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New-guinea sentence examples

new-guinea
  • Araucaria Cunninghami, the Moreton Bay pine, is a tall tree abundant on the shores of Moreton Bay, Australia, and found through the littoral region of Queensland to Cape York Peninsula, also in New Guinea.

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  • Taking opossums to have been the ancestors of the group, the author considers that the present writer may be right in his view that marsupials entered Australia from Asia by way of New Guinea.

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  • From Torres Strait to Dampier Land the shelf spreads out, and connects Australia with New Guinea and the Malay Archipelago.

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  • The emu corresponds with the African and Arabian ostrich, the rhea of South America, and the cassowary of the Moluccas and New Guinea.

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  • that the continent was first inhabited by a Papuan type of man who made his way thither from Flores and Timor, New Guinea and the Coral Sea.

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  • America), the four-day week of the Chibchas, the five-day week of Persia, Malaysia, Java, Celebes, New Guinea and Mexico; in ancient Scandinavia a five-day period was in use, but markets were probably unknown.

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  • The Ismdo-Malayan sub-region includes the Indian and Malayan peninsulas, Cochin-China and southern China, the Malayan archipelago, and Philippines, with New Guinea and Polynesia, excluding the Sandwich Islands.

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  • Myrtaceae comes next with Eucalyptus, which forms three-fourths of the forests, and Melaleuca; both are absent from New Caledonia and New Zealand; a few species of the former extend to New Guinea and one of the latter to Malaya.

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  • From this place Quiros returned to America, but Torres continued the voyage, passed through the strait between Australia and New Guinea which bears his name, and explored and mapped the southern and eastern coasts of New Guinea.

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  • On the 1st of March the Dutch fleet sighted the island of Juan Fernandez; and, having crossed the Pacific, the explorers sailed along the north coast of New Guinea and arrived at the Moluccas on the 17th of September 1616.

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  • He then reached Tongatabu, one of the Friendly Islands of Cook; and returned by the north coast of New Guinea to Batavia.

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  • In 1644 Tasman made a second voyage to effect a fuller discovery of New Guinea.

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  • Dampier's literary ability eventually secured for him a commission in the king's service; and he was sent on a voyage of discovery, during which he explored part of the coasts of Australia and New Guinea, and discovered the strait which bears his name between New Guinea and New Britain, returning in 1701.

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  • He visited the New Hebrides, Santa Cruz, New Caledonia and Solomon Islands, and made careful though rough surveys of the Louisiade Archipelago, islands north of New Britain and part of New Guinea.

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  • The Papuan Subregion, chiefly New Guinea with its dependencies, the Timor group of islands, the Moluccas and Celebes.

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  • The species, about a dozen in number, are widely distributed over Australia, Tasmania, New Guinea and several of the adjacent islands.

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  • Borneo, the most western and the largest of the northern group of islands which extends between 110° and 150° E., as far as New Guinea or Papua, is but little known.

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  • The map of British New Guinea is on a scale of 1:330,200 (1898).

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  • Three species are inhabitants of New Guinea and the fourth is found in North Queensland.

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  • ARU ISLANDS (Dutch Aroe), a group in the residency of Amboyna, Dutch East Indies; between 5° 18' and 7° 5' S., and 13 4 ° and 135° E.; the member nearest to the south-west coast of New Guinea lying about 70 m.

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  • Enygrus, ranging from New Guinea to the Fiji Islands.

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  • The Germans raised levies of Masai and Sudanese, and brought natives from New Guinea to help in suppressing the rising, besides sending naval and military contingents from Germany.

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  • The northern extremity of New Guinea is all but severed from the mainland by the deep MacCluer Inlet, running eastwards towards Geelvink Bay which deeply indents the northern coast.

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  • Starting in the southern extremity of New Guinea from an abrupt face some 3000 ft.

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  • The geology of British New Guinea is best known from the report of A.

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  • Most of western British New Guinea consists of recent superficial deposits, in the basin of the Fly river.

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  • The geology of the rest of New Guinea is imperfectly known.

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  • In Murua (Woodlark I.) are quarries of the banded quartzite from which the best stone adzes found throughout south-east New Guinea are made.

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  • Nearly all the rivers in New Guinea yield " colours " of gold, but only in the Louisiade Archipelago has enough been discovered to constitute the district a goldfield.

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  • Most of the foreshores of New Guinea are eucalyptusdotted grass lands; iri the interior dense forests prevail to a height of many thousand feet.

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  • In the low and sub-mountainous lands the flora is a mixture of Malayan, Australian and Polynesian forms. There are, according to Muller, twice as many palms known from New Guinea as from Australia.

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  • So large an area of New Guinea remains unexplored that it is impossible, except approximately, to state the number of its inhabitants, but probably 600,000 is under rather than over the mark.

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  • On the west coasts there is a semi-civilization, due to intercourse with Malays and Bugis, who have settled at various points, and carry on the trade with the neighbouring islands, in some of which, while the coast population is Malay or mixed, that of the interior is identical with the people of the mainland of New Guinea.

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  • Many of the tribes at the west end of New Guinea are, at all events in war time, head-hunters, and in the mountains cannibals.

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  • Cannibalism, in fact, is practised here and there throughout New Guinea.

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  • The mountain tribes are usually despised by their coast neighbours, but in the south of west New Guinea the coast people live in perpetual terror of their inland neighbours.

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  • Though probably sighted by Antonio d'Abreu, i 5 i 1, New Guinea was apparently first visited either by the Portuguese Don Jorge de Meneses, driven on his way from Goa to Ternate in 1526 to take shelter at " Isla Versija " (which has been identified with Warsia, a place on the N.W.

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  • The name of " New Guinea " was probably given by Ortiz de Retez, or Roda, who in 1546 first laid down several points along the north coast.

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  • The voyage of Thomas Forrest (1774) in the " Tartar galley " of 10 tons, and his account of New Guinea (Voyage to New Guinea and the Moluccas, London, 1780), are still full of interest.

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  • German New Guinea was annexed on the 16th of November 1884, when the German flag was raised in Friedrich Wilhelmshafen and a trading company was established on the north-east coast, and in 1885 the two countries agreed to fix their boundaries through the then neutral areas of the country.

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  • To Germany were assigned all the territory and islands to the north of the British boundary under the name of Kaiser Wilhelms Land, while all to the west of the 141st meridian remained under its old flag as Dutch New Guinea.

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  • Chalmers on the coast of the Gulf of Papua (1893), and of officers of the German New Guinea Company in the ship " Ysabel " on the coasts and among the islands of the German territory; the expedition which crossed the south-eastern peninsula from Huon Gulf of which both the leaders, O.

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  • The trade of British New Guinea is exclusively with the Australian colonies.

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  • German New Guinea The German protectorate of New Guinea, so called after the island which contributes the greatest area, comprehends, besides Kaiser Wilhelms Land, the islands which are now commonly called the Bismarck Archipelago - viz.

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  • In 1884 New Guinea was absolutely wild, not a single white man living on what is now the German part.

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  • It is divided into two districts with separate administrations, New Guinea and the Bismarck Archipelago; over both: presides an imperial governor, the seat of government being Herbertshohe in New Pomerania.

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  • In each district there is a registry of deeds and a court of law, and in New Guinea a court of appeal, of which the governor is president.

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  • The revenue of German New Guinea is derived from taxes, dues and licences, and amounted on the 31st of March 1892 to about £3000; on the same rate, 1901, to £3750.

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  • The New Guinea Company was to receive £ 20,000 for transferring proprietorship to government, which took over the administration in 1899.

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  • 16 a Dutch New Guinea comprises all the western portion of the island.

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  • The boundary on the east, separating it from British New Guinea and German New Guinea, was finally settled in 1895.

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  • The claims to superiority over New Guinea on the part of the rulers of some of the small neighbouring islands date at least from the spread of Islam to the Moluccas at the beginning of the 15th century, and were maintained by the Malay rulers both of Bachian and of Gebeh and afterwards by the sultan of Tidore.

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  • the four Papuan kingships, Waigeu, Salawatti, Misol and Waigamma on Misol Island) and certain islands or points on the north-west coast of New Guinea.

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  • Nominally the sultan of Tidore is still the suzerain of western New Guinea, but his authority is scarcely recognized, except on some few shores and adjacent islands, and practically Dutch New Guinea used to be administered partly from Ternate and partly from Timor, upon more peaceful lines than was the case when the rule of the Dutch in New Guinea largely consisted of the sending of a warship now and again to some distant island or bay to burn a kampong, to punish rebellious villagers, and thus assert or reassert Dutch authority, or that of the sultan, who is their vassal.

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  • There is an assistant Resident at Merawkay, whose immediate chief is the Dutch Resident at Ternate, and who is the civil administrator of the province of southern Dutch New Guinea.

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  • By 1902, therefore, Dutch New Guinea formed a government, with its headquarters at Ternate, divided into the three provinces named.

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  • It was seriously contended in one part of the house that, as eminent men of geographical and ethnographical science had settled the question whether New Guinea belongs to Asia or Polynesia in favour of the latter, a New Guinea colonization scheme could not properly be proposed and decided upon in a section of the Dutch-Indian budget.

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  • This budget concerned only the Asiatic possessions of Holland, not the Polynesian ones, and Dutch New Guinea must, consequently, have its own budget.

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  • Finally, the majority of the states-general, backed by government, decided that New Guinea must still be reckoned to belong to Asia.

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  • C. Rye, " Bibliography of New Guinea " (complete in 1883), in Supplementary Papers, R.G.S.

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  • Romilly, The Western Pacific and New Guinea (London, 1886); R.

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  • Parkinson, Im Bismarck Archipel (Leipzig, 1887); C. Kinloch Cooke, Australian Defences and New Guinea (London, 1887); J.

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  • Strachan, Explorations and Adventures in New Guinea (London,, 1888); H.

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  • Forbes, " British New Guinea as a Colony," in Blackwood's Magazine (July 1892); J.

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  • P. Thompson, British New Guinea (London, 1892); L.

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  • MacGregor, British New Guinea (London, 1897); H.

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  • CayleyWebster, Through New Guinea (London, 1898); R.

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  • Krieger, New Guinea (Berlin, 1899); F.

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  • Blum, New Guinea and der Bismarck Archipel (Berlin); Stanford's Compendium of Geography and Travel; Malaysia and Pacific Archipelagoes (new issue, edited by Dr F.

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  • Pratt, Two Years among New Guinea Cannibals (London, 1906); Annual Reports on British New Guinea.

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  • BIRDS OF PARADISE, a group of passerine birds inhabiting New Guinea and the adjacent islands, so named by the Dutch voyagers in allusion to the brilliancy of their plumage, and to the current belief that, possessing neither wings nor feet, they passed their lives in the air, sustained on their ample plumes, resting only at long intervals suspended from the branches of lofty trees by the wire-like feathers of the tail, and drawing their food "from the dews of heaven and the nectar of flowers."

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  • It is also more common, and much more widely distributed, being found throughout New Guinea and the neighbouring islands.

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  • They are only found in the small island of Waigiu off the coast of New Guinea.

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  • A similar system prevails in New Guinea.

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  • By an agreement of 1879 the sultan exercises authority over some parts of Halmahera, the Papuan Islands, the western half of New Guinea and the islands in Geelvink Gulf.

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  • Wallace (who includes the Solomon Islands as well as New Guinea in the group) points out that the archipelago "includes two islands larger than Great Britain; and in one of them, Borneo, the whole of the British Isles might be set down, and would be surrounded by a sea of forests.

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  • The remaining Europeans are mostly planters and heads of industrial establish 1 Including 487 in Merauke, the capital of Dutch New Guinea.

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  • The explorers reached Amboyna and Ternate, after gaining some knowledge of Java, Madura, Sumbawa and other islands, possibly including New Guinea.

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  • The extension of Dutch political power - notably in Java, Sumatra, Celebes, the Moluccas, Borneo, the Sunda Islands and New Guinea - proceeded simultaneously with the reform movement, and from time to time involved war with various native states.

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  • The enterprise of Sir James Brooke led, after 1838, to the establishment of British sovereignty in North Borneo; in 1895 New Guinea was divided between Great Britain, Germany and the Netherlands; and the Spanish-American War of 1898 resulted in the cession of the Philippines, Sulu Island and the largest of the Mariana Islands to the United States, and the sale of the Caroline group to Germany.

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  • of New Guinea in the Pacific Ocean, about 3° S., 152° E., in the administration of German New Guinea.

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  • Jacob Lemaire and Willem Cornelis Schouten sighted New Mecklenburg in 1616, but it was only recognized as part of an island separate from New Guinea by William Dampier in 1700, and as separate from New Pomerania in 1767 by Philip Carteret.

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  • In the South Pacific the northwest monsoon of Australia affects a belt running east of New Guinea to the Solomon Islands.

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  • Within the southern monsoon region there is a gradual transition to the northwest monsoon of New Guinea in low latitudes, and in higher latitudes to the north-east wind of the Queensland coast.

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  • There now remains a vast number of small islands which lie chiefly (but not entirely) within an area which may be defined as extending from the Philippines, New Guinea and Australia to 130° W., and from tropic to tropic. These islands fall principally into a number of groups clearly enough defined to be well seen on a map of small scale; they are moreover divided, as will be shown, into three main divisions; but whereas they have enough characteristics in common to render a general view of them desirable, there is no well-recognized name to cover them all.

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  • Among marine mammals, the dugong occurs in the parts about New Guinea and the Caroline Islands.

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  • About this time, however, the Portuguese sighted the north coast of New Guinea.

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  • One of his commanders, Luis Vaes de Torres, struck off to the north-west, coasted along the south of the Louisiade Archipelago and New Guinea, traversed the strait which bears his name between New Guinea and Australia, and reached the Philippines.

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  • The French were now taking a share in the work of discovery, and in 1768 Louis Antoine de Bougainville sailed by way of the central Paumotus, the Society Islands, Samoa, the northern New Hebrides, the south coast of New Guinea and the Louisiade and Bismarck archipelagoes.

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  • In1818-1819the French navigator Louis Claude Desaulses de Freycinet ranged from New Guinea through the Marianas to Hawaii.

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  • In 1834 Dr Debell Bennett made scientific researches in the Society, Hawaiian and Marquesas Islands, in 1835 Captain Robert Fitzroy was accompanied by Charles Darwin, and in 1836 sqq., Abel Aubert du Petit-Thouars was carrying on the work of the French in the Pacific. During his voyage of 1837-1840, Dumont d'Urville was again in Polynesia, working westward from the Paumotu and Marquesas Islands by Fiji and the Solomon, Loyalty and Louisiade groups to New Guinea.

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  • Romilly, The Western Pacific and New Guinea (London, 1887); H.

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  • Tiliqua of Australia, Tasmania and Malay Islands, has stout lateral teeth with rounded-off crowns; C. gigas of the Moluccas and of New Guinea is the largest member of the family, reaching a length of nearly 2 ft.; the limbs are well developed, as in Trachysaurus rugosus of Australia, which is easily recognized by the large and rough scales and the short, broad, stump-like tail.

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  • salvator is the largest species, reaching a length of 7 ft.; it ranges from Nepal and southern China to Cape York; a smaller species, common in New Guinea and Australia, is V.

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  • Australia, Tasmania and New Guinea.

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  • Whether the New Guinea S.

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  • The probable geological connexion with New Guinea would account for the Papuan character of the fauna of the Solomons, which form the eastern limit of certain Papuan types.

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  • MOLUCCAS, or Spice Islands, a name which in its wider sense includes all the islands of the Malay Archipelago between Celebes on the W., New Guinea on the E., Timor on the S., and the open Pacific Ocean on the N.

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  • The Anglican Church in Canada has its Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society, working in the North-West and in Japan; and in Australia it has a Board of Missions, working amongst the Australian aborigines and in New Guinea.

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  • In German New Guinea the Neuendethelsau (1886) and Rhenish (1887) Societies have fourteen stations.

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  • By the support of some of the great financial firms they succeeded in forming a company, which carried on the business and undertook fresh settlements on the islands to the north of New Guinea.

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  • The New Guinea Company had less formidable enemies to contend with, and with the exception of a period of three years between 1889 and 1892, they maintained a full responsibility for the administration of their territory till the year 1899, when an agreement was made and ratified in the Reichstag, by which the possession and administration was transferred to the empire in return for a subsidy of 20,000 a year, to be continued for ten years.

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  • Sittella, with four or five species, is found in Australia and New Guinea, whilst Daphnoesitta occurs in New Guinea.

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  • high, found wild in the Banda Islands and a few of the neighbouring islands, extending to New Guinea.

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  • Another governor was D'Entrecasteaux, whose name is kept in remembrance by a group of islands east of New Guinea.

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  • caudatum, in the South Pacific from New Guinea to the Loyalty Islands.

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  • Thus, the species inhabiting Sumatra, Java and Borneo are almost always much smaller than the closely allied species of Celebes and the Moluccas; the species or varieties of the small island of Amboyna are larger than the same species or closely allied forms inhabiting the surrounding islands; the species found in Celebes possess a peculiar form of wing, quite distinct from that of the same or closely allied species of adjacent islands; and, lastly, numerous species which have tailed wings in India and the western islands of the Archipelago, gradually lose the tail as we proceed eastward to New Guinea and the Pacific.

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  • The residency consists of the following groups of islands: the Halmahera group, the Bachian and the Obi group, the Sula Islands, the islands near the western half of New Guinea (Gebeh, Vaigeu, Salawati, Misol, collectively called the Papuan Islands), the western half of New Guinea as far as 141° E., with the islands in Geelvink Gulf on the north coast of New Guinea (Schouten Islands, Yapen, &c.), along with others on the south coast.

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  • Nominally the sultan is still ruler, but virtually his powers were greatly curtailed by his conventions with the Dutch-Indian government, under which he surrendered, with the concurrence of his grandees, many of his former rights to the Dutch resident, who became the de facto governor of the easternmost colonial possessions of Holland, especially since the transfer of Dutch New Guinea in 1901.

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  • The genus ranges from the eastern Austro-Malay islands to New Guinea.

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  • He visited Sumatra, Java, Borneo, Celebes, the Moluccas, Timor, New Guinea and the Aru and Ke Islands.

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  • The most significant point in the distribution of the marine Cainozoic rocks in New South Wales is their complete absence from the coastal districts; this fact indicates that while the Middle Cainozoic marine beds of Victoria and New Guinea were being deposited, Australia extended far eastward into the Tasman Sea.

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  • Very different, on the other hand, is the condition of things in Australia and Papua, where marsupials (and monotremes) are the dominant forms of mammalian life, the placentals being represented (apart from bats, which are mainly of an Asiatic type) only by a number of more or less aberrant rodents belonging to the mouse-tribe, and in Australia by the dingo, or native dog, and in New Guinea by a wild pig.

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  • PAPUANS (Malay papitwah or puwah-puwah, " frizzled," "woolly-haired," in reference to their characteristic hairdressing), the name given to the people of New Guinea and the other islands of Melanesia.

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  • In the north and north-east of New Guinea ancestorworship is widely practised.

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  • In east New Guinea sometimes the houses are two-storeyed, the lower part being used for stores.

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  • The "dobbos," or treehouses, built in high trees, are more or less peculiar to British New Guinea.

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  • In British New Guinea alone is the mancatcher (a rattan loop at the end of a handle with a pith spike projecting into it) met with.

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  • C. Haddon, Decorative Art of British New Guinea (Dublin, 1894).

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  • of New Guinea in the Pacific Ocean, about 6° S., 150° E., in the administration of German New Guinea.

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  • The true boas comprise some forty species; most of them are American, but the genus Eryx inhabits North Africa, Greece and south-western Asia; the genus Enygrus ranges from New Guinea to the Fiji; Casarea dussumieri is restricted to Round Island, near Mauritius; and two species of Boa and one of Corallus represent this subfamily in Madagascar, while all the other boas live in America, chiefly in tropical parts.

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  • MADAGASCAR, an island in the Indian Ocean, and after New Guinea and Borneo the largest island in the world, about 260 m.

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  • m., is, after New Guinea and Borneo, the largest island of the world.

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  • Of the three-clawed echidnas (Proechidna) confined to New Guinea there are two species, Bruijn's echidna (P. bruijnii), discovered in 1877 in the mountains on the north-east coast at an elevation of 350o ft., and the black-spined echidna (P. nigroaculeata) of larger size - the type specimen measuring 31 in., as against 24 in.

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  • In Papua New Guinea a draft core curriculum on IE has been developed for all primary teachers ' colleges which is currently being piloted.

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  • endangered wildlife from Papua New Guinea is entering Safari World with seemingly no restrictions.

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  • The spatial dynamics of mosquito transmission of lymphatic filariasis in Papua New Guinea E. C. Chapman, LC.

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  • Preparation for the arrival of your guinea pig Get everything ready in advance of collecting your new guinea pig.

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  • What precisely is happening in sierra leone and new guinea?

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  • lymphatic filariasis in Papua New Guinea E. C. Chapman, LC.

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  • Spicer also was a key character in a 1997 army mutiny in Papua New Guinea.

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  • orchid flora of Papua New Guinea has appeared.

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  • sierra leone and new guinea?

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  • The true phalangers, or opossums of the colonists, constitute the genus Trichosurus, while the ring-tailed species are known as Pseudochirus; the latter ranging to New Guinea.

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  • From this profound foundation rise Australia, New Guinea and Melanesia, in varying slopes.

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  • It has so completely obliterated the original flora, that a Queensland coast jungle is almost an exact replication of what may be seen on the opposite shores of the straits, in New Guinea.

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  • His discovery was not, however, made known until 1792, when Dalrymple rescued his name from oblivion, bestowing it upon the passage which separates New Guinea from Australia.

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  • They are six in number: (1) Palaearctic, including Europe, Asia north of the Himalaya, and Africa north of the Sahara; (2) Ethiopian, consisting of Africa south of the Atlas range, and Madagascar; (3) Oriental, including India, Indo-China and the Malay Archipelago north of Wallace's line, which runs between Bali and Lombok; (4) Australian, including Australia, New Zealand, New Guinea and Pol y nesia; (5) Nearctic or North America, north of Mexico; and (6) Neotropical or South America.

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  • Borneo, the most western and the largest of the northern group of islands which extends between 110° and 150° E., as far as New Guinea or Papua, is but little known.

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  • It is the chief port of Queensland for the New Guinea trade; and is also the seat of a Roman Catholic vicariate apostolic whose bishop has jurisdiction over the whole of Queensland north of lat.

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  • ARU ISLANDS (Dutch Aroe), a group in the residency of Amboyna, Dutch East Indies; between 5° 18' and 7° 5' S., and 13 4 ° and 135° E.; the member nearest to the south-west coast of New Guinea lying about 70 m.

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  • The New Guinea native is usually of a negroid type with fine physique, but in the Arfak mountains in the north-west, and at points on the west and north coasts and adjacent islands, the very degraded and stunted Karons are found, with hardly the elements of social organization (possibly the aboriginal race unmixed with foreign elements), and resembling the Aetas or Negritos of the Philippines, and other kindred tribes in the Malay Archipelago.

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  • British New Guinea The British Territory of Papua has an area of about 90,540 sq.

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  • Chalmers, Pioneer Life and Work in New Guinea (London, 1895); Sir W.

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  • Political Division.-Politically the whole of the archipelago, except British North Borneo, &c. (see Borneo), part of Timor (Portuguese), New Guinea east of the 141st meridian (British and German), and the Philippine Islands, belongs to the Netherlands.

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  • of New Guinea in the Pacific Ocean, about 3° S., 152° E., in the administration of German New Guinea.

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  • There now remains a vast number of small islands which lie chiefly (but not entirely) within an area which may be defined as extending from the Philippines, New Guinea and Australia to 130° W., and from tropic to tropic. These islands fall principally into a number of groups clearly enough defined to be well seen on a map of small scale; they are moreover divided, as will be shown, into three main divisions; but whereas they have enough characteristics in common to render a general view of them desirable, there is no well-recognized name to cover them all.

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  • The residency consists of the following groups of islands: the Halmahera group, the Bachian and the Obi group, the Sula Islands, the islands near the western half of New Guinea (Gebeh, Vaigeu, Salawati, Misol, collectively called the Papuan Islands), the western half of New Guinea as far as 141° E., with the islands in Geelvink Gulf on the north coast of New Guinea (Schouten Islands, Yapen, &c.), along with others on the south coast.

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  • of New Guinea in the Pacific Ocean, about 6° S., 150° E., in the administration of German New Guinea.

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  • The chief centre is Herbertshbhe at the north of the Gazelle Peninsula; it is the seat of the governor of German New Guinea (see NEW Guinea).

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  • Adult New Guinea males need to drink form a saucer of water for about one hour every week.

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  • Additionally, the instructors frequently deliver presentations at the Orange County Underwater Society in California and occasionally in Papua, New Guinea.

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  • In parts of New Guinea and Irian Jaya, women use knitted net bags that hang from a strap across the forehead.

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  • "Attributes and Categories in the Study of Material Culture: New Guinea Dani Attire."

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