from Newfoundland to Florida subject to a tax of 5% on goods shipped to Europe.
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  • hake, ling, haddock, &c. The most important centres of the cod-liver oil industry are Lofoten and Romsdal in Norway; the oil is also prepared in the United States, Canada, Newfoundland, Iceland and Russia; and at one time a considerable quantity was prepared in the Shetland Islands and along the east coast of Scotland.
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  • wide, from Newfoundland, Gaspe Peninsula and New Brunswick, 1500 m.
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  • The whole system may be divided into three great sections: the Northern, from Newfoundland to the Hudson river; the Central, from the Hudson Valley to that of New river (Great Kanawha), in Virginia and West Virginia; and the Southern, from New river onwards.
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  • Mountains of the Long Range in Newfoundland reach heights of nearly 2000 ft.
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  • Batchellor (Manchester, 1904); Captain John Mason, the Founder of New Hampshire, including his tract on Newfoundland, the American charters in which he was a grantee, with letters and other historical documents, together with a memoir by C. W.
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  • Woodland, our Newfoundland?).
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  • Canada, Newfoundland and Labrador 88,321,706 f9f,438,400
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  • The Dominion of Canada comprises the northern half of the continent of North America and its adjacent islands, excepting Alaska, which belongs to the United States, and Newfoundland, still a separate colony of the British empire.
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  • A somewhat similar relationship cuts off Canada from the Atlantic on the east, the north-eastern coast of Labrador belonging to Newfoundland.
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  • The long stretches of sheltered navigation from the Straits of Belle Isle north of Newfoundland to Quebec, and for 600 m.
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  • The general flora of the Maritime Provinces, Quebec and Eastern Ontario is much the same, except that in Nova Scotia a number of species are found common also to Newfoundland that are not apparent inland.
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  • The islands and other districts within the Arctic circle became a portion of the Dominion only in 1880, when all British possessions in North America, excepting Newfoundland, with its dependency, the Labrador coast, and the Bermuda islands, were annexed to Canada.
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  • Soon after fishermen from Europe began to go in considerable numbers to the Newfoundland banks, and in time to the coasts of the mainland of America.
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  • Though the English, led by Sir Hovenden Walker, made in 1711 an effort to take Quebec which proved abortive, they seized Nova Scotia; and when the treaty of Utrecht was made in 1713, France admitted defeat in America by yielding to Britain her claims to Hudson Bay, Newfoundland and Nova Scotia.
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  • Finally in 1878, in order to remove all doubts about unoccupied territory, an imperial order in council was passed in response to an address of the Canadian parliament, annexing to the Dominion all British possessions in North America, except Newfoundland.
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  • The commission, which included three members of the Canadian cabinet and a representative of Newfoundland, and of which Lord Herschell was appointed chairman, met at Quebec on the 23rd of August 1898.
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  • In many parts all the finer trees have been cut down, but large woods of it still exist in the less accessible districts; it abounds especially near Lake St John, Quebec, and in Newfoundland is the prevalent tree in some of the forest tracts; it is likewise common in Maine and Vermont.
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  • Different states had adjusted their frontiers, Great Britain in British Guiana had settled an outstanding question with Venezuela, France in French Guiana another with Brazil, Great Britain in Newfoundland had removed time-honoured grievances with France, Great Britain in Canada others with the United States of America, and now the most difficult kind of international questions which can arise,.
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  • in Europe, the United Kingdom, Holland and Luxemburg; in America, Canada, Newfoundland and the United States.
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  • RICHARD BROTHERS (1757-1824), British religious fanatic, was born in Newfoundland on Christmas day, 17 57, and educated at Woolwich.
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  • Animals of this species are generally small in size and inhabit the extreme northern sections of Hudson Bay, Newfoundland, Greenland, Labrador and Siberia.
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  • - There are several varieties of these seals in the seas stretching north from Scotland, around Newfoundland, Greenland and the north-west coast of America, and they are far more numerous than fur seals.
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  • But in 1887 Professor Storm announced his conviction that the lands visited by the Norsemen in the early part of the 11th century were Labrador, Newfoundland and Nova Scotia.
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  • was established, and whose works were popular - such an author as Thomson, whose Seasons was in every library, such an author as Fielding, whose Pasquin had had a greater run than any drama since The Beggar's Opera - was sometimes glad to obtain, by pawning his best coat, the means of dining on tripe at a cookshop underground, where he could wipe his hands, after his greasy meal, on the back of a Newfoundland dog.
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  • There are also industrial schools and orphanages, and the institute has branches in Australia, India, Gibraltar and Newfoundland.
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  • In 1793 the see of Quebec was founded; Jamaica and Barbados followed in 1824, and Toronto and Newfoundland in 1839.
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  • Millais, Newfoundland and its Untrodden Ways (1908).
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  • They failed, but discovered Newfoundland, and sailed along the coast of America from Labrador to Virginia.
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  • Finally he concluded with England the important Agreements of 1904 covering colonial and other questions which had long been a matter of dispute, especially concerning Egypt, Newfoundland and Morocco.
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  • In this office he continued for six years, till, in February 1801, he, a vice-admiral of 1799, hoisted his flag on board the "Neptune," of 98 guns, as third in command of the Channel Fleet under Admiral Cornwallis, where, however, he remained for but a year, when he was appointed governor of Newfoundland and commander-in-chief of the ships on that station.
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  • In 1904 the Los Islands were ceded by Great Britain to France, in part return for the abandonment of French fishing rights in Newfoundland waters.
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  • The lower division appears on the Newfoundland and Labrador coasts, and is traceable thence, in a great belt southwest of those points, through Maine and the Hudson-Champlain valley into Alabama, a distance of some 2000 m.; and the rocks are brought up again on the western uplift, in Nevada, Idaho, Utah, western Montana and British Columbia.
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  • 1618), Sir Thomas Gates and Sir George Somers, the new authorities, reached Jamestowri at last with 150 men, but finding things in such a deplorable state all agreed (June ro, 1610) to give up the effort to found a colony on the James and set sail for Newfoundland.
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  • At Tilt Cove, Newfoundland, the Cape Copper Company smelted copper ore, with just the proper proportion of sulphur, iron and silica, successfully without any fuel, when once the initial charge had been fused with coke.
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  • The Newfoundland dog will not live in India, and the Spanish breed of fowls in this country suffer more from frost than most others.
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  • He held the command of the Newfoundland fleet for four years from 1810, and at the close of that period he was made a baronet.
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  • He served on the committee which drafted the Articles of Confederation, and contended that there should be no treaty of peace with Great Britain which did not grant to the United States both the right to the Newfoundland fisheries and the free navigation of the Mississippi.
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  • In the shoal waters about Juan Fernandez are found a species of codfish (possibly Gadus macrocephalus), differing in some particulars from the Newfoundland cod, and a large crayfish, both of which are caught for the Valparaiso market.
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  • Red pines abound in Nova Scotia and Newfoundland, and the tree is rather widely distributed over the northern parts of the continent; it rarely forms extensive woods, but grows chiefly in clumps among other trees, at least in its more southern habitats.
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  • In the case of sea-fishes it is becoming increasingly recognized that the millions of cod fry which are annually turned out of the American, Newfoundland and Norwegian hatcheries are but an insignificant fraction of the billions of fry which are naturally produced.
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  • He touched at Stromo in the Faroe Islands for water, and on the r 5th of June off Newfoundland the "Half-Moon" "spent overboard her foremast."
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  • "RICHARD ANDERSON SQUIRES (1880-), Newfoundland politician, was born at Harbour Grace, Newfoundland, Jan.
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  • The seal and whale fisheries, once vigorously prosecuted, are extinct, but the fishing-fleets for the home waters and the Newfoundland grounds are considerable.
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  • In 1854 he became interested, through his brother Matthew, a civil engineer, in the project of Frederick Newton Gisborne (1824-1892) for a telegraph across Newfoundland; and he was attracted by the idea of a trans-Atlantic telegraphic cable, as to which he consulted S.
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  • With Peter Cooper, Moses Taylor (1806-1882), Marshall Owen Roberts (1814-1880) and Chandler White, he formed the New York, Newfoundland & London Telegraph Company, which procured a more favourable charter than Gisborne's, and had a capital of $1,500,000.
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  • From 1615 to 1621 he was governor of the English colony on the north side of Conception Bay in Newfoundland; he explored the island, made the first English map of it (published in 1625), and wrote a descriptive tract entitled A Briefe Discourse of the Newfoundland (Edinburgh, 1620) to promote the colonization of the island by Scotsmen.
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  • Here he was brought into official relations with Sir Ferdinando Gorges, then a commissioner to regulate the Newfoundland fisheries.
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  • TREATY OF UTRECHT, the general name given to the important series of treaties which in 1713 and 1714 concluded the great European war of the Spanish Succession, and by which inter alia England obtained possession of Newfoundland, Nova Scotia and Gibraltar.
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  • In 1856 the people voted for statehood; and in June 1857 they elected members of a constitutional convention which drafted a constitution at Salem in August and September 1857; the constitution was ratified by popular vote in November 1 For many years it was generally believed that the administration at Washington was prevented from surrendering its claims to Oregon, in return for the grant by Great Britain of fishing stations in Newfoundland, by Marcus Whitman, who in1842-1843made a journey across the entire continent in the depth of winter to dissuade the government from this purpose.
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  • With a charter from the king giving him leave to set up the English banner on all the lands he might discover, the Bristol Genoese trader John Cabot successfully passed the great sea in 1497, and discovered Newfoundland and its rich fishing stations.
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  • In every direction English influence penetrated, and Englishmen before 1603 might be found in every quarter of the globe, following Drakes lead into the Pacific, painfully breaking the ice in search of a north-east or a north-west passage, hunting for slaves in the wilds of Africa, journeying in caravans across the steppes of Russia into central Asia, bargaining with the Turks on the shores of the Golden Horn, or with the Greeks in the Levant, laying the foundations of the East India Company, or of the colonies of Virginia and Newfoundland.
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  • It is only occasionally found near the shore; its real home is the Atlantic, especially near Madeira and the Azores, but many captures are recorded from Great Britain, Ireland and Scandinavia; it strays as far north as Iceland and Newfoundland, and probably southwards to the latitudes of the coast of Guinea.
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  • Thereupon Whitman made his way to Washington, and with much difficulty convinced Webster and President Tyler of the value of the country and prevented its exchange for fishing privileges off`Newfoundland.
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  • The Eastern, the Anglo-American and the Commercial Cable companies united to celebrate the event, and from the university library a message was sent through Newfoundland, New York, Chicago, San Francisco, Los Angeles, New Orleans, Florida and Washington, and was received by Lord Kelvin seven and a half minutes after it had been despatched, having travelled about 20,000 miles and twice crossed the Atlantic during the interval.
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  • PENGUIN, the name of a flightless sea-bird,' but, so far as is known, first given to one inhabiting the seas of Newfoundland as in Hore's "Voyage to Cape Breton," 1536 (Hakluyt, Researches, iii.
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  • In support of the third hypothesis Mr Reeks wrote (Zoologist, 2nd series, p. 1854) that the people in Newfoundland who used to meet with this bird always pronounced its name "pin wing."
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  • The manufacture of cod-liver oil for pharmaceutical purposes is naturally somewhat limited, as Norway, Newfoundland, and latterly also Japan, are more favourably situated as regards the supply of fresh cod, but the technical liver oils (cod oil, shark-liver oil) are produced in very large quantities in Grimsby, Hull, Aberdeen, and latterly also on the west coasts of the United Kingdom.
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  • airplane piloted by Alcock and Brown made the first non-stop transatlantic flight, from Newfoundland to Ireland.
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  • At the time of attack the lights of the Red Cross Ship Newfoundland were visible, about 10 miles distant on the starboard bow.
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  • The Matthew is a modern recreation of the square rigged caravel that John Cabot sailed from Bristol to Newfoundland in 1497.
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  • It was around 1808 that Lord Byron wrote his famous epitaph in honor of his Newfoundland, Boatswain.
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  • fisherman Originally from Newfoundland Canada, the Labrador was trained to jump overboard into the icy waters to haul fishermen's nets to shore.
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  • Late on Sunday night she struck an iceberg off the Grand Banks of Newfoundland.
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  • immortalized in the song ' The Old Black Rum ' by the Newfoundland folk group Great Big Sea.
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  • He departed from St John's in Newfoundland, finally making landfall on the west coast of Ireland 76 days later.
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  • Although Newfoundland is somewhat misshapen this is a highly decorative and attractive map, typical of the period.
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  • B&Q arrives in New York Ellen MacArthur has sailed her 75-foot trimaran into New York harbor after a delivery trip from Newfoundland.
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  • the coasts of Ireland and Newfoundland approach to 1750 m.; the breadth then increases rapidly to lat.
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  • In the early part of the 17th century the town had fallen into decay, but it speedily recovered, and in 17 4 4 could contribute twenty vessels to the Newfoundland shipping trade.
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  • The Greenland icebergs are carried by the Labrador current across the great banks of Newfoundland, where they are often very numerous in the months from February to August, when they constitute a danger to shipping as far south as 40° N.
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  • Newfoundland yields cupreous pyrites, worked at Pilley's Island, whilst the nickeliferous pyrites of Sudbury in Ontario is partly magnetic (see Pyrrhotite).
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  • One breed has gained quite a reputation for being good with children, and that's the Newfoundland.
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  • For example, the Saint Bernard, the Newfoundland and the Dogue de Bordeaux are all heavy dogs.
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  • The Labrador Retriever (Lab) originated in Newfoundland as a working dog to help fisherman pull nets out of the water and catch any escaping fish.
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  • Similarly, there are bans in place in Quebec and Newfoundland as well.
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  • Founded in 1953 in Harbour Grace, Newfoundland, Koch Shoes grew from its humble beginnings to become Terra Footwear, Ltd., an established company providing quality shoes for professional workers.
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  • They fish off the coast of Newfoundland, Canada during the best time to catch swordfish, which is in the fall.
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  • The western trough extends northwards into Davis Strait, forming a depression in the Telegraph plateau; to the south of Newfoundland and Nova Scotia are Sigsbee Deep, Libbey Deep and Suhm Deep, each of small area; north-east of the Bahamas Nares Deep forms the largest and deepest depression in the Atlantic, in which a sounding of 4561 fathoms was obtained (70 m.
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  • Newfoundland, the West Indies, and the Falklands, and the chief oceanic islands are the Azores, Madeira, the Canaries, the Cape Verde Islands, Ascension, St Helena, Tristan da Cunha and Bouvet Island.
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  • Gisborne for a land line connecting St John's, Newfoundland, and Cape Ray, in the Gulf of St Lawrence, and proceeded himself to get control of the points on the American coast most suitable as landing places for a cable.
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  • Visiting England in 1856, Field entered into an agreement with Bright and with John Watkins Brett, who with his brother Jacob had proposed the constructing of an Atlantic cable eleven years previously, with the object of forming a company for establishing and working electric telegraphic communication between Newfoundland and Ireland.
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  • The " Niagara " landed her end in Trinity Bay, Newfoundland, on the 5th of August, while on the same day the " Agamemnon" landed hers at Valentia.
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  • This transmitting plant was completed in December 1901, and Marconi then crossed the Atlantic to Newfoundland and began to make experiments to ascertain if he could detect the waves emitted by it.
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  • The former is poor in Cruciferae, Caryophyllaceae, Umbelliferae, Primulaceae and Labiatae; but for the occurrence of Calluna in Newfoundland it would have no heaths.
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  • The Cabots received a patent in 1496, empowering them to seek unknown lands; and John Cabot discovered Newfoundland and part of the coast of America.
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  • Scotland, North of England, and Midlands, Wales, France, Belgium, Carniola, Moravia, Elsass, Saxony, Perm, Sizran, China, Cape Colony, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Missouri, Tennessee, Kentucky, Alabama, Kansas, Arkansas, Colorado, Oklahoma, Tasmania, Victoria (Permo-Carboniferous), West Australia (Permo-Carboniferous).
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  • Although these dogs were originally brought to Great Britain from Newfoundland and are still bred in the latter country, greater size, perfection and intelligence have been attained in England, where Newfoundlands for many years have been the most popular large dogs.
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