New-hampshire sentence example

new-hampshire
  • We never travelled much except to come up here to New Hampshire a few times.
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  • We were rolling in euphoria when an old friend from my Amherst, Massachusetts childhood telephoned with an invitation to visit her family cabin in New Hampshire.
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  • The goal of our offered summer sojourn was described as a seasonal cabin on a small lake in near Wolfboro, New Hampshire.
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  • His mother pushed him off on us because he stayed up here in New Hampshire because he stayed here a couple of summers growing and she thought visiting might jar something loose.
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  • I asked my mother about visiting the country or a farm and she insisted I'd never travelled anywhere but here in New Hampshire until I left for the seminary.
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  • We spent our remaining time in New Hampshire with no mention of his visions.
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  • The conversation slipped back to our New York life with our sojourn in New Hampshire relegated to a fun, if bizarre weekend with friends.
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  • Howie only came to New Hampshire a couple of times.
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  • Neither of us mentioned the subject since we left New Hampshire.
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  • I've set up the same old power sources as New Hampshire and I managed to gather up about a third of the same plants.
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  • I set both similar to my New Hampshire test but frankly; I didn't pay much attention to precise accuracy.
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  • Connecticut and Rhode Island were ruled out and we began to concentrate on New Hampshire.
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  • Betsy's loving boss presented the most difficulty but she used the excuse her new husband was transferred to New Hampshire.
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  • Claire Elizabeth LeBlanc, all seven pounds, six ounces of her, came into the world at Dartmouth-Hitchcok Medical Center, in Keene, New Hampshire on June third.
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  • It was summer, a wonderful time of year in New Hampshire and on Friday, three weeks after her first visit, Julie returned to Keene.
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  • Frost, not uncommon in New Hampshire as late as June, was considered by Howie a villain to reckon with.
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  • After all, you're miles away in Keene, New Hampshire.
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  • While he yearned to return to New Hampshire I sensed he possessed a strong guilt, locking him to his mother's bedside.
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  • My name is Ben Gustefson and I'm living in Keene, New Hampshire with my wife Betsy.
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  • Keene, New Hampshire - Greenbriar Road.
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  • Come on back to New Hampshire and get on with your life and forget about history.
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  • Cheshire County, New Hampshire.
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  • I arranged to ship Quinn's equipment back to New Hampshire tomorrow so that's out of the way.
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  • I didn't at first recognize the New Hampshire number but remembered I'd given mine to Detective Jackson.
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  • There is on one to connect me to New Hampshire though this little group who thought they were so clever hiding in that silly business in Keene might suspect that the one they hunted is now hunting them!
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  • My wife and I had promised each other to remain constantly in phone contact after the close calls in New Hampshire.
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  • He's been stalking us all the way from New Hampshire where he killed two friends of ours.
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  • I'll get the New Hampshire detective.
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  • My dear, do I have the honor of finally meeting the famous psychic tipster or were you but the helper of the young mother who died so suddenly in that delightful New Hampshire town?
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  • We tried to duplicate our New Hampshire activities; even recording our efforts but fixing the settings proved to be hit and miss.
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  • Tears come to my eyes these months later as I pen these words, sitting in the comfort of our Surry, New Hampshire home with Betsy by my side.
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  • At sixteen, while vacationing at a New Hampshire camp for girls, she had become involved with a local boy, Donald Ryland.
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  • After the close of the war there was an influx of settlers from Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Hampshire and Vermont; a town was laid out on the Van der Heyden farm, and in 1789 the name of Troy was selected in town meeting; and in 1791 the town of Troy was formed from part of Rensselaerwyck.
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  • North of Massachusetts the Connecticut river is wholly within New Hampshire - Vermont's eastern boundary is low-water mark on the W.
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  • Along the shore of Lake Champlain are a few species of maritime plants that remain from the time when portions of western Vermont were covered by the sea, and on the upper slopes of some of the higher mountains are a few Alpine species; these, however, are much less numerous on the Green Mountains of Vermont than on the White Mountains of New Hampshire.
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  • Of the inhabitants born in the United States, 19,974 were natives of New York, 9675 were natives of New Hampshire and 9111 were natives of Massachusetts.
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  • The territory in which these settlements had been made was involved in the boundary dispute between Massachusetts and New Hampshire, which was settled in 1741 by a decision of the king in council favourable to New Hampshire (q.v.).
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  • From 1761 to 1763 Governor John Wentworth of New Hampshire issued 108 grants, and settlements were established in Brattleboro, Putney, Westminster, Halifax, Marlborough, Wilmington, New Fane, Rockingham, Townshend, Vernon (Hinsdale) and Dummerston (all in Windham county, except Vernon, which is in Cheshire county).
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  • The first legislature of the state met at Windsor in March 1778, and voted to admit sixteen towns east of the Connecticut river which were dissatisfied with the rule of New Hampshire.
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  • As a result, New York and New Hampshire formed a secret agreement to divide the state between themselves, the mountains to be the line of division.
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  • The difficulties with New Hampshire were adjusted in 1782, the west bank of the Connecticut being accepted as the final boundary, but New York refused to abandon her claims until 1790.
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  • He was elected to the House of Representatives of the last Royal .Assembly of New Hampshire and then to the second Continental Congress in 1775, and was a member of the first Naval Committee of the latter, but he resigned in 1776, and in June 1776 became Congress's agent of prizes in New Hampshire and in 1778 continental (naval) agent of Congress in this state, where he supervised the building of John Paul Jones's "Ranger" (completed in June 1777), the "America," launched in 1782, and other vessels.
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  • He was a judge of the New Hampshire Court of Common Pleas in 17761 777, a member (and speaker) of the New Hampshire House of Representatives from 1776 until 1782, a member of the state Constitutional Convention of 1778 and of the state Senate in 1784-1785, and in1783-1784was again a member of Congress.
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  • during the first Congress and the second session of the second Congress; a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives in1801-1805and its speaker in 1803-1805; and governor of the state in1805-1809and in 1810-1812.
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  • In the later years of his life in New Hampshire he was the most prominent of the local Republican leaders and built up his party by partisan appointments.
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  • Alfred Langdon Elwyn has edited Letters by Washington, Adams, Jefferson and Others, Written During and After the Revolution, to John Langdon of New Hampshire (Philadelphia, 1880), a book of great interest and value.
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  • There was disagreement from the first, however, with regard to the measure of loyalty to the king, and in 1643, when Massachusetts had asserted her claim to this region and the other three New Hampshire towns had submitted to her jurisdiction, the majority of the inhabitants of Exeter also yielded, while the minority, including the founder, removed from the town.
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  • In 1680 the town became a part of the newly created province of New Hampshire.
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  • He was a descendant of Thomas Webster, of Scottish ancestry, who settled in New Hampshire about 1636.
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  • He was a member of Rogers' Rangers in the Seven Years' War, served in the War of Independence, was for several years a member of the New Hampshire legislature, was a delegate to the New Hampshire convention which ratified the Federal constitution, and was a justice of the court of common pleas for his county.
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  • The case came before the Supreme Court of New Hampshire in May 1817.
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  • Webster was twice married - first in 1898 to Grace, daughter of Rev. Elijah Fletcher, a New Hampshire clergyman.
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  • In 1679, however, New Hampshire was constituted a separate province, and Portsmouth was the capital until 1775.
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  • His wife was the widow of Colonel Benjamin Rolfe, and the daughter of Timothy Walker, "a highly respectable minister, and one of the first settlers at Rumford," now called Concord, in New Hampshire.
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  • The township of Rutland was granted by New Hampshire in 1761 to John Murray of Rutland, Massachusetts, and about the same time it was granted (as Fairfield) by New York.
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  • See Jeremy Belknap, History of New Hampshire (Philadelphia, 1784-1792); and Rev. Dr A.
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  • Laconia, New Hampshire >>
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  • In 1820 he was re-elected, receiving all the electoral votes but one, which William Plumer (1759-1850) of New Hampshire cast for John Quincy Adams, in order, it is said, that no one might share with Washington the honour of a unanimous election.
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  • It is served by the Boston & Maine railroad and by electric railways to Andover, Boston, Lowell, Haverhill and Salem, Massachusetts, and to Nashua and Salem, New Hampshire.
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  • Hutchinson went to England in 1740 as the representative of Massachusetts in a boundary dispute with New Hampshire.
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  • Nelson Dale, The Chief Commercial Granites of Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Rhode Island (Ibid., 1908), being Bulletin 354 of the U.S. Geological Survey.
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  • Dana in 1824 at Franconia in New Hampshire.
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  • The Massachusetts railroad commission, though preceded in point of time by that of New Hampshire of 1844, was the real beginning of modern state commissions.
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  • But others were won over by the news that it had been ratified by New Hampshire and Virginia or by the telling arguments of Hamilton, and on the 26th of July the motion to ratify was carried by a vote of 30 to 27.
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  • Belknap's chief works are: History of New Hampshire (1784-1792); An Historical Account of those persons who have been distinguished in America, generally known as American Biography (1792-1794); The Foresters (1792), &c.
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  • He was a member of the New Hampshire Provincial Assembly in 1774, and in1774-1775was a delegate to the Continental Congress.
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  • In 1772 he had been commissioned a major of New Hampshire militia, and on the 15th of December 1774 he and John Langdon led an expedition which captured Fort William and Mary at New Castle.
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  • From 1782 to 1785 he was attorney-general of New Hampshire.
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  • He presided over the New Hampshire convention which ratified the Federal constitution in June 1788.
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  • From 1789 until his death at Durham, on the 23rd of January 1795, he was United States District Judge for New Hampshire.
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  • In 1686 he became governor, with Boston as his capital, of the "Dominion of New England," into which Massachusetts (including Maine), Plymouth, Rhode Island, Connecticut and New Hampshire were consolidated, and in 1688 his jurisdiction was extended over New York and the Jerseys.
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  • The legislatures of Connecticut and Rhode Island, and town meetings in Cheshire and Grafton counties (New Hampshire) and in Windham county (Vermont) accepted the invitation, and the convention, composed of 12 delegates from Massachusetts, 7 from Connecticut, 4 from Rhode Island, 2 from New Hampshire and 1 from Vermont, all Federalists, met on the 15th of December 1814, chose George Cabot of Massachusetts president and Theodore Dwight of Connecticut secretary, and remained in secret session until the 5th of January 1815, when it adjourned sine die.
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  • Two Indian attacks are particularly noteworthy - one in 1698, in which Hannah Dustin, her newborn babe, and her nurse were carried away to the vicinity of Penacook, now Concord, New Hampshire.
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  • from the shore are the bleak and nearly barren Isles of Shoals, nine in number, a part of which belong to New Hampshire and a part to Maine.
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  • Except on the summits of the higher mountains New Hampshire was originally an unbroken forest of which the principal trees were the white pine, hemlock, sugar maple, yellow birch, beech, red oak, and white oak in the S., red spruce, balsam, and white birch on the upper mountain slopes, and red spruce, white pine, sugar maple, white spruce and white cedar in the other parts of the N.
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  • half of New Hampshire are many song birds belonging to the Alleghany faunal area; in the N.
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  • Fertile soil in New Hampshire is confined largely to the bottom-lands of the Merrimac and Connecticut rivers, where on deposits of glacial drift, which are generally quite deep in the southern half of the state, there is considerable alluvium.
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  • Farms in the more sterile parts of New Hampshire were abandoned when the depleted soil and the old methods of agriculture made it impossible for owners or tenants to compete with western farmers.
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  • In that year New Hampshire ranked fourth among the states in output of granite, with 6.3% of the total value of granite quarried in the entire country; in 1908 the value of granite ($867,028) was exceeded by that of each of seven other states but was more than one-half of the total value of all mineral products of the state.
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  • A quartz schist, suitable for making whetstones and oilstones, was discovered in 1823 by Isaac Pike at Pike Station, Grafton county, and the Pike Manufacturing Company now owns and operates quarries outside this state also; in 1907 New Hampshire was the principal producer of scythe-stones in the United States, and the total value of whetstones made in 1907 (including the value of precious stones') was $59,870.
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  • Manufactures.-The heavy precipitation on the elevated central and northern parts, and the hundreds of lakes and ponds which serve as reservoirs, give to the lower southern part of the state on the Merrimac and other rivers such an abundant and constant water-power that southern New Hampshire has become an important manufacturing district, and manufacturing has become the leading industry of the state.
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  • Textiles, and boots and shoes represented ' Gems are not sought for systematically in New Hampshire.
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  • Factorymade boots and shoes increased in value from $11,986,003 in 1890 to $23,405,558 in 1900, or 95.3%, the industry ranking first in 1900; but in 1905 there was a decrease to $22,425,700, the industry then ranking second; in 1900 the value of boots and shoes was 21.8% and in 1905 it was 18.1% of the total value of all factory products, and in no other state was the degree of specialization in this industry so great as in New Hampshire.
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  • As compared with other states of the Union, New Hampshire in 1905 ranked fifth in the manufacture of factory-made boots and shoes, and in woollen goods, sixth in cotton goods, and seventh in paper and wood pulp, in hosiery and knit goods, and in the dyeing and finishing of textiles.
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  • 1860), who was then governor of New Hampshire.
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  • The constitution of New Hampshire places scarcely any restrictions on the powers of the legislature.
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  • Under the laws of New Hampshire the property rights of husband and wife are nearly equal.
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  • The homestead law of New Hampshire exempts from seizure for debt five hundred dollars' worth of any person's homestead except for the enforcement of a mortgage upon it, for the collection of debts incurred in making repairs or improvements, or for the collection of taxes.
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  • The plan of 1821 to use the Literary Fund for founding and maintaining a state college for instruction in the higher branches of science and literature was abandoned in 1828 and the only state institutions of learning are the Plymouth Normal School (1870) at Plymouth, the Keene Normal School (1909) at Keene, and the New Hampshire College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, organized as a department of Dartmouth College in 1866, but removed to Durham, Strafford county, as a separate institution in 1891.
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  • The state charitable and correctional institutions consist of the New Hampshire School for Feeble-minded Children, at Laconia; the New Hampshire Soldiers' Home, at Tilton; the New Hampshire Industrial School, at Manchester; the New Hampshire Hospital for the Insane, and the State Prison, at Concord; and the New Hampshire Sanatorium for consumptives (1909) near Warren Summit, about 75 m.
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  • Samuel de Champlain discovered the Isles of Shoals and sailed along the New Hampshire coast in 1605, and much more information concerning this part of the New World was gathered in 1614 by Captain John Smith, who in his Description of New England refers to the convenient harbour at the mouth of the Piscataqua and praises the country back from the rocky shore.
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  • latitude, and which made the following grants bearing upon the history of New Hampshire by their inducement to settlement, by determining the boundaries or by causing strife through their conflicts with one another: to John Mason, who has been called " the founder of New Hampshire," on the 9th of March 1622, a grant of the region between the Salem and Merrimac rivers, under the name of Mariana; to John Mason and Sir Ferdinando Gorges jointly, on the loth of August 1622, a grant of the region between the Merrimac and Kennebec rivers for 60 m.
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  • inland, under the name of New Hampshire.
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  • The charter of that colony was drafted under the impression that the Merrimac flowed east for its entire course, but now an investigation was in progress which was to show that its source in Lake Winnepesaukee was several miles north of any of the four settlements in New Hampshire.
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  • Thereupon Mason, in January 1679, petitioned the king to appoint a governor who should have jurisdiction over all the lands which he claimed, and on the 18th of September of this year New Hampshire was constituted a separate province with a government vested in a president and council appointed by the king and an assembly chosen by the people.
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  • 1689 New Hampshire formed a part of the Dominion of New England, which, after the first few months, was under Sir Edmund Andros as governor-general.
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  • There being no provincial authority in New Hampshire at the close of this period, a convention of the leading citizens of its four towns attempted to establish -one.
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  • Upon the failure of this attempt, a temporary nominal union with Massachusetts was formed, but in 1692 Samuel Allen, the assign of Mason, caused a royal government to be established with his son-in-law, John Usher, as lieutenant-governor, and during the remainder of the colonial era New Hampshire was separate from Massachusetts except that from 1699 to 1741 the two had the same governor.
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  • Massachusetts proposed to confine New Hampshire to less than one-fourth its present area; that is, on the west to a line drawn 3 m.
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  • This gave New Hampshire much more territory on the south than it had claimed.
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  • Within a few years the governor of New Hampshire granted in the disputed territory 138 townships which were rapidly settled by those whom it was the duty of the province to protect.
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  • But there was a reluctance to incur the expense of a contest with so powerful a neighbour as New York, and in 1764 that province procured from the king in council a royal order declaring the western boundary of New Hampshire to be the western bank of the Connecticut river.
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  • From 1676 to 1759 New Hampshire suffered greatly from the Indians, and the fear of them, together with the boundary disputes and Mason's claims, retarded settlement.
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  • By June 1775 the once popular governor, Sir John Wentworth, was a refugee; on the 5th of January 1776 the fifth Provincial Congress established a provisional government; on the 5th of the following June the first Assembly elected under that government declared for independence; and on the 16th of August 1777 the important victory at Bennington was won by New Hampshire and Vermont troops under the command of General John Stark, who had a commission from New Hampshire.
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  • Six states had ratified the Federal constitution when the New Hampshire convention met at Exeter on the 13th of February 1788, to accept or reject that instrument, and so great was the opposition to it among the delegates from the central part of the state that after a discussion of ten days the leaders in favour of ratification dared not risk a decisive vote, but procured an adjournment in order that certain delegates who had been instructed to vote against it might consult their constituents.
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  • National elections in New Hampshire were carried by the Federalists until 1816, except in 1804 when President Thomas Jefferson won by a small majority; but within this period of Federalist supremacy in national politics the Democrat-Republicans elected the governor from 1805 to 1812 inclusive except in 1809.
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  • In 1816 the Democrats won both state and national elections; and out of the transition from Federalist to Democratic control, which was effected under the leadership of William Plumer (1759-1850), a prominent politician in New Hampshire for half a century, a United States senator from 1802 to 1807 and governor of the state in1812-1813and 1816-1819, arose the famous Dartmouth College Case.
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  • Accordingly, his denunciation of President Andrew Jackson's bank policy added strength to the Jacksonian Democracy, and, later, his Whig connexions were the greatest source of the Whig party's weakness in New Hampshire.
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  • Hitchcock, Geology of New Hampshire (Concord, 1874-1878); New Hampshire Annual Reports (1871), especially those of the Forestry Commission, Fish and Game Commission, Board of Agriculture and Board of Charities and Correction; J.
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  • Colby, Manual of the Constitution of the State of New Hampshire (Concord, 1902), containing an historical sketch of the constitutions of the state; F.
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  • Ward, " The New Hampshire Constitution," in The New England Magazine, N.S., vol.
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  • Deane; New Hampshire Provincial Papers; documents and records relating to the province from the earliest period of its settlement (Concord, 1867-1873); J.
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  • Belknap, The History of New Hampshire (Philadelphia, 1784); Life of William Plumer (Boston, 1857), by his son William Plumer, Jr.; G.
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  • Barstow, The History of New Hampshire from its discovery, in 1614, to the passage of the toleration act, in 1819 (New York, 1853); E.
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  • Charlton, New Hampshire as it is (Claremont, 1857); J.
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  • McClintock, History of New Hampshire (Boston, 1889); F.
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  • Fry, New Hampshire as a Royal Province (New York, 1908).
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  • His father, Benjamin Pierce (1757-1839), served in the American army throughout the War of Independence, was a Democratic member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives from 1789 to 1803, and was governor of the state in 1827-1829.
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  • In January 1852 the legislature of New Hampshire proposed him as a candidate for the presidency, and when the Democratic national convention met at Baltimore in the following June the Virginia delegation brought forward his name on the thirty-fifth ballot.
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  • The school was never incorporated, it had no buildings, and the lectures were delivered in the law offices of its instructors, but among its 1000 or more students were many who afterwards became famous, including John C. Calhoun; Levi Woodbury (1789-1851), United States senator from New Hampshire in1825-1831and in 1841-1845, secretary of the navy in 1831-1834 and of the treasury in 1834-1841, and a justice of the United States Supreme Court from 1845; John Y.
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  • 4364 ft., Killington Peak, 4241 ft.) and their (west) piedmont ridges farther north in Vermont; and in the ridges of northern Maine: these are all in synipathy with Appalachian structure: so also are certain open valleys, as the Berkshire (limestone) Valley in western Massachusetts and the correspondin Rutland (limestone and marble) Valley in western Vermont; an more particularly the long Connecticut Valley from northern New Hampshire across Massachusetts to the sea at the southern border of Connecticut, the populous southern third of which is broadly &roded along a belt of red Triassic sandstones with trap ridges.
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  • The White Mountains of northern New Hampshire may be treated as a complex group of rnonadnocks, all of subdued forms, except for a few cliffs at the head of cirque-like valleys, with Mt Washington, the highest of, the dome-like or low pyramidal summits, reaching 6293 ft., and thirteen other summits over 5000 ft.
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  • New York, Rhode Island, Massachusetts and New Hampshire in the eastern part of the country, Louisiana in the south, and New Mexico, Arizona, California and Montana in the western part are distinctively Roman Catholic states, with not less than 63% of these in the total church body.
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  • Delaware with 17 senators and 35 representatives, has the smallest; Minnesota, with 63 senators, has the largest Senate; and New Hampshire (a small state) has, with its 390 representatives, the largest House.
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  • True executive councils have now disappeared except in Massachusetts, Maine and New Hampshire.
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  • The Putnam Free School, now part of the public school system, was endowed early in the 19th century by Oliver Putnam of Newburyport and afterwards of Hampstead, New Hampshire.
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  • Manchester, New Hampshire >>
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  • He graduated in 1856 at the Biblical Institute at Concord, New Hampshire (now a part of Boston University), became a minister in the Episcopal Church in 1857, and during the next three years was a rector first at North Adams, and then at Newton Lower Falls, Mass.
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  • McDuffee, History of the Town of Rochester, New Hampshire (Rochester, 1892).
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  • A charter for a town to be founded here was granted by the province of New Hampshire in 1763, but no settlement was made until 1774.
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  • Rochester, New Hampshire >>
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  • The New Hampshire grantees undertook to establish here a colony of Londonderry Irish; but the Massachusetts settlers were firmly established by the spring of 1727, Massachusetts definitely assumed jurisdiction in 1731, and in 1734 her general court incorporated the settlement under the name of Rumford.
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  • The conflicting rights of Rumford and Bow gave rise to one of the most celebrated of colonial land cases, and although the New Hampshire authorities enforced their claims of jurisdiction, the privy council in 1755 confirmed the Rumford settlers in their possession.
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  • In 1778 and again in 1781-1782 a state constitutional convention met here; the first New Hampshire legislature met at Concord in 1782; the convention which ratified for New Hampshire the Federal Constitution met here in 1788; and in 1808 the state capital was definitely established here.
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  • The New Hampshire Patriot, founded here in 1808 (and for twenty years edited) by Isaac Hill (1788-1851), who was a member of the United States Senate in 1831-1836, and governor of New Hampshire in 1836-1839, became one of the leading exponents of Jacksonian Democracy in New England.
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  • Lyford, The History of Concord, New Hampshire (City History Commission) (2 vols., Concord, 1903); Concord Town Records, 1732-1820 (Concord, 1894); J.
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  • from its centre, are the grounds of the Winnepesaukee Camp-Meeting Association, and the camping place for the annual reunions of the New Hampshire Veterans of the Civil War, both at The Weirs, the northernmost point in the territory claimed by colonial Massachusetts; about 2 m.
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  • The New Hampshire State Fish Hatchery is in Laconia.
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  • It commemorates the success gained on the 16th of August 1777 by a force of nearly 2000 "Green Mountain Boys" and New Hampshire and Massachusetts militia under General John Stark over two detachments of General Burgoyne's army, totalling about 1200 men, under Col.
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  • Bennington was settled in 1761 and was named in honour of Governor Benning Wentworth of New Hampshire.
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  • It was one of the "New Hampshire Grant" towns, both New York and New Hampshire claiming jurisdiction over it, and, being the home of Ethan Allen and Seth Warner, it became the centre of activities of the "Green Mountain Boys," of whom they were leaders.
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  • Dover, New Hampshire >>
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  • A clause in the state constitution prohibited any justice of the Supreme Court from holding any other post save that of delegate to Congress on a "special occasion," but in November 1778 the legislature pronounced the secession of what is now the state of Vermont from the jurisdiction of New Hampshire and New York to be such an occasion, and sent Jay to Congress charged with the duty of securing a settlement of the territorial claims of his state.
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  • Portsmouth, New Hampshire >>
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  • The exterior walls are of white New Hampshire granite, and the walls of the See Glenn Brown, The History of the United States Capitol (2 vols., 1900-1903).
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  • Under William and Mary no attempt was made to preserve the Dominion of New England, but Rhode Island and Connecticut were permitted to resume government under their old charters, Massachusetts received a new one, and New Hampshire again became a separate royal province.
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  • Chestnut and walnut are rare and are found only near 2 This name is applied to a chain of lakes (the Rangeley, or Oquossoc, the Cupsuptic, the Mooselookmeguntic, the Molechunkamunk or Upper Richardson, the Welokenebacook or Lower Richardson, and the Umbagog) in Franklin and Oxford counties, in the western part of the state; the Umbagog extends into New Hampshire and its outlet helps to form the Androscoggin River.
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  • Towards the close of 1629 Mason and Gorges agreed upon a division of the territory held jointly by them, and on the 7th of November 1629 Mason received from the Council a separate grant of the tract between the Merrimac and the Piscataqua, which he now named New Hampshire.
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  • Forty-four years after his death New Hampshire was made a royal province.
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  • See Captain John Mason, the Founder of New Hampshire (Boston, 1887; published by the Prince Society), which contains a memoir by C. W.
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  • Franklin, New Hampshire >>
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  • In September 1786, at the time of the Shays Rebellion, the New Hampshire Gazette (still published; daily edition since 1890) was established here in the interest of the state administration.
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  • He was pastor of the Second Congregational Church of Newport, Rhode Island, from 1755 to 1777; in 1776-1777 he preached occasionally in Dighton, Massachusetts, whither he had removed his family after the British occupation of Newport; and in April 1777 he became pastor of the North Church of Portsmouth, New Hampshire.
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  • Here, in what was then a part of the town of Salisbury, Daniel Webster was born, and on the Webster farm is the New Hampshire orphans' home, established in 1871.
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  • Dale, The Chief Commercial Granites of Mass., New Hampshire and Rhode Island (Washington, 1908), Bulletin 354 of the U.S. Geol.
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  • Township government, owing to the abolition of the committee on general business and the consequent confusion of handling so many and minute details, and to the addition to the population of a large Irish element and a large New Hampshire element, both workmen in the quarries, reached the minimum of efficiency in 1840-1870; in 1870, however, the town-meetings were reformed, and in 1874 a committee to consider business details was again appointed.
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  • Nelson Dale, The Chief Commercial Granites of Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Rhode Island (Washington, 1908), Bulletin 354 of the U.S. Geological Survey.
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  • Two years later, on the 14th of August 1870, he died at Portsmouth, New Hampshire.
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  • Concord, New Hampshire >>
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  • outside the state; its average yield per acre (1673 lb) was exceeded in the continental United States only in Vermont (1844 lb) and Massachusetts (1674 lb) in 1899, and in 1907 (1510 lb) by New Hampshire (1650 lb), Vermont (1625 lb) and Massachusetts (1525 lb).
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  • Agreement was final reached on a tentative location for our Shangri La; Keene, New Hampshire.
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  • I gave Daniel Brennan a New Hampshire cell phone number.
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  • One, the Surry Mountain Campground was near our house and a brief drive-through showed only one out of state visitor, a New Hampshire tenter.
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  • Features quick cuts omaha worth Howard in new hampshire.
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  • In New Hampshire car number plates bear the legend, Live Free or Die; a state motto is Don't Tread on Me.
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  • Another series of experiments with the magnet variometers was conducted in New Hampshire between November 1970 and September 1972.
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  • He was president of New Hampshire in1785-1786and in 1788-1789; a member of the Federal Constitutional Convention in 1787, where he voted against granting to Congress the power of issuing paper money; a member of the state convention which ratified the Federal Constitution for New Hampshire; a member of the United States Senate in 178 9 -1801, and its president pro tem.
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  • His elder brother, Woodbury Langdon (1739-1805), was a delegate to the Continental Congress in 1779-1780, a member of the executive council of New Hampshire in 1781-1784, judge of the Supreme Court of the state in 1782 and in1786-1790(although he had had no legal training), and a state senator in 1784-1785.
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  • C. Amory, General John Sullivan, A Vindication of his Character as a Soldier and a Patriot (Morrisania, N.Y., 1867); John Scales, "Master John Sullivan of Somersworth and Berwick and his Family," in the Proceedings of the New Hampshire Historical Society, vol.
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  • At the same time there were 124,561 natives of New Hampshire numbered among the inhabitants of other states, principally Massachusetts, Vermont, Maine, New York, Illinois, California, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Minnesota, Iowa, Wisconsin, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Ohio, New Jersey, Kansas and Nebraska, and to induce these to return for a holiday season to their native state the " Old Home Week" festival, now held throughout New England, was planned in 1899 by Frank West Rollins (b.
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  • Other companies, such as Brittany and Coggs of New Hampshire paint their tiles in layers, rubbing off the top layer of glaze from the relief portion of the tiles to allow the base layer to show through.
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  • Sarah Kate Silverman was born on December 1, 1970 in Bedford, New Hampshire to Donald and Beth Ann Silverman.
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  • After graduating from The Derryfield School, a private day school in Manchester, Silverman left New Hampshire to attend New York University.
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  • He is a big supporter of the Boys and Girls Clubs and donated one million dollars to the Manchester, New Hampshire branch in 2007.
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  • It was founded in 1769 in Hanover, New Hampshire and today offers undergraduate degrees in liberal studies, professional programs in medicine, business and engineering, and 18 graduate programs in the arts and sciences.
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  • Dartmouth College is located in Hanover, New Hampshire.
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  • Southern New Hampshire University offers an entirely online program which earns students a Bachelor of Arts in Creative Writing and English.
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  • The dying process takes place in New Hampshire and the manufacturing of the garments is done in Massachusetts.
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  • According to the National Safety Council, children have died from lead poisoning in Alabama and New Hampshire within the last 10 years.
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  • Yet CNN Money lists college towns like Durham, North Carolina and Hanover, New Hampshire as some of the best cities to retire.
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  • Omni Medical Search features a list of ENT specialists in New Hampshire.
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  • Portsmouth sleep dentists are difficult to find, but the American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine lists three dentists in Nashua, New Hampshire.
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  • One weekend in August, many years ago, a Boy Scout troop from a town in Western Maine went on a weekend camping trip in the White Mountains of New Hampshire.
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  • Off Broadway stores can be found in California, Colorado, Kansas, Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, Pennsylvania, Maryland and New Hampshire.
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  • White Mountain Shoes was founded in 1978 in Lisbon, New Hampshire.
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  • The company's name and image derive from its factory location in the rural White Mountains of New Hampshire.
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  • The first American alarm clock was invented in 1787 by Levi Hutchins of Concord, New Hampshire.
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  • In this fascinating interview, LoveToKnow Cars talks to local New Hampshire car enthusiast Rod Tetu.
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  • RT (Rod Tetu): I was eight years old and I started working at my Uncle's repair shop up in Northern New Hampshire where I grew up.
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  • If I'm really looking for a certain car part, the best place I like to go is Amherst or Nashua, New Hampshire where they have the big flea markets.
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