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newark

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newark

newark Sentence Examples

  • EAST ORANGE, a city of Essex county, New Jersey, U.S.A., in the north-eastern part of the state, adjoining the city of Newark, and about 12 m.

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  • It is served by the Morris & Essex division of the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western railway and by the Orange branch of the Erie (the former having three stations in the city - Grove Street, East Orange and Brick Church), and is connected with Newark, Orange and West Orange by electric line.

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  • In 1863 the township of East Orange was separated from the township of Orange, which, in turn, had been separated from the township of Newark in 1806.

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  • Whittemore, The Founders and Builders of the Oranges (Newark, 1896).

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  • The Barre granites, like those of Woodbury and Calais (also in Washington county) and part of those of South Ryegate, Kirby and Newark (Caledonia county), are of the biotite type; they are grey, except the stone from Newark, which is pinkish.

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  • Green calls this king, had not, however, given up the struggle, and he was still in the field when he was taken ill, dying in Newark castle on the 19th of October 1216.

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  • and between New York and Newark bays at the S., opposite lower Manhattan Island.

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  • Henry of Newark, 1298-1299.

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  • His frank claim to " do what he liked with his own " in the representation of: Newark has given him a place in political history.

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  • At his suggestion the duke invited Gladstone to stand for Newark in the Tory interest against Mr Serjeant Wilde, afterwards Lord Chancellor Truro.

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  • Simply on the strength of his parliamentary reputation Gladstone was nominated, without his consent, for Manchester, and was placed at the bottom of the poll; but, having been at the same time nominated at Newark, was again returned.

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  • Gladstone was again returned for Newark.

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  • Sir Robert Peel became r i me minister, and made the member for Newark p vice-president of the Board of Trade.

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  • He did not offer himself for re-election at Newark, and remained outside the House of Commons during the great struggle of the coming year.

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  • He graduated at Bowdoin College in 1834, and subsequently held pastorates at Newark, New Jersey (1851-1857), and Georgetown, Massachusetts; and from 1870 to 1877 lived in Florida, where he was state superintendent of public instruction in 1871-1873.

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  • Frederick Theodore, left an orphan at the age of three, was adopted by his uncle, graduated at Rutgers in 1836, and studied law in Newark with his uncle, to whose practice he succeeded in 1839, soon after his admission to the bar.

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  • Retiring, with his health impaired by overwork, to his home in Newark, he died there on the 20th of May, less than three months after relinquishing the cares of office.

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  • The Battle Of Dunbar was fought on the 3rd (13th) of September 1650 between the English army under Oliver Cromwell and the Scots under David Leslie, afterwards Lord Newark.

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  • Making for the fortress of Newark, Lincoln and Sir Thomas Broughton, at the head of their motley forces, and accompanied by Simnel, attacked the royal army near the village of Stoke-on-Trent on the 16th of June 1487.

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  • Other works include the Sheridan monument in Washington; " Mares of Diomedes " and " Ruskin " in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; statue of Lincoln, Newark, N.J.; statue of Henry Ward Beecher, Brooklyn; the Wyatt Memorial, Raleigh, N.C.; " The Flyer " at the university of Virginia; gargoyles for a Princeton dormitory; " Wonderment of Motherhood " and " Conception."

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  • DAVID LESLIE NEWARK, Lord (1601-1682), Scottish general, was born in 1601, the fifth son of Sir Patrick Leslie of Pitcairly, Fifeshire, commendator of Lindores, and Lady Jean Stuart, daughter of the 1st earl of Orkney.

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  • Leslie returned to England and was present at the siege of Newark.

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  • In 1661 he was created Lord Newark, and received a pension of £50o per annum.

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  • Newark (Newark-Upon-Trent) >>

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  • The Agricultural Experiment Station, at Newark, publishes in its Annual Report a record of temperature and rainfall.

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  • In 1848 he came to London, but passed on in 1849 to America, where he ministered as rabbi in Cleveland,Cincinnati, Milwaukee, Detroit and Newark, New Jersey.

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  • At Newark from 1875 he gave himself entirely to literary work, and exercised a strong influence as leader of the radical and reforming Jewish party.

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  • The district originally formed part of the parish of Kilmalcolm, the nucleus of the town being the village of Newark attached to the barony of that name.

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  • In 1668 it was purchased from Sir Patrick Maxwell of Newark by the Glasgow magistrates, who here constructed a harbour.

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  • Adjoining the town on the east are the picturesque ruins of Newark Castle, a quadrangular building dating from the end of the 16th century.

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  • In 1910 the state charitable institutions were as follows: State Soldiers' and Sailors' Home, Bath; State School for the Blind, Batavia; the Thomas Indian School, Iroquois; State Woman's Relief Corps Home, Oxford; State Hospital for the care of Crippled and Deformed Children, West Haverstraw; Syracuse State Institution for Feeble-Minded Children, Syracuse; State Hospital for the treatment of Incipient Pulmonary Tuberculosis, Ray Brook; Craig Colony for Epileptics, Sonyea; State Custodial Asylum for Feeble-Minded Women, Newark; Rome State Custodial Asylum for Unteachable Idiots, Rome; State Agricultural and Industrial School, Industry; State Training School for Girls, Hudson; Western House of Refuge, Albion; New York State Reformatory for Women, Bedford; the State Training School for Boys; and Letchworth Village, a custodial asylum for epileptics and feeble-minded.

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  • The pin system of connexion used in the Chepstow, Salt ash, Newark Dyke and other early English bridges is now rarely used in Europe.

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  • At the cal culated position of one of the points of contrary flexure all the rivets of the top boom were cut out, and by lowering the end of the girder over the side span one inch, the joint was opened - -- Section of Newark Dyke Bridge.

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  • 19 shows the Newark Dyke bridge on the Great Northern railway over the Trent.

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  • Newark Dyke Bridge.

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  • NEWARK, the largest city of New Jersey, U.S.A., a port of entry, and the county-seat of Essex county, on the Passaic river and Newark Bay, about 8 m.

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  • Newark is served by the Pennsylvania, the Lehigh Valley, the Erie, the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western and the Central of New Jersey railways, and by steamboats engaged in coastwise and river commerce.

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  • In Military Park is a monument to MajorGeneral Philip Kearny (1815-1862), and in Washington Park is a monument to Seth Boyden (1785-1870), a Newark inventor of malleable iron, of machinery for making nails, and of improvements in the steam-locomotive.

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  • Newark has also a monument to !Frederick Theodore Frelinghuysen (1817-1885), secretary of state in the cabinet of President Chester A.

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  • In 1910 Newark had 658 acres in public parks, of which 637 acres were under the administration of the Essex County Park Commission.

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  • The Newark Academy, founded in 1792, is the leading private school; and there are various Roman Catholic academies.

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  • of Newark, is the City Home for boys, in which farming, printing and other trades are taught.

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  • Among the charitable institutions are the City Hospital, Saint Michael's Hospital, Saint Barnabas Hospital, Saint James Hospital, the German Hospital, a Babies' Hospital, an Eye and Ear Infirmary, a City Dispensary, the Newark Orphan Asylum, a Home for Crippled Children, a Home for Aged Women and three day nurseries.

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  • Newark has long been one of the leading manufacturing cities of the country.

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  • The manufacture of felt hats (product, 1905, $4,586,040, Newark ranking third in this industry among the cities of the United States), carriages, chairs and jewelry (an industry established about 1830; product, 1905, $9,258,095), developed rapidly early in the 19th century, and there are extensive manufactories of malt liquors (product, 1905, $10,917,003), and of clothing (product, 1905, $3,937,138), foundries and machine shops (product, 1905, $6,254,153), and large establishments for smelting and refining lead and copper, the product of the lead smelters and refining establishments being in 1905 the most valuable in the city.

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  • The total value of Newark's factory products increased from $112,728,045 in 1900 to $150,055,227 in 1905, or 33-1%.

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  • In 1905 the value of the city's factory product was almost onefifth of that for the whole state, and Newark ranked tenth among the manufacturing cities of the entire country.

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  • In the same year Newark manufactured more than one-half (by value) of all the jewelry, leather and malt liquors produced in the state.

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  • Insurance is another important business, for here are the headquarters of the Prudential, the Mutual Benefit Life and the American Fire, the Firemen's and the Newark Fire Insurance companies.

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  • Newark was settled in 1666 by about thirty Puritans from Milford, Connecticut, who were followed in the next year by about the same number of their sect from Branford and Guilford.

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  • The town was governed largely after the Mosaic law and continued essentially Puritan for fifty years or more; about 1730 Presbyterianism superseded Congregationalism, and in 1734 Colonel Josiah Ogden, having caused a schism in the preceding year, by saving his wheat one dry Sunday in a wet season, founded with several followers the first Episcopal or Church of England Society in Newark - Trinity Church.

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  • Partly because of its Puritanic genesis and partly because of its independent manufacturing interests, Newark has kept, in spite of its nearness to New York City, a distinct character of its own.

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  • The College of New Jersey, now Princeton University, was situated here from 1747 to 1756, for all but the first few months under the presidency of the Rev. Aaron Burr, who published in 1752 the well-known Newark Grammar, long used in Princeton and originally prepared for Burr's very successful boys' school in Newark.

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  • Newark was incorporated as a township in 1693, was chartered as a city in 1836 and received another charter in 1857; from it the township of Orange was formed in 1806 and the township of Bloomfield in 1812.

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  • Thowless, Historical Sketch of the City of Newark, New Jersey (Newark, 1902); F.

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  • Urquhart, Newark, The Story of its Early Days (Newark, 1904); and J.

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  • Atkinson, The History of Newark, New Jersey (Newark, 1878).

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  • Newark, Ohio >>

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  • by the narrow channel of Kill van Kull which connects New York Bay with Newark Bay; and from New Jersey on the W.

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  • AARON BURR (1756-1836), American political leader, was born at Newark, New Jersey, on the 6th of February 1756.

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  • They are often known as the Newark series, and seem to be chiefly, if not wholly, of terrestrial origin.

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  • The character of some of the conglomerate of the Newark series of the east, and the widespread redness of the beds, so far as it is original, also point to aridity.

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  • At many points in the Appalachian belt attempts had been made to work mines of copper and lead, but with no considerable success, About the middle of the century extensive works were erected at Newark, New Jersey, fo1~ the manufacture of the oxide of zinc for paint; about 1100 tons were produced in 1852.

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  • The burning by the American general McClure, on the 10th of December 1813, of Newark(Niagara on the Lake), for which severe retaliation was taken at Buffalo, was made the excuse for much destruction.

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  • The village is served by the Morris & Essex division of the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western railroad, and is connected with Orange and with Newark by electric lines.

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  • It is primarily a residential suburb of New York and Newark.

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  • Settlements were made within the present limits of the township in the latter part of the 17th century by some of the founders of Newark.

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  • Whittemore, The Founders and Builders of the Oranges, (Newark, 1896).

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  • The burying-ground includes the tomb of Robert Treat (1622-1710), commander of the Connecticut troops in King Philip's War, leader of the company that founded Newark, New Jersey, governor of Connecticut (from 1683 to 1698) at the time its charter was demanded by Governor Andros in 1686-1687, and deputy-governor in1676-1683and 1698-1708; and also that of Jonathan Law (1674-1751), governor of Connecticut from 1742 to 1751.

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  • In 1664 Milford, with the other members of the Jurisdiction, was absorbed by Connecticut; this caused considerable dissatisfaction and some of the inhabitants under the lead of Robert Treat removed to New Jersey and assisted in the founding of Newark.

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  • wide) between New York harbour and Newark Bay, and immediately adjoining the south boundary of Jersey City, from which it is partly separated by the Morris Canal.

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  • Bayonne is served by the Central of New Jersey and by the Lehigh Valley railways (the latter for freight only), and by electric railway lines to Newark and Jersey City.

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  • of New York, and directly adjoining the city of Newark on the N.

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  • Bloomfield is served by the Erie, and the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western railways, the Morris Canal, and by electric lines connecting with Newark, Montclair, Orange and other neighbouring places.

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  • It is a residential suburb of Newark and New York, is the seat of a German theological school (Presbyterian, 1869) and has the Jarvie Memorial library (1902).

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  • First settled about 1670-1675 by the Dutch and by New Englanders from the Newark colony, Bloomfield was long a part of Newark, the principal settlement at first being known as Wardsesson.

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  • Whittemore, The Founders and Builders of the Oranges; (Newark, 1896).

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  • MICHAEL AUGUSTINE CORRIGAN (1839-1902), third archbishop of the Roman Catholic archdiocese of New York, in the United States, was born in Newark, New Jersey, on the 13th of August 1839.

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  • In October 1868 Corrigan became vicar-general of Newark, a diocese then including all the state of New Jersey.

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  • appointed Corrigan bishop of Newark.

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  • It is served by the Morris & Essex Division of the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western railroad and by the Orange branch (of which it is a terminus) of the Erie railroad, and is connected with Newark, South Orange and Bloomfield by electric lines.

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  • The, city lies at the base of the eastern slope of the first Watchung, or Orange, Mountain, and is primarily a residential suburb of New York and Newark; with East Orange, West Orange and South Orange it constitutes virtually a single community, popularly known as " the Oranges."

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  • Settlements were made in or near the limits of the present city soon after the founding of Newark, in 1666, and, on account of the mountainous ridge in this region, they were generally referred to collectively as " Newark Mountain."

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  • As a disagreement soon arose between the people of Newark and those of " the mountain" on questions of church administration, the latter in 1718 severed their connexion with the church at Newark and formed an independent congregation, the" Mountain Society."

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  • Whittemore, The Founders and Builders of the Oranges (Newark, 1896); J.

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  • Wickes, History of the Oranges (1666-1806), (Newark, 1892).

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  • WILLIAM WARBURTON (1698-1779), English critic and divine, bishop of Gloucester, was born at Newark on the 24th of December 1698.

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  • His father belonged to an old Cheshire family and was town clerk of Newark.

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  • William was educated at Oakham and Newark grammar schools, and in 1714 he was articled to Mr Kirke, attorney at East Markham, in Nottinghamshire.

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  • After serving his time he returned to Newark with the intention of practising a.s a solicitor; but, having given some time to the study of Latin and Greek, he left the law and was ordained deacon by the archbishop of York in 1723, and in 1727 received priest's orders from the bishop of London.

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  • NEWARK, a city and the county-seat of Licking county, Ohio, U.S.A., at the confluence of three forks of the Licking river, on the Ohio Canal, and 33 m.

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  • Newark is served by the Baltimore & Ohio, and the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis railways, and by inter-urban electric lines.

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  • and connected with Newark by electric line is Buckeye Lake, an artificial body of water about 8 m.

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  • Newark is the trade centre of an agricultural region, which also abounds in natural gas and coal; natural gas is piped as far as Cincinnati.

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  • Newark was laid out about 1801 and was incorporated in 1813.

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  • The stream then makes a sharp bend southward and empties into Newark Bay.'

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  • of the Hudson river, flows almost parallel with that stream, and empties into Newark Bay, having a length of 34 m.

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  • The chief manufacturing centres in ($ 1 05, as judged by the value of their products, were Newark 1 5 0, 0 55, 2 77), Jersey City ($75,740,934), Bayonne ($60,633,761), Paterson ($54,673,083), Perth Amboy ($34,800,402), Camden ($33,5 8 7, 2 73), and Trenton ($32,719,945).

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  • Most of the product comes from the cities of Newark and Orange.

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  • long, beginning at Jersey City and passing through Newark, Bloomfield, Paterson, Little Falls, Boonton, Rockaway, Dover, Port Oram, Lake Hopatcong, Hackettstown and Washington to Phillipsburg on the Delaware; it is practically in two sections, one east and the other west of Lake Hopatcong (Sussex and Morris counties; about 928 ft.

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  • The chief cities in 1910 were Newark (pop. 347,469), Jersey City (267,779), Paterson (1 2 5,600), Trenton (96,815), Camden (94,538) and Hoboken (70,324).

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  • There are industrial schools in Newark, Hoboken and Trenton, for which the state made an appropriation of $20,000 in 1908.

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  • Among the denominational institutions are the Theological Seminary (Presbyterian) at Princeton; the Drew Theological Seminary (Methodist Episcopal) at Madison; Seton Hall College (Roman Catholic), at South Orange; St Peter's College (Roman Catholic) at Jersey City; St Benedict's College (Roman Catholic) at Newark; the German Theological School of Newark 1 The state's title to its riparian lands was established, after a long controversy, in 1870 in the case of Stevens v.

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  • the Paterson & Newark R.R.

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  • The settled region was called " Achter Koll," or " Back Bay," after Newark Bay, whose waters, lying behind the bay of New York, had to be crossed in order to reach Elizabethtown.

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  • Nelson (26 vols., Newark, 1880-1903); Documents Relating to the Revolutionary History of the State of New Jersey (Archives of the State of New Jersey, 2nd series; 2 vols., Trenton, 1901-1903); and Acts of the General Assembly of New Jersey from 1703-1761, reprinted by A.

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  • i., Newark, 1875); W.

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  • of New Jersey Historical Society Collections, Newark, 1849, 1872); and David Murray, History of Education in New Jersey (No.

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  • A year later Governor Simcoe transferred the seat of government of the new province of Upper Canada from the town of Newark at the mouth of the Niagara River to Toronto, giving the new capital the name of York, in honour of the second son of George III.

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  • Main line - Peterborough, Grantham, Newark, Doncaster; forming, with the North-Eastern and North British lines, the " East Coast " route to Scotland.

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  • On the other side the cavalry of the Eastern Association under Lieut.-General Cromwell and that of the Scots under Major-General Leslie (Lord Newark) formed the left, the infantry of the Eastern Association under Major-General Crawford, of the Scots under Lord Leven, and of the Yorkshire Parliamentarians under Lord Fairfax was in the centre and the Yorkshire cavalry under Sir Thomas Fairfax was on the right wing.

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  • Newark, Beverley, Southwell, Kingston-upon-Hull, York, Selby, Chester, Lichfield, Tamworth and Warwick.

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  • of Newark.

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  • Newark, on the 17th of July.

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  • ELIZABETH, a city and the county-seat of Union county, New Jersey, U.S.A., on Elizabeth river, Newark Bay, and Arthur Kill, 10 M.

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  • In the home of the Rev. Jonathan Dickinson (1688-1747), its first president, the first sessions of the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University) were held in 1747, but immediately afterwards the college removed to Newark.

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  • enterprise ended in the battle of Stoke, near Newark, where the flower of the Anglo-Irish soldiery fell.

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  • From Ireland, accompanied by some bands of German mercenaries procured for him in the Low Countries, he invaded England; but the rising was put down at Stoke near Newark in Nottinghamshire, and, Simnel being captured, the king made him a menial of his kitchen.

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  • These belts are in part exposed in pits near Newark, and extend north by Gainsborough to where the Trent flows into the Humber, passing thence into Yorkshire.

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  • The Midland company has a branch from Newark to Lincoln, and the Lancashire, Derbyshire, and East Coast line terminates at Lincoln.

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  • In the struggles of the reign of Stephen, castles at Newark and Sleaford were raised by Alexander, bishop of Lincoln, against the king, while Ranulf "Gernons," earl.

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  • After his disastrous march to Swineshead Abbey, John journeyed through Sleaford to Newark, where he died, and in the battle of Lincoln in 1217 Gilbert de Gant was captured and the city sacked.

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  • In the Civil War of the 17th century, Lindsey for the most part declared for the king, and the Royalist cause was warmly supported by the earl of Lindsey, Viscount Newark, Sir Peregrine Bertie and the families of Dymoke, Heneage and Thorold.

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  • In 1644, however, Newark, Gainsborough, Lincoln, Sleaford and Crowland were all in Royalist hands, and Newark only surrendered in 1646.

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  • After three years (1865-1868) on the Newark, New Jersey, Daily Advertiser, he founded, with Newton Crane, the Newark Morning Register.

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  • They arrived back home in Newark late yesterday afternoon.

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  • Newark's representatives were coached by Eric Ball and conducted by their own bandmaster Mr David Aspinall.

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  • booed off the stage at a town in the midlands lived there at the time called Newark.

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  • boroughst rained in Newark according to the boro surveyor 's department 13 days ago.

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  • candlewick manufacturers at the Claypole Mills near Newark.

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  • Massive Trent chub March 06 Mansfield angler Richard Kay landed a superb 8lb 2oz chub from the River Trent fishing a section near Newark.

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  • July 11, 1906 We heartily congratulate the Great Northern Railroad Company on having brought Newark within two hours of the bracing Lincolnshire coast.

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  • desired donations for Newark & District Hospice Aid.

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  • Family flowers only please, if desired donations for Newark & District Hospice Aid.

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  • Most of the factory output was for the home market, although they later erected a large mill at Newark, New Jersey.

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  • silly mistakes were made by Newark MP Mrs Fiona Jones in her election return, the Crown Court was told on Monday.

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  • one-way fare from Gatwick to Newark on the less fashionable New Jersey side of New York was £ 99.

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  • In February 1643, Major-General Thomas Ballard led 6,000 parliamentarians from the Midlands in an assault on Newark.

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  • The Newark Rowing Club winner, T. Allen, won his 50th victory in the senior sculls.

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  • It last rained in Newark according to the boro surveyor 's department 13 days ago.

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  • swine fever infection are reported from the Newark area.

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  • Newark Parish Church has again been targeted by Vandals.

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  • old windmill on Newark Dike River Trent Navigation at Newark.

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  • It is primarily a residential suburb of New York and Newark, and has many beautiful homes; with Orange, West Orange and South Orange it forms virtually one community, popularly known as "the Oranges."

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  • Gladstone, addressing the electors of Newark, said that he was bound by the opinions of no man and no party, but felt it a duty to watch and resist that growing desire for change which threatened to produce " along with partial good a melancholy preponderance of mischief."

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  • The first Reformed parliament met on the 29th of January 1833, and the young member for Newark took his seat for the first time in an assembly which he was destined to adorn, delight and astonish for more than half a century.

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  • Delaware College (non-sectarian) at Newark, founded in 1833 as Newark College and rechartered, after suspension from 1859 to 1870, under the present name, as a state institution, derives most of its financial support from the United States Land Grant of 1862 and the supplementary appropriation of 1890, and is the seat of an agricultural experiment station, established in 1888 under the so-called " Hatch Bill " of 1887.

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  • Next day he fell ill of rage and vexation of spirit, contracted a dysenteric ailment, and died a week later at Newark (Oct.

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  • Four cases of swine fever infection are reported from the Newark area.

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  • In the same era that spawned the Newark tar barrel incident equally rowdy goings on could be found in the villages around the town.

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  • Newark Parish Church has again been targeted by vandals.

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  • Old windmill on Newark Dike River Trent Navigation at Newark.

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  • She told The Star-Ledger of Newark, New Jersey, "The really bad ones aren't her.

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  • Three major international airports service the port: JFK, LaGuardia, and Newark, giving passengers multiple airfare options.

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  • They serve Newark, East Orange, Englewood, Prospect Park and all nearby regions.

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  • BKE Newark Cargo Short, found at Buckle.com, is made from quality cotton canvas and includes a belt.

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  • From Newark, New Jersey, to Detroit, Michigan, teachers everywhere have grown increasingly concerned about school violence.

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  • He first found his sense of rhythm with drumming, receiving a full scholarship to the Newark Community School of the Arts for his skillful playing.

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