New haven sentence example

new haven
  • In 1637 he emigrated with Davenport to Massachusetts, and in the following year (March 1638) he and Davenport founded New Haven.
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  • He graduated at Yale College in 1807, studied theology under Timothy Dwight, anfl in 1812 became pastor of the First Church of New Haven.
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  • From 1822 until his death in New Haven on the 10th of March 1858 he was Dwight professor of didactic theology at Yale.
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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, and is primarily a residential suburb of Boston, with which it is connected by electric lines.
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  • Manchester is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway and by electric line connecting with Hartford, Rockville and Stafford Springs.
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  • Her father (the Congregational minister of the town) and her mother were both descended from members of the company that, under John Davenport, founded New Haven in 1638; and the community in which she spent her childhood was one of the most intellectual in New England.
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  • In comparing the figures, it should be noted that main line mileage in the Eastern states, as for example that of the Pennsylvania railroad and the New York, New Haven & Hartford, does not differ greatly in standards of safety or in unit cost from the best British construction, although improvement work in America is charged to income far more liberally than it has been in England.
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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, by inter-urban electric lines and in summer by steamers to Boston.
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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway.
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  • Returning to New Haven in 1869, he was appointed professor of mathematical physics in Yale College in 1871, and held that position till his death, which occurred at New Haven on the 28th of April 1903.
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  • Boston is the terminus of the Boston & Albany (New York Central), the Old Colony system of the New York, New Haven & Hartford, and the Boston & Maine railway systems, each of which controls several minor roads once in dependent.
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  • The former (the North, or Union station, 1893) covers 9 acres and has 23 tracks; the latter (the South Terminal, 1898), one of the largest stations in the world, covers 13 acres and has 32 tracks, and is used by the Boston & Albany and by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railways.
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  • It is co-extensive with the township of New Haven (though there is both a township and a city government), and lies in the south-western part of the state, about 4 m.
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  • New Haven is served by the main line and five branches of the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, by three inter-urban electric lines and by two steamship lines connecting with New York.
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  • Besides the University Library, there are a Public Library (1887), containing about 80,000 vols., the library of the Young Men's Institute (1826) and the collection of the New Haven Colony Historical Society.
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  • Among the newspapers of New Haven are the Morning Journal and Courier (1832, Republican), whose weekly edition, the Connecticut Herald and Weekly Journal, was established as the New Haven Journal in 1766; the Palladium (Republican; daily, 1840; weekly, 1828); the Evening Register (Independent; daily, 1840; weekly, 1812); and the Union (1873), a Democratic evening paper.
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  • At New Haven also are published several weekly English, German and Italian papers, and a number of periodicals, including the American Journal of Science (1818), the Yale Law Journal (1890) and the Yale Review (1892), a quarterly.
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  • In 1900 New Haven was the most important manufacturing centre in Connecticut, and in 1905 it was second only to Bridgeport in the value of its factory product.
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  • Commercially, New Haven is primarily a distributing point for the Atlantic seaboard, but the city is a port of entry, and foreign commerce (almost exclusively importing) is carried on to some extent, the imports in 1909 being valued at $404,805.
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  • The first settlement in New Haven (called Quinnipiac, its Indian name, until 1640) was made in the autumn of 1637 by a party of explorers in search of a site for colonization for a band of Puritans, led by Theophilus Eaton and the Rev. John Davenport, who had arrived at Boston, Massachusetts, from England in July 1637.
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  • As thus founded, New Haven was town and colony combined.
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  • In1643-1644the colony was expanded into the New Haven Jurisdiction, embracing the towns of New Haven, Guilford, Milford, Stamford and Branford in Connecticut, and, on Long Island, Southold; but this "Jurisdiction" was dissolved in 1664, and all these towns (except Southold) passed under the jurisdiction of Connecticut, according to the Connecticut charter of 1662.
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  • The government of the Jurisdiction was of the strictest Puritan type, and although the forty-five "blue laws" which the Rev. Samuel Peters, in his General History of Connecticut, ascribed to New Haven were much confused with the laws of the other New England colonies and some were mere inventions, yet many of them, and others equally "blue," were actually in operation as enactments or as court decisions in New Haven.
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  • One of the most important events in the history of New Haven was the removal hither in October 1716 from Saybrook of the Collegiate School of Connecticut, which developed into Yale University.
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  • The period of greatest material prosperity of New Haven in the colonial period began about 1750, when a thriving commerce with other American ports and the West Indies developed.
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  • In 1815 the Fulton, the first steamboat on Long Island Sound, made its first trip from New York to New Haven.
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  • To that conflict New Haven contributed approximately $30,000,000, and 3000 men, 500 of whom were killed.
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  • From 1701 until 1873 New Haven was the joint capital (with Hartford) of Connecticut.
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  • Fair Haven was annexed to New Haven in 1897.
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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford and the Boston & Albany (New York Central & Hudson River) railways, and by two inter-urban electric lines.
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  • There are no steam railways, but an electric line connects South Hadley and South Hadley Falls with the New York, New Haven & Hartford and the Boston & Maine railways at Holyoke.
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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railroad and by interurban electric railways.
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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford, and the Rhode Island Suburban railways, and is connected with the island of Rhode Island by ferry.
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  • It contains a borough of the same name and the villages of Cos Cob, Riverside and Sound Beach, all served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railway; the township has steamboat and electric railway connexions with New York City.
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  • The first settlers came from the New Haven Colony in 1640; but the Dutch, on account of the exploration of Long Island Sound by Adrian Blok in 1614, laid claim to Greenwich, and as New Haven did nothing to assist the settlers, they consented to union with New Netherland in 1642.
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  • By a treaty of 1650, which fixed the boundary between New Netherland and the New Haven Colony, the Dutch relinquished their claim to Greenwich, but the inhabitants of the town refused to submit to the New Haven Colony until October 1656.
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  • Six years later Greenwich was one of the first towns of the New Haven Colony to submit to Connecticut.
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  • It is served by the Boston & Maine, and the New York, New Haven & Hartford railways, and by interurban electric railways.
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  • The city is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railroad, by interurban electric lines, and by steamboats to New York.
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  • The New York, New Haven & Hartford railway crosses the town and has stations at its villages of Braintree, South Braintree and East Braintree, which are also served by suburban electric railways.
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  • Watertown is served by the Fitchburg division of the Boston & Maine railway, and is connected with Boston, Cambridge, Newton (immediately adjacent and served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway) and neighbouring towns by electric railways.
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  • He was a descendant of one of the founders of the New Haven colony, worked as a boy in an uncle's blacksmith shop and on his farm, and in 1797 graduated from Yale, having studied theology under Timothy Dwight.
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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, and by interurban electric railway.
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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, and by interurban electric railways.
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  • The city is served by the Boston & Maine, and the New York, New Haven & Hartford railways, and by an interurban line.
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  • The municipality owns and operates the gas and electric-lighting plants and the water works (the watersupply being derived from natural ponds, some of which are outside the city limits), and owns and leases (to the New York, New Haven & Hartford railroad) a railway extending (10.3 m.) to Westfield, Mass.
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  • The early history was rendered unquiet at times by wars with the Indians, the chief of which were the Pequot War in 1637, and King Philip's War in 16 75-7 6; and for better combining against these enemies, Massachusetts, with Connecticut, New Haven and New Plymouth, formed a confederacy in 1643, considered the prototype of the larger union of the colonies which conducted the War of American Independence (1 7758 3).
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  • It is traversed by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, and by inter-urban electric lines.
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  • The city is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway (which has other stations in the township at Glenbrook, Springdale and Talmadge Hill), by electric railway to Darien, Greenwich, &c., and by two lines of steamboats to New York City and ports on the Sound.
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  • The principal manufactures are builders' hardware, locks and keys (the works of the Yale & Towne Manufacturing Company are here), woollen goods, dye stuffs, &c. The township of Stamford, known until 1642 by the Indian name of Rippowam, was settled in 1641 by twenty-nine persons who for religious reasons seceded from the Wethersfield church and joined the colony of New Haven.
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  • Discontent with the religious policy of New Haven, however, caused a number of the Stamford citizens to withdraw and to found Hempstead, Long Island, and for the same reason many of the people of Stamford approved of the union of the New Haven colony and Connecticut by the charter of 1662; and in October 1662 Stamford submitted to Connecticut.
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  • In New Haven the same system prevailed from 1639 till 1665.
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  • The borough has a public library (1881), a Masonic Home, the Gaylord Farm Sanatorium of the New Haven County Anti-Tuberculosis Association, the Phelps School (for girls) and the Choate School (1896, for boys).
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  • The township is traversed by the Boston & Maine, and New York, New Haven & Hartford railways.
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  • In the United States schools were opened in New York, New Haven and Boston in 1873.
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  • In the United States a similar system prevails in New York, Boston, Brooklyn, Chicago, Baltimore, Philadelphia, New Haven and many other large towns.
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  • Because of the union of the towns of the New Haven Jurisdiction with Connecticut, in 1664, and the consequent admission of others than church members to civil rights, these Puritans resolved to remove and found a new town, in which, as originally in the New Haven towns, only church members should have a voice in the government.
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  • Hartford is served by two divisions of the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, by the Central New England railway, by the several electric lines of the Connecticut Company which radiate to the surrounding towns, and by the steamboats of the Hartford & New York Transportation Co., all of which are controlled by the N.Y., N.H.
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  • In 1636 Hartford was the meeting-place of the first general court of the Connecticut colony; the Fundamental Orders, the first written constitution, were adopted at Hartford in 1639; and after the union of the colonies of New Haven and Connecticut, accomplished by the charter of 1662, Hartford became the sole capital; but from 1701 until 1873 that honour was shared with New Haven.
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  • In 1647 he seized a Dutch ship illegally trading at New Haven and claimed jurisdiction as far as Cape Cod; the New Haven authorities refused to deliver to him fugitives from justice in Manhattan; he retaliated by offering refuge to runaways from New Haven; but finally he offered pardon to the Dutch fugitives and revoked his proclamation.
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  • The township is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford and by the Central New England railways, which meet at Simsbury village.
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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railroad, and by daily steamers to and from New York City.
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  • The borough is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railroad.
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  • Weymouth is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, and is connected with Boston, Quincy, Braintree, Hingham, Nantasket and Rockland by electric lines.
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  • From 1761 until his death New Haven was his home.
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  • He was once more a member of the Connecticut Assembly in 1764-1766, was one of the governor's assistants in 1766-1785, a judge of the Connecticut superior court in 1766-1789, treasurer of Yale College in 1765-1776, a delegate to the Continental Congress in1774-1781and again in 1783-1784, a member of the Connecticut Committee of Safety in1777-1779and in 1782, mayor of New Haven in 1784-1793, a delegate to the Federal Constitutional Convention of 1787 and to the Connecticut Ratification Convention of the same year, and a member of the Federal House of Representatives in 1789-1791 and of the United States Senate in 1791-1793.
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  • He died in New Haven on the 23rd of July 1793.
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  • Fishkill Landing is served by the New York Central & Hudson River and the New York, New Haven & Hartford railways; by railway ferry and passenger ferries to Newburgh, connecting with the West Shore railway; by river steamboats and by electric railway to Matteawan.
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  • It is served by the main line and the Danbury division (of which it is a terminus) of the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, by inter-urban electric lines, and by steamboats to New York.
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  • He returned to Connecticut in 1785 and made New Haven his home, becoming rector of St James's Church there.
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  • Norwich is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford and the Central Vermont railways, by steamers from New York and New London, and by interurban electric lines connecting with Willimantic, New London and other neighbouring places.
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  • The borough of New Haven (pop. in 1900, 1532) was annexed to Connellsville after the census enumeration of 1900.
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  • It is served by the New York Central & Hudson River and the New York, New Haven & Hartford railways, and by electric lines to New York City, Yonkers, New Rochelle, &c. The city has various manufactures, but in the main is a residential suburb of New York; the finest residences are in the eastern, central and north-eastern sections, the last being known as Chester Hill; the foreign-born element is largely concentrated in the western part.
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  • It is served by the Boston & Albany, and the New York, New Haven & Hartford railways.
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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, and by several inter-urban electric railways.
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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford, and the Boston & Albany railways, and by interurban electric lines.
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  • Milford is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railroad, and by an electric line connecting with Bridgeport and New Haven.
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  • Named after Milford, England, it was founded in 1639 by Rev. Peter Prudden and his followers from New Haven and Wethersfield.
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  • These citizens were an obstacle to the town's admission to the New Haven Jurisdiction, which was formed in 1643, but in the following year a compromise was effected and Milford was admitted on condition that, in the future, suffrage should be granted only to church members and that none of the objectionable six should be elected to any office of the Jurisdiction.
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  • Norwood is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway.
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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford and the Central Vermont railways, and by electric lines to Baltic, Norwich and New London, and to South Coventry.
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  • Westerly is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, and by interurban electric lines connecting with Norwich and New London, Conn.
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  • Lowell is served by the Boston & Maine and the New York, New Haven & Hartford railways, and by interurban electric lines.
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  • A separate colony was founded at New Haven in 1638 by emigrants from England who had stayed for a time in Boston and other Massachusetts towns, but this was annexed to Connecticut in 1664 under the Connecticut charter of 1662.
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  • Massachusetts, Plymouth, Connecticut and New Haven constituted in their early years a group of neighbouring colonies, substantially independent of the mother country, and possessing a unity of purpose and similar institutions but in need of mutual protection from the Indians, the Dutch and the French, and also needing an arbiter to whom they might refer their own disputes, especially those relating to boundaries and trade.
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  • The commissioners met regularly until 1684 - annually until New Haven submitted to Connecticut in 1664, and triennially from 1664 to 1684, when Massachusetts lost its first charter.
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  • Barnstable is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railway.
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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway and by an electric line connecting with Winsted.
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  • The township is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, and by a steamship line to Boston.
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  • Worcester is served by the Boston & Albany, the New York, New Haven & Hartford and the Boston & Maine railways, and is connected with Springfield and Boston by interurban electric lines.
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  • Duxbury is served by the Old Colony system of the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway.
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  • In 1641 English colonists from New Haven migrated southward and planted a settlement on the eastern bank of the Delaware river, declaring it to be a part of the New Haven jurisdiction.
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  • In the following year Governor Kieft, with the assistance of the Swedes, arrested the English and sent them back to New Haven.
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  • The two years after his graduation he spent in New Haven studying theology.
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  • Both are situated on the Pequabuck river, and are served by the western branch of the midland division of the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, and by electric railway to Hartford, New Britain and Terryville.
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  • The chief village, Northampton, is on the New York, New Haven & Hartford, and the Boston & Maine railways.
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  • Pop. (1900), 13,60 9 (3311 were foreign-born); (1910), 14,J79; it is served by the Boston & Maine and the New York New Haven & Hartford railways, and by inter-urban electric lines.
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  • He preached in 1750 to the Indians at Stockbridge, later studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1753, and practised in New Haven for two years.
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  • He died in New Haven on the 12th of May 1795.
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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, and by an interurban electric line.
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  • Springfield is served by the Springfield division of the New York & New England, the Hartford division of the New York, New Haven & Hartford, the Connecticut River division of the Boston & Maine, and the Athol division and the main line of the Boston & Albany railways, and by inter-urban electric railway lines.
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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway and by electric lines to Hartford and to Springfield, Massachusetts.
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  • It is served by the New York Central & Hudson River, the New York, New Haven & Hartford, the West Shore, the Central New England, and the Poughkeepsie & Eastern (merged in the Central New England) railways, and by river steamboat lines on the Hudson.
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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, and by electric railways to New York City and neighbouring places.
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  • Wilson developed the sewing machine; that Charles Goodyear discovered the process of vulcanising rubber; that Samuel Colt began the manufacture of the Colt fire-arms; and it was from near New Haven that Eli Whitney went to Georgia where he invented the cotton gin.
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  • One company, the New York, New Haven & Hartford, controlled 87% of this railway mileage in 1904, and practically all the steamboat lines on Long Island Sound.
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  • The principal cities, having a population of more than 20,000, were New Haven (108,027), Hartford (79, 8 5 0), Bridgeport (70,966), Waterbury (45,859), New Britain (2 5,99 8), and Meriden (24,296).
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  • The bureau of labour statistics has among its duties the giving of information to immigrant labourers regarding their legal rights: it has free employment agencies at Bridgeport, Norwich, Hartford, New Haven and Waterbury.
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  • The Connecticut Code of 1650 required all parents to educate their children, and every township of 50 householders (later 30) to have a teacher supported by the men of family, while the New Haven Code of 1656 also encouraged education.
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  • Supplementing the educative influence of the schools are the public libraries (161 in number in 1907); the state appropriates $200 to establish, and $100 per annum to maintain, a public library (provided the town in which the library is to be established contributes an equal amount), and the Public Library Committee has for its duty the study of library problems. Higher education is provided by Yale University; by Trinity College, at Hartford (nonsectarian), founded in 1823; by Wesleyan University, at Middletown, the oldest college of the Methodist Church in the United States, founded in 1831; by the Hartford Theological Seminary (1834); by the Connecticut Agricultural College, at Storrs (founded 1881), which has a two years' course of preparation for rural teachers and has an experiment station; by the Connecticut Experiment Station at New Haven, which was established in 1875 at Middletown and was the first in the United States; and by normal schools at New Britain (established 1881), Willimantic (1890), New Haven (1894) and Danbury (1903).
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  • In the meantime another migration to the Connecticut country had begun in 1638, when a party of Puritans who had arrived in Massachusetts the preceding year sailed from Boston for the Connecticut coast and there founded New Haven.
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  • In 1643 the jurisdiction of the New Haven colony was extended by the admission of the townships of Milford, Guilford and Stamford to equal rights with New Haven, the recognition of their local governments, and the formation of two courts for the whole jurisdiction, a court of magistrates to try important cases and hear appeals from " plantation " courts, and a general court with legislative powers, the highest court of appeals, which was similar in composition to the general court of the Connecticut Colony.
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  • Among those of New Haven are the prohibition of trial by jury, the infliction of the death penalty for adultery, and of the same penalty for conspiracy against the jurisdiction, the strict observance of the Sabbath enjoined, and heavy fines for " concealing or entertaining Quaker or other blasphemous hereticks."
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  • The next step in the formation of modern Connecticut was the union of the New Haven colony with the older colony.
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  • This charter had been secured without the knowledge or consent of the New Haven colonists and they naturally protested against the union with Connecticut.
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  • Hartford then became the capital of the united colonies, but shared that honour with New Haven from 1701 until 1873.
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  • The relations of Connecticut and New Haven with the mother country were similar to those of the other New England colonies.
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  • Yet with the exception of isolated British movements against Stonington in 1775, Danbury in 1777, New Haven in 1779 and New London in 1781 no battles were fought in Connecticut territory.
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  • For the sources, see Colonial Records of Connecticut (15 vols., Hartford, 1850-1890); The Records of the Colony and the Plantation of New Haven (2 vols., Hartford, 1857-1858) and Records of the State of Connecticut (2 vols., Hartford, 1894-1895).
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  • The Collections (Hartford 1860 et seq.) of the Connecticut Historical Society contain valuable material, especially the papers of Governor Joseph Talcott; and the Papers (New Haven, 1865 et seq.) of the New Haven Colony Historical Society are extremely valuable for local history; but a vast number of documents relating to the colonial and state periods, now in the state library at Hartford, have never been published.
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  • In October 1639 a form of government was adopted, based on the Mosiac Law, and Eaton was elected governor, a post which he continued to hold by annual re-election, first over New Haven alone, and after 1643 over the New Haven Colony or Jurisdiction, until his death at New Haven on the 7th of January 1658.
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  • His administration was embarrassed by constantly recurring disputes with the neighbouring Dutch settlements,especially after Stamford(Conn.) and Southold (Long Island) had entered the New Haven Jurisdiction, but his prudence and diplomacy prevented an actual outbreak of hostilities.
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  • The township is traversed by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, covers an area of 221 sq.
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  • The Connecticut clock maker and clock peddler was the 18th-century embodiment of Yankee ingenuity; the most famous of the next generation of clock makers were Eli Terry (1772-1852), who made a great success of his wooden clocks; Chauncey Jerome, who first used brass wheels in 1837 and founded in 1844 the works of the New Haven Clock Co.; Gideon Roberts; and Terry's pupil and successor, Seth Thomas (1786-1859), who built the factory at Thomaston carried on by his son Seth Thomas (1816-1888).
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  • It is located in Western New Haven County and has a nice blend of rural, suburban, and historic features.
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  • Season Four of this reality show still has the Montelongos flipping houses and a portion of the Atlanta Team from Season Three and the New Haven team from the previous season.
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