Newcastle sentence example

newcastle
  • In Edinburgh, Glasgow, and elsewhere in Scotland, and in London (through the county council), Newcastle and other English towns, the corporations have laid down greens in public parks and open spaces.
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  • In 1754 he became attorney-general, and for the next two years acted as leader of the House of Commons under the administration of the duke of Newcastle.
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  • The principal cities and towns are Sydney (pop. 530,000), Newcastle, Broken Hill, Parramatta, Goulburn, Maitland, Bathurst, Orange, Lithgow, Tamworth, Grafton, Wagga and Albury, in New South Wales; Melbourne (pop. 511,900), Ballarat, Bendigo, Geelong, Eaglehawk, Warrnambool, Castlemaine, and Stawell in Victoria; Brisbane (pop. 128,000), Rockhampton, Maryborough, Townsville, Gympie, Ipswich, and Toowoomba in Queensland; Adelaide (pop. about 175,000), Port Adelaide and Port Pirie in South Australia; Perth (pop. 56,000), Fremantle, and Kalgoorlie in Western Australia; and Hobart (pop. 35,500) and Launceston in Tasmania.
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  • The mines, however, are situated too far from the coast to permit of serious competition with Newcastle in an export trade, and the output is practically restricted to supplying local requirements.
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  • A strike of the Newcastle miners, after lasting twenty-nine weeks, came to an end in January 1890, and throughout the rest of the year there was great unrest in Labour circles.
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  • Essex was inactive near Oxford; in the west Sir Ralph Hopton had won a series of victories, and in the north Newcastle defeated the Fairfaxes at Adwalton Moor, and all Yorkshire except Hull was in his hands.
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  • In 1885 Preece and Heaviside proved by experiments made at Newcastle that if two completely insulated circuits of square form, each side being 440 yds., were placed a quarter of a mile apart, telephonic speech was conveyed from one to the other by induction, and signals could be perceived even when they were separated by 1000 yds.
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  • Shortly afterwards, however, he retired both from parliament and from public life, professing his disgust at the party intrigues of politics, and devoted himself to conducting his newspaper, the Newcastle Daily Chronicle, and to his private business as a mine-owner.
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  • In this capacity he exercised a wide influence on local opinion, and the revolt of the Newcastle electorate in later years against doctrinaire Radicalism was largely due to his constant preaching of a broader outlook on national affairs.
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  • To judge, however, from the dedications, prologues and epilogues of his various plays, he seems to have enjoyed the patronage of the earl, afterwards duke, of Newcastle, "himself a muse" after a fashion, and Lord Craven, the supposed husband of the ex-queen of Bohemia.
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  • Railways had their origin in the tramways (q.v.) or wagon-ways which at least as early as the middle of the 16th century were used in the mineral districts of England round Newcastle for the conveyance of coal from the pits to the river Tyne for shipment.
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  • In 1646 the king joined the Scottish army; and, after retiring with them to Newcastle, he sent for Henderson, and discussed with him the two systems of church government in a number of papers.
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  • After a while he took a leading part in local affairs, and was for some years a member of the Newcastle city council, and Darlington borough council.
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  • Some of his chief nobles - Thomas, earl of Lancaster, in 1321, and Sir Andrew Harclay, earl of Carlisle, in 1322 - entered into correspondence with the Scots, and, though Harclay's treason was detected and punished by his death, Edward was forced to make a truce of thirteen years at Newcastle on the 30th of May 1323, which Bruce ratified at Berwick.
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  • In 1756 he was asked by Newcastle to become prime minister as the alternative to Pitt, but Granville, who perfectly understood why the offer was made, declined and supported Pitt.
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  • It has little trade, but is the principal tourist centre on this part of the coast, and the steamers from Hull and Newcastle, the Norwegian ports, Hamburg, Antwerp, &c., call here.
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  • The bishops did not obtain possession until the reign of John, who during the interval in 1201 gave Hartlepool a charter granting the burgesses the same privileges that the burgesses of Newcastle enjoyed; in 1230 Bishop Richard Poor granted further liberties, including a gild merchant.
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  • He found Newcastle ripe for his message.
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  • On his way to Newcastle that year Wesley visited Birstal, where John Nelson, the stone-mason, had already been working.
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  • In the summer Charles Wesley visited Wednesbury, Leeds and Newcastle.
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  • There is more than one meaning of Newcastle discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.
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  • Around Dundee and Newcastle the coals are bituminous.
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  • North-east of Ladysmith are Dundee (2811) and Newcastle (2950).
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  • Newcastle is also a mining town, but depends chiefly on its large trade in wool.
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  • It is named after the duke of Newcastle who was secretary for the colonies in 1852 and 1859.
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  • Utrecht (860) lies between Newcastle and Vryheid, and was one of the first towns founded by the Transvaal Boers.
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  • The main line starts from Durban, and passing through Pietermaritzburg (71 m.), Ladysmith (190 m.) and Newcastle (268 m.) pierces the Drakensberg at Laing's Nek by a tunnel 2213 ft.
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  • Besides the mines in the Newcastle and Dundee district there are extensive coal-fields at Hlobane in the Vryheid district and in Zululand (q.v.).
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  • The chief towns - Durban; Maritzburg, Ladysmith, Newcastle and Dundee - are governed by municipal corporations and minor towns by local boards.
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  • In this year (1886) the railway reached Ladysmith, and in 18 9 1 it was completed to the Transvaal frontier at Charlestown, the section from Ladysmith northward opening up the Dundee and Newcastle coalfields.
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  • Newcastle was next occupied by the Boers unopposed, and on the 10th of October occurred the battle of Talana Hill outside Dundee.
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  • Ten days previous to the disaster at Majuba Sir Evelyn Wood had arrived at Newcastle with reinforcements.
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  • The influence of Newcastle and Sandwich, however, was too strong for him; he was thwarted and over-reached; and in 1748 he resigned the seals, and returned to cards and his books with the admirable composure which was one of his most striking characteristics.
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  • Samuel Johnson, who was not perhaps the best judge in the world, pronounced his manners to have been " exquisitely elegant "; yet as a courtier he was utterly worsted by Robert Walpole, whose manners were anything but refined, and even by Newcastle.
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  • Mr Thornycroft's other memorials, such as the " Queen Victoria Memorial " (Karachi), the " War Memorial " (at Durban) and the " Armstrong Memorial " (at Newcastle), are well known, and his portrait statuary and medallions are numerous.
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  • In the 15th and 16th centuries the town was a leading seat of the salt industry ("salt to Dysart" was the equivalent of "coals to Newcastle"), but the salt-pans have been abandoned for a considerable period.
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  • Glass-cutting was carried on at works in Birmingham, Bristol, Belfast, Cork, Dublin, Glasgow, London, Newcastle, Stourbridge, Whittington and Waterford.
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  • In England the chief centres of the industry were Bristol, Birmingham, London, Manchester, Newcastle, Stourbridge and York.
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  • Plate-glass was made by Messrs Cookson of Newcastle, and by the British Plate Glass Company of Ravenhead.
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  • His father, remembering his own early difficulties, bestowed special care on his son's education, and sent him in his twelfth year to Mr Bruce's school in Percy Street, Newcastle, where he remained about four years.
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  • He then undertook the management of his father's factory in Newcastle, and greatly aided him in the improvement of the locomotives.
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  • In hand-to-hand fighting before the walls of Newcastle, Douglas is said to have won Sir Henry's pennon, which he swore to fix upon the walls of Dalkeith.
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  • He was educated at Newcastle, and at Edinburgh University, where he graduated M.A.
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  • He gave lectures on mechanics and hydrostatics in Morpeth, Alnwick and Newcastle, and was elected F.R.S.
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  • The fifth duke of Newcastle was one of the chief potentates of the High Tory party.
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  • It was said that persons of high position were concerned in the crime; but although the government offered rewards for the apprehension of the perpetrators, and although General Moyle wrote to the duke of Newcastle that the criminals were "well-known by many of the inhabitants of the town," no one was ever convicted of participation in the murder.
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  • While he taught during the day at Stote's Hall, he studied mathematics in the evening at a school in Newcastle.
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  • In 1760 he married, and began tuition on a larger scale in Newcastle, where he had among his pupils John Scott, afterwards Lord Eldon, chancellor of England.
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  • In 1772 appeared a tract on The Principles of Bridges, suggested by the destruction of Newcastle bridge by a high flood on the 17th of November 1771.
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  • He was a spectator of the riot of St Giles's, Edinburgh, on the 23rd of July 1637, endeavoured in vain to avoid disaster by concessions, and on the taking of the Covenant perceived that "now all that we have been doing these thirty years past is thrown down at once."' He escaped to Newcastle, was deposed by the assembly on the 4th of December on a variety of ridiculous charges, and died in London on the 26th of November 1639, receiving burial in Westminster Abbey.
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  • The latter observer found the gases given off tion of gas by coal from the district of Newcastle and Durham evolved by to contain carbonic acid, marsh gas or light carburetted coal.
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  • In 1907 he became recorder of Sunderland and in 191() a K.C. In 1910 he entered the House of Commons as Liberal member for Newcastle.
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  • In 1775 he took part in the negotiations between Leicester House and Pitt, directed against the duke of Newcastle, and in 1757 in the conferences between the two ministers which led to their taking office together.
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  • In May he succeeded the duke of Newcastle as first lord of the treasury, and he was created K.G.
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  • A threat of invasion by Henry in 1243 for a time interrupted the friendly relations between the two countries; but the prompt action of Alexander in anticipating his attack, and the disinclination of the English barons for war, compelled him to make peace next year at Newcastle.
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  • The profession which he adopted was that of a solicitor, and from 1833 to 1847 he was engaged in active practice in Newcastle as a member of the firm of Donkin, Stable & Armstrong.
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  • In the first example, which was erected on the quay at Newcastle in 1846, the necessary pressure was obtained from the ordinary water mains of the town; but the merits and advantages of the device soon became widely appreciated, and a demand arose for the erection of cranes in positions where the pressure afforded by the mains was insufficient.
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  • He also imported great quantities of English coal and had an agency at Newcastle as well as an interest in some English mines.
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  • Five days later the representatives of the elected delegates had an interview in London with the colonial secretary, the duke of Newcastle, who informed them that it was now too late to discuss the question of the retention of British rule.
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  • They were followed by others at Newcastle, Manchester, Bolton, Chester and Macclesfield.
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  • Its author declared later that it procured him an honorary membership of the patriotic societies of Carlisle, Berwick and Newcastle.
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  • He was educated at Newcastle, and afterwards went into business, where he had a very successful career as a financier.
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  • In January 1644 he commanded the forces attacking Nottingham, and soon afterwards, on Prince Rupert's recommendation, he was made lieutenant-general of Newcastle's Northern army.
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  • When Newcastle was shut up in York, Lucas and the cavalry remained in the open country, and when Rupert's relieving army crossed the mountains into Yorkshire he was quickly joined by Newcastle's squadrons.
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  • With a force of seven hundred men he sailed into the Delaware in 1655, captured Fort Casimir (Newcastle) - which Stuyvesant had built in 1651 and which the Swedes had taken in 1654 - and overthrew the Swedish authority in that region.
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  • His mother, Margaret, granddaughter and heiress of John Holles, duke of Newcastle, brought to her husband Welbeck Abbey and other estates in Nottinghamshire.
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  • One led due north from York past forts at Catterick Bridge, Piers Bridge, Binchester, Lanchester, Ebchester to the wall and to Scotland, while branches through Chester-le-Street reached the Tyne Bridge (Pons Aelius) at Newcastle and the Tyne mouth at South Shields.
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  • The end came in November 1905, precipitated by a speech made by Mr Balfour at Newcastle on the 14th, appealing for unity in the party and the sinking of differences, an appeal plainly addressed to Mr Chamberlain, whose supporters - the vast majority of the Unionists - were clamouring for a fighting policy.
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  • In the vicinity is the beautiful old mansion of Stella, and below it Stellaheugh, to which the victorious Scottish army crossed from Newburn on the Northumberland bank in 1640, after which they occupied Newcastle.
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  • Between 1860 and 1874 Messrs Bell Brothers manufactured the metal at Washington, near Newcastle, under Deville's supervision, producing nearly 2 cwt.
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  • A bond was drawn in which Darnley pledged himself to support the confederates who undertook to punish "certain privy persons" offensive to the state, "especially a strange Italian, called Davie"; another was subscribed by Darnley and the banished lords, then biding their time in Newcastle, which engaged him to procure their pardon and restoration, while pledging them to insure to him the enjoyment of the title he coveted, with the consequent security of an undisputed succession to the crown, despite the counter claims of the house of Hamilton, in case his wife should die without issue - a result which, intentionally or not, he and his fellow-conspirators did all that brutality could have suggested to accelerate and secure.
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  • To increase the alarm of the English, as well as to relieve the famine which then prevailed, Wallace organized a great raid into the north of England, in the course of which he devastated the country to the gates of Newcastle.
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  • Aalesund is a port of call for steamers between Bergen, Hull, Newcastle and Hamburg, and Trondhjem.
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  • Regular steamers serve the port from Hull and Newcastle (about 40 hours), from Hamburg, and from all the Norwegian coast towns.
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  • Apparently he remained the greater part of the time in or about 3 Among the Hardwick papers there is preserved a MS. copy of the work, under the title Elementes of Law Naturall and Politique, with the dedication to the earl of Newcastle, written in Hobbes's own hand, and dated May 9, 1640.
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  • Newcastle himself, who was a cousin of Hobbes's late patron and to whom he dedicated the " little treatise " of 1640, found his way to Paris, and was followed by a stream of fugitives, many of whom were known to Hobbes.
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  • Bramhall, a strong Arminian, had afterwards written down his views and sent them to Newcastle to be answered in this form by Hobbes.
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  • He made himself conspicuous by his support of Walpole on the question of the excise, and in 1 743 a union of parties resulted in the formation of an administration in which Pelham was prime minister, with the office of chancellor of the exchequer; but rank and influence made his brother, the duke of Newcastle, very powerful in the cabinet, and, in spite of a genuine attachment, there were occasional disputes between them, which led to difficulties.
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  • The king, thwarted in his favourite schemes, made overtures in 1746 to Lord Bath, but his purpose was upset by the resignation of the two Pelhams (Henry and Newcastle), who, however, at the king's request, resumed office.
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  • He had married in 1726 Lady Catherine Manners, daughter of the 2nd duke of Rutland; and one of his daughters married Henry Fiennes Clinton, 2nd duke of Newcastle.
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  • Large gas-works of the Newcastle and Gateshead Gas Company are also situated in the borough.
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  • The borough probably obtained its charter during the following century, for Hugh de Puiset, bishop of Durham (1153-1195), confirmed to his burgesses similar rights to those of the burgesses of Newcastle, freedom of toll within the palatinate and other privileges.
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  • The position of the town led to a struggle with Newcastle over both fishing and trading rights.
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  • In 1552, on the temporary extinction of the diocese of Durham, Gateshead was attached to Newcastle, but in 1554 was regranted to Bishop Tunstall.
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  • As compensation the bishop granted to Newcastle, at a nominal rent, the Gateshead salt-meadows, with rights of way to the High Street, thus abolishing the toll previously paid to the bishop. During the next century Bishop Tunstall's successors incor p orated nearly all the various trades of Gateshead, and Cromwell continued this policy.
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  • Hexham and Newcastle form a Roman Catholic bishopric, with the cathedral at Newcastle.
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  • Albert Hall Lord Rosebery advised them to concentrate upon the reform of the House of Lords, that assembly being, as he said, a foremost obstacle to the passing of legislation on the lines of the Newcastle programme; but he was unable to suggest in what direction it should be reformed.
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  • Nevertheless, in a letter to Captain Lambton, an unsuccessful Liberal candidate for Newcastle, in September 1900, he condemned the general conduct of affairs by Lord Salisbury's government, while in several speeches in the House of Lords he strongly urged the necessity of army reform.
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  • David regained the shelter of Carlisle, a legate from Rome made peace, and Prince Henry received the investiture of Northumberland, without the strong fortresses of Bamborough and Newcastle.
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  • At Newcastle on the 12th of July Baliol surrendered to Edward III.
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  • Mary was now in France, the destined bride of the Dauphin; while Knox, released from the galleys, preached his doctrines in Berwick and Newcastle, and was a chaplain of Edward VI., till the crowning of Mary Tudor drove him to France and Switzerland.
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  • Andrew, who behaved with injudicious violence, was banished to France, James to Newcastle; other preachers were confined to their parishes; and by a mixture of chicanery (as at the pseudo assembly of Linlithgow) and of violence, the king established his tottering episcopacy, and sowed the dragon's teeth of civil war.
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  • On the 20th of August Montrose was the first of the Covenanting army to cross the Tweed; Newcastle was seized, and Charles, unsupported by England, entered on the course of the Long Parliament and the slaying of Strafford.
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  • Lanark, from Oxford, fled to join the Covenanters; Charles imprisoned Hamilton in Cornwall; Montrose was made a marquis; Leslie, with a large Scottish force and 4000 horse, besieged Newcastle.
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  • The town was founded by the convent of Durham about the middle of the 13th century, but on account of the complaints of the burgesses of Newcastle an order was made in 1258, stipulating that no ships should be laden or unladen at Shields, and that no "shoars" or quays should be built there.
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  • The chief of them are: Life of the Duke of Newcastle (1886); Scotland and the Commonwealth (1895); Scotland and the Protectorate (1899); Narrative of General V enables (r 9 00); Oliver Cromwell (1900); Cromwell's Army (1902); and the standard edition of Ludlow's Memoirs (1894).
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  • He succeeded his father, George Doubleday, as partner in a firm of soap manufacturers at Newcastle, but devoted his attention rather to literature than to mercantile affairs.
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  • On the failure of the firm he obtained the office of registrar of St Andrew's parish, Newcastle, a post which he held until appointed secretary to the coal trade.
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  • In 1570, 200,000 persons died in Moscow and the neighbourhood, in 1572, 50,000 at Lyons; in 1568 and 1574 plague was at Edinburgh, and in 1570 at Newcastle.
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  • In this and subsequent years the disease was widely diffused in England - for instance, Oxford, Derbyshire, Newcastle.
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  • The same year 7000 out of 20,000 inhabitants of Newcastle died of plague; in 2635 it was at Hull.
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  • For this period see Index to Remembrancia in Archives of City of London 1579-1664 (London, 2878); Richardson, Plague and Pestilence in North of England (Newcastle, 1852).
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  • Places near London were earliest affected, as Brentford, Greenwich, Deptford; but in July or August 1665 it was already in Southampton, Sunderland, Newcastle, &c. A wider distribution occurred in the next year.
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  • The port, which has regular communication with all the Norwegian coast towns - Hull, Newcastle, Hamburg, &c. - carries on an extensive trade in timber, oil, fish, copper, &c. The industries include shipbuilding, sawmilling, wood-pulp and fish-curing works and machine shops.
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  • There was no civil parish of Bridgend previous to 1905, when one was formed out of portions of the parishes of Newcastle and Coity.
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  • Of the castle of Newcastle, built on the edge of a cliff above the church of that parish, there remain a courtyard with flanking towers and a fine Norman gateway.
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  • Railways.-The first ordinary roads deserving the name of highways were made about 1660, and canal-building began in 1 Newcastle, North Shields, South Shields.
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  • Released at last (apparently through the influence of the young English king, Edward VI.), Knox was appointed one of the licensed preachers of the new faith for England, and stationed in the great garrison of Berwick, and afterwards at Newcastle.
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  • Newcastle is the second city in New South Wales, the fourth port of Australia, and the seat of an Anglican bishop. The city rises steeply from the sea, and possesses numerous fine buildings, among which may be mentioned the railway station, post office, custom-house, the cathedral of Christ Church, the school of art with its large library, and the Victoria Theatre.
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  • Newcastle has a fine harbour, with an area of S40 acres, protected by two breakwaters; the breadth of the channel at its entrance is 1200 ft., and the depth at the bar is 25 2 ft.
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  • The facilities for the shipment of coal are excellent, and Newcastle is the chief coaling port in the southern hemisphere.
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  • The population of the municipality of Newcastle is 14,250; of the town and suburbs about 70,000.
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  • The mouth of the Hunter river (named after Governor John Hunter), now known as Newcastle Harbour, was discovered in 1797 by Lieutenant John Shortland, who accompanied Hunter to New South Wales.
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  • The new colonial secretary, the duke of Newcastle, reinstated him, but with instructions not again to raise the federation issue.
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  • In the three and a half months he had spent in the country he had reached the conclusion expressed by the duke of Newcastle nearly twenty years previously, namely, that all England needed there was Table Bay - or the Cape peninsula - as a naval and military station.
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  • This corps never got beyond Newcastle, but young Granby went to the front as a volunteer on the duke of Cumberland's staff, and saw active service in the last stages of the insurrection.
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  • His grandfather, William Scott of Sandgate, a suburb of Newcastle, was clerk to a "fitter" - a sort of water-carrier and broker of coals.
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  • His wife was the eldest daughter of Aubone Surtees, a Newcastle banker.
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  • Bowes having contested Newcastle and lost it, presented an election petition against the return of his opponent.
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  • Here in 1640 the Scottish Covenanters planted guns to protect them while fording the river, after which they defeated the English on the Durham side at Stellaheugh, and subsequently occupied Newcastle.
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  • In 1754 Henry Pelham died, and was succeeded at the head of affairs by his brother, the duke of Newcastle.
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  • Ignoring Sir Thomas Robinson, the political nobody to whom Newcastle had entrusted the management of the Commons, he made frequent and vehement attacks on Newcastle himself, though still continuing to serve under him.
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  • He had made it a condition of his joining any administration that Newcastle should be excluded from it, thus showing a resentment which, though natural enough, proved fatal to the lengthened existence of his government.
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  • With the king unfriendly, and Newcastle, whose corrupt influence was still dominant in the Commons, estranged, it was impossible to carry on a government by the aid of public opinion alone, however emphatically that might have declared itself on his side.
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  • From the political deadlock that ensued relief could only be had by an arrangement between Newcastle and Pitt.
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  • After some weeks' negotiation, in the course of which the firmness and moderation of "the Great Commoner," as he had come to be called, contrasted favourably with the characteristic tortuosities of the crafty peer, matters were settled on such a basis that, while Newcastle was the nominal, Pitt was the virtual head of the government.
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  • A few months after his return, through Germany, to London in 1815, he was induced to take up the question of constructing a miner's safety lamp. Experiments with samples of fire-damp sent from Newcastle soon taught him that "explosive mixtures of mine-damp will not pass through small apertures or tubes"; and in a paper read before the Royal Society on the 9th of November he showed that metallic tubes, being better conductors of heat, were superior to glass ones, and explained that the heat lost by contact with a large cooling surface brought the temperature of the first portions of gas exploded below that required for the firing of the other portions.
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  • He took out no patent for his invention, and in recognition of his disinterestedness the Newcastle coal-owners in September 1817 presented him with a dinner-service of silver plate.'
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  • The port second of commercial importance to Sydney is Newcastle, at the mouth of the Hunter river, which is the great coal-shipping port of the colony.
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  • The Hunter is one of the chief rivers of the state and embouches at Port Hunter or Newcastle Harbour after a course of 200 m.
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  • Upper or Newcastle Coal Measures, containing an aggregate of about 100 ft.
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  • The chief cities are Sydney and suburbs, population in 1906, 535,000; Newcastle and suburbs, 56,000; Broken Hill, 30,000; in 1901, Parramatta, 12,568; Goulburn, 10,610; and Maitland (East and West), 10,085.
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  • Penal establishments were formed at Newcastle in New South Wales, at Hobart and Launceston in Tasmania, and an unsuccessful attempt was made to colonize Port Phillip. The most noteworthy incident in the first decade of the 19th century was the forcible deportation by the officers of the New South Wales Corps, a regiment raised in England for service in the colony, of the governor, Captain Bligh, R.N., the naval officer identified with the mutiny of the " Bounty."
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  • Parramatta, Richmond and Windsor had indeed been founded within the first decade of the colony's existence; Newcastle, Maitland and Morpeth, near the coast to the north of Sydney, had been begun during the earlier years of the 19th century; but the towns of the interior, Goulburn, Bathurst and others, were not commenced till about 1835, in which year the site of Melbourne was first occupied by Batman and Fawkner.
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  • Upon the resignation of Lord Aberdeen and the duke of Newcastle, the general sentiment of the House of Commons and the country called Palmerston to the head of affairs, and he entered, on the 5th of February 1855, upon the high office, which he retained, with one short interval, to the day of his death.
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  • On the north-east the great coal-field of Northumberland and Durham, traversed midway by the Tyne, supports the manufactures of Newcastle and its satellite towns, and leaves a great surplus for export from the Tyne ports.
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  • The most notable bridges over navigable water affording continuous routes are those across Menai Strait, the Tyne at Newcastle, the Severn at Severn Bridge and the Manchester Ship Canal.
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  • The passenger traffic to the Norwegian ports, always very heavy in summer, is carried on chiefly from Hull and Newcastle.
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  • The principal ports for the shipping of coal for export, set down in order of the amount shipped, also fall very nearly into topographical groups, thus: - Newcastle, South Shields and Blyth in the Northern District; Newport in Monmouthshire; Sunderland in the Northern District, Hull, Grimsby and Goole on the Humber, which forms the eastern outlet of the Yorkshire coal-fields; Hartlepool, in the Northern District, and Liverpool.
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  • The tonnage annually shipped ranges from about 42 millions of tons in the case of Newcastle to some half a million in the case of Liverpool; but the export trade of Cardiff in South Wales far surpasses that of any English port, being more than three times that of Newcastle in 1903.
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  • The coastwise carrying trade is also important, the bulk being shared about equally by Sunderland, Newcastle, South Shields and Cardiff, while Liverpool has also a large share.
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  • In the same year he married Arabella, daughter of Henry Cavendish, 2nd duke of Newcastle; she died in 1698 and in 1700 he married Anne Churchill, daughter of the famous duke of Marlborough.
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  • Rupert had relieved York and joined forces with the marquess of Newcastle's army that had defended that city, and the Parliamentarians and Scots who had besieged it had drawn off south-westward followed by the Royalists.
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  • At last, concluding from movements in the enemy's lines that there would be no fighting that day, Rupert and Newcastle strolled away to their coaches and their soldiers dismounted and lay down to rest.
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  • At the same time the Parliamentary infantry had mostly crossed the lane and was fighting at close quarters and suffering severely, Newcastle's north-country "White-Coat" brigade driving back and finally penetrating their centre.
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  • Yet in the following year he had to be bought off by the grant of all Northumberland (save Newcastle and Bamborough) to his son Earl Henry.
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  • Peiham and his brother, the Thomas Peiham, duke of Newcastle, had no principles of government whatever.
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  • The duke of Newcastle, who succeeded his brother, looked on the work of corruption with absolute Engels pleasure, and regarded genius and ability as an castle.
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  • When war began in earnest, and the reality of danger came home to Englishmen by the capture of Minorca (1756), there arose a demand for a more capable government than any which Newcastle could offer.
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  • The great Whig families rallied under Ministry Newcastle and drove Pitt from office (1757).
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  • But if of Pitt Pitt could not govern without Newcastles corruption, and Newneither could Newcastle govern without Pitts energy.
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  • Lord John Russellwho had already vainly urged in the cabinet that the duke of Newcastle should be superseded, and the conduct of the war entrusted to a stronger minister resigned office.
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  • The old duke of Newcastle, probably desiring a post for some nominee of his own, conveyed to the ear of the new minister various absurd rumours prejudicial to Burke, - that he was an Irish papist, that his real name was O'Bourke, that he had been a Jesuit, that he was an emissary from St Omer's.
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  • Prior to 1691, however, Dr John Clayton, dean of Kildare, filled bladders with inflammable gas obtained by the distillation of coal, and showed that on pricking the bladders and applying a light to the escaping gas it burnt with a luminous flame, and in 1726 Stephen Hales published the fact that by the distillation of 158 grains of Newcastle coal, 180 cub.
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  • Coals of this character are obtained in England from the Newcastle and Durham field, South Yorkshire, Derbyshire and Barnsley districts, and an idea of their ultimate composition may be derived from the following table: Our knowledge of the composition of coal is limited to the total amount of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen and foreign materials which it contains; and at present we know practically but little of the way in which these bodies are combined.
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  • Railway communication is supplied by the east coast route to Berwick, the Waverley route through Liddesdale, the London & North-Western by Carlisle, the North British branch from Berwick to St Boswells, and the North Eastern lines from Berwick to Kelso, Alnwick to Coldstream, and Newcastle to Carlisle.
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  • Lancaster, who had just obtained the earldoms of Lincoln and Salisbury on the death of his father-in-law in 1311, drove the king and his favourite from Newcastle to Scarborough, and was present at the execution of Gaveston in June 1312.
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  • On October 20th he spoke at Newcastle, on the 21st at Tynemouth, on the 27th at Liverpool, insisting that free-trade had never been a working-class measure and that it could not be reconciled with trade-unionism; on November 4th at Birmingham, on the 10th at Cardiff, on the 21st at Newport, and on December 16th at Leeds.
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  • In reply to Mr Balfour's appeal for the sinking of differences (Newcastle, November 14), Mr Chamberlain insisted at Bristol (November 21) on the adoption of his fiscal policy; and Mr Balfour resigned on December 4, on the ground that he no longer retained the confidence of the party.
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  • The duke of Newcastle, in his treatise on horsemanship, said that he had seen the above Arabian, and described him as a small bay horse and not of very excellent shape.
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  • The Darley Arabian did much to remove the prejudice against Eastern blood which had been instilled into the public mind by the duke of Newcastle's denunciation of the Markham Arabian.
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  • The Side is still the name of the long and steep acclivity which connected the lower with the upper town of Newcastle.
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  • The Center for Life is a unique science village in the heart of Newcastle upon Tyne, fostering advancement in the life sciences.
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  • I am available throughout the North East, particularly in Newcastle where you can also visit me in my luxurious apartment.
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  • In the same year she created Duel in a Teacup for Dance Umbrella in Newcastle for the Edwardian shopping arcade.
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  • Novotel Newcastle, Newcastle Upon Tyne This is the perfect base for a family weekend, a relaxing holiday or business travel.
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  • Before kick-off famous spoon bender Uri had predicted a 2-1 Newcastle victory, with Alan Shearer scoring with a penalty.
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  • An operation to reduce the nuisance and danger of off-road bikers in Newcastle has already shown success.
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  • At Newcastle, we have used the units on Fungal, Prokaryotic and Plant Diversity to supplement our general botany and microbiology courses.
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  • He ran a coaching business between Kelso and Newcastle and four-wheeled chaises could be hired for 9 pence per mile.
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  • In 1861 the then " central authorities " refused to appoint an evangelical clergyman to St Thomas ' Newcastle.
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  • At the height of its production, coal was brought directly to Wandsworth from Newcastle on the Gas works own steam colliers.
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  • After their disastrous defeat, Newcastle and Eythin fled to Scarborough and sailed to the continent, fearing that all was lost.
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  • Newcastle moved downfield dangerously and got close to the Bristol line.
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  • Methods: Seventy-two traumatically extruded permanent incisors were studied at the Departments of Pediatric Dentistry in Belfast, Newcastle upon Tyne, and Glasgow.
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  • Then [Newcastle chairman] Freddie Shepherd started inviting us to watch football.
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  • Comments England manager front-runner and Newcastle Utd target Martin O'Neill is not qualified for Newcastle job, but he is for England.
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  • Several English fiddlers have been recorded using this pattern, on undotted as well as on Newcastle style hornpipes.
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  • Andrew added âWe are proud of being Newcastle based but we are not scared of a bit of national or even international travel.
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  • Researchers at the Newcastle General Hospital found that using lemon balm twice daily had a significant reduction in their agitation.
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  • The redevelopment will improve pedestrian linkages throughout the town, attract quality retailers, and reduce leakage to nearby centers such as Newcastle.
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  • Drive or take the train to the festival city of Edinburgh, walled town of Berwick or shopping Mecca in Newcastle.
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  • Likewise the Sunderland - Newcastle match turned out to be a fairly mellow affair.
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  • Married, with four children and one pedigree mongrel dog, he has followed the ups and downs of Newcastle United since adolescence.
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  • Finding the best way to support teenage mothers in Newcastle Upon Type.
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  • We have legal experts nationwide in places such as London, Essex, Sussex, Bristol, Manchester, Leeds, Newcastle and Liverpool.
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  • Thus we have the familiar modern phrase ` To carry coals to Newcastle ', an expression of something which is quite needless.
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  • The first northwards was the 4pm dining express from King's Cross to Newcastle.
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  • The other pathfinders cover Newcastle and Gateshead, south Yorkshire, Hull and east Yorkshire, the Potteries, and Birmingham and Sandwell.
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  • Outbreaks of Newcastle Disease (fowl pest) are the main constraint to village chicken production, causing fatalities of up to 100% .
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  • Trinity House of Newcastle was formed in 1536 and regulated pilotage on the Tyne.
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  • Newcastle is a spacious, extended, infinitely populous place.
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  • Researchers from Newcastle university studied 122 primary schools in six local authorities, visited lessons and interviewed teachers and pupils.
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  • In a coals to Newcastle kind of deal, the UK club promoters exported their newly repackaged youth culture back to Ibiza.
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  • However, the Newcastle research suggests that the benefit derived from the use of the sliding rigger was more significant.
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  • Maurice Suckling Maurice lives in Newcastle upon Tyne, where he works as a freelance scriptwriter in the computer games industry.
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  • The New York - Newcastle flight will provide shippers with guaranteed service for high-value or time-critical air freight.
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  • Advertisement After England had lost the penalty shootout 3-1 the raging former Newcastle idol lost his cool.
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  • Then just as the Newcastle defense were looking quite solid the best chance of the first half came on the 33rd minute.
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  • Follow the A696 toward Newcastle then take the A1 southbound.
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  • This time it was not Johnnie but his son Ian who promoted speedway at Newcastle in 1970.
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  • A case in point is the feature lighting of the entrance stairwell at Lloyds Court in Newcastle.
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  • Unpublished master's thesis, University of Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia.
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  • As Newcastle stirred from its economic slumber with piecemeal regeneration, Gateshead sank into an even deeper torpor.
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  • Our 90-strong team donned burgundy vests and ran, jogged or walked the world famous route from Newcastle to South Shields.
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  • The Newcastle bellman invited people to report suspected witches.
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  • As Newcastle kicked off I became aware that the lad sat behind me was academy youngster James Frayne.
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  • Andrew Stone (1703-1773), who was five years older than George, became private secretary to the duke of Newcastle about 1729, and was for many years on the most intimate and confidential terms both with the duke and with his brother Henry Pelham.
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  • On the 9th of September Charles refused once mere the Newcastle Propositions offered him by the parliament, and Cromwell, together with Ireton and Vane, obtained the passing of a motion for a new application; but the terms asked by the parliament were higher than before and included a harsh condition - the he was blunt," says Waller, "he did not bear himself with pride or disdain.
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  • His independence (which his detractors attributed in some degree to his alleged susceptibility to Tory compliments) brought him into collision both with the Liberal caucus and with the party organization in Newcastle itself, but Cowen's personal popularity and his remarkable powers as an orator triumphed in his own birthplace, and he was again elected in 1885 in spite of Liberal opposition.
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  • Richard Trevithick, indeed, had in 1804 tried a high-pressure steam locomotive, with smooth wheels, on a plate-way near Merthyr Tydvil, but it was found more expensive than horses; John Blenkinsop in 1811 patented an engine with cogged wheel and rack-rail which was used, with commercial success, to convey coal from his Middleton colliery to Leeds; William Hedley in 1813 built two locomotives - Puffing Billy and Wylam Dilly - for hauling coal from Wylam Colliery, near Newcastle; and in the following year George Stephenson's first engine, the Blucher, drew a train of eight loaded wagons, weighing 30 tons, at a speed of 4 m.
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  • The Newcastle dog show of 1859 was promoted by Mr Pape - a local sporting gunmaker - and Mr Shorthose, and although only pointers and setters were entered for in two classes immense interest was taken in the show.
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  • Oil has been found in eighteen different districts, the fields being known as follows: - The Carter, Hilliard, Spring Valley and Twin Creek in Uinta county; the Popo Agie, Lander, Shoshone, Beaver and a part of Dutton in Fremont county; the Rattlesnake, Arrago, Oil Mountain and a part of Dutton, Powder river and Salt Creek in Natrona county; part of Powder river and Salt Creek in Johnson county; Newcastle in Weston county; Belle Fourche in Crook county; Douglas in Converse county and Bonanza in Bighorn county.
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  • Numerous protests were made by many of the inhabitants of the Orange River Sovereignty against the abandonment of it by the British government, but the duke of Newcastle, who was then colonial secretary in Lord Aberdeen's administration, replied that the decision was in- evitable (see [[Orange Free State]]).
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  • His father, whose name also was William, began life as an apprentice to a fitter, in which service he obtained the freedom of Newcastle, becoming a member of the gild of Hoastmen (coal-fitters); later in life he became a principal in the business, and attained a respectable position as a merchant in Newcastle, accumulating property worth nearly £ 20,000.
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  • At last a compromise was effected, and Newcastle undertook the work of bribing, whilst Pitt undertook the work of governing (see CHATHAM, WILLIAM PITT, 1ST EARL OF).
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  • Liz Lamb looks at the work of a Newcastle charity which is helping children in a country still ravaged by war.
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  • Ferry - Scandinavian Seaways sail into Newcastle (2 hours drive from Edinburgh) from Germany, Sweden and Holland.
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  • Follow the A696 toward Newcastle then take the A1 Southbound.
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  • The first International syncope conference to be held in the UK was hosted by Newcastle between 20-22 November 2003.
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  • A similar study in Newcastle revealed unemployment to be twice as common in teenagers with arthritis, than others.
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  • Unpublished master 's thesis, University of Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia.
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  • Edward dates from Newcastle, 16th November this year, when he signed a short truce with the Scots.
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  • Kanye West was arrested in Newcastle, England in an incident that sounds like a bit of déjà vu.
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  • This video comes from Otherworld Northeast, a paranormal research organization that set up the video in the allegedly haunted basement of the Literary and Philosophical Society in Newcastle upon Tyne.
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  • Stavanger is the first port of call for northward-bound passenger steamers from Hull and Newcastle, and has regular services from all the Norwegian coast towns, from Hamburg, &c. A railway runs south along the wild and desolate coast of Jaederen, one of the few low and unprotected shores in Norway, the scene of many wrecks.
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