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New-zealand sentence examples

new-zealand
  • The visits to the United Kingdom of properly organized teams of bowlers from Australia and New Zealand in 1901 and from Canada in 1904 demonstrated that the game had gained enormously in popularity.

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  • He was successively governor of Trinidad (1866-70), Mauritius (1871-4), Fiji (1875-80), New Zealand (1880-2) and Ceylon (1883-90).

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  • It consists in the main of an Archean block or " coign,"which still occupies nearly the whole of the western half of the continent, outcrops in north-eastern Queensland, forms the foundation of southern New South Wales and eastern Victoria, and is exposed in western Victoria, in Tasmania, and in the western flank of the Southern Alps of New Zealand.

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  • The first eruptions piled up huge domes of lavas rich in soda, including the geburite-dacites and sOlvsbergites of Mount Macedon in Victoria, and the kenyte and tephrite domes of Dunedin, in New Zealand.

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  • These marine deposits are not found anywhere along the eastern coast of Australia; but they occur, and reach about the same height above sea-level, in New Guinea, and are widely developed in New Zealand.

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  • They are found in New Zealand and also in New Caledonia, their greatest developments being on the south-west of the Australian continent.

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  • Naval defence in any case remained primarily a question for the Imperial navy, and by agreement (1903, for ten years) between the British government and the governments of the Commonwealth (contributing an annual subsidy of £200,000) and of New Zealand (£40,000), an efficient fleet patrolled the Australasian waters, Sydney, its headquarters, being ranked as a first-class naval station.

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  • There is evidence in the languages, too, which supports the physical separation from their New Zealand neighbours and, therefore, from the Polynesian family of races.

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  • Resuming his voyage in an easterly direction, Tasman sighted the west coast of the South Island of New Zealand on the 13th of December of the same year, and describes the coast-line as consisting of " high mountainous country."

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  • On the 6th of October 1769 the coast of New Zealand was sighted, and two days later Cook cast anchor in Poverty Bay, so named from the inhospitality and hostility of the natives.

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  • The vessels became separated, and both at different times visited New Zealand.

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  • In 1777, while on his way to search for a north-east passage between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, Cook again touched at the coast of Tasmania and New Zealand.

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  • The copper mines of South Australia were for the time deserted, while Tasmania and New Zealand lost many inhabitants, who emigrated to the more promising country.

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  • At this meeting all the colonies except New Zealand were represented, and it was agreed that the parliament of each colony should be asked to pass a bill enabling the people to choose ten persons to represent the colony on a federal convention; the work of such convention being the framing of a federal constitution to be submitted to the people for approval by means of the referendum.

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  • In the years 1900 and 1902 acts were passed in Western Australia still more closely modelled on the New Zealand act than was the above-mentioned statute in New South Wales.

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  • In the southern parts of Australia and in New Zealand the tree seems to flourish as well as in its native home.

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  • There was in addition a considerable inter-colonial traffic between Australia, New Zealand and the Fijis.

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  • Pelagohydridae, for the floating polyp Pelagohydra, Dendy, from New Zealand.

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  • In Dawsonia superba, a large New Zealand moss, the hydroids of the central cylinder of the aerial stem are mixed with thick-walled stereids forming a hydrom-stereom strand somewhat like that of the rhizome in other Polytrichaceae.

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  • The watercress blocks the rivers of New Zealand into which it has been introduced from Europe.

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  • SouTH TEMPERATE REGI0N.This occupies widely separated areas in South Africa, Australia, New Zealand and South America.

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  • Travers picked up a seed of Edwardsia in the Chatham Islands, evidently washed ashore from New Zealand (Linn.

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  • Cupuliferae are absent except Fagus in Australia and New Zealand.

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  • The so-called oaks of Australia are Casuarma, which also occurs in New Caledonia, but is wanting in New Zealand.

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  • Amongst Conifers, Podocar pus is found throughout, Agathis is common to Australia, New Zealand and New Caledonia; Araucaria ~ ~he first and last.

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  • While the flora of New Caledonia is rich in species (3000), that of New Zealand is poor (1400).

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  • Of Cupuliferae, Quercus in three species only reaches Colombia, but Fagus, with only a single one in North America, is represented by several from Chile southwards and thence extends to New Zealand and Tasmania.

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  • Amongst Coniferae Podocarpus is common to this and preceding sub-regions; Libocedrus extends from California to New Zealand and New Caledonia; Fitzroya is found in Chile and Tasmania; and Araucaria in its most familiar species occurs in Chile.

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  • At first sight a South African Euphorbia might be mistaken for a South American Cactus, an Aloe for an A gave, a Senecio for ivy, or a New Zealand Veronica for a European Salicornia.

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  • These facts have led some naturalists to include the Palaearctic and Nearctic regions in one, termed Holarctic, and to suggest transitional regions, such as the Sonoran, between North and South America, and the Mediterranean, between Europe and Africa, or to create sub-regions, such as Madagascar and New Zealand.

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  • In 1837 the New Zealand Association was established, and he became its managing director.

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  • For several years Wakefield continued to direct the New Zealand Company, fighting its battles with the colonial office and the missionary interest, and secretly inspiring and guiding many parliamentary committees on colonial subjects, especially on the abolition of transportation.

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  • The company was by no means a financial success, and many of its proceedings were wholly unscrupulous and indefensible; its great object, however, was attained, and New Zealand became the Britain of the south.

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  • In 1854 he appeared in the first New Zealand parliament as extra-official adviser of the acting governor, a position which excited great jealousy, and as the mover of a resolution demanding the appointment of a responsible ministry.

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  • His only son, Edward Jerningham Wakefield (1820-1879), was a New Zealand politician.

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  • Three of Wakefield's brothers were also interested in New Zealand.

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  • After serving in the Spanish army William Hayward Wakefield (1803-1848) emigrated to New Zealand in 1839.

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  • As an agent of the New Zealand Land Company he was engaged in purchasing enormous tracts of land from the natives, but the company's title to the greater part of this was later declared invalid.

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  • He remained in New Zealand until his death on the 19th of September 1848.

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  • The scheme adopted in the following account stands as follows: - New Zealand subregion.

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  • (A) Austrogaea, the Australian region in the wider sense,with the Papuan, Australian and New Zealand subregions, including also Polynesia.

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  • The New Zealand Subregion, considered by Professors Newton and Huxley and various other zoogeographers as deserving the rank of a region, is, and to all appearance has long been, more isolated than any other portion of the globe.

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  • In all, there is a wonderful amount of specialization, though perhaps in a very straight line from generalized forms; but the affinity to Australian or Polynesian types is in many cases clearly traceable, and it cannot be supposed but that these last are of cognate origin with those of New Zealand.

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  • It may be safely deemed the most peculiar area of the earth's surface, while from the richness and multifariousness of its animal, and especially of its ornithic population, New Zealand cannot be 'compared with it.

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  • Apteryx, New Zealand.

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  • Dinornis, numerous species, recently extinct, New Zealand.

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  • Nestor, New Zealand.

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  • Xenicidae, New Zealand.

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  • MAORI (pronounced "Mowri"; a Polynesian word meaning "native," "indigenous"; the word occurs in distinction from pakeha, " stranger," in other parts of Polynesia in the forms Maoi and Maoli), the name of the race inhabiting New Zealand when first visited by Tasman in 1642.

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  • They say they came to New Zealand from "Hawaiki,", and they appear to distinguish between a large and small, or a nearer and farther, "Hawaiki."

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  • The distance from Rarotonga to New Zealand is about 2000 m., and, with the aid of the trade wind, large canoes could traverse the distance within a month.

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  • Moreover the fauna and flora of New Zealand in many ways resemble those of Samoa.

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  • Thus it would seem certain that the Maoris, starting from "further Hawaiki," or Samoa, first touched at Rarotonga, "nearer Hawaiki," whence, after forming a settlement, they journeyed on to New Zealand.

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  • Maori tradition is explicit as to the cause of the exodus from Samoa, gives the names of the canoes in which the journey was made and the time of year at which the coast of New Zealand was sighted.

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  • There is some evidence that the "tradition of the six canoes" does not represent the first contact of the Polynesian race with New Zealand.

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  • The shell heaps found on the coasts and elsewhere dispose of the theory that New Zealand was uninhabited or practically so six centuries back.

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  • Rusden, History of New Zealand (1895); Alfred Saunders, History of New Zealand (1896); James Cowan, The Maoris of New Zealand (1909).

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  • - The Samoans are pure Polynesians, and according to the traditions of many Polynesian peoples Savaii was the centre of dispersion of the race over the Pacific Ocean from Hawaii to New Zealand.

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  • In May 1900 the group became a British protectorate under the native flag, the appointment of the consul and agent being transferred to the government of New Zealand.

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  • At present it occupies the extremity of the Malay Peninsula, Java, Sumatra, Borneo, the Philippines and other islands of the Malay Archipelago as well as Madagascar, while the inhabitants of most islands in the South Seas, including New Zealand and Hawaii, speak languages which if not Malay have at least undergone a strong Malay influence.

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  • The idea that persons who have made their way to the abode of the dead can return to the upper world if they have not tasted the food of the dead appears elsewhere, as in New Zealand (R.

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  • Interesting relationships between the Ethiopian and Oriental, the Neotropical and West African, the Patagonian and New Zealand faunas suggest great changes in the distribution of land and water, and throw doubt on the doctrine of the permanence of continental areas and oceanic basins.

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  • Holoarctic types reappear on the Andes and in South Africa, and even in New Zealand.

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  • Still it seems advisable to furnish some connected account of the progress made in the ornithological knowledge of the British Islands and those parts of the European continent which lie nearest to them or are most commonly sought by travellers, the Dominion of Canada and the United States of America, South Africa, India, together with Australia and New Zealand.

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  • Buller's beautiful Birds of New Zealand (4to, 1872- New 1873), with coloured plates by Keulemans, since the publi.

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  • cation of which the same author has issued a Manual of the Birds of New Zealand (8vo, 1882), founded on the former; but justice requires that mention be made of the labours of G.

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  • Gray, first in the Appendix to Dieffenbach's Travels in New Zealand (2843) and then in the ornithological portion of the Zoology of the Voyage of H.M.S.

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  • Hutton, Mr Potts and others are to be found in the Transactions and Proceedings of the New Zealand Institute.

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  • Buller's Supplement to the Birds of New Zealand (1905-1906) completes the great work of this author.

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  • Another class of nocturnal demons are the incubi and succubi, who are said to consort with human beings in their sleep; in the Antilles these were the ghosts of the dead; in New Zealand likewise ancestral deities formed liaisons with females; in the Samoan Islands the inferior gods were regarded as the fathers of children otherwise unaccounted for; the Hindus have rites prescribed by which a companion nymph may be secured.

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  • Of extra-Atlantic species the mackerel of the Japanese seas are the most nearly allied to the European, those of New Zealand and Australia, and still more those of the Indian Ocean, differing in many conspicuous points.

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  • There is no actual proof that this spider is more poisonous than others, but it is a significant fact that its species, inhabiting countries as widely separated as Chile, Madagascar, Australia, New Zealand and South Europe are held in great fear by the indigenous population, and many stories are current of serious or fatal results following their bites.

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  • - Spain, Italy, Albania ., Croatia, Hungary, Hesse, Hanover, Transcaspia, Algeria, Florida, Alabama, California, Mexico, Peru, Victoria, New Zealand.

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  • France, Switzerland, Spain, Italy, Sicily, Greece, Rumania, Turkey-in-Europe, Styria, Slavonia, Hungary, Transylvania, Galicia, Lower Austria, Wurttemberg, Brandenberg, West Prussia, Crimea, Kuban, Terek, Kutais, Tiflis, Elizabetpol, Siberia, Transcaspia, Mesopotamia, Persia, Assam, Burma, Anam, Japan, Philippine Islands, Borneo, Sumatra, Java, Algeria, Egypt, British Columbia, Alaska, Washington, California, Colorado, Texas, Louisiana, Barbados, Trinidad, Venezuela, Peru, South Australia, Victoria, New Zealand.

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  • Holland, France, Switzerland, Spain, Italy, Sicily, Greece, Hungary, Silesia, Moravia, Westphalia, Brunswick, Hanover, Schleswig-Holstein, (German) Silesia, Poland, Kutais, Uralsk, Turkestan, Armenia, Syria, Arabia, Persia, Tunis, Egypt, West Africa, British Columbia, Alberta, Assiniboia, Athabasca, Manitoba, New Jersey, South Dakota, Washington, Montana, Oklahoma, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, California, New Mexico, Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana, Mexico, Hayti, Trinidad, Colombia, Argentina [?], New Zealand.

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  • Work begun in Australia and New Zealand prospered, and the former country finally contributed over 1 i,000 members to the formation of the United Methodist Church of Australia, New Zealand with its 2600 members preferring to remain connected with the home country.

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  • Further, it is the opinion of competent ornithologists that there is affinity of the Australian emeus and cassowaries with the New Zealand moas and with the Malagasy Aepyornis.

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  • ROTORUA, a town of Rotorua county, North Island, New Zealand.

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  • In New Zealand and Australia rabbits, introduced either for profit or sport, have increased to such an extent as to form one of the most serious pests that the farmers have to contend against, as the climate and soil suit them perfectly and their natural enemies are too few and too lowly organized to keep them within reasonable bounds.

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  • Some thirty species of Balanoglossus are known, distributed among all the principal marine provinces from Greenland to New Zealand.

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  • One of the most singular facts concerning the geographical distribution of Enteropneusta has recently been brought to light by Benham, who found a species of Balanoglossus, sensu stricto, on the coast of New Zealand hardly distinguishable from one occurring off Japan.

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  • Nelson, New Zealand >>

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  • Besides visiting Switzerland and other parts of Europe, he availed himself of his experiences in the United States and in Canada, and journeyed to Spanish America, Australia and New Zealand.

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  • Thames, New Zealand >>

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  • flava is known in gardens as the day lily; Phormium, a New Zealand genus to which belongs New Zealand flax, P. tenax, a useful fibre-plant; Kniphofia, South and East Africa, several species of which are cultivated; and Aloe.

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  • Among its recommendations was the direct political representation of natives in the colonial legislatures on the New Zealand model, and the imposition of direct taxation upon natives, which should not be less than £1 a year payable by every adult male.

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  • Between the last days of March and the day of the landing the defence system was overhauled and greatly developed.2 The Franco-British expeditionary force was to be composed of seven divisions - three, the 29th, the 42nd and the Royal Naval, furnished by the United Kingdom, two formed of Australian and New Zealand troops, and two composed of French colonial troops.

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  • s The abbreviated designation of the " Australian and New Zealand Army Corps."

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  • They are covered by marine Jurassic beds and they in turn by Cretaceous coal-bearing, terrestrial deposits, resembling those of New Zealand.

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  • Glasser, the basic igneous rocks which are associated with the mineral deposits of New Caledonia were intrusive in Cainozoic times, at the severing of the connexion between New Caledonia and New Zealand.

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  • New Caledonia is part of the Australasian Festoon, and in its general characters resembles the geology of New Zealand.

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  • There is much less moisture, and the flora is of a less tropical character than farther north; it has some Polynesian and New Zealand affinities, and on the west coast a partially Australian character; on the higher hills it is stunted; on the lower, however, there are fine .grass lands, and a scattered growth of niaulis (Melaleuca viridiflora), useful for its timber, bark and cajeput oil.

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  • Allied species inhabit most parts of the world, excepting Africa south of the Sahara, New Zealand and Australia proper, and North America.

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  • aegocephala in its smaller size, and is believed to breed in Amurland, wintering in the islands of the Pacific, New Zealand and Australia.

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  • Australia And New Zealand New South Wales.-The Australian Magazine was published monthly at Sydney in 1821-1822.

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  • The South Australian Twopenny Magazine was published at Plymouth, England, in 1839, and the South Australian Miscellany and New Zealand Review at London in the same year.

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  • New Zealand.-The New Zealand Magazine, a quarterly, was published at Wellington in 1850.

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  • In 1857 appeared the New Zealand Quarterly Review, of little local interest, followed by Chapman's New Zealand Monthly Magazine (1862), the Southern Monthly Magazine (1863), the Delphic Oracle (1866-1870), the Stoic (1871), the Dunedin Review (1885), the Literary Magazine (1885), the four latter being written by J.

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  • Grant, an eccentric genius, the Monthly Review (1888-1890), the New Zealand Illustrated Magazine (1899-1905), chiefly devoted to the light literature of New Zealand subjects, the Maori Record (1905-1907), and the Red Funnel, published since 1905.

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  • Hocken, Bibliography of New Zealand (1909).

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  • The order is practically cosmopolitan, with the exception of New Zealand and certain absolutely isolated oceanic islands, like the Hawaiian islands and the Azores.

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  • They are widely distributed in all tropical and subtropical countries, even in such solitary places as Christmas Island, but they do not occur in New Zealand.

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  • The range of the family extends over all the tropical and subtropical countries, including islands, except New Zealand.

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  • This family comprises about nine-tenths of all recent species of snakes and is cosmopolitan, New Zealand being the most notable exception.

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  • The sub-family is cosmopolitan, excepting the New Zealand sub-region, and finds its natural N.

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  • Tropidonotus, with near 100 species, is cosmopolitan with the exception of New Zealand.

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  • They comprise about 300 species of terrestrial, arboreal and aquatic forms, and as a group they are almost cosmopolitan, including Madagascar, but excepting new Zealand.

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  • These snakes are all very poisonous, mostly viviparous and found in all tropical and subtropical countries, with the exception of Madagascar and New Zealand.

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  • The island became a British protectorate on the 10th of April 1900, and was made a dependency of New Zealand in October 1900, the native government, of an elected "king" and a council of headmen, being maintained.

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  • In working auriferous river-beds, dredges have been used with considerable success in certain parts of New Zealand and on the Pacific slope in America.

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  • It is the outlet of the largest agricultural district in New Zealand.

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  • Corps (Harper) (5th New Zealand and 37th Div.

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  • on the right and the New Zealand Div.

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  • in line, New Zealand Div.

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  • of New Zealand and eastward of Antipodes Island.

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  • The Pacific Ocean consists mainly of one enormous basin bounded on the west by New Zealand and the Tonga, Marshall aid Marianne ridges, on the north by the festoons of islands marking off the North Pacific fringing seas, on the east by the coast of North America and the great Easter Island Rise and on the south by the Antarctic Shelf.

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  • The Tonga and Kermadec trenches, both deeper than 4000 fathoms, stretch from the Samoa Islands southwards toward New Zealand for a distance of 1600 nautical miles.

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  • right up to the Antarctic Shelf, with depths ranging down to 2500-3000 fathoms, and communicating with the main Pacific Basin to the east of New Zealand.

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  • The settlement was founded in 1841 by the Plymouth Company under the auspices of the New Zealand Company, and chiefly consisted of emigrants from Devonshire and Cornwall.

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  • Australia possesses fields of great value, principally in the south-east (New South Wales and Victoria), and in New Zealand considerable quantities of coal and lignite are raised, chiefly in South Island.

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  • It is found chiefly in England and Ireland, but there are branches in the United States of America, in South America and in Australia and New Zealand.

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  • In 1841 a separate census was taken of New Zealand and Tasmania respectively.

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  • In Polynesia a number of inhabited islands were brought under New Zealand control in 1893.

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  • The first named, the longest river in the colony, though obstructed by a bar like all western, - and most eastern, - New Zealand rivers, is navigable for some 70 m.

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  • in utility to New Zealand commerce.

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  • The dominating features of south New Zealand are not ferny plateaus or volcanic cones, but stern chains of mountains.

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  • The physical geography of New Zealand is closely connected with its geological structure, and is dominated by two intersecting lines of mountains and earth movements.

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  • But Professor Park has obtained Jurassic fossils in the Maitai series; so that it will probably be ultimately divided between the Carboniferous and Jurassic. The two systems should, however, be separable by an unconformity, unless the Maitai series also includes representatives of the Kaihiku series (the New Zealand Permian), and of the Wairoa series, which is Triassic.

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  • The Pleistocene system in the South Island includes glacial deposits, which prove a great extension of the New Zealand glaciers, especially along the western coast.

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  • The Cainozoic volcanic history of New Zealand begins in the Oligocene, when the high volcanic domes of Dunedin and Banks Peninsula were built up. The Dunedin lavas including tephrites and kenytes correspond to the dacite eruptions in the volcanic history of Victoria.

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  • The healthiness of the New Zealand climate in all parts is attested by the death-rate, which, varying (1896-1906) from 9 to 10.50 per 1000, is the lightest in the world.

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  • The New Zealand flora, like the fauna, has been cited in support of the theory of the remote continental period.

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  • The destruction of the forest is telling fatally on the ' See the geological map of New Zealand by Sir James Hector (1884).

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  • Fullest information about the geology of New Zealand is given in the Reports of Geological Explorations issued by the Geological Survey of New Zealand, and the Annual Reports of the mines department.

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  • Acclimatization, indeed, had played a chief part in the settlement of New Zealand.

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  • As some compensation for its paucity of useful animals and food plants, New Zealand was, of course, free from wild carnivora, has no snakes, and only one poisonous insect, the katipo, a timid little spider found on certain sea-beaches.

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  • In January 1840 there may have been 2000 whites in New Zealand.

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  • About 70% of the population is New Zealand born.

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  • Thanks, however, to the low death-rate, elsewhere referred to, the margin of increase in New Zealand is over 17.

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  • Of the five banks of issue doing business in the dominion three are Australian and New Zealand institutions.

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  • Thanks to the tariff of the United States the balance of trade with North America is heavily against New Zealand.

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  • With these exceptions New Zealand trade is almost all done with Australia (£5,348,000 in 1907) and the United Kingdom; the latter's share in 1906 was £26,811,000 of the whole.

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  • The result is seen in the price obtained for New Zealand sheep in Smithfield Market, which is from Id.

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  • In London, New Zealand cheese fetches as high a price as Canadian; the value of the cheese exported was £662,000 in 1907.

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  • The total value of the gold exported from New Zealand from the discovery of the metal in 1857 to 1907 was, roundly, £70,000,000.

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  • Excellent as the quality of the best New Zealand coal is, the cost of mining and shipping it prevents the growth of any considerable export trade.

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  • The university of New Zealand is an examining body, and grants honours, degrees and scholarships.

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  • to the New Zealand University, which has about fifteen hundred undergraduates keeping terms. The state in no way controls or interferes with religious administration.

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  • In this connexion it may be claimed that the proportion of policemen to population (1 to 1375) is lower in New Zealand than in any other colony.

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  • The date, even the approximate date, of man's arrival in New Zealand is uncertain.

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  • In vain Edward Gibbon Wakefield, organizer of colonizing associations, prayed and intrigued for permission to repeat in New Zealand the experiment tried by him in South Australia.

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  • Lord Glenelg, the colonial minister, had the support of the missionaries in withstanding Wakefield's New Zealand Company, which at length resolved in desperation to send an agent to buy land wholesale in New Zealand and despatch a shipload of settlers thither without official permission.

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  • Meanwhile, a week after Hobson's arrival, Wakefield's colonists had sailed into Port Nicholson, and proposed to take possession of immense tracts which the New Zealand Company claimed to have bought from the natives, and for which colonists had in good faith paid the company.

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  • Meanwhile the industrial story of New Zealand may be summed up in the words wool and gold.

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  • Peace, railways, telegraphs (including cable connexion with Europe), agricultural machinery and a larger population had carried New Zealand beyond the primitive stage.

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  • The socialistic bent of New Zealand was already discernible in a public trustee law and a state life insurance office.

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  • The former supervises the labour laws and endeavours to deal with unemployment; the latter has done much practical teaching, inspection, &c. Butter, cheese and New Zealand hemp are by law graded and branded by departmental inspectors before export.

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  • The outbreak of the Boer War in October 1899 was followed in New Zealand by a prompt display of general and persistent warlike enthusiasm: politics ceased to be the chief topic of interest; the general election of 1899 was the most languid held for fifteen years.

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  • Between 1879 and 1908 seven governors represented the crown in New Zealand.

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  • The presence of New Zealand premiers at the imperial conferences in London in 1897, 1903 and 1907 helped to bring the colony into conscious touch with imperial public questions.

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  • - The only lengthy historical account of any note is Rusden's three-volume History of New Zealand (2nd ed., Melbourne, 1896), chiefly valuable as a statement of the grievances of the Maori race.

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  • Alpers, The Progress of New Zealand in the Century (London, 1902), and W.

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  • Sir William Fox, The War in New Zealand (London, 1866) is the best account of any portion of the native wars.

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  • Thomson's Story of New Zealand (London, 1859) is historical as well as descriptive.

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  • William Gisborne's New Zealand Rulers and Statesmen,1844-1897 (London, 1897), gives many graphic portraits.

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  • Percy Smith, Hawaiki (New Zealand, 1903); John White, The Ancient History of the Maori (6 vols., London, 1889); and many papers - especially by the three last-named, and Colenso, Stack, Wohlers, Best, von Haast, Travers and Shand - in the Transactions of the New Zealand Institute (New Zealand, annual), and the Journal of the Polynesian Society (New Zealand, annual).

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  • Wakefield, Adventure in New Zealand (new ed., New Zealand, 1908); Hon.

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  • Hocken, Contributions to the Early History of New Zealand (London, 1898); Samuel Butler, First Year in the Canterbury Settlement (1863).

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  • For later impressions note: Lady Barker, Station Life in New Zealand (London, 1869); Sir Charles Dilke, Greater Britain (London, new ed., 1885); Anthony Trollope, Australia and New Zealand (London, 1875); J.

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  • An anthology of New Zealand verse appeared in London in 1907.

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  • Sir John Gorst, New Zealand Revisited (London, 1908).

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  • von Hochstetter, New Zealand (translation, London, 1861); J.

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  • Kirk, The Forest Flora of New Zealand (New Zealand, 1889); Sir J.

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  • Hooker, Handbook of the New Zealand Flora (London, 1864); Laing and Blackwell, The Plants of New Zealand (New Zealand, 1906); Professor E.

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  • Hutton and James Drummond, The Animals of New Zealand (New Zealand, 1905); Sir W.

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  • P. Reeves, State Experiments in Australia and New Zealand (2 vols., London, 1902); H.

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  • On Alpine climbing the best book is still The High Alps of New Zealand by W.

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  • The flora is most closely associated with that of New Zealand, and the avifauna indicates the same connexion rather than one with Australia, as those birds which belong to Australian genera are apparently immigrants, while those which occur on the island in common with New Zealand would be incapable of such distant migration.

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  • The larva of a New Zealand moth, Morova subfasciata, Walk.

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  • 44) relates that one who touched a sacrifice meant to avert divine anger must bathe and wash his clothes in running water before returning to his city and home, and similar scruples in regard to holy objects and persons have been observed among the natives of Polynesia, New Zealand and ancient Egypt.

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  • He intended to follow it up with similar treatises on Mars, Jupiter, sun, moon, comets and meteors, stars, and nebulae, and had in fact commenced a monograph on Mars, when the failure of a New Zealand bank deprived him of an independence which would have enabled him to carry out his scheme without anxiety as to its commercial success or failure.

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  • In 1842 Domett emigrated to New Zealand where he filled many important administrative posts, being colonial secretary for New Munster in 1848, secretary for the colony in 1851, and prime minister in 1862.

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  • This bank continues southwards to the Antarctic Ocean, expanding into a plateau on which Australia stands, and a branch runs eastwards and then southwards from the north-east of Australia through New Zealand.

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  • Next follow the two great islands and attendant islets of New Zealand.

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  • Along with these, similarly, hornblende and diabase occur in the Pelew Islands and gneiss and mica 1 These are dependencies of New Zealand, as are also the following islands and groups which lie apart from the main Polynesian clusters, nearer New Zealand itself: Antipodes Islands, Auckland Islands, Bounty Islands, Campbell Islands, Chatham Islands, Kermadec Islands.

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  • The tropical Asiatic element predominates on the low lands; types characteristic of Australia and New Zealand occur principally on the upper parts of the high islands.

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  • Within the limits of the area under notice, his first voyage (1769) included visits to Tahiti and the Society group generally, to New Zealand and to the east coast of Australia, his second (1773-1774) to New Zealand, the Paumotu Archipelago, the Society Islands, Tonga and subsequently Easter Island, the Marquesas and the New Hebrides; and his third (1777-1778) to Tonga, the Cook or Norway group, and the Hawaiian Islands, of which, even if they were previously known to the Spaniards, he may be called the discoverer, and where he was subsequently killed.

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  • the first important American expedition was made under Charles Wilkes, who covered a great extent of the ocean from Hawaii to Tonga, Fiji and New Zealand.

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  • Of the British possessions among the islands of the Pacific, Fiji is a colony, and its governor is also high commissioner for the western Pacific. In this capacity, assisted by deputies and resident commissioners, he exercises jurisdiction over all the islands except Fiji and those islands which are attached to New Zealand and New South Wales.

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  • Naultinus elegans of New Zealand is said to be viviparous; the others lay but one rather large egg at a time.

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  • Non-committal as regards evolution, he vastly broadened the field of vertebrate palaeontology by his descriptions of the extinct fauna of England, of South America (including especially the great edentates revealed by the voyage of the " Beagle "), of Australia (the ancient and modern marsupials) and of New Zealand (the great struthious birds).

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  • Similarly, the Mesozoic reptiles have been traced successively to various parts of the world from France, Germany, England, to North America and South America, to Australia and New Zealand and to northern Russia, from Cretaceous times back into the Permian, and by latest reports into the Carboniferous.

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  • Thus the analysis of George Baur of the ancestral form of the lizards, mosasaurs, dinosaurs, crocodiles and phytosaurs led both to the generalized Palaeohatteria of the Permian and indirectly to the surviving Tuatera lizard of New Zealand.

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  • The geological formation is principally of volcanic rocks, with schists and tertiary limestone; and an early physical connexion of the islands with New Zealand is indicated by their geology and biology.

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  • The climate is colder than that of New Zealand.

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  • There are no indigenous mammals; the reptiles belong to New Zealand species.

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  • There have also been discovered the remains of a species of swan belonging to the South American genus Chenopis, and of the tuatara (Hatteria) lizard, the unique species of an ancient family now surviving only in New Zealand.

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  • Certain resins are obtained in a fossilized condition, amber being the most notable instance of this class; African copal and the kauri gum of New Zealand are also procured in a semi-fossil condition.

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  • Whatever value may attach to the consolidation of the British Empire itself as a factor in spreading the peace which reigns within it, it is also a great contribution to the peace of the world that the British race should have founded practically independent states like the Dominion of Canada, the Commonwealth of Australia, the South African Union and the Dominion of New Zealand.

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  • In 1831 agents were sent to Canada and Prince Edward's Island, in 1850 to South Australia, in 1855 to Victoria, in 1866 to Queensland, in 1877 to New Zealand and in 1885 to China, so that the original O'Bryan tradition of fervid evangelism was amply maintained.

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  • Thus in New Zealand "a priest by repeating charms can cause the spirit to enter into the idol.

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  • de la "Coquille," zoologie, p. 418), and now very generally adopted in English - of one of the most characteristic forms of New Zealand birds, the Apteryx of scientific writers.

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  • In 1851 the first kiwi known to have reached England alive was presented to the Zoological Society by Eyre, then lieutenant-governor of New Zealand.

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  • 146), two had been presented to the Zoological Society by the New Zealand Company, and two more obtained by Lord Derby, one of which he had given to Gould.

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  • KAKAPO, the Maori name, signifying "night parrot," and frequently adopted by English writers, of a bird, commonly called by the British in New Zealand the "ground-parrot" or "owl-parrot."

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  • It thus becomes an easy prey to the marauding creatures - cats, rats and so forth - which European colonists have, by accident or design, let loose in New Zealand.

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  • 241), and Sir Walter Buller's Birds of New Zealand especially.

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  • In New Zealand Maui, the divine hero of Polynesia, was not properly baptized.

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  • Owen, approximating more closely than any other living birds to the extinct moas of New Zealand.

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  • In New South Wales, Victoria, New Zealand and Canada there are also Church missionary associations which supply missionaries, and support them, for the mission fields of the Church Missionary Society.

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  • - Missions: Fiji, Navigator's Island, New Caledonia, Central Oceania, Solomon Islands, parts of New Zealand (dioceses of Wellington and Christchurch).

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  • Missions: Ceylon (diocese of Kandy), New Zealand (diocese of Auckland), N.

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  • Australia and New Zealand.

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  • The Maoris of New Zealand first came under Christian influence through the efforts of Samuel Marsden, a colonial chaplain in New South Wales about 1808.

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  • Opossums and wallabies, good useful furs, come from Australia and New Zealand.

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  • Formerly many skins were obtained from New Zealand and Australia, but the importation is now small and the quality not good.

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  • PHORMIUM, or NEW Zealand Flax (also called "New Zealand hemp"), a fibre obtained from the leaves of Phormium tenax (nat.

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  • The New Zealand government in 1893 offered a premium of £1750 for a machine which would treat the fibre satisfactorily, and a further £250 for a process of treating the tow; and with a view to creating further interest in the matter a member of a commission of inquiry visited England during 1897.

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  • In 1903 it was stated that a German chemist had discovered a method of working and spinning the New Zealand fibre.

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  • The Australian, Canadian and New Zealand censorships adopted a different system, so that the exploits of these troops were and are well known throughout the world.

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  • The diocese of New Zealand was founded in 1841, being endowed by the Church Missionary Society through the council, and George Augustus Selwyn was chosen as the first bishop. Since then the increase has gone on, as the result both of home effort and of the action of the colonial churches.

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  • Two further developments must be mentioned: (a) The creation of diocesan and provincial synods, the first diocesan synod to meet being that of New Zealand in 1844, whilst the formation of a provincial synod was foreshadowed by a conference of Australasian bishops at Sydney in 1850; (b) towards the close of the r9th century the title of archbishop began to be assumed by the metropolitans of several provinces.

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  • C. Patteson for Melanesia, by the metropolitans of Cape Town and New Zealand respectively.

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  • With the exception of Colenso the South African bishops forthwith surrendered their patents,and formally accepted Bishop Gray as their metropolitan, an example followed in 1865 in the province of New Zealand.

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  • In a more restricted sense the term Australasia corresponds to the large division including Australia, Tasmania and New Zealand.

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  • Mr Shortland appears to think that cannibalism among the Maories of New Zealand may have thus originated.

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  • When New Zealand was occupied (1840) the Maori were said to number 120,000, and were doubtfully stated to be still 56,000 in 1857; since then the returns of the 1881 and 1891 censuses gave 44,000 and 40,000 respectively.

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  • Most of these abuses have been checked or removed, and the results may perhaps be detected in a less accelerated rate of decline, which no longer proceeds in geometric proportion, and seems even almost arrested in some places, as in Samoa and New Zealand.

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  • The Kauri pine (Dammara australis) is a native of New Zealand.

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  • The settlement was planted by the New Zealand Company in 1842.

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  • Evans having returned ill to New Zealand and Dr.

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  • 18 1913 and a few days later took off the entire party, reaching New Zealand on Feb.

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  • 157° 30' E., he brought the disabled vessel safely to New Zealand.

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  • The ship was repaired by the New Zealand Government and dispatched under the command of Capt.

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  • The cellular system has been adopted in all British colonies with various modifications, and prisons built on modern principles are to be found in Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the Cape of Good Hope.

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  • The genuine Isopoda are divided among the Flabellifera, in which the terminal segment and uropods form a flabellum or swimming fan; the Epicaridea, parasitic on Crustaceans; the Valvifera, in which the uropods fold valve-like over the branchial pleopods; the Asellota, in which the first pair of pleopods of the female are usually transformed into a single opercular plate; the Phreatoicidea, a fresh-water tribe, known as yet only from subterranean waters in New Zealand and an Australian swamp nearly 6000 ft.

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  • In New Zealand the consequences of the cessation of special encouragement to emigration were still more marked, the foreign-born declining in proportion from 63 to 33%.

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  • Society, 1876, pp. 317-332), says that it presents three local forms - one occurring from New Zealand to Norfolk Island and past Kerguelen Land to the Cape of Good Hope, another restricted to the Falklands, and the third hitherto only met with near the south-polar ice.

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  • Three other smaller species of the genus are known, and each is more widely distributed than those just mentioned, but the home of all is in the more northern parts of the earth, though in winter two of them go very far south, and, crossing the equator, show themselves on the seas that wash the Cape of Good Hope, Australia, New Zealand and Peru.

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  • Confirmation of this is afforded by the occurrence in the mountains of Java of a pariah-like dog which has reverted to an almost completely wild condition; and likewise by the fact that the old voyagers met with dogs more or less similar to the dingo in New Guinea, New Zealand and the Solomon and certain other of the smaller Pacific islands.

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  • The islands belong politically to New Zealand.

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  • So in the New Zealand myth, Rangi and Papa, Sky and Earth, who once clave together in the darkness, were rent asunder by the forest-god Tane-mahuta, who forced up the sky far above him.

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  • Agassiz (in his work on Lake Superior) tells us that the roadside weeds of the north-eastern United States, to the number of 130 species, are all European, the native weeds having disappeared westwards; while in New Zealand there are, according to T.

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  • Kirk (Transactions of the New Zealand Institute, vol.

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  • Feral pigs are numerous in New Zealand.

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  • The hare has been established in New Zealand and Barbadoes.

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  • To check the increase of the rabbit, stoats, weasels and polecats (the last in the form of the domesticated ferret) were introduced into New Zealand on a very large scale in the last quarter of the 19th century.

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  • It is said that the pelage of the New Zealand specimens is superior, as might be expected from the colder climate.

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  • Thus those acclimatized were usually, no doubt, of mixed blood, and further introductions of pure Chinese stock have tended to make the latter the dominant form, at any rate in the United States (where it is erroneously called Mongolian') and in New Zealand.

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  • Of the partridges, the continental red-leg (Caccabis rufa) is established in England, and its ally, the Asiatic chukore (C. chukar), in St Helena, as is the Californian quail (Lophortyx californica) in New Zealand and Hawaii.

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  • The latter, however, though thriving as an aviary bird, has failed at large in England, as did the bob-white (Onyx virginianus) both there and in New Zealand.

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  • The modern presence of the black swan of Australia (Chenopis atrata) in New Zealand appears to be due to a natural irruption of the species about half a century ago as much as to acclimatization by man, if not more so.

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  • It is, in fact, as notorious an example of over-successful acclimatization as the rabbit, but in Hutton and Drummond's recent work on the New Zealand animals (London, 1905) it is not regarded in this light, considering that some very common exotic birds were needed to keep down the insects, which it certainly did.

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  • The so-called hedge-sparrow (Accentor modularis), really a member of this group, is one of the successful introductions into New Zealand.

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  • An Australian tree-frog (Hyla peronii) is naturalized in many parts of the north island of New Zealand.

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  • The most important case of naturalization of fish is, however, the establishment of some Salmonidae in Tasmania and New Zealand.

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  • Many insects and other invertebrates, mostly noxious, have been accidentally naturalized, and some have been deliberately introduced, like the honey-bee, now feral in Australasia and North America, and the humble-bee, imported into New Zealand to effect the fertilization of red clover.

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  • Thus, the linnet and partridge have failed to establish themselves in New Zealand.

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  • The extent of the woollen and worsted manufactures of the United Kingdom is indicated by the following table showing the imports and exports of wool and the quantity retained for use in various years (1890-19ò5):--- During the same period the minimum and maximum amount of wool (in lb) imported into the United Kingdom was as follows: Australia (1904), 220,483,961; (1895), 417,163,078; New Zealand (1890), 95, 6 3 2, 59 8; (1909), 1 7 6, 457, 1 5 0; British possessions in South Africa (1900), 32,219,369; (1909), 115,896,598; South America (1890), 11,173,692; (1908), 78,938,157; British possessions in the East Indies (1901), 24,069,571; (1909), 56,238,633; France (1890), 10, 8 73,7 88; (1902), 27,770,790; Turkish Empire (1908), 5,705,671; (1897), 25,727,462.

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  • During the heat of summer voyages to the North Cape are suitable, and during the spring and autumn to the Mediterranean, but in the colder months of the year the West Indies, India, Cape Town, Australia or New Zealand forms the best objective.

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  • every part of the empire in support of the policy of the government, and from Australia, Canada, New Zealand and India, contingents wore sent to the front.

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  • He was distinguished for his researches on the Tertiary floras of various parts of Europe, and on the fossil floras of Australia and New Zealand.

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  • Gold coin and bullion form one of the principal items in the export list, but only a small portion of the export is of local production, the balance being Queensland and New Zealand gold sent to Sydney for coinage.

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  • After he had observed the transit of Venus at Tahiti, he circumnavigated New Zealand and went in search of the eastern coast of the great continent whose western shores had long been known to the Dutch.

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  • Van Diemen's Land was declared a separate colony in 1825, West Australia in 1829, South Australia in 1836 and New Zealand in 1839; so that before 1840 the original area of New South Wales, which at first included the mainland of Australia and the islands in the South Pacific, had been greatly reduced.

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  • Both groups are unknown in Madagascar, in Australia, with the exception possibly of the extreme north, and in New Zealand.

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  • In this connexion we may note the striking resemblance between some of the New Zealand Alpine Veronicas, e.g.

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  • Phyllocladus occurs also in New Zealand, and species of Dacrydium, Araucania, A gathis and Podocarpus are represented in Australia, New Zealand and the Malay regions.

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  • On the Pacific coast of America, in New Zealand and in Japan a pilchard occurs (Clupea sagax) which in its characters and habits is so similar to the European pilchard that its general utilization is deserving of attention.

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  • (The registration of 1905 showed that there were over 23,000 coloured voters in the colony.) The commission proposed separate voting by natives only for a fixed number of members of the legislature - the plan adopted in New Zealand with the Maori voters.

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  • Wellington was founded in 1840, being the first settlement of New Zealand colonists, and the seat of government was transferred here from Auckland in 1865.

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  • The pigmy whale (Neobalaena marginata), for instance, has only been met with in the seas round Australia, New Zealand and South America, while a beaked whale (Berardius arnouxi) appears to be confined to the New Zealand seas.

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  • It is a regular port of call for several intercolonial lines from Sydney and Melbourne, and for lines from London to New Zealand.

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  • The flora has also some Australian and New Zealand affinities (resembling in this respect the New Caledonia and New Hebrides groups), shown especially in these western districts by the Pandanus, by certain acacias and others.

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  • Among the many valuable timber trees are the vesi (Afzelia bijuga); the dilo (Calophyllum Inophyllum), the oil from its seeds being much used in the islands, as in India, in the treatment of rheumatism; the dakua (Dammara Vitiensis), allied to the New Zealand kauri, and others.

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  • Trade, Administration, &c. - The principal industries are the cultivation of sugar and fruits and the manufacture of sugar and copra, and these three are the chief articles of export trade, which is carried on almost entirely with Australia and New Zealand.

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  • In 1900 the government of New Zealand made overtures to absorb Fiji.

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  • Here he reformed the system of colonial defence, refusing to keep troops in the colonies during time of peace unless their expense was defrayed by the colonists; he also laid the foundation of federation in Canada and, rightly or wrongly, censured Sir George Grey's conduct in New Zealand.

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  • Residence in New Zealand ...

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  • In fact the process from the view of nature which we call personalism to the crudest theories of the physicists was apparently begun in New Zealand before the arrival of Europeans.

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  • 5 The best authorities for the New Zealand myths are the old traditional priestly hymns, collected and translated in the works of Sir George Grey, in Taylor's New Zealand, in Shortland's Traditions of New Zealand (1857), in Bastian's Heilige Sage der Polynesier, and in White's Ancient History of the Maori, i.

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  • It is employed in New Mexico, South Africa, New Zealand and Australia.

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  • The hymns may be read in Sir George Grey's Polynesian Mythology, and in Taylor's New Zealand.

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  • In New Zealand and in North America the sun is a beast, whom adventurers have trapped and beaten.

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  • In New Zealand the government of the colony has displayed the most praiseworthy earnestness and vigour in promoting apiculture.

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  • In the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and in many other parts of the world honey of the finest quality is obtained from this " queen of bee-plants," and in lesser degree from other clovers such as sainfoin, alsike (a hybrid clover), trefoil, &c.

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  • Specimens are recorded from West Australia, Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria and New Zealand.

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  • The fry of fishes is used as an article of diet in almost every country: in Germany the young of various species of Cyprinoids, in Italy and Japan the young of nearly every fish capable of being readily captured in sufficient numbers, in the South Sea Islands the fry of Teuthis, in New Zealand young Galaxias are consumed at certain seasons in large quantities; and, like whitebait, these fry bear distinct names, different from those of the adult fish.

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  • In Australia and New Zealand pumice, which is found in enormous quantities in the latter country, takes the place of charcoal and silicate cotton.

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  • In the meat trade between the River Plate, the United States, Canada and Great Britain, ammonia or carbonic acid machines are now exclusively used, but for the Australian and New Zealand frozenmeat trade compressed-air machines are still employed to a small extent.

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  • Of living genera, Agathis (to which the Kauri Pine of New Zealand belongs) probably comes nearest to the extinct family in habit, though at a long interval.

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  • This Jurassic species bore bipinnate fronds not unlike those of the South African, Australian, and New Zealand Fern Todea barbara, which were characterized by a stout rachis and short broad pinnules bearing numerous large sporangia covering the under surface of the lamina.

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  • andesite volcano located in the center of the North Island of New Zealand.

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  • And as with New Zealand my closest friends here were generally apathetic.

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  • Despite the fact that New Zealand is on the other side of the world, 28 percent of registered attendees came from North America.

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  • Examples include mink, signal crayfish, common carp and plants such a Himalayan balsam, New Zealand pigmy weed and parrots feather.

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  • broadcast live on New Zealand TV!

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  • This is a cracking story about a New Zealand doctor who is opening a brothel in his old medical center.

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  • US to New Zealand via Fiji To Fiji special cachets were applied for mail to Suva.

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  • Sport | New Zealand News UK HOCKEY: North Harbor are the surprise national hockey league women's champions.. .

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  • Tho being a native of New Zealand I do admit to the possibility of mitigating circumstances.

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  • continental shelf off the south-eastern coast of New Zealand.

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  • Originally released in New Zealand last year, Lowe is joined by countryman Hamish Clark and English producer and vocalist, Andy Lovegrove.

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  • From mythical creatures to the real thing, Hector's dolphins, the world's smallest species, occur only in New Zealand waters.

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  • dropped kerbs in New Zealand have to be experienced however.

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  • Stories have been set in Asia, Russia, Nigeria, a future dystopia, wartime London, and 19th Century New Zealand.

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  • Return to top of page emigration and Immigration Some Emigrants from Derbyshire to Australia and New Zealand - brief biographical details of known emigrants.

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  • It seems that all who travel to New Zealand come back utterly enchanted.

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  • I have just bought a 24ft eventide And live in New Zealand.

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  • farming lobby, except in New Zealand.

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  • The native freshwater fish fauna, totalling 17 species, is exceptionally large relative to the rest of New Zealand.

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  • forging links with New Zealand " ...

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  • freeze-dry is an oil derived from the freeze-dried powder of the New Zealand Green Lipped Mussel.

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  • Marty 43cm golly by Robin Rive Ref: 3710 Marty is a traditional golly by Robin Rive of New Zealand.

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  • In 90 per cent of cases within the New Zealand system, the mediation stage settles the grievance.

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  • Himalayan balsam, New Zealand pigmy weed and parrots feather.

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  • hitched a lift out of Kuwait on a New Zealand war plane.

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  • Recovery: the great hoax / New Zealand Labor Party.

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  • My brother and I both race karts here in New Zealand and are really into motorsport of all kinds.

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  • Learn't in New Zealand.

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  • marks another historic milestone for New Zealand mobile users.

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  • King's Head Theater Spring 2003 An elderly Fijian matriarch awakens in the small hours in her home in a New Zealand suburb.

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  • Worked Example A researcher believes that eating New Zealand green lipped mussels may have beneficial effects for people suffering from arthritis.

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  • District Nurses in New Zealand have made similar observations.

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  • She went on: " The cost of filming in Scotland considerably outweighed the cost of filming in New Zealand.

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  • overworked word but how else can you adequately describe the remarkable experiences that comprise a natural history tour of New Zealand?

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  • The New Zealand legislation did not enact the London Convention wholesale, but adopted similar phraseology to the Convention.

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  • Aston, B.C. (1923) The poisonous, suspected and medicinal plants of New Zealand.

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  • This bears a postmark which reads Infantry Brigade, Post Office, New Zealand Division, 20 June 1915.

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  • propeller planes from New Zealand.

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  • In 1888 the Cook Islands were made a protectorate of Great Britain, and in 1901 they were annexed to New Zealand.

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  • We had the New Zealand mussels in red Thai coconut curry sauce.

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  • Since 1965 the islands have had full internal self-government; matters of defense and external affairs remain the responsibility of the New Zealand government.

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  • PHYSICAL FEATURES The islands lie on the shallow continental shelf off the south-eastern coast of New Zealand.

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  • motorcycle sidecar record smashed The world motorcycle sidecar speed record has been smashed in New Zealand.

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  • slaughter without prestunning has been banned in Norway, Sweden and New Zealand.

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  • The two 1d Australian stamps are not postmarked, presumably because the New Zealand airmail stamp more than paid the postage to Great Britain.

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  • The USA, the Pacific islands and New Zealand are the most popular stopovers if you are traveling to Australia via the west.

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  • Auckland, New Zealand In Auckland, the climate is almost subtropical with very mild winters and warm, rather humid, summers.

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  • surrogate dams had to be imported from New Zealand.

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  • Like Tantrix, it was invented in New Zealand and uses wonderfully tactile Bakelite tiles.

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  • Figures include a Canadian trapper, a Zulu warrior, a turbaned Indian an Australian farmer and a New Zealand Maori.

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  • Winemakers in California and New Zealand are producing some stunning results, but they lack the sheer vivacity.

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  • volcano located in the center of the North Island of New Zealand.

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  • Joe came to the Rec in 2004 with a reputation for crossing the whitewash for Canterbury, his previous club in New Zealand.

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  • Customer Feedback - Toughened glass windbreak Screen " I recently purchased a toughened glass windbreak screen for my 1997 MGF here in New Zealand.

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  • Dave Latham New Zealand born Dave Latham has been pouring wine all over Europe for some years now.

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  • It is in reality a university college, for though it was originally intended to have the power of conferring degrees, it was subsequently affiliated to the New Zealand University.

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  • In England in 1876 two churches united to form the Presbyterian Church of England; in the Netherlands two churches became one in 1892; in South Africa a union of the different branches of the Presbyterian Church took place in 1897; in Scotland the Free Church and the United Presbyterian became one in 1900 under the designation of the United Free Church; in Australia and Tasmania six churches united in 1901 to form the Presbyterian Church of Australia; and a few months later the two churches in New Zealand which represented respectively the North and South Islands united to form the Presbyterian Church of New Zealand.

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  • In New Zealand this group is represented by the apteryx, as it formerly was by the gigantic moa, the remains of which have been found likewise in Queensland.

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  • Of the seven colonies New South Wales and New Zealand stood aloof from the council, and from the beginning it was therefore shorn of a large share of the prestige that would have attached to a body speaking and acting on behalf of a united Australia.

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  • In 1888 he visited Australia, New Zealand and South Africa, the effect of this experience being to strengthen still further the Imperialism which was the guiding principle of his political opinions.

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  • In November 1899 a committee was appointed by the Colonial Office for the further examination of the scheme, and towards the end of 1900 a tender was accepted for the manufacture and laying of a submarine cable between the Island of Vancouver and Queensland and New Zealand for the sum of £1,795,000, the work to be completed by the 31st of December 1902.

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  • Swainson's New Zealand and its Colonization (ch.

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  • It is the Tringa interpres 2 of Linnaeus and Strepsilas interpres of most later writers, and is remarkable as being perhaps the most cosmopolitan of birds; for, though properly belonging to the northern hemisphere, there is scarcely a sea-coast in the world on which it may not occur: it has been obtained from Spitzbergen to the Strait of Magellan and from Point Barrow to the Cape of Good Hope and New Zealand - examples from the southern hemisphere being, however, almost invariably in a state of plumage that shows, if not immaturity, yet an ineptitude for reproduction.

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  • To the east the whole chain is bounded by a profound trough in the ocean bed, which extends southwestward, east of the Kermadec Islands, towards New Zealand.

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  • This is conceivable; Maui, too, in New Zealand had no temple or priests.

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  • Apart from these little tropical dependencies New Zealand has an area of 104,471 sq.

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  • - New Zealand is part of the Australasian festoon, on the Pacific edge of the Australasian area.

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  • Meanwhile charred and rotting stumps give a melancholy and untidy air to valleys and denuded hillsides, for hard-wood stumps - and most New Zealand trees are hard-woodtake more than a generation to decay utterly.

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  • Further obstruction was manifestly futile, and the British authorities reluctantly instructed Captain Hobson, R.N., to make his way to northern New Zealand with a dormant commission of lieutenant-governor in his pocket and authority to annex the country to Australia by peaceful arrangement with the natives.

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  • In India the northern range of the group is only bounded by the slopes of the Himalaya, and farther to the eastward parrots are not only abundant over the whole of the Malay Archipelago, as well as Australia and Tasmania, but two very well-defined families are peculiar to New Zealand and its adjacent islands (see Kakapo and Nestor).

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  • The British, however, were paramount among the white population, and as by 1870 not only American, but also German influence was extending through the islands (the first German government vessel visited Fiji in 1872), annexation was urged on Great Britain by Australia and New Zealand.

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  • To the evidence advanced by a great number of authors comes the clinching testimony of the existence of a number of varieties of Australian marsupials in Patagonia, as originally discovered by Ameghino and more exactly described by members of the Princeton Patagonian expedition staff; while the fossil shells of the Eocene of Patagonia as analysed by Ortmann give evidence of the existence of a continuous shoreline, or at least of shallow-water areas, between Australia, New Zealand and South America.

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  • 157° 30' E., he brought the disabled vessel safely to New Zealand.

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  • Among starlings, the Indian mynah (generally the house mynah, Acridotheres tristis, but some other species seem to have been confused with this) has been naturalized in the Andamans, Seychelles, Reunion, Australia, Hawaii and parts of New Zealand.

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  • The Romans are credited with having purposely introduced the edible snail (Helix pomatia) into England, and the common garden snail and slugs (Helix aspersa, Limax agrestis and Anion hortensis) have been unwittingly established in New Zealand.

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  • And the recession of the New Zealand earthworms and flies before exotic forms probably falls under this category.

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  • The extent of the woollen and worsted manufactures of the United Kingdom is indicated by the following table showing the imports and exports of wool and the quantity retained for use in various years (1890-19ò5):--- During the same period the minimum and maximum amount of wool (in lb) imported into the United Kingdom was as follows: Australia (1904), 220,483,961; (1895), 417,163,078; New Zealand (1890), 95, 6 3 2, 59 8; (1909), 1 7 6, 457, 1 5 0; British possessions in South Africa (1900), 32,219,369; (1909), 115,896,598; South America (1890), 11,173,692; (1908), 78,938,157; British possessions in the East Indies (1901), 24,069,571; (1909), 56,238,633; France (1890), 10, 8 73,7 88; (1902), 27,770,790; Turkish Empire (1908), 5,705,671; (1897), 25,727,462.

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  • Of these formulae '(chosen because illustrated by Greek heroic legends) - (I) is a sanction of barbarous nuptial etiquette; (2) is an obvious ordinary incident; (3) is moral, and both (3) and (1) may pair off with all the myths of the origin of death from the infringement of a taboo or sacred command; (4) would naturally occur wherever, as on the West Coast of Africa, human victims have been offered to sharks or other beasts; (5) the story of flight from a horrible crime, occurs in some stellar myths, and is an easy and natural invention; (6) flight from wizard father or husband, is found in Bushman and Namaqua myth, where the husband is an elephant; (7) success of youngest brother, may have been an explanation and sanction of " tungsten-recht " - Maui in New Zealand is an example, and Herodotus found the story among the Scythians; (8) the bride given to successful adventurer, is consonant with heroic manners as late as Homer; (9) is no less consonant with the belief that beasts have human sentiments and supernatural powers; (to) the " strong man," is found among Eskimo and Zulus, and was an obvious invention when strength was the most admired of qualities; (II) the baffled ogre, is found among Basques and Irish, and turns on a form of punning which inspires an " ananzi " story in West Africa; (12) descent into Hades, is the natural result of the savage conception of Hades, and the tale is told of actual living people in the Solomon Islands and in New Caledonia; Eskimo Angekoks can and do descend into Hades - it is the prerogative of the necromantic magician; (13) " the false bride," found among the Zulus, does not permit of such easy explanation - naturally, in Zululand, the false bride is an animal; (14) the bride accused of bearing be 1st-children, has already been disposed of; the belief is inevitable where no distinction worth mentioning is taken between men and animals.

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  • The five Australian and one New Zealand Divisions represented less than 10% of the British and Empire military manpower on the Western Front.

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  • A New Zealand gem of scenic splendor, arguably one of the finest sights in the world.

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  • Motorcycle sidecar record smashed The world motorcycle sidecar speed record has been smashed in New Zealand.

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  • Slaughter without prestunning has been banned in Norway, Sweden and New Zealand.

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  • American citizens are not eligible for any coverage under New Zealand 's socialized medical system.

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  • In their fourth game, the New Zealand women 's softball team beat Cuba 6 - 2, in seven innings.

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  • A: No the lifting device is based at the New Zealand airports and can not be stowed on board during a flight.

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  • In effect, this meant that the surrogate dams had to be imported from New Zealand.

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  • Customer Feedback - Toughened Glass Windbreak Screen I recently purchased a toughened glass windbreak screen for my 1997 MGF here in New Zealand.

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  • Blenheim Just minutes away from some of New Zealand 's finest wineries is Vintners Retreat.

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  • Tessa was absolutely beguiled by the beauty of the New Zealand landscape.

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  • All proteins are from within the United States except some lamb and some venison which is from USDA approved sources in New Zealand.

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  • Karastan sources their wool from New Zealand.

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  • The land that New Zealand sheep farmers used to produce their wool is mostly unsuitable for other agricultural purposes, so it does not compete with food production.

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  • There is almost no negative impact on the land or environment, making New Zealand wool an environmentally friendly product because it is easily renewable and the fiber is biodegradable.

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  • When summer comes, and you are not yet ready to end your ski season, consider choosing from one of the many New Zealand Queenstown skiing vacations.

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  • If summer seems to come too quickly, consider taking one of the many Queenstown New Zealand ski vacations.

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  • The New Zealand skiing season usually begins in June and ends in mid-October.

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  • With a bit of planning, you may be able to find affordable fares for New Zealand Queenstown skiing vacations.

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  • Queenstown is an international resort town in southwestern New Zealand.

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  • The Cornet Peak ski resort is a 25 minute drive from Queenstown, New Zealand.

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  • A New Zealand heli ski vacation is a perfect choice for anyone who wants to combine a snow-skiing adventure with the chance to explore the sights of an international destination.

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  • While the New Zealand ski season usually runs from June to October, the heli skiing season begins in July and runs through September 30th.

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  • Since you will be traveling during the New Zealand winter, it might be easier to find cheaper airfares.

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  • You can plan a New Zealand heli ski vacation in three different parts of the country.

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  • You can combine a New Zealand heli ski vacation with a sightseeing visit to Christchurch.

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  • Each of the New Zealand heli skiing regions has a few heli skiing resorts.

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  • Mount Potts uses the Two Thumb and Cloudy Peak ranges, which are the highest heli skiing mountains in New Zealand.

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  • Keith Lionel Urban was born on October 26, 1967 in Whangarei, New Zealand.

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  • When Paquin was four years old, the family moved to her mother's native New Zealand.

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  • Paquin went to school in New Zealand until 1995, when her parents divorced and she moved to Los Angeles with her mother.

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  • When she was only nine years old, an ad was posted in the local newspaper in New Zealand looking for a young girl to play a part in an upcoming movie.

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  • The Patch actually began so simply, that the business was originally run out of the founder's personal garage, and eventually moved on to a mail order service and then a flagship store in New Zealand.

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  • For example, P&O Cruises offers two ships that host adults-only sailings in Australia and New Zealand.

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  • If you are looking for online training help, or you're a native of New Zealand or Australia, check out Doglinks.co.nz.

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  • Science Diet Lamb formula uses lamb meal produced in New Zealand.

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  • Wellness produces 100 percent human-grade dog foods and treats made with real, USDA grade, fit for human consumption, naturally preserved meats such as deboned chicken, New Zealand lamb and ocean white fish.

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  • Brachyglottis Repanda - A New Zealand shrub, with fine foliage, deeply toothed; of a deep green, mottled with dark purple on the upper side and silvery-white beneath.

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  • Chrysobactron) is a distinct New Zealand plant, 15 to 20 inches high, with bright yellow flowers, in long spikes in early summer.

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  • Of the forty or more known species a few only have been introduced to cultivation in this country, those few being chiefly natives of New Zealand.

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  • In New Zealand and the Norfolk Islands it grows from 12 to 25 feet high under favourable conditions, but when growing in exposed, rocky places it is often a prostrate shrub or low bush.

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  • Daisy Trees (Olearia) - Pretty evergreen bushes, natives of Australia and New Zealand.

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  • This plant is one of the most interesting and prettiest of the composites which are found in New Zealand.

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  • Some of the small New Zealand species, such as glabellum, nummulariaefolium, and longipes, are very useful for draping stones on rock gardens.

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  • There are several allied shrubs from New Zealand and S.

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  • Franklini (Huon Pine) and D. cupressinum (New Zealand Cypress), a common New Zealand tree attaining nearly 100 feet in height.

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  • The plant seldom exceeds 3 or 4 feet in height, though the branches trail widely, and it is hardier than many New Zealand shrubs, growing in exposed places and without protection in the north of England.

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  • L. ixioides, a New Zealand plant, is also a handsome evergreen species, with narrow grassy foliage and small white blossoms.

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  • H. millefolium is a very elegant New Zealand Fern, with a stout and wide-spreading rhizome, from which arise erect light green fronds, 1 to 1 1/2 feet high, very finely cut.

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  • The best are H. moschata and microphylla, two New Zealand species, and nitidula, though all of these are somewhat tender.

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  • Pink Broom of New Zealand (Notospartium) - N.

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  • In New Zealand it grows 20 feet in height, and seems to be fairly hardy here, though not a shrub for cold climates or exposed places.

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  • Sheffieldia - S. repens is a hardy little New Zealand creeper, with small leaves, small slender stems, and tiny white flowers which appear in summer.

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  • This very handsome Fern, C. dealbata, known in New Zealand as the Silver Tree-fern, has a slender, almost black stem, 4 to 8 feet high, ending in a fine crown of fronds, dark green above and milk-white below.

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  • Celmisia spectabilis - also known as cotton plant, shepherd's daisy, and mountain daisy or by its Maori name, tikumu -- is an subalpine perennial native to New Zealand.

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  • This New Zealand music teacher felt a strong calling to use his musical talents as a way to worship with others, so he began writing and recording his own Christian songs.

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  • The company uses American sourced wool as opposed to the imported Australian and New Zealand wool that many manufacturers use.

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  • Generally, kiwi imported from Australia and New Zealand is safe.

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  • OFLC - The ratings organization of Australia and New Zealand.

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  • It hasn't spread to far away from home in South Africa but it can be found in California and New Zealand.

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  • Crawford acted as a negociant, buying grapes, using various winery facilities, and running all the business operations from their tidy little family home in Auckland, New Zealand.

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  • Sauvignon Blancs from down under in New Zealand are even different yet: they can display an intense gooseberry nose that is distinct (and yummy!).

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  • Choose between a California, Oregon or New Zealand version or roll the dice with a Burgundy and turn your picnic into a sensual experience with earthy aromas and flavors.

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  • Send a statement with a 2-bottle Rubicon giftbox handmade of rosewood from New Zealand and etched with the winery's logo.

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  • Vodafone also operates in a number of other Asia-Pacific countries under its own banner, including Australia, Fiji, and New Zealand.

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  • SIDS deaths in Great Britain were reduced by 91 percent between 1989 and 1992; in Denmark they declined by 72 percent between 1991 and 1993; and they were reduced by 45 percent in New Zealand between 1989 and 1992.

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  • There are lots of jobs available in New Zealand.

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  • There's more to working in New Zealand than simply finding a job.

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  • If you've found jobs available in New Zealand that you feel you already possess the skills to do, you're one step closer to packing up and starting your life in a new country.

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